Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
OF IAWS THIS WEEKEND

Mead Highlights Convention

Anthropologist Margaret Mead will keynote the
regional convention of the Intercollegiate
Association of Women Students (IAWS) at the UF
Reitz Union Thursday through Sunday.
Dr. Mead will address the conference of 200
college women leaders through a convention phone
hook up. The hook-up will allow the audience to
communicate directly with the speakers.
OTHER long distance telephone speakers will
include Catharine East, executive secretary of the
Presidents Citizens Advisory Council on the Status
of Women, and Dr. Mary Calderone, executive
director of the Sex Information Education Council
of the United States (SIECUS) on Friday.
Speaking Saturday will be U. S. Rep. Margaret M.
Heckler (R-Mass.), Jane Jacobs, a national expert on
urban renewal, and Elizabeth Kontz, head of the
Womens Bureau of the U. S. Department of Labor.
The conference, using the theme Dawn of a
Decade Challenge 70, is designed to challenge
women to leadership on all levels, according to

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 62, No. 120

Rat Broke Even
Winter Quarter,
Records Show
See related story page 2
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The Rathskeller may be $19,000 in debt, but figures furnished
Wednesday by the accounting firm of Moore, Cobb & Cloud showed
that the debts were incurred before last quarter.
Frank Klement, president of the UF Faculty Club, has informed
the Student Senate and Student Body President Walt Morgan, that the
faculty club, which holds the Rathskellers beverage license, is
planning to take the license back from thei tavern as of September,
1970.
JOE HILLIARD, former chairman of the Rathskeller board of
directors, said he understood the agreement for use of the beverage
license was to have been for two years.
The faculty club had no place to use the license. They didnt even
have plans, so we all thought it would probably be three or four years
before they wanted the license back, he said.
But they have apparently started a fund-raising drive, he said, and
they want to clear up the situation with the Rathskeller.
KLEMENT TOLD the senate Tuesday night that the Rathskeller
had lost approximately $5,000 or $6,000 during Winter quarter.
Tim Kaskey, the accountant who has been auditing the
Rathskellers books, said the figures which Klement used were
misleading.
Klement said the tavern is in debt for about $19,000. And
$13,000 of this amount was incurred before December, 1969, he said,
with the remainder incurred through and including January,
February and March, 1970.
KASKEY SAID only $722.52 of that debt was incurred during
December, but renegotiation of a contract with Your Fathers
Mustache made them come out even. The renegotiation saved the
club SBOO.
Because the Rathskeller was originally set up as a non-profit
organization, they are only expected to break even, he said.
Kaskey said these figures were revealed at a meeting April 7, which
Klement attended.
Klement said at the senate meeting that he felt if the Rathskeller
were'to continue in operation, the senate would have to be willing to
subsidize its operations.
Kaskey said, From what I saw last quarter, according to the
figures given by the Rathskeller, it can at least come close to breaking
even in the future .**

University of Florida, Gainesville

convention chairman Caron Balkany.
FRIDAYS GROUP discussions will be The Role
of the Black Woman on Campus, History of the
Black Panthers, Feminity in a Womans Future:
Sex in Everyday Life, Campus Drug Culture and
Female Militancy.
Saturday Women and the Mechanics of
Politics, The Problems Next Door Community
Work, If Woman Can Survive Solving the Crisis
of the Environment, and Student Police
Relationships in Time of Crisis.
Other discussions will be held Saturday at the
Flagler Inn. These include Dean of Womens Office
- Relevant or a Tradition?, Is There an
Alternative to Association of Women Students
(AWS)?, and Is there Sex Discrimination in
Student Government?
Thursday the participants will tour the campus
and attend a reception in the home of University
President Stephen C. OConnell. The only event
scheduled Sunday is a breakfast.

Thursday, April 16, 1970

.% irrPPiis* : A- BH|

One arrest followed a minor incident of violence
following the Student Mobilization Committee's
noon anti-war rally Wednesday. Approximately 500
attended the rally in the Plaza of the Americas,
which was followed by a march through Tigert Hall
and to the Gainesville Federal building.

Star-Crossed Apollo 13
Needs Course Change

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) Officials discovered
Wednesday the crippled Apollo
13 spaceship is slightly off
course and will miss earth
dooming the pilots to death in
space unless they can change
their trajectory.
Under normal conditions, the
relatively minute course
correction needed for a safe
return of the three astronauts
James A. Lovell, John L.
Swigert and Fred W. Haise
would pose no problems.
BUT IN their patched
together spacecraft, every
maneuver was fraught with
danger.
The new crisis hit just as the
fates seemed to be smiling on
the beleaguered crew. A tropical
storm which threatened their
splashdown area in the Pacific

M MK K B
t mMB
PHOTOS BY TOM KENNEDY

SMC ANTI-WAR RALLY

Ocean appeared to be taking
another route, and the oxygen,
water and electrical supplies
aboard their spacecraft were
holding up well.
Flight director Milton Windier
then announced: Were not yet
in the re-entry corridor, and
well have to make this
maneuver to get in.
the Maneuver involves
slowing the spaceship now
traveling about 2,000 m.pii.
by about a mere 5 m.pJi. But in
order to do this, the astronauts
had to turn their combersome
big craft around so that the
descent engine on the lunar
lander faced forward.
This required using precious
electrical and rocket fuel
supplies, and shaped up as
extremely difficult to perform,
since Lovell has reported the

Rally speakers included former Students for a
Democratic Society member and UF graduate Ed
Freeman and David Hoake from the Law Students
Civil Rights Action Committee. Student body
presidential candidates Steve Uhlfelder and Andy
Kramer also spoke.

vehicle pitches and rolls during
maneuvering.
For the maneuver to be a
success, the spacecraft had to be
lined up at a very exact angle
before the braking blast was
fired.
l# : |1
THE HILLEL Foundation
shares a meal Tor peace and
the coming of Passover
Sunday on the Plaza.. .page 2
Classifieds 14
Editorials.. i 8
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Movies 14
Small Society 9
Sports., 19
Whats Happening 3



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, April 16,1970

1
Virgil Sturgill
Sings And Runs
For Life At 73
1

9L : J|
r
11111 l I
I ; JP^^F
r -.
Hp SjL *! j
A |Hp||| ||Hk jL fH
R&y ': : y x-V iaH
>&k* -^H
bOUG CASE
DOUBLE DIP KID
There's more than just rides at the Camigras being held on the ROTC
field this week. As far as little Samantha Case is concerned, it's
enough just to have a double dip ice cream cone.
Freedom Party Holds
First Campus Bed-In
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The first Bed-ln to be held on the UF cainpus is scheduled today on
the Plaza of the Americas.
Organized by Larry Woldenberg, Student Freedom candidate from
Arts and Sciences for the student senate, the Bed-In idea is to
promote dialogue between the students and the Student Freedom
people.
WHILE WE admit the idea of the Bed-In is a bit unusual, it is not
a put-on, Woldenberg said.
It is designed as a happening a means of meeting and achieving
communication for the principal of true representation, Woldenberg
said.
Interested students are invited to attend the opening ceremony
which will begin at the College Inn at 11 a.m. and proceed in solemn
procession to the Plaza of the Americas.
Obviously it involves a risk on our part of not being taken
seriously. But risks are riot necessarily a deterrent. Achievement never
comes easily, Woldenberg said.
The Bed-In will continue as long as the people express an interest
in this happening. Woldenberg invited everyone on campus to attend
and bring a bed or a lunch or an instrument or a frisbee or just
themselves.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
' Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Writer
Theres nothing unusual about a folk
singer from the mountains of North
Carolina. And theres nothing unusual
about a man running the two-mile. It is
unusual that 73-year-old Virgil Sturgill
does both.
Friday night Sturgill will sing folk
music and play his four-string
dulcymore at the Bent Card, 1826 W.
University Avenue.
SATURDAY he will show form as
national two-mile cross-country

champion (70 years and older). He will
participate in the Run For Your Life
rally held in conjunction with the Gulf
Coast Relays at 1:30 pan. on Florida
track.
After the Run For Your Life Rally,
Sturgill will sing on the Plaza of the
Americas as part of Celebration 7O.
According to his friend, author Jesse
Stuart, Sturgill has never smoked, drank,
or cursed in his life. Stuart also claims
Sturgill is the only white man to emerge
the victor in a foot race with Indians he
knew in Oklahoma. Sturgill has been
. ......... -

SENATE DELAYS ACTION

Wauburg Plan Submitted

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday
night was given a preliminary
Lake Wauburg proposal for the
development of the site by the
Lake Wauburg Committee.
Action on the proposals was
put off by the senate until next
Tuesday to give the Budget and
Finance Committee an
opportunity to study the
proposals and make a
recommendation to the senate.
MEASURES passed at the
meeting included: Florida
Student Congress (FSC)
affiliation by UF and the
establishment of an FSC
coordinator at UF to act as
liaison between SG and the FSC;
a suspension of three sections of
the SG election laws to allow
re-location of voting machines;
and a request from Honor Court
for funds to hire expert
witnesses required by law for
trials in cheating.
The Wauburg proposals
included four main sections:
Program of requirements,
including a list of recreational
items such as canoes, sailboats,
row boats, paddle boats, power
boats, swimming and boat
docks, volleyball and other
Carl Chiarenza
Speaks Tonight
Photography expert Carl
Chiarenza, former editor of
Contemporary Photography
and one of two doctoral
candidates in photography in the
United States, will speak at 8
p.m. tonight in the Reitz Union
auditorium.
Chiarenza, who is sponsored
by Celebration 7O, is being
presented in conjunction with a
display of photographs from
many schools throughout the
nation.

o THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH O
1 MINI-SKIRT CONTEST 1
I TONIGHT §
S s2slst PLACE 1
S \ 1
I SIOEVERY CONTESTANT I
to
| NEVER A LOSER |
| DUBS LOUNGE
O (MVmaOS3HI JJJIASJNIVD JO HVMnwnn r,.<
xu Hvuuomo any noaos jhi jtiiasjnivo

games, picnic areas, a swimming
pool, open and closed pavilions,
and various facilities such as
gates, maintenance shop, roads,
sewage and parking.
t A site plan indicating
locations of these requirements,
using the south site because of
its larger acreage.
Construction budget for
the program of requirements.
The costs include $629,020 for
construction, $8,725 for
equipment and $7,620 for
accessories.
First phase of construction,
listing as priority A those
items the committee feels
necessary for opening and as
priority B those merely
desirable for opening. Those
items listed as priority A
included: swimming docks, boat
docks, boat storage, well, septic
tanks, canoes, rowboats, power
rescue boat, open pavilion
(partial), maintenance shop and
roads. The first five of these
were said to be the absolute
minimum needed for opening.

Howes: Faculty Club
Wants Liquor License
It is apparent that the UFs Faculty Gub wants the Rathskeller
closed so they can have the beverage license for a private faculty
club, Alan Howes, manager of the Rat, said.
To get the type of beverage license the Rat must have because of
zoning regulations requires a corporation have been in business for at
least two years.
THIS MEANS if the faculty club takes their license back, the Rat
will not be able to get another license until January, 1971, Howes, Do
It party s candidate for student body president, said.
Howes said the faculty club should be made to leave the license in
the Rat until it can get another one on its own.
Legally, the license is the faculty clubs, but the students secured
it for themselves. It appears these men will go to any length to get a
private faculty club even if it takes stomping on the students.
HOWES SAID the faculty club has been the greatest single
hindrance to the success of the Rat.
He said once again the students are getting stepped on.
They tried to make us pay for football tickets, hike our tuition,
and now take away our Rat. Whats next?

running the mile since 1922. He still runs
a mile every morning.
Sturgill, a retired English professor,
was bom and reared in the mountains
near Ashville, N. C., where he learned to
play the four-string dulcymore and
sing.
In the past, Sturgill has sung in
Greenwich Village in New York, at
Philadelphias Second Fret, and at the
Beaux Arts Coffee House in St
Petersburg where he spends his winters.
Next month he will be at the Florida
Folk Festival.

WILLIAM OSBORNE,
assistant director of Reitz Union
and secretary of the Wauburg
committee, said all costs given
were merely estimates given by
the architect based on similar
facilities elsewhere and, as such,
were purposely on the high side.
He said more exact figures could
not be given until the architect
was authorized to begin the
actual research and designing of
the proposed facilities.
He said the senate had several
actions it could take on the
matter:
Close Lake Wauburg
entirely.
Begin the minimal
construction.
t Proceed at whatever pace
you wish on the old location
making use of, and expanding
on, existing facilities.
The senate will hold a special
meeting tonight at 7:30 to
consider the second reading of
the bill and any request for
adjustments in voting machine
locations by other colleges.



