Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Earth Day Festival Features Ralph Nader

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writar

Ralph Nader will kick off UFs Clean Earth
Festival with a speech on environmental hazards at
1 p. m. today on the Plaza of the Americas.
Nader, nationally known safety critic and
consumer spokesman, is the only paid speaker in a
three-day program including eleven seminars, a
parade, film and threater presentations and a
recycling ceremony where aluminum cans are
returned to Reynolds Aluminum Co., according to
coordinator Alan Sandler of the Environmental
Action Group (EAG).
THE FESTIVAL celebrates Earth Day and the
nationwide Environmental Teach-In on Wednesday.
It will be the largest such program in the Southeast,
according to Sandler.
Speakers at the festival will include Fred Schultz,
speaker of the Florida House of Representatives;

KOL
All AmVum

Vol. 62, No. 123

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CLAY PHIPPS
SIDELINE STAR
Gator star quarterback John Reaves (no. 14) played the sidelines a
good deal of the time while junior John Schnebly called most of the
plays at Saturday's scrimmage. See story, page 18.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

CONGRESSMEN, STUDENTS TO SPEAK

Monday Schedule
1:00 pjn.: Environmental Hazards: Man-Made
and Man-Remedied, Ralph Nader, Plaza of
the Americas.
2:00 pjn.: Alternative Locomotion Parade from
Plaza of the Americas to Municipal Building.
Open to any transportation mode not
involving an internal combustion engine,
including walking.
4:00 p.m.: The Universitys Role in
Atmospheric Control, seminar by
Department of Physical Science, Bless
Auditorium, Williamson Hall.
7:30 pjn.: Mixed-Media Earth Revival, with live
band The Mud Crutch, skits, slide shows,
geurilla theater; Plaza of the Americas.

University of Florida, Gainesville

ALUMS CITE FINANCES
KS House Closing
Blamed On Bias

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
In a storm of accusations and
denials last week, Kappa Sigma
members charged that the UF
chapter was Partially shut out
of its house over the quarter
break because it tried to pledge
two black students.
Representatives of the
national Kappa Sigma
organization and the alumni
association denied the charge.
The sole reason for closing
the living quarters in the house is
financial, Dr. Shaw E. Grigsby,
the chapters faculty and alumni
advisor, said Tuesday.
NATIONAL Kappa Sigma
President Horton F. Early,
reached at his Nashville, Tenn.
office, said the question of
national approval or disapproval
was never discussed, although
one of the members had called
to inform him I** copter was
trying to pledge the blacks.
Early stressed color is no
barrier to membership in K :ppa
Sigma.
We have Negro members in
chapters around the country but
I dont know which ones
because each chapter chooses its
own members, he said.
RICK MILLER, Kappa Sigma
president, and Ron Edwards,
former Kappa Sigma president,
were among members of the
local chapter who told the
Alligator Tuesday and
Wednesday they had been
denied permission to live in their
house this quarter.
We can still meet in the
house, but we just cant live
there anymore, Miller said.
Miller and the other members
said the house was closed
because of alumni and national
opposition to the local chapters
liberal actions, particularly an
attempt to pledge two black
students during the winter

state Sen. Cliff Reuter, sponsor of a liberal abortion
bill; Col. Avery Fullerton, U. S. Army Corps of
Engineers; and a representative of the Florida Power
Corporation.
Naders speech will be followed by a parade of
alternative means of transportation, leaving the
campus at 2 p. m. for the Municipal Building in
downtown Gainesville.
ANY MODE of transport not involving an
internal combustion engine is welcome, and
bicycles, walkers and possible a man-drawn float are
expected, Sandler said.
Activities will continue Tuesday with a
dump-in on the plaza at 3:30 p. m. As part of a
dump-in seminar, UF Plants and Grounds
personnel will unload a days haul of campus
garbage on the plaza for display.
Forty UF student speakers will visit local high
(SEE 'DUMP IN', PAGE 2)

quarter.
THEY ARE opposed to our
liberal views, Miller said.
National and alumni
spokesmen termed the charge
ridiculous.
The boys have incurred a
sizable indebtedness and had a
poor rush last quarter. They just
dont have enough people living
in the house, Grigsby explained.
THOMAS R. BROOKMAN,
Kappa Sigma district grand
master, agreed at his Gearwater
office Thursday that the reasons
for closing the house were 100

Confusion Reigns
Over Rat Debts

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
That there is confusion about
the Rathskeller debt of over
$19,000 is the only thing
everybody seems able to agree
on.
Frank Klement, president of
UFs Faculty Club, the
organization which holds the
beverage license for the
Rathskeller, held a meeting
Friday night to eliminate
misunderstanding,
contradictions in the Alligator
and rumors on the campus.
JOE HILLIARD, former
chairman of the Rathskeller, said
the meeting answered questions
which had already been
answered, and left open those
which had not.
Klement said the meeting was
a Faculty Club Board of
Directors meeting to which
interested parties had been
invited, and parliamentary
procedure would be followed.
THIS ELIMINATED the
possibility of asking many of the

Monday, April 20, 1970

percent financial.
The chapters comptroller,
Chris Tompkins, told the
Alligator the chapter had a large
mortgage and was $7,000 in
debt at the time the houses
living quarters were closed.
The members did not
present an ability to even collect
the money owed now by the
actives, he said.
THE MEMBERS admit they
were in financial trouble but
maintain their attempt to pledge
two black freshmen, Carl Leon
(SEE 'ALUMNI', PAGE 6)

questions that students had,
Hilliard said.
Klement told the Student
Senate that approximately
$6,000 of the $19,000 debt had
been lost during the last quarter.
He said he is not really
interested in when the debt was
incurred, but rather that the
Rathskeller is over $19,000 in
debt, and the Faculty Club is
legally responsible.
Klement said there was no
(SEE 'RAT', PAGE 6)
8111
UFS JOURNALISM College
placed first in the National
Hearst Foundation writing
awards again page 3
Campus Crier 10
Classifieds .. 11
Editorials 8
Letters ..' 9
Movies 11
Small Society 9
Sports..'. 18
Whats Happening 12



Page 2

!; Th Florida AMgtfor.'MbndSy, April 20,1970

(EDITORS NOTE: Alligator
News Editor John Sugg is also a
member of the Student
Mobilization Committee. This
article is written as a reporter
participating in the event.)
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator News Editor
The statewide antiwar march
in St. Petersburg Saturday was
marred with violence that march
organizers claim resulted from
police provocation.
Eleven people, including UF
Education Instructor Robert
Canney and student David
Liberman, were arrested.
ST. PETERSBURG Police
Capt. B. J. Atkins said that when
the crowd became disorderly by
insulting the officers and
throwing objects, he gave orders
to vacate the park.
The violence began after
Canney, 41, completed a speech
in which he used the term God
damn and said the war could be
ended only by smashing the
system.
Canney came down from the
speakers platform and while the
next speaker was being

Rawlings Open House
May be Eliminated
By PHILIP MORGAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A no-open-house policy for Rawlings Hall may take effect next fall
if enough students to fill the dorm request it, Interhall President Sue
Johnson said Sunday.
Returning dorm residents and entering freshmen will be able to
choose whether they wish to live in a dorm with opposite sex visiting
hours when they sign their contracts for the fall quarter, she said.
I just estimate that Rawlings will be the dorm without open
house Miss Johnson said. It all depends on how many replys we get
back. Presently, there are about 350 students living in Rawlings.
She said there may not be enough requests to initiate the plan. If
only 20 people say they dont want open house, I dont know what
will be done. They may just set aside one section of a dorm in that
case.
Director of Housing Harold C. Riker said he will be able to make an
estimate on the number of students requesting no open house in two
weeks.
Miss Johnson said the plan was begun because of complaints from
students about present open house conditions. She said some students
feel it interrupts their studies.
She predicts that those declining open house will be mostly girls.
She said many parents of entering freshmen girls probably feel uneasy
about the present open house policy.
Present open house hours are 10 a.m. to 11 pjn Sunday through
Thursday and 10 am. to 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.
Miss Johnson said Interhall is also discussing a new proposal to give
Towers 24 hours of openjiouse. Efforts to do this last summer failed.
She said with this policy, students can have the right to live in areas
with no open house. She added that juniors and students over 21
should be able to have 24-hour open house. Most of the students
presently living in the Towers are in upper division.

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A complete line of swim
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376-4576 Phone 376-4577

.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
InserWon. . .. ...
* .

Violence Hits St. Pete Peace March

Violence began after Robert Canney completed a
speech in which he used the term God damn and
said the war could only be ended by smashing the
system.

introduced, several policemen
rushed over and arrested him for
obscenity and resisting arrest
with violence. Canneys bond is
$1,025.
FROM WHERE this reporter
stood, the next thing that
happened was an unidentified
man threw some bottles.
Although police were present,
this person was never arrested.
Florida Antiwar Coalition
speakers at a later rally charged
violence was initiated by police
and subsequent provocation was
the work of provocateurs.
At this point more than a 100
riot-equiped policemen came on
the scene from side streets.
Shotgun-armed police stationed
themselves around the perimeter
of the park. The rest formed
ranks and began sweeping the
park.
THE POLICE then began
selecting members of the milling
crowd and four or five

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Profits to Citrus Club
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April 20 thru May 1

PROVOKED BY POLICE?

policemen would rush them,
according to UF student Frank
Lord.
In at least two cases this
reporter observed there was no
apparent provocation, one girl
attempting to leave the park was
arrested by five policemen and
dragged from the park by her hair.
FAC leaders and marshals by
this time were clearing the
antiwar demonstrators from the
park, sending them in a column
to the Junta of Militant
Organizations (JOMO)
headquarters for a rally to plan
legal defense.
MARCH MARSHALS urged
the demonstrators not to
provide targets for arrest and to
isolate provocateurs in their
midst. The crowd largely heeded
the orders of their leaders.
Joe Cole, a speaker at the
march and a former soldier
discharged from the Army for
antiwar activity, said that this

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Steve Uhlfelder, Focus
party presidential candidate,
said students, rather than
university policemen, should
be employed at campus
checkpoints.
This would free the
campus police to go to the
places where they are more
needed for example, the
married student villages and
dorm areas, Uhlfelder said.
UHLFELDER SAID
married students have been
having problems with people
speeding in the parking areas,
and a policemen there
possibly could eliminate this.
Also, he said, there have
been many complaints from
the girls dorms about

-
Dump-In To Feature Garbage

PAGE o]|
schools and junior high schools during the program.
THE FESTIVAL is being held to educate the
public in environmental problems, according to
Sandler.

Engineering Division
The Procter & Gamble Co.
NEEDS MORE ENGINEERS
M.E., CH.E., E.E. (power), Civil Building Const.
Bachelors and Masters Degrees.
June, August and December Graduates.
Sign up at the Placement Office for
Interviews on 5/4 & 5/5
U 5. Citizens Preferred, but no renrioon, as to rex. rare, are* colof

Uhlfelder Wants To Free UPD

was the worst case of police
provocation and violence he had
seen in several years of antiwar
work.
Speaking at a Saturday night
meeting of UFs SMC, Cole said
the police began harassment
during the march by driving
their motorcycles dangerously
close to demonstrators,
sometimes bumping them.
After the march and during
the rally, Cole said, when they
could find nothing legitimate to
bust us up with, they
intentionally provoked violence
with the arrest of Canney and
then used the expected
indignation of the crowd as an
excuse for a violent attack
against the demonstrators.
Cole said the police attack
was an attempt to discredit the
antiwar movement.
THE BUILDING of a
nationwide legal defense
conmittee has already begun,
said David Rossi, SMC steering
committee member. The
minimum demand Rossi said, is
dropping all charges.
Despite the violence, Lord,
member of Student Mobilization

prowlers.
We dont need policemen
with guns surrounding the
campus all day, but they are
needed in other areas,
Uhlfelder said. Hiring
students part time would free
the police and allow sutdents
to earn extra money.
UHLFELDER ALSO said
counseling of students, by
students should be set up.
He said students like to
know something about a
course and professor before
they register.
Graduate students could
advise others about the
contents of a course and the
professor who teachers it.
The service could be on a
volunteer basis, he said.
UHLFELDER SAID he
thinks the results of teacher

Specifically, EAG hopes to gain passage of
Conservation 70s legislation package, a group of
55 bills proposed to the Florida Legislature. Passage
of this legislation would make Florida a model for
other states in environmental action, according to
Sandler.

