Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 62, No. 11X

$5 TICKET PROPOSED, TOO

Athletic Association
Agrees To Inspection

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Athletic Association officials
Monday agreed to let Student
Government representatives
inspect their bodes and consider
an SG proposal for a $5 season
ticket in lieu of student ticket
prices.
Lee Green, SG secretary of
athletics and other SG members
will work out a proposal for a $5
student season ticket with
random seating and provisions
for bloc seating to be presented
at the April 23 meeting of the
Athletic Association.
Student Body President
Walter Morgan proposed that
Steve Gertzman, ILW, Larry
Levine, ILW and John
Lacouture, 7BA be allowed to
inspect the records. Athletic
Association officials agreed,
after lengthy discussion, but
whether the inspection would
actually be made was not
decided.
I dont see any reason why
not if this can be done without
disturbing the Athletic
Associations operations,
Mandell Glicksburg of the
Athletic Association said.
Pledged by UF President

Bailey Campaign Appeals
To Student Pocketbook

By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Wrtor
I think 111 be able to provide
sensible financial coordination/'
Jimmey Bailey, Student
Government SG presidential
candidate said. I think this is
most important."
The most sensitive spot for
each student is his pocketbook,"
he continued.
BAILEY, an independent
candidate for the top SG spot,
said, The economic aspects of
every action of Student
Government" have the most
effect on the student and
deserve first attention.
If they (the UF
administrators) insist on
charging students to get into
football games, we should charge
the alumni to get into Gator
Growl," he said.
We should also charge the
alumni more for better seats at
football games," he added.
AN ANNOUNCED
candidate for the State House of
Representatives from District 7,
Bailey said the would in no way
interfere with discharge of his

University of Florida, Gainesville,

Stephen C. OConnell to open
their books in the Monday
meeting, the Athletic
Association provided Student
Government representatives a
summary of income and
expenditures, football
attendance, Athletic Association
contributions to the students
and university and athletic fees
of other Florida institutions.
William Elmore, UF vice
president for administrative
business affairs, emphasized that
students paid for only 10-12 per
cent of the total athletic budget,
but some SG representatives felt
the student share was too high.
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| knocked out half the Apollo |
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£ miles from earth Monday
night, ruling out a Moon
landing and endangering the §:
lives of the astronauts.
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BAILEY
... courses against communism
duties as student body president.
He said the legislative session
doesnt begin until April 1971,
and his term of office as
president would be nearly over
by then.
We need courses to better
understand our processes of
government, and to understand

Tuesday, April 14, 1970

We would like to see the
thrust go toward the people who
have money who haw not been
tapped. Let them pay for better
seats or something, Greg Jones,
4LW, president of the Florida
Blue Key committee on the
student ticket prices, said.
Several representatives
questioned the value of the
spring sports program, suggesting
this program be cut.
Students who pay to go to
football games will be paying so
that other students who dont
pay can go to Spring Sports
events, said Ralph Galtfelter,
7AS.

SMC Publicizes Plans
For Antiwar Rallies

/Speakers for the Spring
Offensive of the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)
were lined up Sunday night and
parade routes for both the
Gainesville march, April 15, and
the St. Petersburg march, April
18, were announced.
The Gainesville march will

the evils of communism, he
said.
BAILEY SAID he would also
like to see some reform in the
campus traffic court and in the
parking situation and shuttle
buses.
His position in Student
Government will not be
hindered by his work with the
Gainesville Independent, a local
publication, he said.
Speaking again of finances, he
said, A good way to build up
the Gator Loan Fund would be
for Student Government to
operate the vending machines
around campus. They don't
work half the time anyway.
WHEN ASKED if he had any
comments about the election in
general, Bailey charged, Do It
and Focus Parties are both
extensions of the First Party
tactics of Charles Shepherd.
He called Do It Party the
Do-Nothing Party and used
similar terms for other parties
and candidates for the top SG
spot.
Bailey said he has never run
for student body president
before.

jjggsS
i * >& . j £ffH>wi~ %<, $Ze VyaftM
a WfLmJr £
CARNIGRAS OPENS
UF's annual carnival opened Monday on the ROTC field across
from the stadium. The ferris wheel, symbol of circuses and carnivals,
is seen here being erected. Times for Camigras are today through
Thursday, 5 p. m. to midnight, 5 p. m. to 2 a. m. Friday, and 11 a. m.
Saturday to 2 a. m. Sunday.

begin with a rally in the Plaza of
the Americas at noon. The
parade will start at 2 p.m. from
the plaza to University Avenue
and go to the Federal Building.
SPEAKERS AT the rally
include Dr. Irving J. Goffman,
chairman of the UF Economics
Department; Robert B. Canney,
education instructor, Mitchell
Dasher Jr., Black Student Union;
and others from the SMC
Womens Caucus, Young
Socialist Alliance and other
anti-war organizations in the
area.
The marches being staged
to protest the war in Vietnam
and the theme, set in Cleveland
last February is Bring All the
Gls Home Now.
SMC members will be carrying
a white cross for each Alachua
County veteran killed in action,
according to Brook Rood,
steering committee member.
This number is now 44. The
remainder of the members will
be carrying American flags,