HILLEL SHARES MEAL

Passover Starts In Plaza

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Writar
A Passover Peace and Freedom Seder open to all
UF students will be held Sunday at 1 pm. on the
Plaza of the Americas. The Seder is the traditional
meal inaugurating the beginning of Passover.
The seder is sponsored by the Hillel Foundation
and will feature music by Celebration.
ACCORDING TO Rabbi Michael Monson from
Hillel, the Peace and Freedom Seder is an attempt
to speak to contemporary issues of peace and
freedom in the sense of ,the traditions of Passover.
It is our way of sharing the holiday of Passover,
the most universal of all Jewish holidays, with the
entire campus community both Jewish and
non-Jewish.
Celebration will participate by playing traditional
music, and also rock music in the spirit of the
theme of Passover.

WHATS
HAPPENING
BACK ISSUE: The
Anthropology Club meets today
in room 3C of the Arts and
Sciences building at 7:30 pm.
SEXY CLASS: Dr. Mary
McCaulley will speak on Sex
Education in the Classroom.
Reitz Union room 347 from 7 to
9 pm.
CELEBRATE: Celebration
7O presents Faculty Poets in
room 122 of the Union at 8 pm.
BLACK EDUCATION: The
College of Education presents as
part of the Education Black
Series Mrs. Doris Hall Welcome,
who will speak on Developing a
Positive Self-Concept in the
Black Elementary Child.
Tonight in the Norman Hall
Auditorium at 7:30 pm.

Up your Kite.
12 beautiful designs printed on clear poly. A whole new thing in flying great on the wall too. Simple I
assembly easy to fly with no tails or extras needed. At headshops, bookstores and department stores. A most unusual high.

Russia Pledges Aid
In Apollo Recovery

By United Press International
The Soviet Union joined seven
anxious Western nations
Wednesday in pledging whatever
assistance needed for recovery of
Americas Apollo 13 astronauts.
Russia sent two merchant
ships toward the scheduled
splashdown area in the South
Pacific, and Britain sent six naval
vessels toward the alternate site
in the Indian Ocean.
FRANCE, Holland, Italy,
Spain and West Germany in
Europe, South Africa, and
Uruguay in South America placed
their navies on alert and advised
the United States they were
ready to assist in the recovery in

THE TRADITIONAL Seder meal will be
symbolized Sunday by matzah, or unleavened
bread, being given to those in the plaza.
The service will be an adaptation of the
traditional text into a modem medium. It will deal
with contemporary issues as the black struggle for
equal rights, movements for peace in Vietnam, the
Middle East, and the plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union and the fact they are denied their rights,
according to Monson.
The Sunday Seder will be similar to another
Peace and Freedom Seder presented by Arthur
Waskow last year on the steps of the Lincoln
Memorial.
The text' of the Seder will be presented to those
in attendance.
Services will be held at Hillel during Passover
week, April 20-28. Monson stresses everyone is
welcome. Hillel is located at 16 NW 18th Street.
Meals will be served.

whatever way needed.
The offers of assistance for
recovering the crippled spaceship
highlighted increasing world
concern for the fate of its three
astronauts, James A. Lovell,
John L. Swigert and Fred W.
Haise. They are returning to
earth in a crippled spaceship that
space technicians hope to bring
down Friday about 600 miles
southeast of Pago Pago in the
South Pacific.
The United States and the
Soviet Union are bound by
treaty to provide assistance, if
needed, in the recovery of each
others space ships but an
occasion for international rescue
operations had not previously
arisen.

A isD*
Jrti, y % jfl
jfl 2|p
?. ~ l < P fit |||BBl $
L Janr f ; Vi i.
oj I "'' m ; p § ( j, *j^,
'' a a f .-.~,(
GATOR GIRL
Alligator photographer Phil Bannister found Diane Boyd, 2UC,
sunbathing on the lawn behind Weaver Hall and captured a springtime
wonder. Wouldn't ya say? Diane is a secondary education biology
major from West Palm Beach. She is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha
sorority and likes to swim.
Concert Uncertain
An April 26 concert which would have featured television singing
celebrity Joe Feeney in the Gainesville High School Auditorium has
been termed questionable by the Gainesville Chamber of Commerce.
Chamber of Commerce spokesman J. H. Ruckriegal said, The
promoter of the concert has not made a contract for the use of the
high school auditorium.
The Alligator office and College Terrace Apartments were listed on
a handbill as two of several places where concert tickets could be
purchased. Neither place is selling tickets.

Thumtey, Apr* W. 1970, T)*F tori* AMfMor,

Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

UFs Honor System: Best Available

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
On ray honor as a Florida
student.. .
How many times has each UF
student read these words? What
do they really mean? How many
people think of what they are
signing when they put their
names at the bottom of a test?
IS THE honor system the best
UF can do?
On April 22 students will vote
tor Student Government
officers. One of the positions for
which they will vote is that of
Honor Court chancellor.
Two law students, John
Maynard and Dan Stephens, are
running for the office. What are
their views on UFs honor
system and Honor Court?
MAYNARD, Do It Party
candidate, said he knows all
honor code violations cannot be
eliminated.
But, he said, I think we
have the best system possible.
The only other realistic
alternative is a proctor system,
and having seen it, I know its
bad.
Stephens, Focus Party
candidate, said the idea of an
honor system, which he believes
rests upon individual
responsibility, is a good one.
BUT, WHILE the Honor
Court and honor system are old
traditions, we shouldn't get so
wrapped up in tradition that we
lose sight of reality.
He said the testing conditions
in University College are
beyond belief.
**Most people dont intend to
cheat But the conditions are so
bad, and the temptation so
great, they may end up taking
information unintentionally.
MAYNARD also spoke of the
temptations which the UC
student faces.
Kirby Appointed
Extension Head
Edwin L. Kirby, who until
September 1969, was associate
director of Extension for the
state of Ohio, has been named
administrator of the Extension
Service.
Kirby has served as associate
administrator of the Extension
Service since the fall of last
year.
Kirby replaces Lloyd H. Davis
in the administrative post. Davis,
who had served as Federal
Extension Service administrator
for more than six years, has been
named director of the USDA
Science and Education
Coordination staff.
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMEN^_
Mustang
MOBILE HOMBmoV
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

CHANCELLOR CANDIDATE^ AGKtt

DEPTH REPORT
i WWBQWWOOOBOaWOaWOWQWOOOfIfIOBOOQOOWOQWMWaWIIOWfiOCWtWWW^'

Both suggested the scrambling
of test questions and, if possible,
more space between students,
although crowding is a problem.
Maynard said he didnt think
a proctor system was necessary.
He said some people think of the
test administrators as proctors,
but actually, if they turn anyone
in for irregularities, they are
doing so only as students.
SOME HAVE suggested we
just have one proctor, but soon
you have a handful, then a
fistful and then a roomful,
Maynard said.
JOHN MAYNARD
D6st system posstDve
Afar"'' ' v @1
I I I>l K,
Mm
DAN STEPHENS
... dont lose sight of reality

I VETS FOR PEACE PRESENT^
1 as a part of Anti-War Week 1
1 Joe Cole, member of the 'Ft. Jackson 8; Gl's I
United Against the War
'Army', a film depicting the inhuman motives &
1 methods of the Armed Forces. I
I TODAY I
1 7:30 PM, Reitz Union, Room C-4 (
I ALSO I
1 Friday, 2 pm McCarty Auditorium ft
1 A panel of Vets representing various points of view I
I of the U. S. involvement in S.E. Asia. |
| 4 Ibbl
m i §^n
I END THE WAR NOW! I
I BRING ALL THE GIS HOME! I

He said people just pacing
back and forth trying to catch
people doing something wrong
would lessen anyones
concentration.
Stephens said he did not feel
it was up to the chancellor of
the Honor Court to decide
whether to continue with the
honor system and Honor Court
the same as in the past.
HE SAID he thinks the
decision should be up to the
students.
If it takes a full proctor
system, and students want a
proctor system, it would be my
responsibility as chancellor to
get that type of system, even if I
personally favor the one we have
now, Stephens said.
He said he would like to see a
study of the way other colleges
handle the situation.
WE SHOULD find out what
other colleges are doing. First,
we can find out if they have an
honor system. Then, if they do,
we should see if it works better
than ours, and if so why.
Maynard said he would like to
see the chancellor and other
officials of the Honor Court talk
with students and explain to
them exactly what the honor
system is.
We should try to get people
to take pride in the system,
because it is a system in which
they can take pride.
HE SAID he hopes by
educating the student about the
honor system, the student will
begin to help improve the
system.
Anyway, its well worth the
effort, Maynard said.
Stephens stressed the
importance of educating the
student. He said he would like to
see professors remind their
students that UF is under an
honor system.
HE ALSO said he would stress
orienting freshmen and transfer
students about their individual

responsibility under the honor
system.
We cant expect students to
function under a system which
they dont understand.
Most people who have worked
in the Honor Court agree that
the most important role of the
chancellor is that of judge.
Honor Court Attorney
General Gavin Lee said the most
important qualification for a
competent judge is that of
experience. Therefore, certain
basic requirements are listed in
UF Student Body Constitution
for the position of chancellor.
The qualifications of the two

BE A
MARINE CORPS OFFICER
W FLT THE BEST
PLC PROGRAM
UNDERGRADUATES ENROLL NOW
COMPLETE COLLEGE BACHELOR/MASTERS
NO ON-CAMPUS TRAINING
CHOOSE AIR OR GROUND
ATTEND LAW SCHOOL AS A MARINE
G GOCC
OCC GOCC PROGRAM
FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
GUARANTEED OCCUPATIONAL FIELDS
AVIATION PILOT/FLIGHT OFFICER
Marine Officer Selection Team will be at the Student Union
20th thru 23rd April at 9 AM 3 PM
Paid Political Advertisement
FOCUS ON
JOHN
W DODSON
E i TREASURER
Hell be signing checks for you. .
But he won't sign checks to send S.G. leaders on
unnecessary trips.
He won t sign checks for paneling and dictaphones in S.G.
offices until organizations' financial needs are met.
He won t sign checks for S.G. projects that only serve to
glorify student politicians.
It's time to re-evaluate priorities in S.G. spending!
FOCUS on the man who will
give you your moneys worth
PAID FOR BY FOCUS PARTY
1 1 |

candidates this year are:
John Maynard: Honor Court
assistant chief defense counsel,
chief investigator for the defense
staff, secretary of the Honor
Court Bar Association, Florida
Blue Key Speakers Bureau and
Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity.
Dan Stephens: chief
investigator defense staff,
chairman of the new faculty
orientation committee, treasurer
of Phi Delta Phi, one of four
research assistants for the
university attorney and
participated in the final round of
the Cambell Thomel Moot Court
arguments.



' o *
..
c* 9
1969 Jos. Schlitt Brewing Co.. Milwaukee and other great cities.
v <
M W
9 9
Ki
iBHH9Bpf 9HH^B^^g.
9 9 9
.jB BL B
* 1 s > 9h^^h|B9|
I M*. lilliil 9
g . > B 4 I i w v- --, I \* __ I I I ,I ff -^Bk
...Jjf.-' | -V. : .: : : Vv^^-'^> :^-o.^^-'?^'D^; ft'
-*5 ; ' y^ 9^l Bl *! i
9ll?^^fPiiifitlS^i^lSll^^^
lij vx&&^osHHHflfli^Bflflfllflfl^lSHEHj^H9fiHl^^BfiiNHi^^lfHHlH^flllflaflll^m^fl^Hfl""fe l #*|^^f^B^^^lfl^HflH^l^l^lH^fllj^^^^BflHi^^BHH^S9Bmf!!&Be
i, '*; s* : *} ? I|| p V fc ; I
B^ggggggg_BHH99
If "" ~ j
hf mV nPi^Mxii^l^Bi a
gBBk 1 :Bk i. w B RSt^B9DOS^BVSr^SMwJMBi
I f
J |9 .awaMMKittfe>. % BSSffiE^SSa^^kg^tflwM
B lk BF MUBgSSta^flK^Bnr^**^
' :.' '.) '' ' ' - I
.. :.- v .-, / ;, v
-

Thursday, April 16,1970, Ttw Florida AlHpator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

FACTIONS SIGN UNITY PACT

Cuban Exiles Plan Invasion

MIAMI (UPI) Exile leader
Jose de la Torriente, who is
organizing a new invasion of
Cuba, said Wednesday that not
more than 5,000 of Fidel
Castros troops will remain loyal.
He said he would guess the
Cuban premier should be out
by the end of the year.
DE LA TORRIENTE, a
66-year-old retired Cuban