Committee (SMC), termed the
mobilization a success.
It was the largest statewide
antiwar mobilization to date
Lord said. About 1,000 people
marched from Campbell Park to
Park in St. Petersburgs
downtown area. 500 attended a
rally in Straub Park after the
march.
AMONG THE arrested, the
following were identified:
Linda Carole Anthony, 20, of
Coral Gables, disorderly
conduct (obscene language), $25
bond; David Mark Liberman, 21,
of Gainesville, resisting arrest
with violence, $ 1,000 bond; Earl
Lynn Kidd, 20, of Tampa,
obstructing a police officer, SSO
bond. Others arrested were: Bird
William Thompson, 26, of
Clearwater, verbal abuse of a
police officer, SSO bond; Mary
Ann Gross,-21, of Tampa,
disorderly conduct (obscene
language). $25 bond; David
Brigdon Maynard, 21, of
Bradenton, disorderly conduct
(obscene language), $25 bond;
and Russell John Christie, 21, of
Clearwater, aggravated assault,
SIO,OOO bond.

evaluation should be
published.
He said there should be
more relevancy in Student
Government (SG).
This could be
accomplished through the
distribution of information
concerning such things as the
draft and birth control, he
said.
Uhlfelder would like to set
up booths or tables in the
Plaza of the Americas where
SG representatives could
listen to students problems.
THE BIGGEST problem
in SG is communication, he
said.
Uhlfelder plans to improve
communication within the
dorm areas.
We have to break through
the walls of apathy, he said.



UF College Os Journalism Rated First

By Alligator Services
For the third time in a row,
UFs College of Journalism and
Communications has placed first
in the William Randolph Hearst
Foundation national writing
contest.
UF is the only school to have
won the award three times in a
row, and a previous no. 1
ranking in an earlier year makes
the UF the only school to have
won the competition four times
since it started 10 years ago.
RAUL RAMIREZ, 4JM, a
former Alligator editor, and
Dave Osier, 4JM, a former
Alligator managing editor, both
took first places during monthly
contests.
For six months during the
year, entries from two students
are selected from among the
colleges to be placed into
national competition. Os the 12
submissions, seven were rated
among the top 20.
Ramirez story in the general
news category dealt with the
failure of a federally subsidized

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bus system in Flint, Mich.
Ramirez wrote the story during
his last summers internship with
the Wall Street Journal in
Detroit.
OSIERS ARTICLE on
poverty in North Central Florida
which appeared in the Alligator
netted him a first place in the
investigative reporting category.
He also received an honorable
mention for another story.
Ramirez and Osier will
compete for the individual first
place prize in a write-off in
Washington, D.C., April 27, with
the other monthly finalists from
among the 55 participating
schools.
Other UF students placing in
the top 10 are Larry Jordan,
4JM, a former Alligator staffer,
who received a fourth place in
investigative reporting, and Mary
Copeland, 4JM, who placed 10th
for her eyewitness account of a
Halloween pot party.
CAROL SANGER, 4JM,
former Alligator executive
editor, and Daniel Vining, 3AS,
Alligator entertainment editor,

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IN HEARST FOUNDATION AWARDS

HEARST WINNERS RAUL RAMIREZ AND DAVE OSIER
... present UF President Stephen C. O'Connell with a "trophy"

received honorable mentions for
their entries.
The combined monetary
prizes for the students won in

the monthly contests totaled
approximately $2,000 with a
matching amount and a gold
medal for the college.

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Monday, April 20,1970, The Florida Alligator/

UF was followed by Kansas
State University in second place
and the University of Minnesota
in third 7

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Floridq Alligator, Monday, April 20, 1970

HONOLULU (UPI) The Apollo 13 wives spent
Sunday, a national day of prayer, thankful that theirs
had been answered.
While a brilliant rainbow rose in the island sky, Mrs.
Marilyn Lovell, wife of Apollo 13 commander James
A. Lovell Jr., Mrs. Mary Haise, wife of Fred W. Haise
Jr. and the parents of bachelor John L. Swigert Jr.
were reunited with the astronauts Saturday after their
perilous journey.
PRESIDENT NIXON, who had declared Sunday a
national day of prayer and thanksgiving for the
astronauts safe return, stood smiling nearby with his
wife, Pat, while the men were welcomed by their
families.
Mrs. Lovell, Mrs. Haise and Dr. and Mrs. L. Leonard

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
publication Sunday of 235 pages
of secret testimony about
Americas involvement in Laos
ended a six-month struggle
between the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee and the
Nixon administration.
Originally, the administration
wanted none of the testimony
released, partially on the
grounds that if the government
did not acknowledge its role in
Laos the Russians would not
protest. The Senate committees
subcommittee on United States
security agreements and
commitments abroad wanted
virtually all of the transcript
released.
SEN. STUART Symington,
D-Mo., the subcommittee
chairman, said if we can get the
facts out to the people, 1
believe there is a chance of
avoiding another Vietnam War.
If we dont get the facts out, I
dont believe there is a chance
yy
The subcommittee staff said it
held literally hundreds of
meetings with State and Defense
Department officials over how
much to release. In the end,
about 10 per cent of the
testimony was deleted.
The staff said 14 persons at
the State and Defense
Department had a hand in
making the deletions. We
literally went over this transcript
page by page three times, said a
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Apollo 13 Families United

Laos Testimony Ends Senate Hassle

subcommittee staff member.
IN A LETTER to
Symington, the staff member,
Walter Pincus, said a lot was left
out, covering these points of

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Swigert, Denver, Colo., threw their arms around the
astronauts as they alighted from the silver Air Force jet
that flew them to Honolulu from Pago Pago, American
Samoa.
Had the lunar landing been successful, the wives and
parents would have had to wait until May 7, when the
astronauts were to emerge from quarantine before
embracing the men.
HULA GIRLS swayed to island melodies and the
crowd of 3,000 cheered and waved American flags as
the families were reunited.
Mrs. Haise, seven months pregnant and wearing a
blue maternity dress, and Mrs. Lovell, an attractive
brunette dressed in red, white and blue, beamed as the
President awarded their husbands and Swigert the

information which I believe the
American people have the right
to know:
Certain details on United
States government support for

Medal of Freedom, Americas highest civilian honor.
Mrs. Lovell and Mrs. Haise, wearing flower leis they
were given on arrival, stood together and smiled as
attractive hula girls kissed their husbands and draped a
garland of flowers around their necks.
WHEN ASKED after the ceremony about future
space flights for her husband, Mrs. Haise, holding the
astronauts arm said, I hope he does get to go again.
But Mrs. Lovell, whose husband had said before the
mission that Apollo 13 was his last, just smiled and
shrugged. He is ready to retire from the space program.
Nixon had picked up the wives and the Swigerts at
Houston and brought them to Honolulu to watch the
medal presentation.

the irregular Lao forces
commanded by Gen. Vang Pao.
Adequate information about
the increase in combat sorties
which have been flown and are

being flown by United States Air
Force and Navy personnel over
northern Laos as distinguished
from operations against the Ho
Chi Minh Trail.



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CLAY PHIPPS
PEACE AND FREEDOM SEDER
Rabbi Michael Monson, from Hi II el speaks to students at the Peace
and Freedom Seder, held Sunday at the Plaza of the Americas. The
rock group "Celebration" played traditional and popular music.
Journey Ends Well
For Unlucky 13 Crew
HONOLULU (UPI) The Apollo 13 astronauts headed for home
Sunday on the last leg of an incredible eight-day journey that took
them around the moon in a crippled spaceship.
Astronauts James A. Lovell and Fred W. Haise and their wives, and
John H. Swigert and his parents flew to Houston aboard a presidential
backup plane as the nation honored them with a day of prayer and
thanksgiving.
PRESIDENT AND Mrs. Nixon, who brought the astronauts
families to Honolulu to meet the space heroes as they arrived
Saturday from the recovery carrier USS Iwo Jima, led the prayers at a
morning ceremony at Honolulus historic Kawaihao Church.
The astronauts, all appearing cheerful, greeted a crowd of about
100 at Hickam AFB before their 2:45 p.m. EST departure. Their
flight to Houston was expected to take seven hours.
A Hawaiian band played and the astronauts and their families were
presented with red and white flower leis. The spacemen were dressed
in business suits for the first time since they left Houston on their trip
to the moon.
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12 MONTH LEASES

First Quarter Slump
Worst Since 6O Recess

WASHINGTON (UPI) The nations economy
slipped during the first three months of this year
into the worst slump since the 1960 recession. But
the most troublesome inflation since the Korean
War continued unabated.
The Commerce Department said Thursday the
nations total output of goods and services declined
at an annual rate of 1.5 per cent in the first quarter
of the year but prices increased at a rate of 5 per
cent.
AS A RESULT, there was less to buy in the
January-through-March period but it cost more.
The 1.5 per cent decline in economic output was
the sharpest since a 3 per cent dip the fourth
quarter of 1960 and it followed a 0.4 per cent drop
in the fourth quarter of last year. By some
rule-of-thumb definitions, a downturn that lasts two
consecutive quarters is a recession.
But there was evidence that the mini-recession

Communist Forces Continue
Siege On Special Forces Camp

SAIGON (UPI) Communist
forces pressing a 19-day-old siege
of the U. S. Special Forces
outpost at Dak Seang shot down
an Army helicopter and clashed
four times with South
Vietnamese troops in fighting
around the base, the U. S.
military command said Sunday.
The fighting occurred late
Saturday and early Sunday, the
command reported, and 110
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong troops were killed. The
helicopter, a UHI Huey, was
shot down and its four crewmen
wounded Saturday about one
mile north of Dak Seang.
The command reported

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Communists also shot down an
F 4 Phantom jet Saturday 105
miles southeast of the northern
port city of Da Nang and
another Huey helicopter 97

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Monday. April 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

has ended.
'THE FEDERAL Reserve said industrial
production increased 0.2 per cent last month after
declining for seven consecutive months.
The Commerce Department said the Gross
National Product was at a seasonly adjusted annual
rate of $960.4 billion in the first quarter, up $8.2
billion from the fourth quarter of last year. The
GNP measures the value of total production of
goods and services.
But the department said inflation was at an
annual rate of 5 per cent during the three months,
higher than the 4.5 per cent for the fourth quarter
and the 4.7 per cent recorded in 1969 as a whole.
Prices rose more sharply since the Korean War.
HAROLD C. PASSER, assistant commerce
secretary for economic affairs, predicted output
would resume its growth during the current quarter
which ends June 30.

miles east of Saigon. The two
men in the Phantom were killed
in the crash, spokesmen said, but
the helicopter crewmen escaped
injury.

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Aorll 20.1970

Page 6

Alumni
Deny
Chdrges
EASE 0-3
Smart and Ronald S. Felder, was
the underlying reason for closing
the house.
They blamed it on finances
but we are only about half as
much in debt as some of the
other houses, Miller said.
We attempted to pledge two
black students earlier this year
but they (the alumni) raised
hell, he said. What they want
to do is to get rid of the brothers
here now and start over again
next quarter.
MILLER SAID about 35 of
the 50 chapter members are
planning to quit and about 15
are planning to remain.
Most of those planning to
remain are freshmen, said Miller,
who himself plans to stay on as
president.
Ever since we tried to pledge
two black students its been all
dovnhill, Miller said.
EDWARDS and Jim Bowen
Thagard, a Kappa Sigma brother,
said alumni had indicated to
them before the vote if you
want to be a local, pledge these
two blacks.
Every other active Kappa
Sigma member the Alligator
contacted said he had heard the
same or a similar threat from
alumni before the vote.
Edwards, Thagard and Miller
said the brothers were under a
great deal of pressure because
they feared the alumni would
pull their chapter.
WE REALLY sold our souls
on the colored issue, Thagard
said.
Grigsby expressed surprise the
active members would try to
relate the closing of the living
quarters with the vote on the
black students.
He added the matter was
confined to the brothers in the
house because no alumni
exercised their right to vote on
the two pledges. (Under Kappa
Sigma rules alumni are eligible to
vote on new members. One
blackball is sufficient to turn
down a prospective member.)