Talks Air Views
By LES GARDIEFF
And GINA SC HR AM
Alligator Staff Writers
Student leaders criticized and administration representatives
defended Sundays seven-hour conference between student and
administrative leaders Monday.
Student body presidential candidates vied with each exprening
their dissatisfaction with results of the meeting.
ALAN HOWES, Do It Party candidate, said he was not surprised.**
I went in expecting just what I found. Nothing happened,** he
said.
Steve Uhlfelder of Focus Party commented As a result of
Sundays conference we have a disgruntled and disenchanted student
body.
JIMMY BAILEY, independent, felt essentially the meeting was
beneficial to all present. There were some alternatives and solutions
suggested. Things were brought out into the open and discussed.
(SEE TEADERS' PAGE 2)

banners and placards.
ALL PEOPLE in Gainesville
and the campus community are
urged to join in the march for
peace.
At the march in St.
Petersburg, the speakers will
include Gen. Hugh Hester,
U.S.A. (Ret.); Joe Cole, member
of the Ft. Jackson Eight; A1
Featherstone, brother of Ralph
Featherstone, assistant to H.
Rap Brown, killed by an
explosion in Maryland; Andy
Kramer and Steve Uhlfelder,
both candidates for president of
the UF student body; and other
speakers from BSU, SMC and
YSA.
The parade route is from
Campbell Park to the Federal
Building, where the rally will be
held.
Transportation is being
arranged daily at SMCs table in
front of the graduate library,
and the caravan will leave from
that parking lot Saturday
morning at 8 a.m.



Page 2

:, The
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
It was a rally with only a little hassle.
Mostly it was a getting together not just the Student
Freedomers but some Focus people too and some freaks
and some straights and the Alligator people and the plain
clothesmen and the maintenance men and the hard and
heavy sun and the cool, green shade from the trees.
IT WAS Friday afternoon at the plaza and the Student
Freedom Party staged a rally for the people on subjects
ranging from drugs to the loyalty oath to black rights to
the new ticket policy.
But they are not running from but to. Student
Freedom Party is a mixture of straights and freaks,
bare-chested men and skinny wheeled bicycles.
Student Freedom Party, presidential candidate Andy
Kramer said, represents the students on this university
campus. We make up what the. people want and are. Were
not much of anything but people getting together to do
people things.
THERE WAS a rumor among some Student
Government people that 50 policemen would be in
attendance actually it was only a couple of cars full of
plainclothesmen cleverly disguised in crew cuts, half-inch
ties and black suits.

Health Center Expansion
Hinges On Bond Sale

Expansion of J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, including
provisions for the states first
school of dentistry, hinges on

Leaders React
gTOM PAGE ONE Jj
Student Freedom candidate Andy Kramer said, The meeting was
beautiful but the average student is not being represented.
The main complaints centered around doubts that action would
follow the discussion.
RAY GRAVES walked out not considering any alternative routes
toward replacing the student activity fee, Howes said.
Howes further said the meeting was a crisis retreat aimed at
stemming student unrest.
Uhlfelder said the administration mistakenly looked to certain
groups instead of attempting to gather all student views.
ITS TIME for students to take up these issues and start working
on other views besides Tigerts, he said.
The Athletic Department is in financial trouble. Well, the students
are too. They (the Athletic Department) want to renovate Yon Hall,
they buy new books for athletes, keep giving scholarships, even give
players extra tickets to the games so they can make some more
money. The primary interest of UF should be academic, not athletic,
Uhlfelder said.
Bailey said he has a workable, sound business proposal that could
easily support the entire athletic program within a single season. It
would liquidate the debts of the department, and there would be no
charge for student or date tickets.
I FEEL the administration acted hastily on the anti-noise factor.
A good look at class schedules, hospitals, libraries and other areas
would have to be taken and a workable time and place arranged for
events. We are here to get an education not listen to music, Bailey
said.
Andy Kramer suggested the administration follow up in terms of
ticket price and tuition increase without another tax on the students.
The students arent being considered. The university gets so hung
up in the politics of the situation they dont serve the students, he
said.
DEAN HARRY SISLER was puzzled at the student reaction.
Os course we didnt solve anything. What would you expect to
come out of a meeting called to discuss problems? Sisler asked.
I felt the meeting was very helpful. I dont see how anyone leaving
die meeting could say we didn't accomplish anything.
THE PURPOSE was to understand the problems so people with
responsibility would be more inclined to deal with them. Thats what
we did, he said.
The meeting was recessed Sunday with plans to reconvene April 26.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Straiahts, Freaks Share Rally

the sale of $12.5 million in
bonds.
Vi ce President of
Administrative Affairs William

KRAMER, UHFELDER SPEAK

El
II
Even with the police and the hassle with the
maintenance men who wanted to take the platform away
someone had called and cancelled the rally but forgot
to tell the rally organizers it all came out all right.
Kramer gave a little party philosophy to the crowd
numbering about 200.
HE EMPHASIZED the gist of his partys feeling the
students were getting a bad deal in a no-deal attitude
with the administration because students werent taken
into account.
He said personal contact was what counts and that was
how his party plans to run the campaign through

Elmore said, the board is only
committed with the successful
sale of bonds.
THE BOARD of Regents
deadline on bond bids is Sept.
15.
The problem the regents face
is a possible lack of legislative
appropriations if the state
doesnt sell the bonds. If the
states capital outlay isnt ready
by project bid time the matching
federal funds, a total of $19.7
million, will not be released for
the expansion.
The original expansion cost
was estimated in 1966 at $333
million.
REGENT Fred Parker said
present estimates of
approximately $38.3 million
have been presented to him.
Parker added that efforts to
cut back on the project would
result in at least $36.6 million
expansion cost, according to
architects estimates.
Parker said lack of legislative
support since 1967 resulted in a
lack of funds 512.5 million
to meet rising construction costs
and the states share of an
estimated $33.3 million project
cost.
IN THE MEANTIME, the
regents have transferred a federal
$3.3-million grant for Health
Center equipment to the
construction cost.
The transfer is legal provided
the board and the legislature
replace the federal funds in two
or three years, when the
equipment will be needed.

i GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
I Fried thicken {
ItrrlO ~ MO I
1 3 Pc. Chicken
K Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1 .25 M
|_Rl sla f bring coupon I

personal contact with the students.
Kramer invited Focus presidential candidate Steve
Uhlfelder to speak to students on legal procedures to take
if they are caught with drugs.
UHLFELDER advised the students to play it safe.
He said the channels through the state via the university
were the only way to modernize the present laws
controling drugs and mentioned the widespread concern
for students who get into drug troubles with the police.
During the speeches, bicycles and dogs ran and chased
each other through the crowd. Independent groups passed
out literature: Getting Busted Is A Bummer and
March Against The War April 15. Petitions were passed
for the Ban On Banning The Bands Movement.
FOR OUR next number, sang out the man behind
the microphone, and new people came on. It didnt
matter if they were scheduled or not there were holes in
the program everyone was invited up to the podium to
say what he wanted to say.
This is to show you our basic idea is freedom -of
speech or academics, Kramer said.
Larry Woldenberg, a history major, gave a little of the
history of the loyalty oath.
Student Freedoms candidate for student body
treasurer, Bob Wise, said UF has a racist problem. It has
only three black professors, he said.

Arrests Expected
In Drug Drive
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
A good number of new arrests are expected in a joint
city-county-UF drive on drug abuse, Assistant State Attorney
Mack Futch said Sunday.
George A. Smith, who gave his occupation as a UF student,
and Richard J. Perlmutter, a lab assistant at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, were among four arrested last week for
possession of marijuana, according to police records.
SMITH and Perlmutter were arrested in connection with two
raids south of Gainesville in which over 750 marijuana plants
were confiscated.
Drug abuse is a problem on the UF campus and has increased
sharply in Alachua county in the past year, Futch said.
However, the full extent of die problem is not clear.
It depends on who you talk to. Some say its (Gaineswe) the
(drug) capital of the south, and some say the problem is
insignificant, Futch said.
BOTH STUDENTS and non-students have been involved in
drug traffic from a variety of sources, according to Futch.
I think the amount (of marijuana) thats grown in the
county would astound all of us. But it also comes in from
outside, Futch said.
Refusing to go into detail on the joint efforts of UF, city
police and county sheriffs deputies, Futch simply said there
would be highly effective law enforcements
Wherever we find it (drug abuse), we are going to make
arrests and get it stopped as soon as possible, Futch said.
The joint effort was announced April 4 by city, county and
UF officals. Speaking for the three, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said the drive would require fair and effective law
enforcement, treatment and counseling, and a change in the
public attitude on drug abuse.
SDX Officers Elected

Sigma Delta Chi, the
professional journalistic society,
elected new officers Sunday
night.
John Batman, a junior in
journalism, was elected
president.

Jeff Brein, 3JM, Alligator
editorial assistant, was re-elected
vice president.
Other officers elected were
Rick Roskowe, 3JM, treasurer;
Terry Biehl, 4JM, secretary, and
Dee Dee Horn, 3JM, historian.



AFTER INTERVENTION

Goverment Accuses
Kirk Os Disobedience

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Justice Department today
accused Florida Gov. Claude
Kirk of deliberately disobeying a
federal court order for
desegregation of Manatee
County schools.
In a memorandum filed with
the Supreme Court, the
government said, any
confrontation between the
governor and the United States
would be entirely of his own
making.
SOLICITOR General Erwin
N. Griswold asked the Supreme
Court to deny a motion by Kirk
on Friday that the Manatee case
be transferred directly to it.
Contending that only the
Supreme Court could solve the
federal-state dispute, Kirk had
refused until Sunday to allow
implementation of a federal
district court order to
desegregate Manatee schools.
The Justice Department told
the Supreme Court: It is
inadmissible that any officer
high or low should assume the
stance that he will not obey the
order of any court but this
court.
It contended Kirk was in a

Students Push Young Vote

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Concern about lowering the voting age to 18
prompted several UF students to travel to
Tallahassee for the Florida House of Representatives
ballot on the issue.
Student Senate President Jack Vaughn presented
copies of letters from students, and the Alligator
editorial concerning the matter, to members of the
house.
THE HOUSE was to vote Thursday on whether
to lower the voting age. The senate had already
voted for the change.
However, the bill was amended by the house to
remove all disabilities of non-age from persons in
the 18-to-21 age bracket. These include not being
able to buy alcoholic beverages and marry without
parental consent.
A joint committee will now examine both bills
and present a recommendation to the senate and
house. The recommendation must then be passed by
both bodies to appear on the ballot in November.

need a better tomorrow.
Help u in* lifting
man... even high enough
to touch God.
The Trinitarians
Garrison, Maryland 21055
. I tought my Soul,
but my soul couldn't
I sought my Cod
*, but my Cod eluded me.
1 sought my Brother
/ found ALL THREE.

poor posture to invoke this
courts discretion.
THE GOVERNOR is
expressly bound by oath,
required by the supremacy
clause, to obey the mandates of
the Constitution as declared by
the courts of the nation,
Griswolds memo said.
Yet, he has deliberately
disobeyed the orders of the
district court, after both the
Court of Appeals and this court

Kirk Files Briefs
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Florida Gov. Qaude Kirk asked to
intervene in an appeal of the Manatee County school case today so he
could argue that a law which cannot be enforced without knowing the
race of the pupil is unconstitutional.
The law must be color-blind, Kirk said in two friend of the
court briefs he carried with him to New Orleans to file with the U. S.
Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in an attempt to rule out forced busing
in desegregating Manatee schools.
Texts of the briefs were released in Tallahassee before the governor
reached the New Orleans courthouse.
One of his briefs cited legal precedents and problems involved in
massive transfers of students and teachers in the final five weeks of
the school term.
His supplemental brief narrowed the issue down to
constitutionality of forced busing to achieve racial balance.
Forced busing on the basis of race violates the due process and
equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment to the United States
Constitution, Kirk said. The law must be colorblind.