Pollution Law Fought
By Power Company
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (UPI) The Southern Governors Conference
has sought to intervene in a Minnesota case that may be a precedent
setting test of states power to write stricter pollution controls than
those established by federal agencies.
Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller, chairman of the conference, said the
suit tests the authority of Minnesota to set stricter regulations than
those issued by the Atomic Energy Commission.
DON S. SMITH, an Arkansas public service commissioner who is
one of the attorneys for the Governors Conference in the
intervention, said the motion to file a friend of the court brief was
entered Monday in the third division of U. S. District Court in
Minnesota.
Sixteen of the conferences states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands entered the suit. Tennessee did not participate.
The suit was filed by the Northern States Power Co. in connection
with the operation of its Monticello nuclear generating plant.,
THE MINNESOTA pollution control agency refused to allow the
power company to operate in Minnesota because the radioactive
waster discharge was greater than the commission permits.
However, the company met the standards set by the Atomic Energy
Commission.
The company contends the state cannot supercede federal
regulations.
THE STATE contends that it can when the health, safety and
welfare of its citizens is involved, Smith said.
Smith said it was the first court challenge of its kind.
One of the perennial issues of vital concern to the conference is
the constitutional and jurisdictional authority of its member states to
exercise their historic role in assuring the health, safety and welfare of
their citizenry, the governors brief said.
Cambodian Premier Pleads
For Vietnamese Eviction

PHNOM PENH (UPI)
Premier Lon Nol called on the
people of Cambodia tonight to
drive out the Vietnamese as they
did in 1840 in a national
uprising that killed thousands of
Vietnamese and freed the
country from Vietnamese
domination.
Massacres of Vietnamese
civilians already have been
reported from the border regions
of Cambodia and Vietnam,
brought on by centuries-old
hatred between the Khmer
tribesmen of Cambodia and the
Annamite tribesmen of Vietnam.
INFILTRATION by North
Vietnamese has added to
Cambodian anger.
An estimated 500,000
Vietnamese live in Cambodia,
mostly in the border areas, plus
about 40,000 to 60,000 Viet
Cong and North Vietnamese
troops.
In order to evict the enemy
from the country, the
government makes this
oppressing appeal to all
Cambodians, future citizens of
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES AH ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

executive who is now a U. S.
citizen, said recruiting of a new
exile army soon will begin, but
he declined to say exactly when.
Gen. Eulogio Contillio, who
briefly held the reins of
government when President
Fulgencio Batista fled Cuba on
Jan. 1, 1959, is acting as
military adviser to De la
Torriente and will oversee
recruiting.

the Cambodian republic, to
organize in groups to defend
energetically with every means
our soil, Lon Nol said.

1 500 Northwest 1 6th. Avenue
I omo note's Living I'tutay .
VILLA RAVINE
A Country Club atmosphere where von can
enjoy apartmerit lining to its fullest I
large roof deck for entertaining outside the
rear door of your one bedroom apartment. .
. 1 tico bedroom l (twnhouse uilh the bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms on the lower level instead of the up upper.
per. upper. ... 1 rien oJ the tree tops from the
master bedroom window of your three bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. . Luxurious shag carpet carpeting
ing carpeting in five rich color combinations. . In
exclusive i\ortlncest residential location. .
And Management that cares. Mrs. Linda
Langford would like to show you the beauti beautifully
fully beautifully decorated models. Call .> 711-tt.il*l any anytime.
time. anytime.
Professional Management By:
ERNEST TEW & ASSOCIATES, INC

DE LA TORRIENTE recently
influenced some of the warring
exile factions including
Castros exiled sister, Juanita, to
sign a unity pact.
He expanded on his hopes and
plans for overthrowing Castro in
an interview with the Miami
News.
Asked if there is a target
date for ousting Castro, the
exile leader replied:
YES, BUT thats within my
brain. I can tell you I think he
should be out by this year.
Thats just a guess on my part.
But hes going to be at the
bottom of the barrel within the
next two, three months.
De la Torriente said money
is no problem in financing the
projected invasion which he
predicted will be successful
because Castro no longer has the
support of the people.
The facts are that 95 per cent
of the people in Cuba are against
Castro including his Army, he
said. I say he will have about
4,000 to 5,000 men wholl fight
- thats all. Maybe not even
that.
HE SAID Batista was
overthrown by Cuban public
opinion, not Castros forces.
Asked to indicate if he was
planning on a 15,000-man
invasion force the exile leader
said: I couldnt tell you how
many you need, but I do know
when we get there well handle
it.
He said he recently had a
very pleasant conversation
with President Rafael Caldera in
Venezuela but, I didnt ask him
for anything. Therefore, he
didnt have to say no.
But he added: Im starting to
travel to get the support of the
Latin countries for what we have
to do. Its very plain now.

1 1
BPfj .jfljrv ify Irfiy --
*' ?" wFw M
' B? If" 1 \
iMy y m %ts J 8
' .£££ j f \Vv ift?sl -
: mii
:' i % 4^w
1 ;: $ \p£f J|W
\;i i, 3liWH| :: '"''' m 11 yr_ <
|i I j||^Ht
fell i
|U |W nr //||
:< mBJ
' : fci'Mlf /y(r> %111111111-
>. B2L' -wk Qfi&JHi'\|T twllj vN Vn'



the ugliest
words in college:
Quiz Friday over the next six chapters
4

Why "Sweat It ?"
You can learn to read and study much
faster! The average Florida Reading Dynamics
student increases his reading and study speed
(including skimming and recalling) over 4.4
times and improves concentration over 10% as
tested by our standardized testing program.
Reading Dynamics graduates include over
1,000 University of Texas students, 100
professors, and many deans. As a matter of

PLAN TO ATTEND A FREE MINI LESSON
Today at 3, 5:30, & Bp.m.
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Upstairs at
1015 W. Univ. Ave.
(next to University City Photo Supply)
#

f
fact, our graduates include many of the
world's most famous respected
people ... Presidents, Senators, Movie Stars,
Scientists, and Business Leaders.
The best way to find out about the
remarkable Reading Dynamics course is to
come to a free MINI-LESSON. Here,
crammed into one exciting hour, you'll learn
what it's like to be able to read and study
faster. You will see a short, enjoyable movie

Thursday, April 16,1670, Ths Florida AMprtor,

and have all your questions answered. In
short, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to
read and study substantially faster than you
thought possible without skipping a single
word with better comprehension.
Important Note: We can only help those
who are NOW average or above average
readers. To check your own level of reading,
we suggest you contact the University of
Florida Reading Clinic.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

and now gentlemen of the Senate, those opposed to Hiram P. Suckleshew
for the Supreme Court. ..
Rocky In Trouble

NEW YORK While Republican strategists plan
for sizable gains in the Senate (unlikely) and the
House (highly unlikely) in 1970, an important
governorship may be sliding away. The state is New
York where Nelson Rockefeller has proved a strong
Administration ally in the first year of Mr. Nixons
Presidency.
Contrary to most expectations, Rockefeller has
rarely, if ever, joined the liberal Republican
opposition to the Nixon program. A sturday
supporter of the ABM, he even came to Washington
to help lobby wavering Republicans. On Vietnam,
his line has been at least as hard as the Presidents,
and he was sharply critical of New Yorks GOP Sen.
Charles Goodells plan to pull out U. S. troops by
the end of this year.
IN LATIN-AMERICAN affairs Rockefeller risked
considerable personal prestige by undertaking a
series of official visits, and his report takes almost
all the heat off the Administration to do more or
differently in the hemisphere.
Consequently, Rockefellers troubles in New
York, and they are real, are causing some worry in
the White House. The President has already agreed
to come to New York and help in the governors
campaign for an unprecedented fourth four-year
term.
The key, at this stage, to Rockefellers success or
failure is in the hands of Alex Rose, boss of New
Yorks once-potent Liberal Party who is anxious to
wrest back from the states Conservative Party the
role of third-party leader. Roses Liberals ran
Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. for governor in 1966, in a
direct slap at the Democratic Party whose candidate
they usually support. They ran fourth behind
Rockefeller, Democrat Frank OConnor and the
candidate of the Conservative Party.
ROSE TOOK THE Liberals out of the
Democratic camp in part because of his view that
OConnors Liberal credentials were somewhat
tarnished and because OConnor, with the solid
support of the big-county leaders, was unwilling to
make patronage concessions to the Liberals.
This time there should be no such problem. Rose
is aware, as are other New York politicians who can
count (by no means a general description), that the
combined Democratic-Liberal vote, even with weak
and underfinanced candidates like OConnor and
Roosevelt, exceeded Rockefellers by 200,000.
And not only will the Democrats have a
candidate with solid Liberal credentials (probably

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor
Den Vining Jeff Brein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant
r r \ 'it>s u'ii ,-v~\ -3 *.' i>. -n

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

Earl Hartman John Sugg
News Editors

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Frank Mankinwicz Mankinwicz_
_ Mankinwicz_ Tom Bradon
Nassau County executive Eugene Nickerson), but
Rockefeller has lost a lot of ground with the
Liberals in New York on whose support he has been
accustomed to lean.
HIS HAWKISH STANCE on Vietnam, his strong
support of the ABM, continuing skirmishing on
state-city and welfare-education matters with Mayor
John Lindsay and his support of Conservative John
Marchi against Lindsay have all eroded Rockefellers
Liberal Party strength.
An unspoken Rockefeller deficit is the hostility
of New Yorks large Jewish bloc of voters to the
governors brother, David Rockefeller of the Chase
Manhattan Bank, who recently urged what the State
Department calls an evenhanded policy in the
Middle East.
On the right, Rockefeller can count on little help.
The Conservative Party was founded in order to
beat Nelson Rockefeller; it is highly doubtful that it
will withdraw from the struggle now.
ON THE LEFT, Rockefeller tried to bolster his
sagging status by supporting Sen. Goodell. But the
days when Rockefeller could count on winning or
neutralizing the Liberal Party are as long ago as
David Dubinsky and Adolph Berle, and his
forthright support of Goodell only served to enrage
the Conservative Party.
So the Democrats, armed with polls which show
that Nickerson might beat Rockefeller if the
Liberals stand aside, are looking carefully to Alex
Rose. The withdrawal from the race for governor of
Arthur Goldberg and Kennedy strategist Stephen
Smith means the race will be political rather than
personal. And politics is what Alex Rose knows
best.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Morida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.
i .: r i,; :

EDITORIAL
A Six Act
Absurdity
UF President Stephen C. OConnell is a man who likes to
have his way. ,
OConnell has developed a patented technique to push his
pet projects through, to see them to fruition.
ACT ONE: The president approaches the student body
president for support on a huge, ultra-modem, super
Student Activities Center. The student body president
pledges student support by saying, Im sure most students
wouldnt mind a tuition increase of at least $lO when
theyre told what its for. He says this to an assembled
group of well-known personages, all interested in education.
The meeting is semi-secret. Only two members of the press
are present.
ACT TWO: The student body president enlists a group
of do-gooder students to back a referendum for their
fellow students to pass a $6 a quarter tuition increase.
OConnell makes glorious predictions on the coming of his
grand scheme, the monument to himself for posterity, the
Activities Center.
ACT THREE: Students soundly reject the tuition
increase. OConnell goes into the doldrums of his
presidential career. But his methodical mind is still working.
ACT FOUR: The Athletic Association decides to charge
students $4 a piece for their football tickets. Ostensibly, the
charge is needed to bail-out the faltering athletic program.
OConnell first claims the move is only a proposal for
possible future action, and implies it is a last resort, that
there is no need to worry, it probably wont be passed. The
next day, the association passes the ticket charge. The ticket
committee covered themselves by mentioning the plan, but
it appeared to have been pre-decided, a fait accompli, only
needing an official vote.
The Athletic Association claims it is more than SIOO,OOO
in debt. But five football games, with 12,000 students
attending, at $4 a head, the total is at least $240,000 a
season. And thats not counting the increased reserved
tickets, now $7 apiece. Plus, faculty tickets have gone up to
$7 apiece.
The money must be needed for something else than just
retiring the athletic programs debt.
ACT FIVE: OConnells dream of an Activities Center
may be reality after all. The president has been involved in
getting the ticket prices increased. Since his dream was
rejected by the students, his next choice was to force it by
going to the Athletic Association.
ACT SIX: The future, Fall, 1970. Four dollar student
football tickets are a reality. Student attendance falls off
but their seats are sold to an eager alumni. The activities
center takes form and President OConnell retires early so it
can be named for him.
The next project is a domed stadium. No college football
team can draw the crowds necessary to build it, so an
overtly professional team is lured to Gainesville.
Student football is relegated to empty lots in obscure
parts of the campus. Friends watch the boys run, jump and
throw, much as fans did 100 years ago. The campus
refocuses on academics.
Think about it, Steve.