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SUNNY BARLOW
KISSING LIZARDS
It's the time of the year when
even lizards find they have a lot
in common. These two make a
smacking pose for the Alligator
photographer.
BROOKMAN SAID, Color
had nothing to do with it. The
brothers are called to vote on
people by name, not color.
He added, They were not
pledging these two black boys.
They were extending bids to
them.
The Kappa Sigma brothers
insist the blacks had reached the
pledging stage.
Smart said he thought he was
to receive a bid. Felder
understood they were deciding
to pledge him at the meeting in
question.
TOMPKINS SAID the
national is attempting to help
the UF Kappa Sigma chapter
reopen its living quarters as soon
as possible.
Both a national rush team and
a national loan are being
considered, he said.
According to Grigsby, three
off-duty policemen are presently
living in the Kappa Sigma house
to prevent vandalism.

FROM REITZ UNION
Film Featuring Stones Stolen

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
Investigation is underway on
the theft of the film Sympathy
for the Devil featuring the
Rolling Stones, from the Reitz
Union projection room about
noon Saturday.
University Police Investigator
Bob Hester is working on the
case. A promise of amnesty for
the thief if the film was returned
by 10 a.m. Sunday did not
produce the film.
THE FILM was shown to full
houses three times Friday. It was

Rathskeller Debt
Politics Charged

political motive or intent in his
announcement of the debt.
HOWEVER, the issue has
become a political one because
the manager of the Rathskeller
last quarter was Alan Howes, Do
It party candidate for student
body president.
Several meetings of the
Rathskeller Advisory Board had
been held prior to the
announcement, Hilliard said.
We concluded we wouldnt
bring it up until after the
election, so it wouldnt be
brought into the political realm.
I dont know why Dr. Klement
brought it up now, Hilliard
said.
KLEMENT SAID he was
requesting swift senate action
on the indebtedness and the
management of the
Rathskeller.
He then said he invited
questions, but said he was not
interested in details concerning:
business management.
financial deficiencies.
political ambitions of any
one person or groups.
Howes said, It is apparent

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to be shown again Saturday and
Sunday. The Union is giving full
refunds to holders of tickets for
the Saturday and Sunday shows.
Refunds can be picked up at the
Constans box office until 4:30
pjn. Friday.
Linda Jones, the director of
the Union films, said
Sympathy was a first-run
movie. It was being premiered
here because it was such a
controversial film, she said.
IM DISAPPOINTED fornot
being able to see the film, and
Im sure a lot of other people are
too, she said. Im doubtful if

that UFs Faculty Club wants
the Rathskeller closed so they
can have the beverage license for
a private faculty club.
Klement said he had informed
Hilliard sometime in October
1969 that the faculty club might
want to use its license in
September 1970, and the
Rathskeller should be
investigating other ways of
getting a license.
AT THE senate meeting,
Klement said the faculty club
would be needing the license,
but Friday he said something
might be worked out.
To acquire a beverage license,
a club is required to have been
incorporated at least two years.
The Rathskeller was not
incorporated until September
1969, which means it cannot get
its own license until September
1971, Hilliard said.
He said there is one other
possibility.
A RULING from the attorney
general concerning the
University of West Florida said
school property was not subject
to the zoning laws. If we could
get the same kind of ruling, we
might be able to get a different
type of license.

the film company will send us
another copy after having this
one stolen. The film company
is New Line Cinama. Cost of the
film has not been determined.
Jim Demos, cleric at the
Union guest dest, saw a group of
normal-looking, college-aged
males walk past his desk with a
reel of film about the time the
film was stolen.
The Union is scheduled to
show another first-run movie,
Kinetic Art this weekend.
Mrs. Jones said better protection
would be given this film.
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my
i
jr*
An
Open
; :(
Letter
To
UF
Students
from
/

<**'* - ' ;

Svdcfi'Wood READING DYNAMICS 9
1015 W. Univ. Ave.
2nd Floor
next to University City Photo Supply
J V e- +l*l 9et #* 4 ''* > ~ t#f# 4 f I '# 4 I* *'* * V t*-V
*##+ + *4 +6++4 #*4 /*X4 44451 #M4 #4 I4I44I 4** f f tJF.9 +9 *

,U> 17 Tvi-M ?Ji > V :TI 'VT.vmn i.>w-
ci. c 6 t
: .
i-
Hi:
Remember the promise you made yourself after finals the fall quarter?
You remember don't you?
How you rededicated yourself to better grades last quarter? Then
("After all," you told yourself, "there's a whole lot more to life than grades.")
Be honest. Studying was a drag last quarter, wasn't it? This quarter will be the same
unless you do something about your reading and study skills.
Here is what some of our recent graduates have to say about the Evelyn Wood
* ,*
Reading Dynamics course: (wpm final test reading rate; % comprehension
final test score)
"It's well worth the time and money if you have to or like to read."
968 wpm, 80% comprehension, L. F. LEE, Freshman
"Because of the course, I drastically increased my words per minute and my
comprehension."
1120 wpm, 96% comprehension, TERRY PITMAN, lUC
"Saves time."
1292 wpm, 92% comprehension, TOM WARSON, Graduate
"Saves time reading which helps somewhat on studies."
1200 wpm, 85% comprehension, GEORGE BOLGER, lUC
"It increases reading speed and comprehension."
875 wpm, 80% comprehension, WAYNE PHILLIPS, 3JM
"For as little time as I put in, I gained almost four times in reading speed."
1120 wpm, 80% comprehension, BILL DORSEY, Senior
<>
"Tremendous help in increased comprehension."
1084 wpm, 96% comprehension, LAMAR SAWYER, Senior
"I read faster but more important, comprehend more of what I read."
860 wpm, 100% comprehension, BILL HAND, Junior
"Retention of material, capacity to read more material, and better study organization."
1000 wpm, 100% comprehension, RICK BACON, 4EG
"Truth of increased rate and comprehension."
1084 wpm, 88% comprehension, RON CYRE, Staff
t'
These people are potential curve setters. Don't fight 'em when you can join 'em.
JIM HENRY, Director
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics
CENTRAL FLORIDA INSTITUTE
Plan now to attend a FREE mini-lesson at our institute upstairs at 1015 W. University
Avenue, next to University City Photo Supply today or tomorrow at 3:00 or 5:00 p.m.
These are the last two mini-lessnns this nnarterl

Monday. April 20.1970. Tha Florida Alligator, Papa 7

Page 7



Page 8

, Ttw Florida Alligator, Monday, April 20,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

'VEAH.... -SURE I TROTTED ViHEN I Ms IN BtfT
time: VIE MAROttSD ok SOMETHING- THERE SOME GAT
VENTED TO TAKE" OVER. A "SVIUDIMG, INSUEf A GOP OR MAKE
GCME KIND Os 3C/ENe£ I MORE CONCRETE AND EASS TO FOLLOW, CO TRETTW SOON
JEJ WE WE*fc All FOLLOWING AND TOROOT WHAT WERE
The Next World Power?

WASHINGTON Israels Intelligence agents have
pulled off another coup, illustrating what the CIA
officials have believed for some time about the
Intelligence Service of this tiny state: It is, one
CIA man put it simply, the best.
The theft of French ships from the port of
Cherbourg was not really a difficult job, but it was
done with all the secrecy, high intrigue and
matter-of-fact swashbuckling which would have
enhanced one of lan Flemings heroes.
When Charles de Gualle declared a total embargo
on weapons to Israel shortly after the bombing of
the Beirut airport in 1968, five of the 12 ships
ordered from France had already been delivered.
Two more escaped to the high seas while De
Gaulles orders were being transmitted. It was then
that an Israeli charge daffaires was quoted by the
Intelligence Service here as having boasted: Well
get the rest of them when theyre ready.
And so they did probably with the connivance
of the French, but certainly in a fashion which
professionals in this country vastly admired.
The coup of the ships is only the latest in a long
series of Israeli Intelligence efforts which have
caused chuckles of admiration among men who have
an instinct for the fact that a Christmas morning is a
very good time to get things done. Israeli exploits in
finding and spiriting out of foreign countries men
accused of crimes in Nazi Germany are here
regarded as among the finest operations in
history.
But amid admiration unparalleled since the days
when British SIS was the secret jealousy of Allen W.
Dulles, a sense of foreboding about Israels
capability for operations is also detectable. As
one high official put it: They can make mistakes,
too we all do. And their mistakes when they
make them will be dangerous.
What he meant was that Israels Intelligence is
becoming so good at what the trade calls plans or
operations as distinct from pure intelligence
gathering that success contains the seeds of
failure.
Moreover, each success is reason for a further
reach, and for additional money and personnel to
make the reach. At the time of Iran and Guatemala,
the CIA was a great deal smaller than at the time of

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
Earl Hartman

Craig Goidwyn
Sports Editor

Fred Vollrattt
Wire Editor

Jeff Brein
Editorial Assistant

Karen Eng
Managing Editor
John Sugg

News Editors

Frank Mankiewicz-
Tom Braden
the Bay of Pigs. Nothing is so essential to the
growth of bureaucracy as a larger plan, which
explains why Israels Intelligence Service, according
the the estimate of officials here, is becoming not
only better but bigger.
Former Secretary of State Dean Achesons fear
once advanced to President Truman is pertinent.
I had the gravest forebodings about this
organization, Acheson remarked at the birth of
CIA. And he warned the President that as set up
Neither he ... nor anyone else would be in a
position to know what it was doing or to control
it.
Acheson, who wanted Intelligence to be under
control of the Department of State, would not
approve of the Israeli organization chart, which is
modeled on our own. But the post-World War II
concept of large-scale operations as a part of
Intelligence makes organizational safeguards
relatively less important. No one can argue that
John F. Kennedy was not fully informed about the
Bay of Pigs operation. But by the time he was
informed, the rolling stone was a long way down the
hill.
The coup of the ships points to Israels emerging
status as a power in the world with which major
powers must deal. The new status will become
official when, as American Intelligence confidently
predicts, Israel announces that it has a nuclear
capability. At that point, the major powers will no
longer be making arrangements for Israel, but will
be dealing one to one.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Ilorida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of I lorida.
y tK- i

editorial
EAG Solutions:
Must Be Real
When our sensibilities are assaulted with facts of
questionable validity, we become suspicious, skeptical.
Most students react in a like manner, no matter what the
issue, no matter what the cause. Even when in complete
agreement with a cause, students have the capacity to stand
back and embrace the issue with full intellectual vigor as
well as emotional involvement.
While we are in complete agreement with the civil rights
movement, for example, we do not accept every uttering
of H. Rap Brown as the word of God.
Our views of the Environmental Action Groups (EAG)
teach-in also fall into this category. We are concerned with
the state of nature, as are millions of Americans, and want
polluted rivers, polluted air, insecticide poisoning and other
dangers eliminated.
But we realize the necessary pressures for remedying
these situations can be brought to bear only through
sensible appeals. Clothing a deadly serious matter in a circus
appeal will not bring results. Results can only come by a
rational approach to concerned publics primary interest
the will to live. Any other appeal, while dramatic and
entertaining, will not raise the sort of concern that
culminates in action.
Once the problems are defined, only logical, feasible
solutions should follow. To say cars cause air pollution,
therefore cars must go is not likely to bring results in an area
where public transportation is in a Neolithic stage.
To say the internal combustion engine must depart the
scene immediately cannot be expected to gain wide popular
support when the average American has difficulty deciding
which of his cars he should drive.
We would hate to see what should be mans vital area of
concern reduced to a mere fad, the 19705 hula-hoop.
To a degree, this has happened to the civil rights
movement. What began as a sincere effort to bring us
together has fallen on hard times. To a significant degree,
civil rights has fallen to the name-calling level in which little
meaningful progress is made. Everybody, from Claude Kirk
to Eldridge Cleaver makes their points and retires to their
bastions.
We hope the EAGs teach-in is a success. We hope it will
inform the public as to its problems.
But we will remain skeptical of impossible solutions.
4JP E
WP"
An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth



Staff Writings

Sitting next to my typewriter
is one of the governments less
frequent but more obvious
invasions of my privacy.
It is the United States Census
questionnaire.
The census, taken once every
ten years since 1790, has but
one constitutional purpose. It is
to determine where the
population lives to re-district the
House of Representatives.
But, governments tend to
expand their scope of authority
and increase their power.
Now, they wish to know
whether you have ever been
married, your income, the
number of rooms in your house,
if you have a flush toilet and
other questions totally unrelated
to their original function.
You are required to answer all
the questions accurately under
penalty of law.
It amuses me that a
government that will put you in

Tigert Hall Beware

MR. EDITOR:
I left President OConnells seven hour
Sunday Conference April 12 with a
tremendous headache. Perhaps this was a
symptom of rejection (one of those
symptoms that Student Freedom
student body presidential candidate Andy
Kramer talks about frequently). The
cause of this symptom was probably the
rejection of the bitter pill that the
administration was trying to get the
student leaders to swallow. What we
had there was a failure to communicate.
The administration had prepared a cute
little capsule so that we would accept
their plans for the fee increase, the new
football ticket policy, the drug
crack-down, plaza utilization and
minority group involvement. I really do
not think that they expected their little
pill to change student views on these
issues, but rather pacify our minds and
dull our senses so the knife could slip
more easily and unsuspectingly into the
backs of the student body.
Andy Kramer and Jerry Seigal (of the
Corner Drug Store) did an excellent job
of conveying and classifying the
symptoms of the students dissent on
each issue and the cause for them, but
President OConnell, in his typical
eloquent manner, quickly but smoothly
cast sand on the flames of heated
discussion.
In Mondays Alligator, Kramer was
given no credit for his beneficial
contributions to the conference except in
the sole area of the drug issue. This kind
of casual stereotyping reflects the
prejudiced attitudes of the new
Alligator which is completely out of place
in our enlightened society. Give Kramer a
break!
As soon as the students there realized
LETTERS POLICY
Littan must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exoeed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
draws just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
b items ted in submitting a regular column
is asked to contact the editor and be
prepared to show samples of his work.
11 1 I 1 I l t I< 1 *"" l! .l M'.' I
" w

None Os Your Damn Business

jail for refusing to tell if you
have a flush toilet calls itself
free.
I dont believe Western
civilization is going to fall if I
dont wish to divulge such
information about myself
perhaps it indicates the level of
competency of our officials that
they do.
My first reaction was to bum
it, but I decided against it. Then
I considered answering every
question but my name and
address with NONE OF YOUR
DAMN BUSINESS. This would
have fulfilled the requirement of
law I thought. I would have
answered the question, and told
the truth as I saw it.
If I had a martyr complex my
problem would be solved.
I would simply refuse to
answer and go to jail. However,
lets face it spending time in jail
for not answering a census isnt
very appealing, nOr is filling all

what was trying to be shoved down their
throats, definite action was demanded
but casually passed over by the
administration present.
Don Middlebrooks, Florida Blue Key
president, challenged President OConnell
to do something positive for the benefit
of the students. Presidential candidates
Steve Uhlfelder and Alan Howes followed
in the wake of Middlebrooks challenge
also demanding action. Even
independentent candidate Jimmey Bailey
took this opportunity to stand up against
the ticket policy because it sounds awful
socialistic to me.
About that time President OConnell
left leaving the student leaders to
continue talking to the walls, as before,
but now these walls were unflowered.
Tigert, students are getting uptight.
Beware.
R. LAMAR SAWYER, JR.
ACTING STUDENT BODY
VICE PRESIDENT
Activity Coupon
MR. EDITOR:
Ive been shut out for being a
gentleman.
On Tuesday April 14, I was ready to
hop a bus for class. The Big Blue
stopped and a few passengers got off
before the several people waiting began to
load up. I was last in line and so waited
patiently. Then it was my turn to get in.
Before stepping on, a young lady came
up at a quick pace. Obviously, she wanted
on. I put out my arm in an after you
gesture.
She stepped on and as I followed, the
driver closed the door on my foot! I
was the only person at the stop, yet the
driver would not let me in.
I had to get to the other side of the
campus to make my class. Yes, the driver
acknowledged my being a gentleman by
closing his door on me. Needless to say, I
wasnt much of a gentlemanly figure as I
ran to class.
If the university would like to rid itself
of this type of driver, I will be glad to
cooperate. I know who this driver is.
If women want to be equal, I*ll help,
From now on they can wait while I get
(Mi a bus.
. , > v, ALAN HIRSCH. 3JM
> I > t f-t ekeee-**

those forms that ask if you have
ever been arrested.
It might work if everyone
refused to answer. Sort of
conspiracy to preserve the

Satire
No Comment
: :
By Reg Crowder

WASHINGTON The Federal
Communications Commission opened a broad
area of regulation upon broadcasters violating the
Fairness Doctrine yesterday.
The doctrine covers political comment by
commercial licensees.
The landmark decision, which broadcast
spokesmen who decline to be identified say will
have an immense effect upon the industry,
adds to the alternatives available for policing
FCC policies.
In a 6-1 vote, commissioners decreed that
... The responsible broadcast manager or
executive who the Commission shall have found
in violation of the Commissions policies shall
have a hole no less than one inch or more than
two inches in diameter bored into his tongue.
He shall then have one or both ears cut off
and thence after a suitable period be
disemboweled. Should he then persist in

Bigger Lies
MR. EDITOR:
As I passed through the hall tonight on
my way to the sanctity of my room a
friend in the room next door called me
into his room. He shoved a PLAYBOY
into my hands and instructed me to read
the story he had turned to, naturally I
complied.
The story was one of a boy named
Richard Jordan. It seemed that in the
futuristic society that Richard lived in, all
children had to take an intelligence test
on their twelfth birthday (under a truth
serum). If they proved to be too bright or
not bright enough, they were put to
death (at a cost of $lO of course).
Richard proved to be too bright, his
parents paid the $lO fee.
Chilling thought, huh? Well it wasnt
half bad until I was shown an article in
NEWSWEEK. It seems that some doctor
has proposed that all young children take
tests to see if the child is a potential
criminal or troublemaker. If the test
proves so, the child is automatically put
into a corrective institution.
The article said the proposal probably
didnt have a chance to be taken into
consideration by the Administration.
Forced busing didnt have a chance
twenty years ago either.
Doesnt that scare you? my friend
asked.
That cant happen, Im not the least
bit worried, I said laughingly. Ive told
bigger lies.
KERRY SCHWENCKE, lUC
the small society

i t Woo-So'd I
WoHPe# WHicH
coOh TfcY
&
JpfPnTTnsl / /' r ''
* Urn W. A-.XO

privacy of your john.
But, I arrived at a compromise
between my ideological
convictions and practical reality.
I didnt mail mine in.

FORUM:^^
Addict ml DmmT
hope for the

Monday, April 20, 1970, The Florida! Alligator, i

By Fred Vollrath

breathing or other signs of life he shall then be
drawn and quartered.
The Commission emphasized that the measure
was not aimed at intimidating honest, patriotic
news commentators.
The White House expressed confidence that
the FCC would proceed properly.
Most network commentators were not
available for comment.
Walter Cronkite was found whimpering in a
CBS broom closet, but only uttered, MOMMY,
MOMMY, to reporters.
Meanwhile, David Brinkley was being fitted
for an NBC pages uniform. He will escort visitors
to Lets Make a Deal, reliable sources noted.
Vice President Spiro Agnew was attending a
book burning ceremony in Cicero, 111., when
news reached there.
When reporters approached Agnew with the
news he only smiled broadly and skipped away
giggling.

Big Blue
MR. EDITOR:
The alleged lack of sound management
and planning on the part of the UF
Athletic Association has resulted in a
proposed increase in student financial
contributions to keep Florida Field green.
Students who pay activity fees should
rightfully be assured of activities of
their choosing. If, in fact, part of the
activity fee is earmarked for students
admissions to Florida Field, on specified
Saturdays in the fall of each year, then
the student should be provided with
script, coupons, passes, tokens or other
reasonable evidence of activity purchase.
It should be possible for students who
do not care to watch a football game to
exchange their ticket for cash on the
open market. The cash would make it
possible for students to attend activities
of their own choosing such as concerts,
plays, lectures, recitals etc.
An alternative consideration could be
the issuance of books of activity coupons
which the student could exchange for
activities of his choice. The various
activities would then have a means
(coupon received) of reflecting the desires
of students for such activities. This
system would permit students to have a
free choice of activity.
MARKF. BEARD, 7ED
by Brickman

The Census people have to ask
me personally if I wont tell
whether I have a flush toilet. If
theyre going to take me off to
jail, then Ill fill it out.

Page 9



Page 10

i. Tin Florida Alligator, Monday, April 20,1970

| Campus Crier SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
HEAR THE CANDIDATES DEBATE
If you care about the future on this campus lf you want to hear real issues clarified come to the Rathskeller tonight
at 8 P.M. All five Presidential candidates will be present to put forth their positions. Specific, significant questions will be
asked with each candidate in turn presenting his proposals. General debate among the candidates will follow. Later the
floor will be opened for questions from the audience. Sponsored by The Gamma Beta Phi Society, this debate will be
different from all previous debates in that THIS is where,the TRUE differences among the Presidential candidates come
out. COME and bring your questions.
I HONOR COURT FORMS SPEAKERS BUREAU
The Honor Court Bar Association has formed a Speaker's Bureau. The purpose of the Bureau will be to furnish any
interested faculty or Student organization a qualified member of the Honor Court to talk about the Honor System, the
Honor Code, and the Honor Court. Any interested organizations should contact the Honor Court Office at 392-1631-2-3.
I FLORIDA BLUE KEY APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Florida Blue Key men's honorary fraternity is now accepting applications for membership. Application forms may be
picked up at your Dean's office, the information Desk of the Reitz Union, or in the Florida Blue Key Office (312 JWRU).
The deadline for turning in applications is Monday, April 27.
SAVANT UF NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
I ~\
Savant UF, women's leadership honorary, is now accepting applications for membership. Anyone interested may pick up
an application at the Activities Desk or room 303, Reitz Union. Applications are due no later than April 20. Send or bring
applications to the Activities Desk or rm. 303.
MAYBE YOULL BE THE NEXT MISS FLORIDA
Applications for the coming Miss Florida contest are available at the Student Activities Desk, J. Wayne Reitz Union.
I BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
STUDENT GOVT. BALLOT
PICK ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
I FOR BODY PRESIDENT:
L VCTT ON^pl^rtirY-
I ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER miict have
I their INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 5-OOnF paXh
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS. t, 0 OF EACH
I BOBBERRIN
DIR ECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
1-- : STUDENT GOVERNMENT



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
SSSSfSR
Fender Jazz Bass with case SIOO.
Wuriitzer stereo electric 6 string cost
$425. with case sell $125. without
case A-l condition. 372-5157.
(A-st-119-p)
F-rarmis 12-String Guitar, not
Semi-hard shell Case.
Weekdays after 5, weekends anytime.
$225. PHONE 378-0167.
(A-st-117-p)
*. i
Spacious, well-kept, 10x47 GREAT
LAKES, two bedroom, air, carpet,
6x utility shed. 378-9426.
(A-st-120-p)
Trailer Bx2B plus 2 Room Cabana
SSOO. Bx3o one bedroom furnished
SIBOO. or rent 378-0226,
376-6217. 67 Rambler 32,000
miles SI,OOO. (A-st-120-p)
1968 180 Yamaha Electric,
meticulous condition, luggage rack,
parking decaf lst $350 takes it,
Call 378-8210. (A-st-120-p)
New stereo equipment all brands
15-50% off. Any record or tape
35% off. No hidden charges.
Everything guaranteed. Call
37*3-9192. (A-3t-120-p)
i
DONT merely brighten your
carpets... Blue Lustre them...
eliminate rapid resoillng. Rent
electric shampgpdr sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-23-c)
HAM Transmitter, Phone and CW
Globe Scout Good Cond. $30.00
Stereo tape deck for car with
speakers $50.00 Call 373-2761.
(A-st-121-p)
Sofa with slipcover. $45. Call
378-6234 after 6:00 p.m.
(A-st-121-p)
ONE of the finer things of life Blue
Lustre Carpet and upholstery cleaner.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-156-lt-c)
Yamaha 250 Road Bike 1968 Model
excellent condition S4OO. Call
372-9307 anytime ask for Brian.
(A-3t-122-p)
SPRING 1966 250 CC H model. Very
good condition leaving state. $350.
See at 6315 sw 13 St. Apt. 17 After
6 PM. (A-3t-122-p)
Be a world famous musician I Buy my
guitar. Excellent condition. S3O (SBO
new). Free neck strap, cover, book.
Must sell. Steve 373-1085.
(A-2t-122-p)