MdduuA
FROSTINGS & PERMANENTS
THROUGH APRIL
>
"Madeleine's makes the new look, the you look/'
1250 W UNIVERSITY AVE 378-6811
RAMADA INN ARCADE

IF EITHER body does not pass the
recommendation, any farther action would require
introduction of a new bill.
Vaughn said some legislators were afraid the
people of the state would not support the lowering
of the age requirements on all the rights of adults,
although they might be in favor of lowering just the
voting age.
My concern is with the difference in the two
bills, he said. I think it might be better if just the
voting age question were going to be on the ballot.
But either way Id like to see the people have a
chance to vote on it in November.
JIM GUNDRY, a University College (UC)
senator, said he thought the large number of people
in the gallery between the ages of 18 and 25 helped
with passage of the bill.
I think the vote showed that the Florida
legislators really feel the 18-year-old is mature
enought to vote, Gundry said. The house believes
they are mature enough for full citizenship,
although the senate only seems one-fifth sure.

had declined to stay the
judgment pending appeal.
Beyond that, the government
said there was the gravest
doubt whether the case was
within the original jusisdiction
of the Supreme Court.
Either a state or the federal
government can bring a lawsuit
directly before the Supreme
Court. But what Kirk asked was
transfer of an existing case.

| Teach-In Stages
| Plaza Dump-In
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNER
Alligator Staff Writer
k bags of garbage lying around and people talking on Dempster i
§ Dumpsters, dont be surprised. j
lijj; Thats what will happen at 3:30 pjn., April 21 when the j
Environmental Teach-In holds a dump-in.
| Dr. Walter A. Rosenbaum, assistant professor of political
S science, will host the program on a platform of dumpsters.
THE UNIVERSITY physical plant has offered us all the \
garbage we need to arrange tastefully in bags around the
plaza, he said. :
The purpose of the program is to show the social :
implications associated with environmental control, :
v Rosenbaum said, to show what the individual can do in order j:
$ to control the world he lives in. :
jij Speakers will include Dr. George Cornwell, associate
£ professor of forestry, to discuss waste disposal in Alachua
County; and Dr. David Anthony, associate professor of botany,
$ to discuss the Cross-Florida Barge Canal. :
DR. JOHN GAMBLE, associate professor of environmental :
engineering, will discuss Lake Alice, Mrs. Maijorie Carr will talk
on the political problems of environmental control. >
One of the main topics will be excess packaging. The speakers :
will question the desirability of one-way bottles and recycling of :
duminum :j
\ THEN v ri i
vu ol}[?(l enou 6 h
Wmm
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A COLLEGE ON A SHIP
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Tuesday, April U. 1970, Th* Florida MHgdfcr,

Page 3



Page 4

I, Tfai FldrMWUHsatbr, Tymday, April 14, IS7O

| Apollo 13
(Gains 3 Hours!
1 1
SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) The flawless fliers of
| Apollo 13 gained three hours on their exacting timetable
: Monday, permitting them to get an early start on the checkout jj
v of their lunar landing ship, Aquarius. :
Ground control messaged the three spacemen, James A. :
IIS Lovell, John L. Swigert and Fred W. Haise, their course was so jj
accurate that a midcourse correction opportunity, programmed j:
at 9:30 pan. EST, had been skipped.
TBE ASTRONAUTS first felt the tug of moons gravity early
today enroute to mans third landing on the lunar surface late >
Wednesday.
With their quarter-million mile, outward bound trip already :
more than half completed, ground controller Vance Brand told $
them their 48-ton spaceship would pass within 71 miles of the
moon's far side if held to its present course. $
WELL, THATS not bad, said Haise. §
J: Thats supposed to be just right, corrected Brand. %
Mission control asked the astronauts to see if they could sight
the comet Bennett, discovered last year by a Johannesburg,
£ South Africa, scientist.
5; CAPSULE communicator Joseph Kerwin said the comet, :
j: which is following a path just above the suns horizon, may be £
visible briefly while the Aquarius, riding on the nose of the if!
j: Appdo spaceship, Modes out die suns ray. &
i During the Aquarius check-out, which was moved ahead by if!
5 three hours because of cancellation of the midcourse maneuver, if
:f: special attention had to be given to a helium tank that caused 3
if: some coaoem. §
if: ENGINEERS noticed that the tank, which provides pressure ff
if: to the moon lander's descent engine fuel tanks, seemed to be |
if: hearing up faster than normal, but the problem was finally f:
| honed out. fj
**111616 is no concern at all over the tank, a space agency
if! spokesman said. He explained the doubiecheck was to see if g
| the pressure reading conespoods to what were reading here. 1
MONDAY WAS the last day of relative ease the astronauts |
IwiH have until they head home. jfj
Tuesday night they swing into lunar orbit, and from there on if
out their schedules are as fall as mission planners can make $
them. if
Lovell and Haiae wi take two moon wa&s, each lasting up to fi
I fine hours, mid will spend nearly a day and a half- on the lunar f:
surface. fj
SWIGERT, A civilian rookie serving as a stand-in for prime
crewman Thomas K. Mattingly, will keep the command ship fi
Odyssey in lunar orbit while his two companions carry out ff
> man's first exploration of the lunar uplands, a section known as jj
f: Fra Mauro.Swigert stepped into the flight when Mattingly if
£ became exposed to measles, and it was feared hed fall ill during if
if the space voyage. if
Death Gratuity Pay
Buys Anti-War Ad

LA PORTE CITY, lowa (UPI)
- The parents of an lowa soldier
killed in Vietnam placed an
SI,BOO anti-war advertisement in
an lowa newspaper Sunday using
the gratuity pay the army sent
them.
We think the war is immoral
and senseless, Mrs. Gene Mullen
said. We just hope to wake up
people with the ad.
THE MULLENS used $1,844
of the $2,000 the Army sent
them to defray expenses of their