Speaking Out

(EDITORS NOTE: Ray Cohn
is a member of the UF
graduating class of 1967. He is
residing in Frankfort,
Kentucky.)
Oh, how sad things must be
back home.
As a Floridian now working in
Kentucky, I am sorry to say it
has become almost impossible
for me to pick up a newspaper
without being ashamed of my
state.
How sad things must be in the
Sunshine State when our go-go
governor who four years ago ran
on a law and order platform
defies the courts of the land in
an obvious attempt to rescue his
sagging popularity.
In the process Claude Kirk has
tagged the Sunshine State with
the racial stigma Alabama and
Mississippi suffered through
similar grand stand plays by
their governors.
But Floridians have come to
expect this kind of -behavior
from the present chief executive.
In his three and a quarter years
in office he has played politics
with the states court system;
interfered with the
constitutional autonomy of the
Board of Regents; padded
governmental agencies with his
political cronies; and used the
Florida Development
Commission to conduct his
ill-fated drive for the Republican
vice presidential nomination.
Yes, how sad things must be
in the Sunshine State.
Nor will Kirks action
necessarily mean the political
suicide it should. Florida voters
have a history of tolerating

YSA RecognitionA Benefit?

MR. EDITOR:
I think perhaps many of the problems
facing us today stem from a
misunderstanding of the functional
processes of society.
First of all, many radicals and
conservatives alike (as well as the vast
majority of the middle-of-the-roaders)
suffer from the delusion that a specific
set of absolutes exist that are requisite to
the establishment of a just society. Let
me say to all of you: NUTS! There are no
absolutes. Even the sanctioned need to
preserve life or the necessity to procreate
can no longer qualify as absolutes. Truth,
justice, equality? They never were nor
will they ever be absolutes. They exist
and have meaning only in the context of
a given society at a given point in time.
Secondly, it is nonsense to speak of
dangerous goals or to say that society has
taken a turn in the wrong direction.
Societal goals exist only in transition and
their real effects can be considered only
in a historical context. As to direction, ail
(he tmoll society

OFFHANP I'P -SAV
. TH& AW &
To cosk IK6 FTbMTV- OFOalfise,

The Sad Sunshine State

political absurdity. Witness the
defeat of former Sen. Claude
Pepper in the early sos to a Red
baiting witch hunt; the Johns
Committee frantic search for
homosexuals in our educational
institutions; the election of
Hay don Bums in his racist 1964
campaign; and the constant
harassment of higher education
by power hungry politicians.
Oh, how sad things must be in
the Sunshine State when the
chairman of the Board of
Regents indirectly intimidates
the university community
because distinguished law
professors exercised their
freedom to participate in the
political process. Burke Kiblers
statement that the educators
letter opposing the nomination
of G. Harrold Carswell makes it
difficult for the university to get
adequate funding is a curious
one. Does he mean the purse
strings of the university will be
tightened because faculty
members exercised their
constitutional rights?
Yes, how sad things must be
in the Sunshine State.
How sad they must be when a
UF student well versed in the
vital subject of environmental
protection is greeted in
Tallahassee with legislative
rudeness. What faith can young
Floridians have in the
democratic process when
legislators like Rep. Cecil
Bothwell tell them, the
position of students in a meeting
of this sort is exactly the same as
it is on campus. Their job is to
go and leam from someone who
knows more than they do? He
even had the audacity to tell the
student he resented the time

directions are of relatively equal merit.
What I am trying to say is that we
cannot order society according to our
likes and dislikes precisely because it is
the society that has produced those likes
and dislikes. As such, what we are faced
with is not a number of individuals
operating outside society trying to
reorder it but instead are faced with a
number of individuals who are integral
creations of the society as evidence of its
changing state. The society is changing
and thus produces individuals desirous of
change.
I am not saying that society will order
itself and do nothing. I am merely stating
that radicals and revolutionaries, Black
Panthers, Klu Klux Klaners and John
Birchers, as well as members of YSA are
integral and necessary factions of a
society in flux because they have been
produced by that society order to exert a
directional influence on the society, be it
of a negative or a postive nature.
Therefore, it is my contention that
by Brickmqn

they took up.
How sad they must be when
faculty members at UF are
subjected to the McCarthy era
humiliation instrument of
loyalty oaths. Does anybody

Staff Writings

Being a reporter for a newspaper in a university is
easy.
Especially when you are blessed with
perseverance.
Take the case of Rick Roskowe, an enterprising
reporter, if there ever was one. He has
stick-to-it-tiveness.
He was sent out to look for a plow £nd find
out where it came from.
The plow, which is actually a hay reaper, has
been sitting out behind the new engineering
complex since who knows when.
And that was just the trouble nobody knew
when the plow got there, much less how, why or
who put it there.
Calvin Greene, director of physical plants and
grounds, never heard of the thing, and suggested the
reporter look elsewhere.
Any other reporter would have stopped there if
the man who knows everything about the university
doesnt know where the plow came from, nobody
would. The story was a dead end, to use the
newspaper terminology.
Why would a horse-drawn plow be out under a
tree in a pasture near a garden nobody ever went to?
Calls to a dozen possible sources turned up
nothing. A few people recalled a plow being there, but
no one knew why. Someone said it had been used
back when that whole section of campus was a
farm, and just never got moved.
Finally, near the bottom of the prospect list, a
call to Noel Lake, groundskeeper supervisor, hit the
jackpot.
Sure I remember the plow, he said. Been

Horse Drawn Plow

more harm is done to the society by
silencing the variant factions than would
be done by encouraging free, uninhibited
expression by those factions. It does not
follow that official recognition of YSA
by the university is an official
endorsement of the principles and
policies of YSA. Official recognition
would, however, imply a desire on the
part of the university for an atmosphere
of free and uninhibited expression and
exchange of ideas.
I contend that the university, and
implicitly society as a whole, can only
benefit by the official recognition of
YSA. YSA was formed only because
there existed a need for its formation
within a certain segment of society. To
deny expression to such a faction can
only inhibit the natural developmental
processes of society. Let YSA stand or
fall on its own merits, but also give it the
chance to proclaim such merits freely and
publicly.
MICHAEL J. McKEON, 3AS
Education
MR. EDITOR:
Tonight I listened to another hopeful
candidate. His ideas made as much sense
to me as a student who is led up with the
great white fathers in Tigert. Yet I realize
that even if his party is elected, there is
much consternation cm my part
concerning the enforcement of their
I haveTiat through rain and scorching

believe a true subversive would
hesitate signing such a
meaningless piece of paper? If he
is disloyal to begin with what
does he have to lose by lying?
As I sit in the capital of

Thursday, April 16,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Neal Sanders

apF'V $ >
Bis|ifMF wNltj&M&r' 1 TT Wn
\ v *2pl/'\l TSw* / \ MWP£I
;j:§wi \ l \if / \ SeEmD^
SUNNY BARLOW
there for years. I put that plow out there myself.
Lake said he saved the plow from being melted
down years ago when surplus university property
was being discarded.
Last year we were thinking of ways to clear the
hyacinths from Lake Alice, Lake said, and I
suggested using the plow. It didnt work out too
well, though. The plow couldnt pick up enough
weeds to make it worth the effort.
Only one other call panned out for reporter
Roskowe.
A retired professor remembered using a plow
similar to the one residing on campus more than 20
years ago.
Its probably not the same one, he said.
The plow remains, a setting spot for couples, but
unscathed by heartless individuals who would brand
the relic as an eyesore.
Which, for the plow, may be just as well.

OPEN FORUM:^^
Adoia ml J
nn hnp* f or f/j cQ^jnlnce
sunny afternoons on Florida Field,
caught an occasional glimpse of the
players, and even had the pleasure of
having two glasses of whiskey thrown on
me at the precious homecoming game. I
used to enjoy football games back in the
good old days when the guys played to
win the game, not to gain administrative
favor and my money.
Now the leaders of this school are
trying to raise our tuition, which would
make us the most expensive state football
and activity club in Florida. In 1990
when I am 41, I do not want to take
pride in four winning seasons or three
$500,000 lakes; I want to be an asset to
my community as an educator. Without
education, how will I educate? How will
any of us help others with a bigoted,
second-rate education?
We want to learn.
NANCY MALUNE, lUC
DEBBIE HEALEY, 3JM
DOROTHIA WITKOWSKI, 3AR
PHYLLIS WHALEN, 3AR
LETTERS POLICY
Lfttm must:
Bt typsd, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 900 avoids.
Not be signed wHh a pseudonym.
Have srtdrswts and telephone
numbers of writers.
Mmum witt kn JUI U

By Ray Cohn

Kentucky and hear and read
about these events in Florida I
can only hang my head in
shame.
Yes, things must really be this
sad in the Sunshine State.

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator. Thursday, April 16.1970

Page 10

gfromOwr q/HmU
K** Armoer i..rMir.C-r.
Sliced Bacon *+ T9*
B| milll I|F Swift's
h mM iisES
: ?.*i\ :'
pOUxl :§if!f ~, iBBSif I /- IliAnif Brown'MServe ..,*
Mli#Z r a4 THf HAPI/V ££=£ ,S
t : mm \ f^ j ml nc nnrr ;...*...**
i MU/*3i¥'-SKiS 3 nirrrnriiArn , n*
UlrrcKcNCcS = =~
Smoked Ham r !"
:J.wm I \jyj ~ f imf
./'WIPi I AT I/I IKI IX Braunichweiger .... £ 45'
(I |B T 1 1 Cooked Crawfish ...."' !*
Siled \ cu " AoeArw oA a at.
/ddj|K EC)C)S German B*yle Bologna r 99*
1 ill I M cb .r.*#*
i H\ H\ d * n mm T Potato Salad ST ***
lohmarlas Sandwich ..... 4*
(Jut §J)airy P/Jept. Swifts Premium Tender-Grown Government- r H^iS t
D FrMh n t Frozen, ss SESEw5fi 1 H 0 "* l|
e ** us * a gziJfi&m. Tasty
Fryer Breasts .. ... 59* e..?e
Wkdmfc 'il| Swift's Premium Meoty Ak fl
pTidifls_Jii Fryer Thighs ... 59* B
|yT w Swift's Premium Delicious P!^FERENCEtLi:
it'S^f>p Fryer Drumsticks k 55*
Fryer Wings 39* pil|
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED WESTERN BEEF
A HAPPV DIFFERENCE ITmjPe j|y HiuSSSRai'issWUSBfMIfJ^JIRRH
opi Swift's Premium Proton
|d LieMAlsdh m Pot Roast ~79*
. UCI O CjP^^ p r Imperial Roast ~s l *
Swift's Premium Proton Boneless English-Cut
HB A ate' fit Swift's Premium Proton Boneless
39W Sirlein Vi,. >ee.t
1 yk BSSlft Plus 100 EXTRA SAH
green stamps
****** ( Irolen*) WITH THE PURCHASE OF AMY
U Vr- SWIFT'S PREMIUM BEEF ROAST
F FLORIDA OOLD d PELIC| ouS
FROHN FLORIDA DIUCIOUS
bl Jp nlr thg J
L cmtis H sh^B*Bbs^-^BBB[^^^i|FypPP^^ ,:Fi:pcNirtr Ui, d
1 __ *^=>



UBLIX RIGHT FACING PAGE.THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1970..8 COLS. FULL.. 22