HEMINGWAYS
THE SUN ALSO RISES
WITH AVA GARDNER & TYRONE POWER
IN COLOR
This film will be shown in the Union Auditorium on Tues. Apr.
21 and Wednesday, Apr. 22 at 7:00 and 9:30. Admission 50
cents.
Sponsored by J.W.R.U.
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA 4
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
MONDAY
Baked Meat Sauce and
Macaroni 791
All you can eat
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken
>
All you can eat
W **** ** ,-* .*l*,'* * V"* V," *'"* -/ '* *,,

Monday, April 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

for rent
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
Room two blocks to campus,
carpeted, aircond., kitchen, prlv.
quiet yet liberal. T.V. stay 1 qtr. or
year call 378-0286, 1204 nw 3rd
Ave, S6O mth. (B-4t-119-p)
Sublet 1 br. Apt. 66, Mt. Vernon
turn, A/C Carpet dishwasher laundry
bar-b-q, pool pets $ 145/mo. lease
expire Sept. 15, renewable 372-5389
anytime. (B-st-119-p)
Mcross Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
One Coed roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment close to campus $37.50
per month. Call 373-2766.
(C-st-117-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Sublet for summer quarter Village 34
2 bdr. furn A/C, 115/mo. Call
373- (B-st-117-p)
HEAD to share 3-bedroom house, aid
cond. PRIVATE ROOM. $45/mo.
Summer & Fall term. Call 376-2344.
Np LEASE. (C-3t-120-p)
1 or 2 female roommates for 2 bedrm
Poolside Village Park apt. occupy
Immed. Apt can be all yours June,
when Im leavlpg. 378-3903 evening.
(C-3t-119-p)
Female roommate to share luxurious
1-bedroom Landmark poolside apt
for summer quarter. Suana,
dishwasher prefer over 21 after 5 call
378-1921. (C-3t-120-p)
A coke for a book. Bring your used
paperbacks to the union browsing
library on Fri. May 1 only and get a
free coke for each one. (C-Bt-120-c)
1 female to share Landmark 2 bedr.
apt. no. 107 Immediately poolside
and woodside, good parking, call
anytime 373-1208. (C-st-121-p)

Page 11

V.V.V/.%%%V.W.V.V.V.V.%%VAVf.V.V.V
WANTED
3EG Needs roommate to share two
bdr. home in quiet NW Gainesville.
,$45 per month plus half utilities.
378-2798 or 372-1481. (C-st-119-p)
Roommate needed imediately. Phone
378-5465 or 373-1375. $37.50 per
month. (C-4t-119-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Concrete block cottages, Indv. living
units, 6 mins, of campus, decor may
be changed to suit taste, furnished,
no lease S7O mo. 372-4407 evenings.
(B-2t-121-p)
4 bedroom furnished house for
summer. 2 blocks from campus.
Wall-to-wall carpet, central air. Full
kitchen. 372-1928. (B-2t-121-p)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Linen and maid service.
A.C. Separate entrances. Off street
parking call 376-5360. (B-120-3t-p)
3 female roommates wanted for
summer quarter. Pool, air cond,
wall-to-wall carp, 41.75/mo. Call
after 5: 378-0591 Summit House.
(C-3t-122-p)
HELP WANTED
English Masters, Doctoral student
capable of proofreading scholarly
material, high academic average,
work weekends, Call Prlmack
392-0724, 378-5866. (E-st-117-p)
OPPORTUNITY, sparetime,
addressing envelopes and circulars!
Make $27.00 per thousand.
Handwritten or typed, in your home.
Send Just $2. for INSTRUCTIONS
plus LIST OF FIRMS using
addressers. Satisfaction Guaranteed!
B&V ENTERPRISES, Dept. 4-23, PO
Box 1056, Yucaipa, Calif. 92399.
(E-st-120-p)
Mature student for telephone
advertising program. Approximately
5 hrs. per week. Min. wage, call Mr.
Brown 372-7883. Days or evenings.
(E-3t-121-p)
Bartender or barmaid needed
Immediately, must be over 21, salary
according to ability, adjustable
schedule THE CHATTERBOX.
(E-3t-122-p)
AUTOS
66 VW BUG, good body. Excellent
engine. Tires good. Must sell. SBSO
must sell. Call 372-2225 or
376-0940. (G-5M19-P)
1968 Dodge Charger 383 4BBL auto
trans, power steering, wide tires,
vinyl top, and more. Excellent
condition. $2350. 392-1561 or
376-5125. (G-st-119-p)
1968 VW automatic stick, air-cond.,
radio, heater, 23,000 miles, excel,
condition. Phone 378-8976 after 5
P.M. (G-4M19-P)
1961 MGA-1600 mark-1, British
racing green, newly rebuilt engine,
asking S6OO, or best offer. Call
376-3872, or see at 108 SW 26 St.
(G-3t-120-p)
67-Cougar x R7 4 speed, 4 br. 390 cl
front disc, leather bucket seats,
posl-traction. Call 372-5698 try late,
seldom there. Best offer.
(G-st-120-p)
1970 V.W. BUG 4 months old, 5000
miles SIOO and assume balance Call
376-2804. (G-st-117-p)
62 Austin Healy 3000, Radio, WW
Overdrive, Completely Rebuilt,
Immaculate Condition, 1235 39th
Ave. after 6:00 M F, all weekend.
(G-st-117-p)
N.W. 13h St. PH. 372-9523* A
ACROSS FROM THE MAIL J
SWEDEN HEAVEN W
AND HELL £
BABY LOVE
PENTHOUSE 2
A THE BIBLE 0
PENTHOUSE 3 #
3 LIBERTINE
4*ii VSVV$ * *A*r*l* *. *.*,. *,!*.* v w

AUTOS
Classic 60 Bugeyed SPRITE excellent
condition 6B factory rabullt angina
radio new top; call 378*3246
after 6; $590. (Q*st*l22*p)
MUST SELL 64 Falcon convertible
excellent condition $450 call
anytime 376-2738. (G-st-122-p)
196 8 340 Barracuda fastback
formulas package low mileage
automatic air factor warranty $1995
evenings 378-5108. (G-st-122-p)
1962 Chevy wagon, 327 workhorse.
Runs perfectly, clean inside. New
tires, brakes and rear end. $425. Call
Jay after 5:00 at 376-95 83.
(G-120-3t-p)
VW 1969 good condition $1595 will
bargain call after 500 pm 372-7191.
(G-st-120-p)
'67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
!;X:X;X?XxXw*;*S?:V*VxX!XvXvX:XX'
PERSONAL
CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-l 13-p)
SANDALS Handcrafted at the
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE a
couple of dollars less for a better
sandal, ready a week from ordering.
108 NW 7th St. 1,000 ft. from the
Circus. PAX. (J-st-119-p)
GOD FEAR YOU Have You
Dared to Consider a Life of Christian
Service? Write to: P. O. Box 65,
Maitland, Fla. 32751. (J-st-119-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4. Phone 378-0320.
(J-10t-107-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost Is low fast world
famous Kree method. Edmund
Dwyer electrologlst 372-8039 102
NW 2nd St. (J-21t-120-p)
Overland Expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan,
Khatmnuda. Ivs London late June.
$545 fully inclusive. Encounter
Overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6
Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda
Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda
Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda Wanda
Wanda Wanda Wanda wants a bicycle
373-2118 evenings (J-lt-122-p)
EMILYS holesome Home-made
Whole Wheat Bread Baked to
Order Call 378-9919. (J-lt-122-p)
FLASH! FLASH! FLASH! FLASH!
FLASH! FLASH! FLASH! FLASH!
FLASH! FLASH! FLASH! Pd Pol
AdV. (J-lt-122-p)
Alterations and Dressmaking by
Experienced Seamstress
Reasonable Prices Call 378-9919.
(J-3t-122-p)
Dear Tunaflsh, Happy Birthday! Now
you are 19 years old Just like the
Pumpkin who loves you so much.
(J-lt-122-p)
warm _______
BEsEI I last
2 DAYS
ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER GIG
% YOUNG
JANE ilifli <£&
FONDA |Wi [GP]
mowi
I www*
GEOfiGESEGAL
EVA MARIE SAINT IST
wed. M-A-S-H
M-A-S-H M-A-S-H
**|' > *
t

PERSONAL
The tent Is where its happening.
Monday, Apr. 27, 11a.m. 6p.m.
Student Art Sale. Call .392-1611 If
youd like to participate.'(J3t : HT-p)
Kittens need home only responsive
and responsible party s need call
376-7502 after five. (J-3t-120-p)
LOST St POUND
Found grey female cat Broward
area Mon nlte call Elaine 392-9740.
(L-120-3t-nc)
SERVICES
German tutoring send phone no to
campus box 30-0032. (M-st-122-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Unlv.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
- /- 2
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
SOCIAL-ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES Nationwide
directories of positions. All relevant
fields. Accurate. Current.
Inexpensive. Information write:
Sociocom, Box 317, Harvard Square
P. 0., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.
(M-4M19-P)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smalles eyeglass office in town.
Drive your own waiting room to
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
GERMAN or SPANISH tutoring. Get
expert Help In reading, translating,
conversation. $4 a lesson. Informal.
378-2270. (M-st-121-p)
] [ Guns Guns Guns 1
( Inventory over 500. Buy j.
] | Sell Trade Repair. l
. ( Reloading supplies, Layaway j!
** plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
1 [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j
Last
WMISisl / ] 4 Days
a
1 WINNER OF 4
ACADEMY AWARDS^E|*IS
* Co or e
^ f Last
4 Days
JASON ROBARDS
STELLA STEVENS e
: Dallad or :
CABLE:
BOGUS*
% TECHMCOLOR
Ltie.T.iiXJ X
I mW. UNveny 4ve. | e^
.* Makes I. *
fA WOMAN;
: Look Like I
: MARY :
ipoppins::
fRI NEW YORK I
*= DAILY NEWS e



*
fm




Page 12

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, April 20,1970

NON-CHEMICAL PESTICIDE

Insect Control Sought

Scientists at the UF Citrus
Experiment Station here are
continuing to look for
non-chemical ways to control
insect pests by manipulating the
environment. One result may be
a reduction in the need for
pesticides on citrus.
The concept of manipulating
the environment for
horticultural reasons is not new
to Florida citrus, said Dr. M.
H. Muma, an entomologist with
the Citrus Experiment Station.
But practically nothing has
been done in manipulating the
environment to control insects.
MUMA SAID that preliminary
studies have been made and
non-chemical factors that might
be manipulated to give greater
control of insects have been
isolated.
One such factor is the
variety of citrus grown, Muma
said. Some citrus varieties are
more severely infested than
others, so planting varieties that
are least infested could make
possible a reduction in
insecticide uses. Or one might
plant an early season orange to
cut insecticide usage, since these
varieties are on the tree a shorter
time.
We could also manipulate
the nutritional elements in the
environment, Muma said, to
produce good citrus without
increasing infestations of many
insects and mites.
MUMA ALSO cited cover
WHATS
HAPPENING
CUBA III: Prof. Richard
Fagan will talk on
Mobilization, Cultural Change
and National Development in
Cuba. Today in the Latin
American Colloquium Room of
the College Library, at 8 p. m.
MILITARILY: The Scabbard
and Blade Military Ball Queen
Contest gets under way tonight
at 7:30 in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
ENCOUNTER: Encounter
group sessions, sponsored by the
UF Counseling Center will start
today in Little Hall. For more
info, call 392-1578.
LIFE BEFORE: Two free
pre-natal information classes will
begin this week at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
Tuesday, at 10 a. m. in room
M-321 of the Health Center, a
six week class for expectant
mothers.
Wednesday, at 7:30 p. m., in
room M-601 of the Health
Center, a six-week class for
expectant fathers and mothers.
(l IMAipNiS |
|A I 3ook and Supply H
4l| 1712 W. University |B
Wk 1 I TEXTBOOKS H
B1 I SCHOOL SUPPLIES BH
flll I ART SUPPLIES H
I ENGINEERING
H ; I supplies
|H 1 I Customer Parking In IK
jH j I The Rear H
Hj j I We Welcome: S

crop cultivation as another
factor that could affect the
insect population on citrus. The
disking, chopping or mowing of
natural cover crops increases
infestations of many injurious
insects and mites. If a managed
cover crop, such as grass or
legumes were cultivated, what
would be the effect on citrus
pests?
Manipulation of shade is
another factor to be considered,
Dr. Muma said, pointing out that
most growers have or are now
getting rid of the shade in their
groves, though they do not

EncounterGroupsMeet
The UF Counseling Center again will hold encounter group sessions,
beginning tonight.
Four sessions will be held weekly, according to Dr. Harry Grater,
director.
Sessions Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays are for individual
student groups.
A black-white encounter group will meet Wednesday nights,
provided there are enough students interested in participating.
The Counseling Center is in Little Hall. Interested students should
call the center for details.
Encounter group sessions were held by the center last quarter.