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sons death to pay for a one half
page advertisement in the Des
Moines Register.
Sgt. Michael E. Mullen, 25,
was drafted out of the
University of Missouri where he
was studing for a doctorate in
agricultural chemistry. He was
killed by friendly fire Feb. 17.
MRS. MULLEN said her son
died during a night offensive
ambush but was not included in
the war casualty count because
he was hit by friendly fire,

M
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Ff & m&gm IBIN ORRi
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_ PHIL BANNISTER
MILITARY BEAUTIES

Twenty-five beauties are vying for the soapier of
queen over Scabbard mid Blade's Military Ball April
25. The contestants foot in order) are Leslie Bauer,
Jan Adams, Msry Weiss, Mary Asms La Pomte,
Susan McOergh, EM Kuypere, Brenda Crews,
Christine ftike, Cydney Aronson, Gad Porter, Diana

FIRST IN 4 MONTHS

Communists Rocket Saigon

SAIGON (UPI) Communist
gunners subjected Saigon to its
first rocket attack in nearly four
months Monday night, firing at
least four Soviet-made missiles
into the downtown area.
U. S. headquarters said four
persons were killed and 44
wounded.
THREE OF THE dead and
most of the wounded were in a
movie house hit by one of the
122 mm rockets minutes before
the show ended. A South
Vietnamese Navy lieutenant was
killed by another rocket. No
American casualties were
reported.
The Saigon bombardment
came only a few hours after
allied military sources said North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
troops were expected to launch
a second phase of the current
spring offensive later this month.
COMMUNIST forces pressing
the first phase, which began
Black Week
Correction
It was stated in yesterdays
article on Black Week that no
written budget was submitted
until March 19. The first copy of
the budget was, in fact, received
the 18fh, and was preceded by
verbal requests.
The Alligator regrets the
error.
I 1 1
Jk B
wfl
si

Outward Bound Film
Graham Lounge
9:15 P.M. Wed 4/15

April 1, surrounded the Green
Beret camp at Dak Pek on the
Central Highlands Monday and
field reports described the
situation there as very serious.
Wounded South Vietnamese
militiamen flown out of Dak Pek
said that by noon Monday North
Vietnamese troops had seized all
outposts around Dak Pek,
including the hamlets of Dak
Gap and Dak Ly, about 800
yards from the camp.
THEY SAID the outpost was
being shelled and that rockets
had destroyed the administrative
building.
At Dak Seang, another Green
Beret camp about 10 miles
north of Dak Pek, South
Vietnamese militiamen clashed
Monday with North Vietnamese
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|| DIALOGUE WITH A TNEOLOGUE
Is Mercy Killing
MoraH
CHAPLAIN SAM BANKS.
UF MEDICAL CENTER
WEDNESDAY, APRIL IS, 4J OP P.M.
LOUNGES 122 *123, REITZ UNION
SPONSORED BY REITZ UNION
university religious ASSN*

Leach, Jane! Overholt, Toni Simms, Linda Burr,
Kathy Bennett, Margaret Toms, Kathy Knoche,
Julie Crawford, Elizabeth Snyder, Mary Zimmer,
Deborah McLeod, Kathy McCarry, Carolyn Jones,
Sharttn McCabe, and KatyMarkman.

troops a mile south of the camp
and reported killing seven of
them.
Light shelling was reported at
Dak Seang.
AT PEIKU, 60 miles south of
Dak Seang, a Communist force
armed with rocket grenades,
small arms and satchel charges
early Monday overran the
dependents housing area of the
2nd South Vietnamese Ranger
group.
Thirteen persons, including
two women and eight children,
were reported killed
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By United Press International
A teachers strike in Los Angeles,
Teamsters walkouts and lockouts in
Chicago and the threat of a newspaper
blackout in New York dominated the
labor scene today.
As the school day opened in Los
Angeles, it appeared about half the
approximately 25,000 teachers had failed
to report for work. Principals joined
nonstrikers in attempting to keep classes
open for 650,000 children.
THE BOARD OF education was ready
to conduct open air classes for pupils in
the 616 schools making up the countrys

Womens Liberation
Seizes Grove Press
NEW YORK (UPI) The offices of Grove Press, pioneer publisher
of underground and erotic literature, were seized today by members
of the womens liberation movement.
Grove Press is more obscene than most of the stuff its been
making its money on, a spokesman for the women said.
THE SPOKESMAN said the women took over the offices of Barney
Rosset, president of the publishing house, and of other executives at 9
a. m.
They hung a large red and white liberation banner from a window
of the building in Greenwich Village.
Myron Shapiro, vice president of the firm, acknowledged that the
women were occupying Rossets office but said he was out of the
country.
GROVE WON a landmark Supreme Court decision on obscenity a
decade ago with publication of D. H. Lawrences novel, Lady
Chatterleys Lover.
The ruling opened the way to sale in America of the works of such
writers as Henry Miller and William F. Burroughs.
THE WOMENS spokesman said they were past or present
employes of Grove or other publishing houses and members of various
womens liberation groups.
They demanded that Grove give women 51 per cent of its
editorships and immediately stop publication of books and magazines
and distribution of films that degrade women.
They also asked Grove to set aside some of its profits for a fund for
divorced women so they do not have to rely on alimony.
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Strikers Dominate Labor Scene

FROM L A. TO NEW YORK

second largest school system while
seeking a court injunction ordering all
18,000 teachers to work.
The teachers union called the strike
after rejecting a proposed 5 per cent raise
on a salary scale which begins at $7,200.
TEACHERS also were at odds with
school administrators in Minneapolis and
Butte, Mont.
Schools remained closed in Muskogee,
Okla., but intensive weekend talks
produced guidelines for negotiations and
a back-to-work order in Santa Maria,
Calif.
Teamsters local 705 and the
independent Chicago Truck Drivers