t, y * savi fJrJP intst Ai^i
B wSShouS. O?***. *13531
W Sauce S*ry %* Vanl
f'W B SAVI < *.... rm EXTRA W* 9 **
/7T\ J Ag Prune juice 49- |[|l|UwGreenStampsisy
/ /fa % Thouiand lllond wit* .. couro* ' MMiiiiM
f / l \ \ K el fl Salad Dressing 3L" *1 |
/ 111 25*01. SAVI IO< All Purp... I Any Swift's Premium Proten Beef
I I are | Crisco Oil hot* 49* 1 Roast 3-lbs. or over 2
M a f
// // / I I I Pinoappi;':4':: H^GreenStampsS
I j / v I I J* wit* auaj
/P I rn if 1 PRICES EFFECTIVE Baby Food 'jVr 10* Rath's Honey-Cure Boneless 2
J./ f M f I THURSDAY, APRIL 16 THRU *avi i* upw. Smoked Ham 2
/ / APRIL 22, 1970 BigS per lb. $1.69
or idit: j^aaaMssassMssbsoftflnfliiiftiiMsuri
l wif*..!, .ouro* **..*.., I?
c QLm&Um&m £|ff I iSEfc
_ jBBSpp yf I rv |> 7-o*. size $1.29
Iceberg Lettuce ffeft V? HAPPY DIFFERENCE fawifUlttUlfc
US 19* Goldeii g [filil^GreenStamps^
ir..>.sal...>.*.< Bananas B > j"
Tomatoes "?;' 69* ** " d i ...noh
Red Bliss 10 £ 79* jMfejr- OvC Mll 1
Green Cabbage.... r 10* BB IllllfWGreenStampsp?]
lr..k il.rid. § Awort.d F1.,..,
Juicy Oranges .... 5 ... 39* ,#^~E RODUCE I ".. I
__ v_ S three 10-oz. cans 39c 3
Torpicana Fresh Florida | a f
Orange*,!. IfiLj JwGreenStarnps sLs^nti^
(@Jinm \Jur g/tveety cdJept. | NESTEA I Hoir Spray STBf- !f-
SAVI 11 c Asserted Flevors, Fruit Drinks | B Calpwi. mfp I leSueur Tasty 2
Hi-C Drinks INST.TCA | Peetol Creaw sor f e-HafiSm 1
SAVI 4Sc Green Giant, Cream Style or Whole Kernel 1 3 oz Tl IS 1 (impi. wml. April I*7*l |
Golden Cern 5 :Z 3 $ l L P"J 2^0^.^...,;.^^..^.^
v.. 0r ... jj.., ..... Borden's Elsie Wl|^GreenStampsP3
Green Peas 5 .... *1 Tw in Pop f 1
Heinz Ketchup iT 39* 3- k $ i B Cheer ,K I
SAVI 22V BsamL D sra m #soo $n / / kina nine XhcnnnnAdnnnnnnnnebnnnAAnisnnnnnnnsnAr
"oru m cseans # cam 1771 extra P p!!!^l
*.,... ara #9Fl> |mJdWGreenStampsM
O'Sage Peaches ...4 5 1 B BMY
1 Pizza 2
IVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Tasty f Sausage A Cheese 2
Cut BAGtC #303 lAc B LIMIT IPLEASK WITH OTHER | 14-oz. pkg. 79c 1
bill PGGiS eeeeeeeeeee can IV Isl purchases or ss.oo OR more la p 9 2
EVERYDAY LOW PRKI. F A P BLfl v
J^ow?*.Jnsi>a lifll^GreenStamps
6re Beqns 20, |||ff | ;~:; h |
B # AVB * Eohrlc softenor (20c off) Gome Hens 1
Gentle Downy ~..51 1
SAVE Ac Deodorant Boauty Bar (Ac off) SAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA*
w savi sow Zest Soap .... 2 U'.; 39* ITI EXTR A 101
ILL ORINDS SAVI 10. tl.vl. D.t.r...t (10. oH) h] I St3 [Tips
v.DK el-iw-fi a W&ml Liquid Dove 53* ;;;-- M
AISLES NI3X WBII Village Inn Assorted
WITH JwwE* House SAVE AssortodFlovors 10-o* Ge Flavored Rices
name iSbToJn Smacker's Jellies 4
WmK&mf BB m L^^aaaaaaaaav.aaL^aaaw^aawaww m J
tBI 59* 1 Pirar Pams H b*!-pB
I One fyoVC Beauty Bir 12-.. AQ C I Texize Window
ll..lllll:MP: PURCHASESOFSS.OO oS MORE | n. Comphxion Siz. Be., | COUPON I Cleaner
(CLUD.HG CIGARETTES, | 20' | ONE COUPON PER FAMILY Hfl 12 -OZ. hot. 39c
I W t WITH THIS COUPON !*! I l2 *Pir.. April isrsi
A HAPPV !u.,n,. ii . Kgl Greatest of Champ, ok Ejjgi
A HAPPy DIFFERENCE!^PER COUPON L r "* U j J.| EXTRA r 1
4BBM)k> ..s,@@( (Expires Wed.. April 22. 1970)t(s iu a Bfaiiil %<&(. ((Expires Wed.. April 22. 1970).,
ILdLdl win* mi coupon and purcmaii of hfiiiii
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL I *~*~ 1
Assn u tu IlaL Cb sa A 1 Honey 2
1014 N. Main Street 2630 N w ,3m Mr#W K 4 IIIIIIIII/'VH 1 24 "* j-r 65e 1
Wt HIIUI Ilf | fi| 1 (Seplrw. W*4.. April SS, I*7#* 2
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER (11% mak rsf £ J fSTTI EXTRA P^ R!^|
w. univ.r*iy Av.nu. <* 34tti str.w f-kN % ./M |fll|*4WGreenStanipsPJ
with tnti cupa amd purcnasc Os Hiititii
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat Uncle Ren's 1
THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES ONLY! Where shopping j 11-oz. pkg. 45c I
Brevard, Orange, Osceola, Lake, Seminole, Volusia, Marion and Alachua. w a pleasure | T 4; |

Thursday, April 16,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

Student Plans Lake Alice Hyacinth Harvest

By PATSY TRUBOW
Alligator Correspondent
Those lovely lavender water
hyacinths, which have proven to
be a problem in waterways, have
a useful function after all.
UF journalism student
Clarence J.R. Leach and his
father Clarence D. Leach Sr.,
Sarasota, would like to clear the
hyacinths out of Lake Alice and
convert the water plants to
cattle feed.
THE YOUNGER Leach
became interested in both Lake
Alice and the hyacinth control
problem when assigned to do a
story on the wildlife sanctuary
for a journalism class.
When he had previously been
a student at the UF in 1965 he
had seen the lake clean, clear
and full of fish.
Almost four years later when
he investigated it for the report
he found the waters clogged and
the fish gone.
IN 1965 the UF began
dumping sewage into Lake Alice.
The heating plant began to
empty water between 75-80
degrees into the lake.
Hi mm
New Dentistry
Professor
Appointed
Dr. Jose E. Medina, dean of
UF College of Dentistry, has
appointed Dr. Floyd A. Peyton,
internationally respected dental
educator, researcher, author and
lecturer to the college faculty as
professor of biomaterials.
The appointment, effective
immediately, brings Peyton to
the UF from a University of
Michigan professorship in
dentistry and a chairmanship of
that schools Department of
Dental Materials. He has held
those posts since 1948 and has
been on the Michigan school of
mtistry faculty since 1935.
His career has earned for him
eminent authority status in the
science of dental materials;
memberships in dental academic
societies in this country and
abroad; and active memberships
in a host of scientific
organizations. He is a leader in
the International Association for
Dental Research/ and the
American National Standards
Institute; a consultant to the
American Dental Association,
and the Pan American Health
Organization, among others. He
is listed in American Men of
Science.

PLANTS MAY BE USED AS CATTLE FEED

Hyacinths grow better in
polluted waters and many forms
of algae and bacteria thrive in
warmer waters.
The result was an overgrown,
dirty and dying lake.
AFTER CHECKING with an
official at the Plants and
Grounds Division, Leach met Dr.
James Henges at the annual Beef
Cattle Short Course held at the
UF. Among the topics of
discussion at this seminar was
the use of hyacinths as feed.
Henges has been especially
interested in this program in
light of the predicted food
shortage of the late 19705.
Also present at the meeting
was the I.S. Joseph Co. of
Tampa who wanted someone to
harvest the hyacinths for them.
THIS FIRM has found a ready
market for hyacinths in Japan
and Europe where there is
already a shortage on food
available for animal
consumption.
The UF has run experiments
on feeding a group of cattle
completely on water hyacinths.
Although the cattle did not
particularly savor the feed, they
did eat it and slowly gained
weight.
At the end of the experiment
.the cattle were sold to a meat
packing firm at market prices.
HOGS HAVE also been fed
the water plants and there is a
possible good market as chicken
feed.
Water hyacinths have a very
high content of xanthophyll, the
yellow pigment of plants. The
American public likes the yolks
of eggs they eat to be bright
yellow and their chicken meat to
have a healthy color.
Feeding hyacinths to chickens
may prove highly successful in
light of the yellow pigment
content.
LEACHS INTEREST in the
possibilities of hyacinths use led
him and his father to organize
Sarasota Weed and Feed, Inc.,
last January.

fnesh /
I REG. 7l SPICY OLD FASHIONED I-IS.. 2-.
VT7 Applets auea j
Ls- feu! . 59*
ALWAYS FRESH AND TENDER
.jWlilta Mountain
.39*
FILLED WITH RICH ALMOND FILLING
_ AND garnished with sliced
TOASTED ALMONDS 12-ti.
Almond loci
* 59* a
DANISH BAKERY I
Goinosvillo Moll
Spociol Ordors Coll 372-3085
ggHBMiMMHHRHHHHMHMRIMMRHHHRMMMdMIMMMIHRMMMRMMMM

, 11Ji8r.....
TOM KENNEDN

Along with Lake Alice, which
they have offered to clear at
costs, the Leaces hope to receive
contracts to empty other
waterways throughout the state.
Once removed from water,
the hyacinths, which weigh
between 100-150 tons per acre,
are processed by a machine that
essentially bales the plants.
The main problem is removing
them from the water. Biological
controls have not proven
practical. Many, such as foreign
fish and snails, destroy the
ecological balance of the waters
once they have the hyacinths
under control.
OTHERS, as manatees or sea
cows, are expensive and
pneumonia-prone.
Chemical defoliants have been
linked with birth defects in
South Viet Nam and with
excessive bleeding in some
pregnant women and eventual
hysterectomies in the area
around the Tonto National
Forest in the far west. Their use
is declining.
There is no machine to
remove them from the water,
said Leach.
What is effective in a swift
river full of tree limbs is useless
in a slow, clear river. A warm
stream has different problems
from a cool, stagnant pond.
THUS, removal is done in
various manners, some of it
tedious hand raking.
The process is slow and
expensive.

imDEALT:
ITSAMEAL! I
| i c Ms m Now Serving
,lb mm m fk Weekly
Ollly Monday
thru
Lunch and
Sorry no take-out service or discounts at this low price
Daily Choice of Four
Entrees 1
Entrees Served With
Choice of Potatoes, Rice or Vegetable 1
Choice of Special Salads of The Day 1
Hot Roll or Muffin (
SKapPI dpft SELF SERVICE NO TIPPING
313 W. UNIV. AVE.
WZOmitxF I DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING
IN REAR
I Living Color I
I 5x7 PORTRAIT I
97'
I e PLUS 49c HANDLING CHARGE I
I NO AGE LIMIT 1
I WORK GUARANTEED I
I Photography by: Daniel L. Drew I
I April 16-17-18 (Thurs., Fri., Sat.) I
I Hours: 10-1; 2-5 pm Fri. till Bpm I
I -Tiyliil I
I 1202 N. Main I
SI V ijr%.



IbreacTsaie lit
A Loaves AA Prices in **"* 8(1 are 9od through Saturday,
seeded RYE WW A April 18, unable to purchase any
'* j jl' "^" * *"* **"*
1-Lb 6-oz Size Jane Parker Special ;mn
- l * ~
I SAVE 36e! If SAVE 16c! Si Blended or Seasoned Peas
With this Coupon when you Buy 20* Off label! jft H With this Coupon when you buy A&P S| Tiny Whole Beets & Golden Corn
With This M) lUCTAIIT */>( H C. S. White Corn
IYORY Coupon with- || INjIAIiI Klvfc H stewed Tomatoes
I I /V. Coupon MS With This Coupon h U _[ mix or / Bk>z a
LIQUID <*47C II T I 6ri *I.OO
Limit 1 Coupon per family w/$5 or more order H|H Coupon good thru April 19 at your A&P
Coupon good thru April 19 at your A&P f
Hf*SAV!r| V ak, h rf
1 HEINZ 57 SAUCE 1
H With This Coupon % M Without B Sifl
fl stt ox. BtL 2&# upon B
ufflj % 39* TO) I DECAF INSTANT IBWfff*
SSL Coupon good thru April 19 at your A&P COFFEE -OZ. 51.67 i
0000 throuoh apr. ia 4-ia-7o
w c

Thursday, April 16,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

a
a
FOR SALE
1965 Ply. Fury 3, auto, radio, heater,
power steering, exceptionally clean.
Call 372-2240 evenings or 376-2411
day, SBSO or best offer. (A-3t-119-p)
HONDA 305 cc Dream rebuilt ertgine
with zero miles; new tires, chain,
sprokets, brakes, mufflers, and many
more $225. Call 376-1824 after 5
PM. (A-3t-119-p)
Fender Jazz Bass with case SIOO.
Wurlitzer stereo electric 6 string cost
$425. with case sell $125. without
case A-1 condition. 372-5157.
(A-st-l 19-p)
Five week old gerbils for sale. Very
playful make excellent pets clean
with very little upkeep. $1.50 each
Call 392-7628. (A-3t-119-p
1970 Honda CB 450 4000 Miles In
Perfect Condition Best Reasonable
Offer. Steve Coble 342 Thomas F
372-9167. (A-4t-117-p)
Framus 12-String Guitar, not
Electric. Semi-hard shell Case.
Weekdays after 5, weekends anytime.
$22 5 PHONE 378-0167.
(A-st-117-p)
School bus for sale. Exc. running
cond. Perfect camper. Inquire 1808
N. W. Ist Ave. $550.
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadhw -3too pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
*M
I lI 1| [| £
inif i ? ? §
s r i i asio
II I I a O
__ Z
>
" m U1 4* CO. to
__ __
9:0 || I TO
__ | § g z
I i
TO
i Q > SQ z
r-< O c >
030 a
m m
K Z
M H
A