Paid Political Advertisement
focus on
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know how this will affect the
insect and mite population.
The way irrigation is
conducted might also affect the
insect population, Muma said.
A good comparative study of
the results of manipulating these
various environmental factors
remains to be made, according
to Dr. Muma. It is hoped that
through systematic
environmental research, grove
practices can be developed that
will reduce the threat of insect
pests without diminishing the
citrus yield.

} Parachute Jump
'Best Thing
§ By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Writer v
§
: The wind was roaring in the cockpit. The pilot nodded his
J head to my jump master, Jack Kabat.
Get out of the plane, he yelled.
:j MY FIRST reaction was, Who, me? I crawled out under
:: the wing of the Cessna 180, being careful where I put my feet.
:: I looked down 2,500 feet to the ground. Kabat tapped me on
3 the leg and shouted, Go!
: Now?
ji GO!
: What could I do? I went.
? The wind roared in my ears. I could hardly hear myself
i| shouting out the seconds as I floated to the ground.
5 THEN THERE was a jerk which flipped my feet forward and
*: brought me into an upright position.
: I believe it was the best thing Ive ever felt in all my life.
: I was one of 15 Gator Raiders, members of UF ROTCs
: counterinsurgency training unit for Freshman and Sophomore
j: ROTC students, who jumped for the first time at Stengel Field
: Saturday.
THE RAIDERS plan to use parachute jumps in their field
|: training exercises, held about three times a quarter in wooded
- areas north of Gainesville.
j: I was surprised to learn that sport parachuting is one of the
:j safest sports in America today, and after Saturday I can see that
: this must be due to the amount of training students receive
: before their first jump.
:j The jump itself was so simple we were almost disappointed.



ATTEND FREE
1
Over 90% Os The People
Who Attend Increase Their Reading
Speed On The Spot!
For The Ist Time Ever...
World Famous Evelyn Wood You'll see why President
Reading Dynamics offers you Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood
a free glimpse of what its like to the White House to teach
to be able to read and study his advisors and the Joint
much faster Chiefs of Staff how to read
faster.
Youll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty
to read and study faster during members of one of Americas
the exciting Speed- Reading foremost colleges says about
Lesson. Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read-fast!

II Free sphd mom Lessons!
II Today And Tomorrow I
II At 3 & 5 p.m. I
fl| 1015 W. Univ. Ave. I
SvdcfKTVMd READING DYNAMICS* |
next to University City Photo Supply I
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We want you to decide for yourself the
value of becoming a Speed-Reader, Evelyn
Wood style.
For the first time we are offering a Special
Speed-Reading Lesson to provide you with
a glimpse of what it's like to be able to read
and study substantially faster... and
you'll actually participate in the techniques
that will improve your reading and study
speed on the spot!

You'll find this Special Free offer of
increased reading speed to be an exciting
and unusual experience.
Limited Seating Available at Each Lesson.
Because of limited seating capacity, we ask
that you please call the number listed
below to Reserve Your Seat. Choose the
time most convenient to your schedule and
call now for Your Personal Reservation.

Monday, April 20,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

m mm

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:
Wm JH k! V H
fIHH|H:%
' ;9HHH '. ilMia <%
FLASH SHOWS OFF
...his winning gum

Dairy Heads To Visit Europe

Dr. E. L. Fouts, Acting
Chairman of the UF Dairy
Science Department, and C. W.
Reaves, Extensions Dairyman
and Extension Section Leader,
have been invited to visit
Denmark and Sweden the last
week of April.
The trio is sponsored by Foss
America, Inc. Foss represents a
Danish manufacturer of
precision instruments, including
the new electronic testing
equipment for milk.
In addition to tours of dairy

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equipment factories, the group
will visit Danish dairy farms,
plants and the Government
Research Institute for Dairying
at Hillerod.
The Foss Company has
invited those in charge of the
DHIA production testing
program in each state and
certain other college personnel
to make the trip.> The
Milk-O-Tester was approved by
the U. S. National Committee
for DHIA last year and has been
approved in several states for use

Flash Chews Way To Top

By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The gum-chewing contest Saturday night left its
audience with mixed emotions, most of them humorous.
The only daik moments in the half-hour contest
occured during a twist contest in the sixth round, when
presidential hopeful Andy Kramer, an independent
candidate, was fouled in an apparent right-wing
assassination attempt.
KRAMER WAS injured by a frisbee hurled from the
audience, which struck him in the lower abdomen. Chee
Chee West, his trainer-manager, was able to get the
long-haired candidate on his feet and back in the race
after only a short while.
Robert Flash* Matte, another independent candidate,
passed his large yellow flower back and forth under his
legs as he chewed. During the second round, he moved
that the contest be shortened from ten to five rounds. His
motion was disregarded.
Henry Solares, vice presidential candidate for Focus
party, chewed.
BARBARA MI LEWS KI, a visitor from Bishop Kenny
High School in Jacksonville, who filled the spot reserved
for Do It party, looked sick. Although Kramer proclaimed
that there should by equality of the sexes, she was given a
five stick handicap early in the race. Do It party was not
represented at the contest.
Flash and Kramer recited poetry during the one minute
breaks in the marathon, to the unending delight of the
audience.

in purchase of milk. Equipment
is also made by the company for
the electronic testing of milk for
protien and solids not fat.
The group leaves New York,
Sunday on a chartered plane for
Copenhagen, Denmark. On
Thursday, April 30, they will
ferry to Malmo, Sweden, to visit
a farm and the Alfa-Laval
milking equipment plant at
Lund, Sweden. The group
returns to New York on Friday,
May 1.

m m
- .' fas
John Maynard
Chancellor

Presented and Paid For by
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political ; ;
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Honor Court Chancellor
Isnt a part-time j0b....

During the fourth round, a race around the stage was
held with a prize of ten bonus points to the winner; the
high schooler won it.
THE FIFTH ROUND saw Miss Milewski with 60 sticks
of delicious Wrigleys gum in her mouth, a wad
approximately the size of a baseball. Kramer had 41 sticks
at this time, and Flash had fallen to his knees, groping at
the air.
In the sixth round Flash received 15 bonus points as
the winner of the twist contest.
During the seventh round, a gum shaped contest netted
the caped crusader another 20 bonus points. At this time
he described the gum as tasting like silly putty.
KRAMER called it a new high.
Solares had 63 sticks now, and Miss Milewski had 78.
In the eighth round, Kramer won 25 bonus points for a
tremendous last minute sprint and dive during the
kneeling race around the stage.
THE TENTH round saw a most chews in three
minutes contest, which, after what appeared to be a
small political deal between the emcee and Flash's
counter, ended in an overwhelming victory for the caped
crusader.
A spectator, Larry Curies, 4EG, estimated the crowd at
5,376.8.
However, Flash, the winner of the entire contest, said
he estimated 19,586 students werent there.
This is a great victory for the Students for Dynamic
Apathy (SDA), he said.
SDA is one of the many groups backing Flash for
president of the student body.

John Maynard has put
his full time into the
Honor Court. That's
what it takes to do the
job right. John Maynard
has proven his ability by
performing excellently
on tough assignments.
Chancellor is a FULL
TIME job for an
exceptional man. John
Maynard is the ONLY
man qualified to DO IT.



A
***-# M; w
SUNNY BARLOW
SOMETHING NEW?
Amid the clamor to make one cause heard above the rest, there's
still room for Susan Duke, 1 UC, to practice the art of roller skating.
Anybody for the downhill slope at Med Center Hill?

Cuban Student Urges Fight
Against Castros Government

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
It is our duty and our right to fight the regime
which exists in our country, Julio Ferrer, secretary
of the Cuban Federation of Students (FEC) said to
Cuban students meeting Friday to commemorate
the 9th anniversary of the Bay of Pigs invasion.
I Ferrer said the Cuban students will show we will
never accept any kind of dictatorship, and that the
students now should pick up the fight for the
liberation of Cuba.
HE SAID the Castro government had jailed more

UF Professor Appointed
To State Education Post
The State Department of Education has appointed Miss Barbara
White to serve on the State Advisory Committee for Health
Occupations Education. State Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Floyd T. Christian, made the appointment which Continues through
June 1971.
Miss White is professor and chairman of the Department of Physical
Therapy in the UF College of Health Related Professions.
The committee will counsel and advise the Department of
Education on the development of a carefully planned program of
health careers for supportive personnel in junior colleges and
universities around the state.
Last year, Miss White served on a state education advisory
committee to develop guidelines for physical therapy assistant
programs in junior colleges.
V Attend a lecture and Demonstration class on . I
I E.S.P.
I AND |
I 'MIND CONTROL
H Do you know ...
B The difference between a sensitive, a seerer, a I
K clairvoyant? How brain waves relate t 0... E.S.P.,
M health, business, success, intuition, education, art and I
B creativity? J
m The answers to these and many other questions will I
B be presented in an interesting, entertaining discussion of J
f the latest scientific findings in E.S.P. and mind research. V
Bring a friend! fl
I Holiday Inn Admission SI.OO J
K April 19 2 & 7:30 pm
V April 20 7:30 pm I
B rrasentart by Southwest Motivation Center J

than 100,000 persons for political reasons, and
forced more than one million into exile.
This is our right, the right to Fight, to be free, no
matter what the cost might be, Ferrer said, we
will pay it with Cuban blood, Cuban sacrifices and
efforts, with or without the help from those who we
might regard as friends.
AFTER FERRERS speech, Mario Cabello, a
veteran of the 1961 invasion read the names of the
Cubans who died in the invasion, the list included
four Americans who were also killed in the
three-day battle.
The rally was followed by a march throughout
the south side of the UF campus.

IF AS ENTOMOLOGIST SAYS

DDT Ban 'Unadvisable

The environmental teach-in
Wednesday is expected to bring
DDT and other persistent
pesticides into the limelight
again, and agriculturists are
concerned that their position on
pesticides may not get much
exposure.
James E. Brogdon, an
Extension entomologist with the
UFs Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS),
who had voiced this concern
says that he thinks DDT is on
the way out in Florida and that
a ban at this time would be
inadvisable.
IF DDT is banned, Brogdon
said, it is doubtful that it will
be available for emergency use,
because companies will quit
manufacturing it.
I definitely think DDT is
being used less and less in
Florida, Brogdon said. Its
only a matter of a relatively
short time before DDT will be
removed from all Cooperative
Extension Service
recommendations, he said. We
feel confident that the use of
DDT for the past year is down

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1968 CADILLAC $4295
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1968 CADILLAC $4895
Eldorado. White with black vinyl roof, leather interior
air conditioned, AM, FM radio, front wheel drive.
1966 CHRYSLER.....SI79S
New Yorker. Black vinyl over gold. Air conditioned,
full power.
1966 OLDSMOBILE 98 $1695
Two door hardtop coupe. Black vinyl over white. Air con
ditioned. Full power. NICE!
1966 CHEVROLET $1495
Two door hardtop. VB, Automatic transmission, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, posi-tiaction rear end. Nice red and READY!