Douglas Impeachment:
Legislation Readied

WASHINGTON (UPI) House GOP Leader
Gerald R. Ford announced Monday legislation
will be introduced this week seeking a special
investigation to determine if Supreme Court
Justice William O. Douglas should be removed
from office.
Ford said personally he would support an
impeachment move.
AFTER A MEETING attended by two
Democrats and three Republicans, Ford said the
bill would seek creation of a select committee to
investigate the 71-year-old jurist.
The committee would report its findings
within 90 days whether to recommend that the
House vote an impeachment resolution. If the
House so voted, the Senate would have to hold a
trial on the charges.
FORD SAID HE will spell out results of a

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Union called a strike of their 32,000
members already locked out of their jobs
in Chicago.
THE DRIVERS sought contracts
providing a $1.65 an hour pay increase
over three years instead of the sl.lO
agreed on in national negotiations in
Washington.
Pickets marched outside trucking
terminals inJ2hicago, and in Detroit they
threw rocks at out-of-town drivers
arriving at one terminal.
MORE THAN 1,000 other trucking
firms employing about $5,000 drivers
signed the contracts before the deadline.
The New York Post, The New York
Times, Daily News and Long Island Press

Tuesday, April 14, 1970, The. Florida AWpeter,

also would shut down if the papers follow
precedent.
The contracts for all 10 newspaper
unions expired March 31 and the printers
already have begun slowdowns to press
for wage increases.
THE ONE BRIGHT spot in the labor
picture was the return to work in
gradually increasing numbers of air traffic
controllers who started a sick out 19
days ago.
The Federal Aviation Administration
said while it still was having problems
at air traffic centers in New York, Kansas
City and Denver, the situation was
improved at the Minneapolis and
Oakland, Calif., bottlenecks.

preliminary investigation by his staff into
Douglas on Wednesday, but he said the charges
would involve Douglas writing on obscenity,
youth and rebellion, and his dealings with a
foundation which had links with Las Vegas
gambling casinos.
Ford told newsmen that if there were any
doubts about impeachment proceedings they
were eliminated by an article in Evergreen
magazine this month in which Douglas had an
article entitled Redress and Revolution.
FORD SAID THERE were shocking
pictures of nudes in the magazine.
If all the facts Ive collected are properly
presented, Ford said, Im convinced the
committee will recommend such impeachment
actions.

Page 5



Page 6

, Th* Florida Alligator, Tyaaday, April 14, 1970

Conservative Democrats Flex Muscle

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Flexing its newfound
muscle of 41 and possibly 46 votes, a coalition of
conservative Democrats in the/ House got behind its
first piece of legislation Monday a bill to end one
man rule in the State Transportation Department.
The bill creates a five-member board of
transportation, named by the governor but with
specific qualifications that would give representation to
the areas of road construction, mass transportation,
urban planning, aviation, and either marine navigation
or harbor planning.
THE DISTRICTS would be drawn so that no chief
resident engineer would be responsible to any one
board member, eliminating the evil of past roads
boards in which each member ran his own little
kingdom.
Unhappiness with some of the 1969 governmental
reorganization, including supplanting of the old road
board with a transportation czar, was what jelled
together the formal organization of conservative
Florida Democrats.

Soviet Nuclear Sub Sinks ?

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
Soviet nuclear submarine is
believed to have sunk in the
Atlantic Ocean, the Defense
Department said Monday.
Jerry W. Friedheim, a
Pentagon spokesman, said the
sub, which had been under
surveillance by a U. S. patrol
plane, disappeared from sight
Sunday after it was sighted
under tow by two Soviet
merchant ships.
THE PATROL plane reported

Republicans Urge Bill
To Outlaw Busing

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Republican House members
voted at a caucus Monday to
have a policy committee draft an
antibusing bill that will not
disrupt the majority of Florida
counties where schools are
running smoothly.
GOP Leader Don Reed said he
will ask Speaker Fred Schultz to
name a similar group of
Democrats to work with them
and avoid making busing a
partisan issue.
DON MEIKLEJOHN, top aide
to Gov. Claude Kirk, told the
caucus the governor would
cooperate in the effort to get a
bill that would preserve the
neightboihood school concept
and outlaw busing solely to
achieve racial balance.
Senate Education Chairman
Wilbur Boyd, who represents

I Exercise Lessons
V Tuesday April 14, 7:30 p.m.
I Room 118, Union, or sign up in
Room 310, Union beforehand.

that later Sunday the merchant
ships were seen apparently
conducting a search in the area
off Cape Finesterre, Spain,
where two oil slicks, a standard
indication a sub has sunk and
ruptured, were seen.
Friedheim said the Soviet sub
had been sighted by the Orion
patrol plane last Friday while it
was on routine patrol about 40
miles northwest of Cape
Finesterre.

Manatee County where busing
begins today under court order,
predicted it will be at least a
week before local school board
attorneys will be ready to report
on potential effects of the
pending bill which incorporates
language of the federal appeals
court order permitting Orange
County to retail a number of
segregated schools.