FOR SALE
Sony stero tape recorder model 200.
Excellent condition. Tapes also
available SIOO.OO call 3 /8-5033 after
5:00 p.m. (A-2t-120-p)
Spacious, well-kept, 10x47 GREAT
LAKES, two bedroom, air, carpet,
6x utility shed. 378-9426.
(A-st-120-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and lipholstery. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-9-c)
STEREO TAPES "greatest hits
tapes of Rascals, Byrds, Creme,
Association etc. in perfect condition
373-2901 anytime. (A-lt-120-p)
BS A 650 cc Superocket just
overhauled excell cond sacrifice 495
call 378-6228. (A-st-120-p)
!
Trailer Bx2B plus 2 Room Cabana
SSOO. Bx3o one bedroom furnished
SIBOO. or rent 378-0226,
376-6217. 67 Rambler 32,000
miles SI,OOO. (A-st-120-p)
Almost 5 yrs old and still going and
growing. The Bent Card Coffee
House features Virgil Sturgill, 73 yrs.
old & still going strong 372-3225.
(A-lt-121-p)
1968 180 Yamaha Electric,
meticulous condition, luggage rack,
parking decal lst $350 takes it,
Call 378-8210. (A-st-120-p)

Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16, 1970

FOR SA LE

%*****%"*****"*****
New stereo equipment all brands
15-50% off. Any record or tape
35% off. No hidden charges.
Everything guaranteed. Call
378-9192. (A-3t-120-p)
Golfers: Married student needs bread.
7 irons, 4 woods, bag, cart, etc. See
to appreciate. $75 or best offer. Call
Ray 372-1827, 284-14, Corry
Village. (A-3t-117-p)
FOR RENT
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
376-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
Room two blocks to campus,
carpeted, aircond., kitchen, priv.
quiet yet liberal. T.V. stay 1 qtr. or
year call 378-0286, 1204 NW 3rd
Ave, S6O mth. (B-4t-119-p)
Sublet 1 br. Apt. 66, Mt. Vernon
furn, A/C Carpet dishwasher laundry
bar-b-q, pool pets $145/mo. lease
expire Sept. 15, renewable 372-5389
anytime. (B-st-119-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included .completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, l-bdrm. r spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Sublet for summer quarter Village 34
2 bdr. furn A/C, 115/mo. Call
373- (B-st-117-p)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Linen and maid service.
A.C. Separate entrances. Off street
parking call 376-5360. ; (B-120-3t-p)
Large room thirtyfive per month
private entrance refrigerator private
bath call 376-3164. (B-2t-120-p)
3 bedroom house avail June & Sept.
2 bedroom duplex avail now or In
future. 1 & 2 bedroom apt. near
campus avail Sept. Call 376-9524 or
372-6333. (B-st-120-p)
Almost 5 yrs old and still going and
growing. The Bent Card Coffee
House features Virgil Sturgill, 73 yrs.
old & still going strong 372-3225.
B-lt-121-p)
WANTED
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
1 FEMALE roomate wanted
immediately LANDMARK
$46.25/mo. Call anytime 376-2184.
(C-st-117-p)

"EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL IS COMING"
HHHHHH a m c A MUST
mmamm "poor HH
QShH trash USHB
|HBVnBHHVTIH|PIVv ? e>s shaves lha milan. I
Tfi*lll pi P 1 8 OOUSLAS FOWLEY d CA#Ey ;
jfl
t'-'Mfi) ? ;.
|MMMiM| lj J / SHOWN AT mummjjb
niiMMii I 3rd
j 2nd HIT BIG DADDY | MONDO EXITO
HkHHHHiiN coLORfIHHHHHiBBIHIHHHHjH

WANTED
3EG Needs roommate to share two
bdr. home in quiet NW Gainesville.
$45 per month plus half utilities.
378-2798 or 372-1481. (C-st-119-p)
Roommate needed imediately, Phone
378-5465 or 373-1375. $37.50 per
month. (C-4t-l 19-p)
Male roomate wanted to share one
bedroom French Quarter apartment
for the summer quarter. The
beginning med. student desires an
intelligent mature individual. Rent is
$125 per quarter. Call 376-0428.
(C-3t-119-p)
One Coed roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment close to campus $37.50
per month. Call 373-2766.
(C-st-117-p)
HEAD to share 3-bedroom house, aid
cond. PRIVATE ROOM. $45/mo.
Summer & Fall term. Call 376-2344.
NO LEASE. (C-3t-120-p)
1 or 2 female roommates for 2 bedrm
Poolside Village Park apt. occupy
immed. Apt can be all yours June,
when Im leaving. 378-3903 evening.
(C-3M19-P)
Female roommate to share luxurious
1-bedroom Landmark poolside apt
for summer quarter. Suana,
dishwasher prefer over 21 after 5 call
378-1921. (C-3t-120-p)
A coke for a book. Bring your used
paperbacks to the union browsing
library on Frl. May 1 only and get a
free coke for each one. (C-Bt-120-c)
HELP WANTED
We are looking for an agressive
couple to move into responsible
management position at new luxury
apt. complex. You must be
personable and have supervisory
skills. Apartment plus salary. Send
resume to P. O. Box 14038.
(E-10t-112-p)
English Masters, Doctoral student
capable of proofreading scholarly
material, high academic average,
work weekends, Call Primack
392-0724, 378-5866. (E-st-117-p)
Need experienced smart gardener,
also girl, general housecleaning. Nice
Lake Estate. Permanent; prevailing
wages; hours arranged. Kingsley Lake
Rte. No. 1, Box 361. Tel
533-2381. Ideal positions.
(E-2t-119-p)
Ladies! Do you know someone who
would like to learn professional
makeup techniques, have fun, and
make money, too? Call Cindy.
392-7673. (E-st-116-p)
OPPORTUNITY, sparetime,
addressing envelopes and circulars!
Make $27.00 per thousand.
Handwritten or typed, in your home.
Send just $2. for INSTRUCTIONS
plus LIST OF FIRMS using
addressers. Satisfaction Guaranteed!
B&V ENTERPRISES, Dept. 4-23, PO
Box 1056, Yucaipa, Calif. 92399.
(E-st-120-p)
Almost 5 yrs old and still going and
growing. The Bent Card Coffee
House features Virgil Sturgill, 73 yrs.
old & still going strong 372-3225.
(E-lt-121-p)

AUTOS
66 VW BUG, good body. Excellent
engine. Tires good. Must sell. SBSO
must sell. Call 372-2225 or
376-0940. (G-st-119-p)
1961 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000 1964
engine and transmission with
overdrive, many spares including
engine and transmission call
3 76-1824 after 5 PM. S4OO.
(G-3t-119-p)
1968 Dodge Charger 383 4BBL auto
trans, power steering, wide tires,
vinyl top, and more. Excellent
condition. $2350. 392-1561 or
376-5125. (G-5M19-P)
1968 VW automatic stick, air-cond.,
radio, heater, 23,000 miles, excel,
condition. Phone 378-8976 after 5
P.M. (G-4t-119-p)
62 Austin Healy 3000, Radio, WW
Overdrive, Completely Rebuilt,
Immaculate Condition, 1235 39th
Ave. after 6:00 M F, all weekend.
(G-st-117-p)
Campus wheels . and then some!
Do you want cheap, dependable
transportation that just cant be
beat? Then come look at my 1967
Fiat .. clean as can be and in
perfect condition. Brand new tires.
ONIy $550. Im telling it like it is.
Call 376-6166 or 378-8211.
(G-st-114-p)
1961 MGA-1600 mark-1, British
racing green, newly rebuilt engine,
asking S6OO, or best offer. Call
376-3872, or see at 108 SW 26 St.
(G-3t-120-p)
67-Cougar x R7 4 speed, 4 br. 390ci
front disc, leather bucket seats,
posi-traction. Call 372-5698 try late,
seldom there. Best offer.
(G-st-120-p)
1970 V.W. BUG 4 months old, 5000
miles SIOO and assume balance Call
376-2804. (G-St-1 17-p)
VW 1969 good condition $1595 will
bargain call after 500 pm 372-7191.
(G-st-120-p)
'67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
1962 Chevy wagon, 327 workhorse.
Runs perfectly, clean inside. New
tires, brakes and rear end. $425. Call
Jay after 5:00 at 376-9583.
(G-120-3t-p)
59 VW excellent shape, new brakes,
33 miles per gal. Call 378-7597 ask
for Stan S2OO or best offer.
(G-st-120-p)
67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
The SPANISH MAIN. Guess what
were doing this week folks? All
posters are 25% off thats nothing,
so are we. While you're here or
there well whatever, take a look
at our new styles by Mary Ann and
Wanda. Like the new channel shirt
and muslin dresses, or even better a
new shipment of Male slacks from $6
to $8 (that arent here yet). But hold
on, we have something to top that:
Indian silk scarfs made by a 200 year
old Maharlshi in our back room (that
will be out to lunch when you come
in). Open Mon. Sat., 10-10, At
1642 W. Unlv. Ave. (J-4t-227-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

personal
ENCOUNTER GROUPS now
forming. Ugrads In 0 or 1 group
before leave name & number
Jeffrey Hutter 392-1575(day)
376-8540(eve). (J-st-117-p)
GOD FEAR YOU Have You
Dared to Consider a Life of Christian
Service? Write to: P. O. Box 65,
Maitland, Fla. 32751. (J-st-119-p)
SANDALS Handcrafted at the
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE a
couple of dollars less for a better
sandal, ready a week from ordering.
108 NW 7th St. 1,000 ft. from the
Circus. PAX. (J-st-119-p)
j
Jm L
Silver Sxprjixgs
I Hocfciws Chair /Twiw\J
013033 |1 Last
Dav
; TELL THEM Y
J WILLIE BOY IS HERE
l tomorrow
; Cable Hogue :
; says... :*< \ I
V Hf
Jl JHB vBHH
; Seek...and ye
I shall find!
ms
! BALLAD Or :
CABLE
i HOGUE
J TECHNICOLOR FROM WARNER BROS. El J
<
J
2a J Awards
iim Winners J
Why is | | 1
everything 1
we're good j
unuMN
ncwram
: BUTCH CASSIDY
: AND THE
: SUNDANCE KID
[OP 1 20th CEMtURY fOX
e COLOR
##4
B m li I Last
| 2 W. University Ave. j Day
l TRUE GRIT &
J STERILE CUCKOO
Starts TOMORROW!
Makes U WOMAN
Look Like MARY
: POPPINS.o.:u
Ei
j
i
i
<
-i
i
Vo^nvaJL^

PERSONAL
Uneasy Rider? Want to be a walking
Woodstock? The Thing for Spring is
BIG ALS Tie-Dying Service.
392-7329 eves. (J-117-2t-p)
Remember! Savant applications are
due April 20th. Send applications to
rm. 303 Union. Hurry & Apply! Any
questions? Call 3 78-9606.
(J-3t-119-p)
CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-l 13-p)
Dear Bob, the occasion is special and
so are you. HAPPY BIRTHDAY. All
my love, Janet. (J-120-lt-p)
t Still no summer plans? How about
six weeks in Europe with a highly
experienced graduate couple? For
booklet call 372-5489 Now!
(J-st-115-p)
FLY ANYWHERE round trip or one
way for up to 3 passen. pilot offering
co-op flying arrangements, call
Z 378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359.
J (J-3t-119-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4. Phone 378-0320.
(J-10t-107-p)

Almost 5 yrs old and still going and
growing. The Bent Card Coffee
House features Virgil Sturgill, 73 yrs.
. old & still going strong 372-3225.
(J-lt-121-p)
;
FIJIS thank you for the wonderful
serenade. Love ya L.M. (J-120-lt-p)

FLASH presents Fantasy Trips Inc.
featuring gum chewing contest
between pres candidates. Univ Aud
i Sat April 18 8-10 pm Pd Pol Adv.
I (J-2t-120-p)

Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous Kree method. Edmund
Dwyer electrologist 372-8039 102
J NW 2nd St. (J-21t-120-p)
J Go with a Winner! Move up to the
_ radio station Programmed with you
J in mind. WUWU Radio .. 1390 at
the top of your dial. PS Come see us
at the mall. (J-2t-120-p)

Gary-with-the-legs, Happy 1/5 of a
century. Come to my house for a
piece of cake. Luv, Karen.
J (J-lt-120-p)
Kittens need home only responsive
and responsible partys need call
376-7502 after five. (J-3t-120-p)

Overland Expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan,
J Khatmnuda. Ivs London late June.
$545 fully inclusive. Encounter
Z Overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6