OTHER FINE LATE MODEL USED CAR BUYS! gjBBOIBI I
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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiuiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiii
If DDT is banned it
is doubtful that it will be
available for emergency
use, because companies
will quit manufacturing
it.
James E. Brogdon
IFAS Extension
entomologist
111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 l
75 to 90 per cent over two or
three years ago.
Conservationists say that the
threat to the environment is
such that by the time all the
research is in on DDT, it will be
too late. Brogdon says that he
doubts that the situation is that
critical.
THERE IS some research
that indicates adverse effects of
pesticides on certain species of
wildlife, Brogdon said, but
this is somewhat limited.
Studies showing that DDT
may cause cancer in mice may or
may not be relevant to human

rTSSSTTJHT" 1
I ITS A MEAL! I
I J> Weekly rV 1 9 I
I Only f Monday I
thru
Sorry. no take-out service or discounts at this low price
X Daily Choice of Four S
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Entrees Served With
I Choice of Potatoes, Rice or Vegetable I
I Choice of Special Salads of The Day I
8 Hot Roll or Muffin 8
X Iced Tea or Coffee (Free Seconds! X
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wfllMwMk 313 W. UNIV. AVE.
DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE |
I PLENTY OF FREE PARKING I

Monday, April 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

1968 CHEVROLET SI6OO I
Four door sedan. VB. Air conditioned. Radio heater j
power steering, new points Used in legal work.
1968 FORD LTD ...$2195 I
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, low mileage. Block 1
vinyl over gold.
1967 BUICK RIVIERAS2S9S|
Maroon with black interidV. Air conditioned, full
power. Extra clean car.
1967 OLDSMOBILE .... $2495 I
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1967 FORD $2195 I
Thunderbird. Air conditioned, full power. Black vinyl |
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1967 Pontiac Tempest $16951
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sion, radio, heater, power steering.
1967 OLDSMOBILE FBS $995 I
Two door sedan. White. Six cylinder with standard trons
mission. Eye appeal plus economy. Radio ond heater. 8

beings, Brogdon said. The
amount of DDT used to induce
cancer in mice was many, many
times greater than people and
wildlife would be subjected to
routinely in the environment.
Brogdon says he thinks it is
desirable to reduce the use of
persistent pesticides as fast as
expediency will permit, but he
argues against taking away these
protections before other, less
persistent pesticides are available
to do the same job.
The IFAS position,
Brogdon said, is that the public
well being must determine the
use of pesticides. We want to
reduce the use of DDT and other
persistent pesticides, but we
have to consider the total effect
of any reduction.
Brogdon explained that it can
take from five to seven years, at
a cost of 4 to 5 million dollars,
to develop a new pesticide and
that substitutes are not readily
available for all of the persistent
pesticides. We cant leave the
farmers defenseless against insect
pests, Brogdon said.

Page 15



Page 16

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, April 20,1970

SG SPONSORED
Carnigras: Lights,
Spinning Wheels
By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Carnigras is over for another year, but students will remember its
hustle and bustle for a long time.
They will remember its bright flashing lights and dark places and
the dizzy spinning of the roller coaster, and maybe someone they met
there, more than anything else.
IF YOU were there, and you had a date like mine (one who likes to
take her life in her hands), you went on the double ferns wheel just
after you had eaten a com dog with a double portion of raw onions.
From there, you went to one of those spinning wheels which throw

i'JIL
CHANCE
... gaming was a hit

- iUj ~~? F 5
jjjg ,?'L.
/ fpk'' ' raBpPF j < * M£j Isife-
B Sfll- fiSISiR
*jPF- w :, SBB. JBkJL BB| *> s
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B ? am a &I^Bg^MLB
a tPitW f^^ 1111 4^hk
,> ;^a;<. 1 _. a -U ,, v>
< Sf f v v / |l|Pfllliill ,>4, \*
"
SNACK TIME
... hot dogs and cold Coke
the i* right"
FH "'PpriEROSA
I quarterly l Jin i steak hq^s^j
7 J FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
11 OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
B 1 Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
1 tji i jj -j. r I 3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
We only dtd it for you.
W S W: .**'* T ""

you back against a wall and try
to strain you through a mesh
backdrop.
If that wasnt invented by the
devil to punish me for my sins, I
dont know what was.
NEXT YOU went to
something called a Tilt-a-Whirl,
which reminded me of being
caught in the jolly green giants
teacup in an electric dishwasher.
The damn thing almost killed
me.
My date was laughing.
And dont forget the maze of

Photos
By
Tom Kennedy
iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiHniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiHiiiuHiHMMiHiNMiiiniiiiiiuiHiuniHiunniiiiiiimiiniiiiiiiitn

SPINNIN'WHEELS
' ... night lights on and from ferris wheel

mirrors, or the Hillbilly Inn, or
the booths where you could win
your girl a teddy bear, or a set of
china (if you were very good or
very heavy on nickels), or a
bottle of RC Cola (oh, wow).
WHAT STUDENTS may not
remember is that Carnigras is
only a carnival brought here by
Student Government to raise
money for the Gator Loan
Fund.
What Ill remember most is a

guy and a girl I saw on a ride just
before midnight Saturday. Ive
seen other people in quieter
places look at each other that
way.

im 22 Short films from Internationally famous filmmakers. HU
H SHOWINGS: 2:30 o 5:00 o 7:30 o 10:00
in the Reitz Union Auditorium
TICKETS SI.OO -^B
Program 1 April 26, Sunday
Program 2 May 10, Sunday
Program 3 May 24, Sunday '^B^
tickets available at Box Office
Thursday & Friday. 124:30
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BONUS ft PHOTO
Greatest thing
to happen to your
color snapshots!
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To them, it will be a state of
mind, a time and place not to be
regained. And they will
remember the flashing lights for
a long, long time.



||| |- uu >iii r ""' ' ;'- ;' r ~''
xs v -^ S M1 . ~ *y "**"
1 1111111 11
- : ""'^^^p
nB I I
''
WINNER SURVEYS PLANE 808 FRASER
... Joyce Cook with Bland McCartha, Flying Hawks school

Paid Political Advertisement
IS THE JUSTICE BUND?
ATHLETIC PRIORITIES HAVE BEEN OUTWEIGHING
ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR TOO LONG
STEVE UHLFELDER led the drive to defeat
THE PROPOSED UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
6b l l |
Paid For By Focus Party
, Paid Political Advertieement ~ . :

BY FIRST PLANE RIDE
Essay Winner Fascinated

When she was 12 years old,
Joyce Cook, 3PE, was
fascinated with her first
airplane ride.
Her interest continued. When
she saw an essay contest
sponsored by Flying Hawks, Inc.
in the winter quarters last
Alligator issue, she decided to
enter.
HER ENTRY, Why I Want
To Learn To Fly, was chosen
by the Alligator as the best essay
submitted.
I dont believe it was Miss
Cooks reaction when she was
told of the decision.
Commencement
Set June 13
Spring quarter
commencement exercises
scheduled for June 13 will begin
at 9 a.m. with the academic
processional starting at 8:40
a.m. on Florida Field.
Exercises had originally been
set for 10 a.m.
No speaker for the event has
been announced yet. Nor have
honorary degree recipients been
selected.

She will be given 10 hours of
instruction worth $175, by the
Flying Hawks school at Stengal
Field. The fields about a
half-mile past SW 34th St. on
Archer Road.
GENE BARKER, president of
the flying club, said 8 to 10
hours of flying instruction are
usually adequate to learn to
solo, to fly alone. A minimum of
40 hours of flying time is
necessary to pass the Federal

Military Ball Queen
Contest Tonight
Three finalists for Military Queen will be chosen from a slate of 10
tonight in the Reitz Union Ballroom at 7:30.
Scabbard and Blade, national military honorary society, is
sponsoring the event. The finalist contest is free and open to the
public.
THE TEN semifinalists competing tonight are Leslie Bauer, Linda
Burr, Julie Crawford,Carolyn Jones, Elly Kuypers, Kathy McCarry,
Debbie McLeod, Janel Overholt, Margaret Toms, and Mary Zimmer.
From the three finalists will be chosen the queen, to be crowned
Saturday at the Military Ball in Reitz Union Ballroom at 9 p.m.
Tickets for the ball, open to all ROTC cadets and military
personnel, can be purchased from Sgt. Paul McLean Jr. in the ROTC
Department for $4.50.

Monday, April 20,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Aeronautics Administrations
flight test for a flying license. A
pilots license is required before
anyone but an instructor can fly
with Miss Cook.
Miss Cooks first lesson will be
Tuesday, April 21. Last week
she was given an introductory
flight. Barker said her lessons
should be completed by the end
of this quarter to insure
continuity in the learning
process.

Page 17



-
The
Florida
Alligator

EVEN IN HOT SUN
Enthusiasm,ExecutionEvident

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Were just scrambling for people, said football
Coach Doug Dickey after Saturdays enthusiastic
Florida Field scrimmage under the hot, hot sun.
That one statement just about summed up the
Gators spring practice.
Weve got a lot of boys who will be second and
third string players next fall, said Dickey. Theyre
going to be in reserve roles and somewhere down
the line we hope it pays off.
WHAT DICKEY was referring to was the fact
that presently the Gator coaching staff is working
with offensive and defensive units that are
comprised of the uninjured players.
-
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BbiBBBF bneSt j...
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TOMKENNEDY
JOHN SCHNEBLY
... plays better, more often

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TOM KENNEDY
GARRY WALKER
... senior runs to daylight

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Our entire offensive line, almost, is missing,
said Dickey. There are five linemen who are not
there who figure to be in the scrap.
Dickey was talking of the absences of Donny
Williams, Dale Hutcherson, Jim Kiley, Walter
Hutchinson and Tom Condon, all of whom are
recovering from injuries and off-season operations.
OUR DEFENSE is almost in the same position,
Dickey added. Fred Abbott is still out. We need
him at that middle linebacker post. Dickey also
made reference to the loss of defensive, backfield
veterans Jimmy Barr and Harvin Clark, due to
injuries.
[On the bright side of Saturdays game type
scrimmage Dickey took time afterward to praise the
efforts of running backs Tommy Durrance, Willie
Jackson and Garry Walker.
The pass and catch action of John Schnebly to
Jerry Vinesett also gained Dickeys attention along
with words of praise for passing star John Reaves
and receivers Carlos Alvarez and Leonard George.
Schnebly connected on several long passes with
Vinesett before unloading a 14-yd. touchdown to
Vinesett to complete an 80-yd. drive against the
number one defense. Schnebly also started another
touchdown play when he flipped a behind the
scrimmage toss to Jackson, who then turned and
lobbed an 18-yd. scoring pass to Vinesett.
OVER ON THE defensive and kicking phases,
Dickey said he was pleased with linebackers Richard
Buchanan and Mike Kelley, end Jack Youngblood
and monster back Jack Bums.
Punter John James booming 40-yd. kicks and
Richard Francos consistent medium-range field
goals also gained favorable notice from Dickey.
Franco kicked two field goals from the 30-yd. range
and ended his afternoons work with a sure
49-yarder under pressure from the number one
defensive unit.
Dickey said plans for this weeks practice
schedule will be drills on specialized offense and
defense Tuesday and Wednesday. On Thursday the
squad will be split for the annual Orange and Blue
game at Florida Field Saturday.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 18

3? J&F FN*
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CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