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IN STATE LEGISLATURE

REP. MILEY MIERS of Tallahassee and four other
members of the steering committee announced at a
news conference Monday that it had 41 signed-up
members, and five others who would vote with it but
did not want to be on the official membership list.
One of its long-range goals, in addition to legislation,
is to shed the taint of liberalism attached to the
National Democratic Party, and to beat Republican
Gov. Claude Kirks re-election bid.
THERE WERE 500,000 Democrats who put Kirk
in office, Miers said, and we are going to keep losing
if we dont get conservative Democrats in the picture.
But he said the group had no specific person in mind
to run for governor, or immediate plans to endorse any
candidate.
Dodging the small county Pork Chop tag, the
group boasts Miamians Dick Renick and Dick Clark,
Tampans Ed Blackburn and Elvin Martinez as well as
five legislators from Jacksonville on its rolls.
FOUR OF THE five members of the steering
committee said they were pledged to support liberal

THE SUB WAS on the surface
and accompanied by two Soviet
merchant ships. Sailors were
seen on the subs deck and it
appeared to be in distress, Fried Friedheim
heim Friedheim said.
Later Orion flights noticed
the ships were trying to tow the
sub but were having difficulty
because of rough seaas.
OTHER FLIGHTS Sunday
were unable to find the sub but
did sight the oil slicks.
Friedheim said the vessel was
a nuclear powered attack
submarine designed to seek out
and sink enemy ships and subs.
It does not carry nuclear
missiles, he said.
Two American nuclear
powered subs, Thresher and
Scorpion, were attack vessels
which also sank in the Atlantic.
FRIEDHEIM said the Navy
could not identify the Soviet sub
by name but said it was of the
November class which carries a
crew of 88.
The Soviet sub would be the
third neclear-powered submarine
to sink in seven years. The
Thresher was the first, in 1963.

Miami Democrat Dick Pettigrew for speaker in 1971,
and denied there is any talk now of dropping him or
threatening the leadership of present Speaker Fred
Schultz of Jacksonville.
But we want to be recognized, and not passed
over, Rep. Ted Alvarez of Jacksonville declared.
He said a coalition of liberal Democrats and
Republicans opposed to the cabinet system rode
roughshod over dissenters last year, refusing to
consider even good amendments to the
reorganization bill.
REP. JEROME PRATT, D-Palmetto, said he never
intended to be pledged to Pettigrew and he pointed out
that all it takes to get out of such a pledge is to ask
Pettigrew for a release.
Miers said the coalition will not vote as a bloc on
every issue.
But when the chips are down and we really want
some piece of legislation, we will vote as a bloc. The
only way to get anywhere is by sheer numbers, he
added.

YET TO DO: The Do It party will hold a meeting in Jennings
basement at 7:30 p. m. today.
SECOND CHANCE: If you missed Camigras yesterday, dont miss
it today. On the Drill Field from 4 p.m. to midnight.
MARTIAL GOODY: ROTC Military Ball Queen Contest semi-finals
are today. Reitz Union Ballroom at 7:30 pan.
SINGLE MINGLE: The Gainesville Singles Club will have a mingle.
We are all mingling in the Winnjammer from 8 to ? tonight.
REVOLUTION: Professor Neil Maculay of history was in Cuba in
1958 during the revolution. His book A Rebel In Cuba will be the
subject of tomorrows talk in the Latin American Colloquium Room
of the College Library.
MEET: The Alachua County Association for Retarded Children
meets tonight at 8 in the Sunland Special Training Building. The
public is invited. For more info call 376-8314.
HONOR TALK: Tonight Dialogue presents a discussion on the
Honor Court and its relevance to the UF community. Listen at 11:05
p.m. on WRUF. The program is co-sponsored by Florida Blue Key and
WRUF.
This is not just a young man's fancy.
IHt jSM TTT T P | |IT
Ji Wm
Anything but.
A young man can climb into this incred incredible
ible incredible piece of hardware and break the
sound barrier.
And the awe-inspiring probes into space
are notfigments of hiswiid imagination.
He read the fantasy of Buck Rogers as a boy.
Now in a Buck Rogers space suit he ex explores
plores explores the outer reaches of the beyond.
It all started with imagination and dreams.
If anything, a young mans fancy is exactly
what we need.
Without it wed all still be on the ground.
U.S. Air Forcegreat career, great life.
Ve \ WO years of college remaining (graduate or
Air Forrp 'anir** Want t 0 fly you may qualify for the
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Cam thf A ?SdIL TWO YEAR PROGRAM TODAY.
CALL THE DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES.
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Timd Wf, April 14, 1970, Tha Florida AHiptor,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 14, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Staff Writings

The Dominant Issue

The air, the air is everywhere, the lyrics from a
song in Hair tell us.
Yes, the air is everywhere, and in an increasing
number of places it stinks. Not only the air, but
rivers, streams, lakes, oceans and even the soil. It is
beyond inconvenience, it is dangerous.
Environmental pollution will become the
dominant issue of the Seventies.
It is an issue everyone agrees on in principle.
Nobody of any political persuasion to my
knowledge has ever come out in favor of pollution.
At the UF, the local pollution organization,The
Environmental Action Group, (EAG), enlists the
support of members of groups as diverse as the
Student Mobilization Committee (SMC) and the
Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) to the Young
Republicans (YR) and Young Americans for
Freedom (Y AF).
But I fear the hue and cry will go up from the
land demanding the government step in to clean it
up.
I dont want the government to clean it up.
The government has no business cleaning up
anyones pollution but its own. This formidable
task should keep the bureaucrats busy for years. If
the government literally cleans up its own back yard
I might be pursuaded to see the case for government
intervention into the private sector.
An attempt to legislate pollution out of existence
will touch off political infighting which will drag on
for years as each group manuvers to protect its
special interest.
They will succeed in evading the cost of cleaning
up the filth and passing it to the taxpayer along
with a new bureaucracy to support it.
No, if the government ever gets the responsibility
for cleaning up pollution in the private sector it will
develop a vested interest in pollution itself, not
cleaning it up.
Billions will pour into programs and projects with
most of it going to support the people administering
them.