I THE I
I QUARTERLY I
I IS HERE! I
I
The Quarterly is here and our best wishes and ourl
the waiting is over. greatest efforts. I
... The Quarterly is here
The Quarterly is here with stacked on little card table!
fiction and poetry that ae jn the p| aza 0 f t h e Americas!
alive today, written y gnd Little-Walker Plaza!
people that are alive today. frQm 1Q am t 0 4 p I People you might know. y uesc | a y through Friday ofl
The Quarterly is here with a t! l' s w ! k> I
portfolio of photographic flOrilUl J
art (that really is art). flKltftCtllj I
The Quarterly is here with We only did it for you. [

Thursday, April 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

LOST Sc FOUND
LOST: Pair of PRESCRIPTION
SUNGLASSES about two weeks ago,
mens reward call JIM, 392-8821.
(L-3t-119-p)
Found grey female cat Broward
area Mon nite call Elaine 392-9740.
(L-120-3t-nc)
REWARD ($ if youre mercenary,
moral satisfaction if youre not)
LOST One zippered, leather-bound
notebook, lost Friday, 4/10, W/ a
name tag on the handle giving as
address a P.O. Box at F.P.C.
3 7 2 2 3 3 2.
********** REWARD *********
(L-3t-119-p)
SERVICES
<*
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-l 14-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
RECORDS! Oldies! 20,000 in Stock.
Send 35 cents for 2,000 listing
catalog. Mail orders filled. RECORD
CENTER 1895 W. 25th Cleve., Ohio.
Record Tapes. (M-4t-122-p)
SOCIAL-ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES Nationwide
directories of positions. All relevant
fields. Accurate. Current.
Inexpensive. Information write:
Sociocom, Box 317, Harvard Square
P. 0., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.
(M-4M19-P)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smalles eyeglass office in town.
Drive your own waiting room to
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
Need help PROGRAMMING?
trained, experienced programmer Is
available to help you call 376-6054
between 8 a.m. and 12 noon for
detail. (M-4t-120-p)
Photography Outdoor color portraits
1-Bxlo, 2-5x7, 6 wallets all for only
sl2. 6 proofs, 4 textures to choose
from Satisfaction guaranteed. Call
Ron 376-6042 between 5-7 pm.
(M-2M20-P)

Page 15

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
Fish Almondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
Pp!BJ HELD OVER 11
L r- h gig
JL m YOUNG w
ACADEMY r I
SB AWARD
ffi WINNER JANE
BEST SUPPORTING|| FONDA I
CP actor^^^^#!^^^^
|GP]
pMMinr-ii!7w| Hii B I M
I Trirw 37204 gJ |
I -Gene Shalit, Look
4 Lovingis a wise, human, painful experience- I
an important film of remarkable truth and I
beauty which Ido not hesitate to recommend!' I
Rex Reed, Holiday
Lovingcomes to terms H
with sex, sin and suburbia!' I
New York Column Bp
Loving'achieves high,
V pathOSl NEWSWEEK
******
| Presents
ENDS TODAY "BLOODY MAMA"



Page 16

' Th# Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16.197 p

PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, APRIL 22
fAND
m.
sUb hJB mm Warn jT
Limit On* of your choico with a $5.00 or mom food order excluding cigarottos W Bfe.'
v .A.ow.Kur. U nwr.c. aSTOR WmESmBeP
Buns.. 2 69 s COFFEE 49 c s V v
THRIFTY MAID CUT DUNCAN HINES AU FLAVORS ASTOR
Green Beans .. .6 s l Cake Mixes ... .3 -r $ 100l 00 Fruit Cocktail. .5 $ 1
STOKELY WHOLE KERNEL ARROW WHITE, PINK OR YELLOW THRIFTY MAID
Gold Corn 6 - $ 1 00 Bath Tissue ... .5 s l Fruit Drink.... .4 *l
STOKELY CS ARROW, WHITE OR ASSORTED VAN CAMP
Gold Com 6 S I OO Paper Towels .. 4= $ 1 00 Chili w/ Beans. .4 s l
THRIFTY MAID SLI. OR CRUSHED THRIFTY MAID GREEN THRIFTY MAID
Pineapple .... .4 sa s l Lima Beans.... 5 -? s l Tomato Sauce .. 5 Is l oo
Quantity Rights Rotorvad
WINN-DWIf STORK, INC. COPYRfOHT
GAIN CAijS^ife.
f DETERGENT ZWM jPfAlaiaV WW
Limit One with mere food order,
REGULAR OR SUPER BRYAN DUMPLINS & THRIFTY MAIO CUT SWEET DEEP SOUTH
Kotex ~ 69 e Ham Sauce.. 2 89 e Potatoes... .3 ss 89 e Apple Jelly ... r 29*
DEEP SOUTH SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY PEANUT THRIFTY MAID CALIFORNIA CRACKIN' GOOD CRACKIN'GOOO
Butter 6 39 c Tomatoes ~,3 89 c Cookies 3 89 c Saltines s 19<
niililAf Lettuce ... .2 * 39 c Carrots .. .2 .£ 23 c Cantaloupe 2 so. M OO
DMIIMRAu Potatoes.. .10 88 c Oranges .. .5 49 c Str' berries .3 *1 00
I TOP VALUE STAMPS ; QIIJ W> VALUE STAMPS Bjlf fIfrVAuBTsTAMPS \ TO*VALUE STAMPS 10 [ITITto*VALUE STAMPS
* T M*. -e fvocm.m op i m,tm -u.hi coop * MCmH o J M-ueti (vm> MCMM op J w.te w-uun COUPON MO MCWU OP *rfe .Uxm uSjql nntrJ
|j|g >;By Ic* Dri* k 4oVci * ml ANT *' wo * or LUUIUL*I,I
No > ** >* P*e I a* POMP toc.i WWW. mix 1 At row. ioc an mix At tou. iocm WWW. M . |
iiiii>uiaiauiiiiA..ii l }
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



j I z II
PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, APRIL 22
W-D BRAND LEAN HANOI PAK FRESH QUARTER LOIN SLICED USOA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF FULL CUT
Ground Beef. .3 $ 1 79 Pork Chops .... 79 c Round Steak ... s l l9
808 WHITE (2-LBS THICK SUCEDSI.S7) REGULAR USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEE*BONELESS USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF TOP ROUND OR
Sliced Bacon... .79 c Rump Roast... $ 1 29 Sirloin Steak... *1 29
COPELAND All MEAT USOA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF EYE OF BONELESS USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF PORTERHOUSE OR
Franks 49' Round Roast... s l 3 T-Bone Steak *1 3
TARNOW SMOKED USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF TENDER USDA GRADE "A" QUICK FROZEN W-D
Sausage 99 c Cube Steak *1 Baking Hens ... 49'
.Mm ante, w-dbrand u.s. choici hiw York strip IM3O
| a gnHMWELEBOTTOMMUNMIip I PiiTiHli c ? w 3ct T? r fKmT'* *" 17' I
JPI d|Hk I d Sll>9ly WfOPP j d P^^* d LONGHORN ft
lpJ> v R ifck dwwe .TH 45 c KseT A 69 c |
SAVE He... MORTON APPLE, PEACH, COCONUT OR CHERRY SAVE 25c . MORTON SPAGHETTI W/MEAT H|. Bjtifc gRR 9^.
Fruit Pies. .3 89' Macaroni. .5 *1 T WM'|l
SAVE 30c... MORTON IN A BASKET SAVE 17c... MORTON A_ ..
Chicken .... s. *1 Pie Shells. .3 =*l fM H
Honey Buns 4- V Fish Rllets.. 59 ri. 1 / W
BSSETT. n 39' Dinners : 65' MED. EGGS A oz f W
cikic cab cc 11 r\c BASKET PARK AY DIET
RED OR GOLDEN DELICI OUS WASH. STATE EXTRA FANCY FINE FOR SALADS 16o. $* <>o A O LB QO* MORTON MEAT 4
Apples . .11 99* Tomatoes ..4~ $ 1 Margarine .2 ~89
K n c .. .12 49* Cream Pies 3. 89* Margarine ,2 4 89* rHi $ V
*** ** V I CTT^ 111 'ew/TL* '' I
E X i IHk/fc. i riTif E : BfITTIT roi>vau"stamw KTjT roi vaLis*stam i TOP VALUE STAMPS ;
T .OP.Y.ALUE STAMPS ; Mil / TOPVALUE STAMPS ; |Uj ; Epffdf HW SuT CHICKEN
Fish A*Chips ; Cak RoH WSii&Sr Ground Beef HS&B m p> m ***
-il*,:.Mn- 1 TUW(| v "*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. ""*
HIW AY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ... t*- ST ..

Thuraday, April 11/1970, The Florida AMgator,

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

POWER IN THE BLOOD
They Shoot Horses: It Moves

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
It takes quite a bit of nerve to
use a marathon dance as a World
metaphor. And it takes real skill
to come close to pulling it off.
They Shoot Horses, Dont
They?, now showing at The
Plaza Theater, has that metaphor
at its base and the people who
made the picture have the skill
to make the metaphor work.
The result is a kick-in-the-head
movie.
THE STORY is about a group
of people most of them young
who are in a marathon dance
contest, competing for SISOO in
Exhibit Os
20 Portraits
At Gallery
Twenty portraits by American
Artists from the IBM Collection
will be on exhibit at the
Teaching Gallery in the Fine
Arts building now through May
1.
The portraits date from the
late 18th to mid-20th centuries
and include work by Benjamin
West, James Whistler and Gilbert
Stuart.
ALTHOUGH PORTRAI PORTRAITURE
TURE PORTRAITURE by contemporary artists
is relatively rare, it was the
mainstay of American painting
from the middle of the 17th
century until almost two
hundred years later.
The earliest pictures by
American painters were usually
anonymous likenesses of
respected individuals done in the
traditional American realism.
Professional European artists
came to the colonies with their
own skills and modified the style
of American portraiture.
The invention of photography
in the 1830 s marked the end to
an era of American printing.
Since then, photographs have
satisfied most needs for
portraits, except among the rich,
fashionable and famous.
The exhibit can be seen
weekdays from 9 am. 12
noon and from 1:30 5 pm.

Seminole 4
t_ Hall of Fame j
k and 7
f- Whos Who A
k certificates have arrived j
fThey may be picked up in the
I Seminole Office or the
I Offico

jSK |j| |j| || |J H fj J§gjJ w s|

prize money that will go to the
couple who dances the longest.
The marathon dance contest
was a very real part of The
Twenties. These things used to
last even a month or so. The
dancers would go for a couple of
hours and then rest for a time
and go back dancing again.
There are few things that
seem more ridiculous than
dancing your heart out for 30
days. There is very little
accomplished. Only one couple
can win.
Yet this ridiculous thing is
presented to us as representing
the lives we lead. Dancing in a
contest for a prize becomes
living. And, as unbelievable as it
sounds, that representations
real and believable.
GIG YOUNG plays the
barker who keeps the horrible
show rolling. The marathon is
conducted in a huge hall in front
of an audience that changes in
shape and size as the dancing
goes on and on. Young, as I
suppose his Oscar indicates, is
tremendous. He has an
incredible power and glory and
push. He is the God of the dance
and hes believable in that
position.
Jane Fonda plays a bitter
young girl who comes to dance,
believing in winning. Though she
is hard and cold in her actions
and words, she has a kind of
helping and uplifting tenderness
that comes to the surface later in
the picture. Miss Fonda is good,
too. One critic has said that this
picture is the start of her acting
career.
Miss Fondas partner for most
of the contest is a soft young
Western man played by Michael
Sarrazin. Sarrazin is very real.
His soft confusion and
introversion contrast beautifully
with Miss Fondas role.
THE REST of the people
dancing (suffering is the word)
include a pregnant girl and her
husband, an aging sailor (played
by Red Buttons), and a young
actress who has beauty but not
endurance. Endurance, of
course, becomes everything.
At one point Gig Young tells
of his childhood as a part of his
faith-healing fathers sideshow
act. He was the one his father

healed. He says of it, They
didnt believe in him, the healer.
The believed in me.
Theres always an audience
there to watch these people
suffering, dancing. They are they
because they need to believe in
the healed, the perservering,
those who suffer and do not fall.
One cannot help but love the
dancers, regardless of their
faults, because of their one
incredible strength the ability
to keep on dancing.
I wont try to say how the
picture ends or why it ends that
way. The ending is powerful and
justifiable, I think. It is a thing
that should be discovered in the
theater and not here. Because of
the ending, it is extremely
important to see the film from

SEE THE
ON
Outside game room in I
Reitz Union, Through April 17 JV
Iftan education. m /

I This is
I where
I its at.