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B' V
i
'
VIRGIL STURGILL
... 73-year-old runs two miles
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
St. Louis 7 2 .778
Chicago 6 3 .667 1
Pittsburgh 5 4 .571 2
New York 6 5 .545 2
Philadelphia 4 8 .333 4V6
Montreal 1 8 .111 6
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 11 4 .733
Houston 7 6 .538 3
San Francisco 77 .500 3Vi
Atlanta 5 7 .417 4Vi
Los Angeles 5 7 .417 4Vi
San Diego 5 8 .385 5
SUNDAYS RESULTS
Philadelphia 3, New York 2 (Ist 10
innings
New York 10, Philadelphia 2 (2nd)
Montreal at Chicago (postponed, rain)
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (postponed,
rain)
Los Angeles 10, Atlanta 1
Cincinnati 6, San Francisco 0
Houston 5, San Diego 1
MONDAYS GAMES
Houston at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Atlanta
(Only Games Scheduled)
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Detroit 7 3 .700
Baltimore 7 4 .636 Vi
Washington 4 4 .SOO 2
Boston 5 5 .500 2
Cleveland 3 6 .333 3Vi
New York 4 8 .333 4
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 6 2 .750
California 7 4 .636 Vi
Kansas City 5 5 .500 2
Oakland 5 6 .455 2Vi
Chicago 4 6 .400 3
Milwaukee 3 7 .300 4
SUNDAYS RESULTS
Washington at Cleveland (2, post postponed,
poned, postponed, rain)
Baltimore 4, New York 3 (Ist)
New York 8, Baltimore 5 (2nd)
Chicago at Milwaukee (2 postponed,
rain)
Boston at Detroit (postponed, rain)
Kansas City 4, California 1(13 innings]
Minnesota 6, Oakland 3
MONDAYS GAMES
Kansas City at Oakland
Milwaukee at California
New York at Washington
Baltimore at Boston
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UF Tops FSU
I
Several Gator cindermen came out of the sickbed to help the UF
sweep by FSU and three other Southeastern Conference teams to win
their own Gulf Coast Five-Way Track Meet for the fourth straight
year.
We are tickled to death to win, said Track Coach Jimmy Hawk
Carnes, without (Roger) Carson and (Ron) Coleman entered in the
100-yd. dash and the triple jump.
BOTH TRACKSTERS have pulled leg muscles and Cames said he
decided to let them compete in only one event each. Carnes strategy
payed off as Carson won the 220-yd. dash and Coleman pulled out
victory by half an inch in the long jump.
The Gators finished with a total of 79 points, FSU had 69,
Alabama 46, Mississippi State 42, and Auburn 34.
Six records fell in the meet, but none went to Gators.
THE MOST startling record to fall was Gator John Parkers mile
record, which FSUs Misner broke in the process of upsetting Parker
for the first time in two years of competition between the two
outstanding distance men. Misners 4:06 time broke Parkers old
4:10.5 record.
I scored the meet as if it were a dual meet (between the Seminoles*
and the Gators), Cames said, and we would have won by just three
points.
Cames said it was a good indication of the Gators strength even
when weakened by injuries. The Seminoles will be back in Gainesville
May 1 at 4 p. m. in what is shaping up to be one of the highlights of
the Gators track season at home.

Baseballers Tighten SEC Race

The Gator baseball team made the race for the
Southeastern Conferences Eastern Division even
thicker by winning their three game series over
Kentucky. The Gators are now just a half game
behind Tennessee.
In Fridays action Glen Pickren and Wayne
Rogers threw shut outs blanking Kentucky 10-0,
and 4-0.

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Saturdays game was a tough come from behind
5-3 victory struggle with Leon Bolldworth hitting a
two-run single in the top of the ninth inning to
break a 3-3 deadlock. Rogers was the winning
pitcher in relief and brought his season record to
five wins against four losses.
The Gators now have a 16-12 overall record and a
7-2 SEC mark. Tennessee is 8-2 in the SEC.

f H
n jBHp
. MmII
B
JERRY CARNES
... 12-year-old close behind

Monday. April 20,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Golfers Eighth
The UF golf team finished
eighth in the annual Houston
Invitational Golf Tournament
last against 24 other teams.
Stacy Russell lead the Gators
Friday with a score of 74.
Florida State won the
tournament with a team total of
891. The Gators had a total of
915 strokes.
Ruggers Blanked
The Gator Rugby team felt
the strain of a long season this
weekend as they lost 20-0 to
Pensacola Saturday. The Gators
made the trip with only eight
men and had to take seven of
Pensacolas extra players to
make a full team.
The Rugby team will be
looking for a big weekend of
wins May 2 when they go to
Miami to play in a four team
tournament.
Tillers Sunk
In the first Gator-Hurricane
Sailing Regatta the visiting
sailors from Miami won 67-62
over the UF at Lake Wauburg.
The UFs Rick Edmons and
his Bary Laws crew won high
skipper in the co-ed B
division. Also Linsey Schofield
won for the young UF dub in
the individual C division.

Page 19



Page 20

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, April 20,1970

Knicks Bounce Bucs

MILWAULEE Cazzie
Russell broke the back of a
Milwaukee Bucks comeback and
sparked the New York Knicks to
a 117-105 victory for 3-1 lead in
the National Basketball
Association Eastern Division
finals Sunday.
The Knicks can win the
Eastern Division playoffs with a
victory at Madison Square
Garden tonight. The Bucks, a
two-year-old expansion team,
now have to make up a 3-1
deficit -a feat accomplished
only twice before in NBA
history.
Russell can* off the bench
and scored six clutch field goals
in the second half after the
Bucks, down 6545 at the half,
had rallied to within two points
midway in the third period.
Lew Aldndor scored 38
points for the Bucks, but the
Knicks had better balance with
26 by Willis Reed, 18 by Russell,
17 by Frazier and 18 by Barnett.
* *
WEST HENffSTEAD, N.Y.
The New York Nets, leading by
as many as 22 points late in the
second quarter, had to withstand
a fourth quarter rally by
Kentucky Sunday to take a
107-99 victory. The decision
gave New York a 2-1 lead over
the Colonels in their American
Basketball Association Eastern
Division playoff series.
Tart and Dove led the Nets
with 25 points apiece. Lou
Dampier had 19 and Darel
Carrier 18 for the Colonels.
Fourth game in the playoff
series will be played Wednesday
night in the Island Garden
Amea, home court of the Nets.
* *
NEW ORLEANS
Left-handed Bob Charles birdied
three of the last five holes
Sunday to move into a sudden
death playoff with veterans
Miller Barber and Howie
Johnson for the $25,000 first
prize in the Greater New Orleans
Open Golf Tournament.
* #
ATLANTA The mark of
Henry Aarons longest homerun,
a 475-foot plus clout into the

FOOTBALL
Spring Practice
GOLF
Houston All-American in Houston, Texas
TENNIS
Gators play Georgia in Athens
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upper left field deck in Atlanta
Stadium, will be preserved in
point in the form of a hammer.
The Braves Tuesday gained
permission from the Atlanta
Stadium Authority to paint a
hammer at the spot where
Hammering Henrys third
homerun of the season bounced
off the back of seat 107, aide
324, row 2.
It was the first time anyone
had ever hit a home run into the
upper left field deck at the
six-year-old stadium and Aaron
said it was the longest homerun
he ever hit.
* *
ALBANY, N.Y. Gov.
Nelson Rockefeller Thursday
announced agreement on
programs seeking to legalize
offtrack betting on horse racing
as one of the measures designed
to aid New York states
financially troubled big cities.
New York City Mayor John
Lindsay, who made a strong
appeal for offtrack betting to
help cut his citys deficit, said
the city would realize SSO
million through the measure.
* *
CHARLOTTE, N. C. Three
top American women amateur
tennis stars were named
Saturday to the 1970 U. S.
Federation Cup Team, the
womens counterpart to the
Davis Cup. The same trio will
make up the U. S. Wightman
Cup Team this year.
Carol Graebner of New York,
the non-playing captain, named
Julia Heldman of New York,
Mary Ann Curtis of St. Louis
and Peaches Barkowitz of
Hamtramck, Mich. Miss
Heldman is the second-ranked
U. S. amateur, Miss Curtis is
third and Miss Bartkowitz
fourth.
* *
GREEN BAY The Green
Bay Packers announced
Saturday they have signed their
no. 1 college draft pick
6-foot-5, 288-pound Mike
McCoy of Notre Dame.
The 21-year-old Erie, Pa.,
native was the second player

chosen in the college draft. The
Packers had acquired the choice
in a trade which sent veterans
Elijah Pitts, Bob Hyland and Lee
Roy Cassey to the Chicago Bears
during the winter.
* *
CHICAGO Otto Graham,
head coach of the 1970 College
All-star football squad which
plays the Kansas City Chiefs
here July 31, Saturday
announced his staff of six
coaching assistants, including
Willie Davis and Bobby Joe
Conrad.
Davis wound up his laying
career as a defensive end with
the Green Bay Packers last
season and Conrad, after years as
an outstanding pass receiver with
the St. Louis Cardinals, closed
out with the Dallas Cowboys last
year.
Others in the staff will be
Mike McGee, head coach of East
Carolina, also a former Cardinal;
Prentice Gautt, another ex-Card
who now is an assistant coach at
the University of Missouri; Walt
Corey, former player with the
American Football League
Dallas Texans and Kansas City
Chiefs, now head defensive
coach at Utah State; and Stan
Springer, former assistant with
the Washington Redskins, now a
pro scout.

If you think
youre getting a great
shave with a razor blade,
feel your face.

A razor blade can give you
a good, close shave on the easy
parts of your face.
Like your cheeks. Because
your cheeks are almost flat,
like a razor blade.
But what about the hard hardto-shave
to-shave hardto-shave parts of your face?
Feel your neck
Feel how your beard grows
down on part of your neck? And
up on another part? (Some
beards even grow sideways.)
To give you a close,
comfortable shave on your
neck, we designed the Norelco
Tripleheader with 18 self selfsharpening
sharpening selfsharpening rotary blades that
shave in every direction.

1970 North American Philips Corporation, IQO East 42nd Slreet, New York, N* Y. 10017.
L

f Stewart Wins Prix, {
) Ickx Wrecks, Burns j
>:
>: MADRID (UPI) World Champion Jackie Stewart of
$ Scotland paced his new formula one Mach 701 to an easy
victory Sunday in the Spanish Grand Prix -an event marred by f.
$ injury to veteran Belgium driver Jacky Ickx. >j
ft The lead-footed Scot, who won five of last years 11 world f.
championship grand prix races to insure him the number one
* spot, gunned the British-built car into the lead in the early jjj
ft stages of the race and stayed there all the way.
§ STEWART COVERED the 189-mile, 90-lap race over ft
§ Madrids narrow Jarama circuit of tight and twisting turns in
§ two hours, 10 minutes and 58.2 seconds, averaging 87.01 mph. $
New Zealands Bruce McLaren was second in his McLaran ft
Ml 4, which he designed and built himself, covering 89 laps with
an average speed of 86.1 mph. ft
5 Mario Andretti, the only American in the race, was third in
$ Andy Granatelli STP-Mach 701. :j
ONLY FIVE OF the starting field of 16 cars survived the race J:
finish line.
The first casualty came in the early stages of the race when ;j:
Ickxs Fenari 3128 collided with a BRM driven by Englands
Jackie Oliver. Oliver escaped injury but track doctors said the >:
:j Belgian was draped from his blazing racer with first degree
ft bums on his left hand and arm and on his thighs. ft
*j: Doctors at a Madrid hospital where Ickx was rushed said later >|
ft his condition was not serious. $
§ 5
* V
V j\e
Players Stall Merger
NEW YORK (UPI) The National Basketball Association Players
Association succeeded in stalling merger negotiations between the
NBA and the American Basketball Association Friday by obtaining a
temporary restraining order in federal court here freezing the
consolidation discussions.
The temporary restraining order freezing the merger negotiations
was signed by U. S. District Judge Lloyd F. MacMahon, who set May 1
as date for arguments for a preliminary injunction.

Rel your chin
The Norelco Tripleheader has
3 Microgroove shaving heads
that float to follow the curves
of your chin.
The heads go in where
your chin goes in, and out
where your chin goes out. To
give you a really close shave,
without irritating your skin.
(In independent tests, the
Tripleheader shaved as close or
closer than a stainless steel
blade in 2 out of 3 shaves.)
Feel your upper lip
The hard thing about shaving
your upper lip with a razor
blade is shaving close enough.
Again, the unique Norelco
design lets you maneuver
around your nose and mouth,
to shave your beard in every
direction.

Feel your sideburns
The biggest problem with
shaving sideburns is to get
them straight, and even on
both sides.
The Norelco Tripleheader
has a pop-up trimmer that lets
you see exactly what youre
trimming. So its a lot harder
to make a mistake.
Now, run your hand over
your whole face.
If your beard feels uneven,
maybe you should be shaving
with a Norelco Tripleheader.
It comes in two models.
The Cord Model Tripleheader
(with easy flip-top cleaning).
And the new Rechargeable
Tripleheader (the shaver that
gives you up to twice as many
shaves per charge as any other
rechargeable). Either one will
give your face a whole new feel.