Page 18

its beginning minutes.
THE PICTURE takes a lot of
chances in a lot of areas.
Photographically, it is tough and
imaginative and striking. The
script is unbelievably tight and
controlled and beautiful. The

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
RJJDW^ k
I STARKE. FLORIDA hill
1 ^lP
SOONER OR LATER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER \ST
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM

RO-MO CAMERA SHOP I
CLICK CAMERA
SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS // -j
MIKE'S BOOKSTORE HOTUM
UNION GUEST DESK /
FLORIDA BOOKSTORE llj I
DESIGN SHOP I
PLAZA OF THE AMERICAS

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

acting is all it needs to be.
All those things come
together in the picture the way
bones and flesh and organs and
skin do in a body. Endurance
puts blood in the body. The
body moves extemely well.



The
Florida
Alligator

CHALLENGE SPURRIER & CO.
Dunn Coaches Frat-Stars

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
Coach Jimmy Dunn of the
football Gators has graciously
offered some time to coach the
fraternity All-Stars in the
upcoming Varsity All-Star

Intramurals
1 By Steve Rohan =
BLUE LEAGUE: Chi Phi reinforced its position in the Blue League
by shooting a 75 on the front nine in the third round of the Blue Golf
Tournament. Bruce Weeks set the pace with a 37. The fine round
moved the Chis into second place in the tournament behind KA.
The KAs maintained its big 14 stroke lead with a 75 also. Johnny
Fox hit a one-under-par 35 to lead the way.
Theta Chi fell to third place in the tournament, and DU is way
down in fifth place.
ORANGE LEAGUE: Tau Epsilon Phi moved into first place in the
Orange League on the strength of a tennis victory over Pi Lambda Phi.
Number one singles player Jim Stark and the doubles team of Lee
Borden and Rodney Margol continue to set the pace for the defending
champions.
Pikes moved to within 20 points of a tie for the lead by narrowly
defeating the SPEs 3-2. The Pikes are favored to win the tennis
championship and move into a tie for first place.
The TEPs hold on first place will be short-lived as the Betas are
expected to move back onto first place after golf. The Sigma Chis, the
likely winners of golf will also move into very close contention
LAW LEAGUE: Tempkins Torts moved into first place in
bracket one softball action on the strength of a 10-2 lacing of the
DWI.
Center-fielder Bob Bolt led the way with a double and a triple while
Happy Harry Tempkins pitched nearly flawless ball. The double play
combination of Tempkins to Shifty Amie Shevin to Towering Jeff
Tobin came up with two double plays.
The Shags are right behind Tempkins Torts and sport an
outstanding team. Heading the lineup for the Shags is former Gator
end Gene Peek, former Gator end Richard Trapp, former Gator hurler
David Kahn, and Sanfrancisco 49er center Forrest Blue. The Shags
have banged out 23 runs in two games.
In ttie lower bracket the Supersticks led by Roger Bolling, Stan
Morris and Rick Levinson have had little trouble winning both their
opening games. The Sticks will fact super opposition from the Golden
Gloves led by Mike Roily son.
ENGINEERING LEAGUE: In Engineering AIEE has had little
trouble moving to the front of the league with three victories. AICHE
and AGENG are in second place with two wins and one loss each.
FOOTBALL
Spring Practice
GOLF
Houston All-American in Houston, Texas
Foster Fights

LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Unbeaten heavyweight
contender Mac Foster of Fresno,
Calif., and Jerry Quarry of Los
Angeles will meet in a 10-round
fight at the coliseum June 12.
Foster scored his 24th win
and 24th knockout last week by
stopping Jack OHalloran of
Boston in the first round.
Quarry, 24, has a 3544 record
with 21 knockouts. Foster is a
27-year old Vietnam war
veteran.
Iroawood
Golf Club
STUDENT MIMIIRSHf
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information tall
p 376-0090
& teovwcop
coir civ*
N i 19lfc AVIWiH

GATOR SPORTS

football game.
Fraternity All-Stars contacted
are excited about the
opportunity to play against such
greats as Steve Spurrier, Richard
Trapp, and Steve Tannen.
THE ALL-STARS are
confident they can win this year

Attend a lecture and Demonstration class on . m
I E.S.P. (
C AND 1
I 'MIND CONTROL |
M Do you know...
V The difference between a sensitive, a seerer, a
clairvoyant? How brain waves relate to ... E.S.P.,
health, business, success, intuition, education, art and
K creativity? M
The answers to these and many other questions will m
m be presented in an interesting, entertaining discussion of m
the latest scientific findings in E.S.P. and mind research. K
V Bring a friend!
C Holiday Inn Admission SI.OO 1
M April 19 2 & 7:30 pm
m April 20 7:30 pm
Presented by Southwest Motivation Center M

but so were the TEPs (fraternity
Orange League Champs) last year
when the Gators drubbed them
33-14.
Over 3,000 fans turned out
last year to see Spurrier fire
bullet passes all over the field.
But the score wasnt really
indicative of the way the game
was played. The score probably
would have been closer if it
hadnt been for Varsity rusher
Boyd Welch who completely
flustered the TEP quarterbacks.
But the TEPs were able to move
on the Gators and the fraternity
men this year are expected to do
the same. The challengers this
year are made up of the
fraternity All-Campus
footballers.
The game is played flag style
under intramural rules. Six men
go out for passes and one man
throws. On defense, six men
defend against the pass and one
man rushes the passer. Each man
has three flags around his waist
and the game is supposedly
non-contact. When old football
players and experienced
fraternity men play the game
however, one wonders how
non-contact the game really is.
FOR INSTANCE last year in
the late stages of the game
Spurrier intercepted a TEP pass.
When he began to run the ball
back, the varsity players forgot
themselves and started to block,
or rather pulverize, every TEP in
their path.
Last year there was some
problem with the officiating as
the varsity was excused from
some minor violations but this is
expected to be remedied this
year.
The game has been officially
scheduled for May 7, a Thursday
night. Admission will be 50
cents and all proceeds will go to
the Coliseum Fund.
Foreman Fights
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (UPI)
Olympic heavyweight
champion George Foreman,
unbeaten as a professional,
signed yesterday to fight Scrap
Iron Johnson at the Forum
May 16,
It will be the First California
appearance for Foreman, who
has won 18 straight as a pro.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Thursday, April 16,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

I !OX*X<;W.M.W.W.TOOA<AW:*W.W. .WAV. , AWAVAW.W!.*.,
j FSU Ranked Second j
:: Florida State, winner of all but two of its first 28 games,
moved into the runnerup spot behind Southern California in the
* college baseball pdl released Wednesday by the newspaper,
:j Collegiate Baseball. >
j; Four other Florida teams, Jacksonville, Miami, Florida
Southern and Stetson also earned spots in the newspapers |
$ weekly rating. Jacksonvilles Dolphins were 11th and Miamis
Hurricanes were 13th in the major college poll. Florida £
£ Southern was fourth and Statsons Hatters were 10th in the $
$ small college polls. x
S NATIONALLY the Southern California Trojans, 28-7, jj:
§ retained their top ranking in all three polls released this season.
The Seminoles moved into the second spot this week from §
v fourth place. Texas, 214 was third and Stanford, 22-5-1, were $
placed fourth. |
Rounding out the top 10 were Southern Illinois, Washington $
J State, Clemson, Arizona, Mississippi State and Texas A &M. £
:j: IN THE SECOND 10, in order, were Jacksonville, Arizona
State, Miami, Tulane, Mississippi, Minnesota, Michigan State, :
Tulsa, Pan-Am, and Western Michigan.
In the small college division, Chapman College of California i|:
:j: remained in the top slot, followed for the second time by Grand
Canyon College of Arizona. Illionis State was third and Florida S
:j Southern, fourth.
j; Also in the top 10, in order, were Sam Houston, Central x
* Michigan, Jackson State, San Fernando Valley State, La Verne $
and Stetson. ;5
- ~ .... Mm Sf.'
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Paid Political Announcement
FOCUS ON
HKATNI SPELLMAN
Parking and Traffic Commission
Secretary of Student Affairs
f Rawlings Hall Council Representative
Rawlings Outstanding Service Award
Ist Vice President of Women's Commission (AWS)
i Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities
Honor Court Arts and Sciences
Student Senate Arts and Sciences
PAID FOR BY FOCUS PARTY S
mtmmmmmmmm Paid Political Announcement mmmmmmmmmm

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 16,1970

UN Says: Isolate South Africa

UNITED NATIONS (UPI)
American tennis ace Arthur
Ashes proposal that South
Africa suffer complete athletic
isolation, has been endorsed by
the General Assemblys Special
Committee on Aparthied.
The committee, in a
communique, calls for strict
implementation of a General
Assembly resolution passed in
December 1968 requesting all
states and organizations to
suspend sporting exchanges with
the racist regime and with
organizations or institutions in
South Africa which practise
apartheid.
THE COMMITTEE
particularly criticized Britain
and New Zealand because in
spite of that resolution sports
teams from South Africa have
still been able to visit those
countries.

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT. GB
Pittsburgh 4 2 .677
St. Louis 4 2 .667
New York 3 3 .500 1
Chicago 3 3 .500 1
Philadelphia 3 4 .429 IVi
Montreal 1 5 .167 3
WEST W L PCT. GB
Cincinnati 7 3 .700
San FranciscoS 4 .556 IVi
Atlanta 4 4 .500 2
San Diego 4 4 .500 2
Houston 3 5 .375 3
Los Angeles 3 5 .375 3
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
Chicago 5 Philadelphia 1
Los Angeles at Cincinnati, Night
Montreal at St. Louis, Night
San Diego at Atlanta, Night
San Francisco at Houston, Night
(Only Games Scheduled)
THURSDAYS GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York
Philadelphia at Chicago
San Diego at Atlanta
Los Angeles at Cincinnati
San Francisco at Houston
(Only Games Scheduled
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT. GB
Baltimore 5 1 .833
Detroit 4 3 .571 IVi
Boston 4 3 .571 IVi
Washington 3 3 .500 2
New York 2 5 .286 3Vi
Cleveland 2 5 .286 3Vi
WEST
Minnesota 3 0 1.000
California 5 1 .833 Vi
Oakland 3 3 .500 IVi
Milwaukee 3 5 .375 2Vi
Kansas City 2 4 .333 2Vi
Chicago 2 5 .286 3
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
Boston 6 New York 2
Chicago at Oakland, Night
Minnesota at California, night
Washington at Baltimore, ppd.-rain
THURSDAYS GAMES
Chicago at Oakland
Minnesota at California
Kansas City at Milwaukee
Cleveland at Detroit
New York at Boston
Washington at Baltimore
r Student Special
Any car or color!
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665 |

FROM OLYMPICS, ALL SPORTS

Ashe said, specifically, the
International Lawn Tennis
Federation (ILTF) at its meeting
in the near future, should expel
South Africas Lawn Tennis
Union which he described as
representing only the white
minority from its
membership.
But Ashe also said the only
course left is complete isolation
(of South Africa) politically,
athletically, diplomatically.
THE APARTHEID
Committee endorsed Ashes
proposal on the ILTF action. It
said it strongly feels that the
International Lawn Tennis
Federation should sever all ties
with the South African Lawn
Tennis Union, as long as South
Africa refuses to agree to
multiracial sport in the country
and to allow white and
non-white South African

I /Kopy a
if 1 HEan
Hrnilii M m
i^i
. '&&s&"''''> v -'v -v'v

sportsmen to compete against
each other in local South
African games.
The committee also urged
that at its next meeting in
Amsterdam in May the
International Olympic
Committee should decide not
only to exclude South Africa
from the next Olympic Games at
Munich (in 1972) but also to
expel it from the Olympic
movement.
SOUTH AFRICA has already
been kicked out of the previous
Olympic Games in Mexico and
last month the Davis Cup
International Committee
meeting in London voted to
exclude South African tennis
players from the cup
competition.
Ashe urged also that golfing
tournaments bar South African
golfer Gary Player from

participating on grounds he had
never categorically denounced
his countrys apartheid policies.
He said Player and other
white South African sportsmen
participating in international
events should be asked how they
feel about apartheid. He
denounced the attitude of the
International Lawn Tennis
Federation as anachronistic in
trying to keep politics out of
sports. He said it was silly in
our day and age.
Pool Hours
Pool hours have been changed
as follows: Monday through
Friday 3:30-7 pm.; Saturday
and Sunday 12 5 p.m.
All swimmers and bathers are
reminded that both ID cards
must be presented in order to
obtain admission into the
universitys swimming area.

Hawks Down/
Hazzard Out
ATLANTA (UPI) The
Atlanta Hawks, down 2-0 in
their National Basketball
Association playoff with Los
Angeles, lost Walt Hazzard,
their top playmaking guard,
for the remainder of the
playoffs Wednesday with a
fractured left wrist.
Hazzard hurt his wrist
when he fell during a
scramble under the basket
Tuesday night. He went out
of the game briefly but when
he returned he found he
could not dribble with his left
hand. An X-ray examination
early Wednesday disclosed
the fracture.
Its a terrible blow,
especially at the stage where
we have to be at our best to
win, coach Richie Guerin
said.