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brain
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
Earl Hartman

News Editors

Karen Eng
Managing Editor
John Sugg

By Fred Vollrath

But, if the government doesnt clean it up then
who will. This is the first question which pops into
the mind of the state oriented Liberal.
Who will clean up industrial pollution if the
government doesnt?
I think those responsible for it will.
Not out of the goodness of their hearts, of
course, any more than they pollute because they are
inherently bad people who like to pollute the
environment.
Industires pollute for the same reason individuals
do. It is cheaper, easier, or convenient.
I suggest the direction protest and solution
should take is to establish the legal principle that
polluters are liable for civil damages done to
individuals through their actions.
For example, if you should own beach property
in the Tampa Bay area, and your beach was polluted
by the oil spill, you should be able to sue the
companies responsible.
They would be liable not only to clean up the oil,
but would be liable for such things as; denying you
the use of your beach, killing the fish and denying
you the pleasure you once derived and, the decrease
in the market value of your property because
potential buyers are aware of the possibility of oil
pollution.
In addition one might consider the damage to the
surrounding, then of course you had to smell it and
look at it, and that should be worth something, and
- well Im sure voure getting the point.
This approach has several advantages. Some of
them are:
It enables the person damaged to collect
directly.
It requires no government agency to be
supported by public funds.
Cuts down on politicking because its harder to
influence a judge and a jury through lobbying than
it is a legislator. Besides it is also illegal.
Enables the individual the maximum amount of
freedom to initiate direct action through the courts.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business. Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lorida Alligator are those of
'.lre editors or of the writer of tiu: .article and not those
of the University of I lorida.

EDITORIAL
f
Widening Gulfs
In spite of President Nixons promise to bring us
together, the move in American society is toward greater
polarization. The gulfs between black and white, rich and
poor and other dichotomous groups are widening splitting
America in the process.
In recent weeks the trend has hit the UF m a number of
areas. Perhaps the most ominous is the recent rift between
the Black Student Union (BSU) and the office of Dr. Lester
Hale, vice president in charge of student affairs.
Briefly, the problem arose when Hales office promised to
help the BSU fund Black Week but, ran out bf money
before a written budget was submitted three months later.
The result was for the BSU to feel it had been betrayed
by Hale and President Stephen C. OConnell. Considering
the commitment had been made by Hale to an inspection
team from HEW, at first appearances the incident looked
like a promise made in bad faith, in the hope of securing a
flattering report.
But the BSU was not dealing with an individual, Hale, it
was dealing with a bureaucracy. The BSU made its mistake
in believing a bureaucracy moves by the spoken word. It
doesnt. A bureacracy moves by the written word and
nothing else.
In other words, the BSU, did not realize it could not
expect a box of paper clips from Tigert Hall, much less
$4,000, without volumes of paperwork being submitted
months in advance.
The cause of the misunderstanding is rooted in cultural
differences. In the black culture, a man is only as
trustworthy as his spoken word. The bureaucracy is hardly a
black phenomenon!.
Conversely, the white culture is more legal, more
technical by nature. A mans word counts far less than his
signature on a contract.
When the black meets the white, particularity in cases of
this sort, what results is an issue cloaked in gray.
The ramifications of this gray situation are most
unfortunate.
First of all, the BSU becomes more convinced that the
UF is a racist institution. Incidents of this sort quickly
become concrete proof, their membership becomes more
embittered and their educational priorities suffer. They pull
out of their student role and entrench themselves where
they can place their trust, in the Black Student Union.
The administration, in turn, throws up its hands and
wonders what can be done with students who dont follow
directives.
Obviously, no solution can be given easily. Each group,
however, can help prevent further feelings of bad faith by
simply bending to fit the others demands. The
administration, in short, will have to be less bureaucratic
with minority groups, and minority groups will have to be
more bureaucratic with the administration.
And perhaps the gulf between them will narrow and,
someday, we will live together in peace.
WC:
... but the boys need new socks and underwear.

t*



Another View

It was saddening to read of
the announcement that there
will apparently be a massive drug
elimination effort in our fair
town. President OConnell asked
for my support in this fight. Well
Mr President I give you my
assurance that you will have my
total and unfaltering opposition
in this effort, and I will try to
hamper this repression in any
legal way possible.
Why will I be conscience
bound to oppose these efforts?
Surely enforcing the just laws of
our state should get every
citizens support, shouldnt they?
But I cant support laws that I
feel are unjust, unnecessary and
an infringement of the basic
rights I should have in a free
society. And I feel all drug laws
on non-physically addicting
drugs fall in these categories.
Conservatives always argue
that you cant legislate morality.
But then they turn right around
and say you cant take drugs
because it will hurt your mind
and is immoral to copout from
reality and escape into a
psychedellic experience. Perhaps
our President would like it
better if some students tried to
meet reality by occupying his
office and throwing him out? I
think that would be a definite
improvement over present
realities.

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is in response to Mr.
Vollraths column of March 31. In it, he
assumes that the substantive argument
about the war in Vietnam is between
hawk and dove. It appears to me that the
material argument is not between two
groups dividing ex-presidential advisors or
congress, popularly called the hawks and
doves. I say this because each of these
groups is in substantial agreement over
the goals of US foreign policy; an
agreement perhaps left over in these days
of Presidential foreign policy from the
days of bi-partisian foreign policy.
I should like to suggest that the
substantive argument against the war and
the engagement of US secret agencies in
Laos comes from those who are in basic
disagreement with the policy of
continued US pre-eminence in the
economic, military and political affairs of
the countries of S.E. Asia. This is the
policy variously and improperly described
as protecting the free world, making war
for peace, containment, meeting out
treaty commitments, Vietnamizing the
war, keeping a toehold in Asia and
upholdirg western culture and values.
It is this part of the opposition to the
war which perceives that the basic policy
of continued US domination in the affairs
of these several countries leads quite
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-speced end
not exoeed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
hows just oause. The editor reserves the
to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
* "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
j* hed to contact the editor and be
to drew samples of his work.

The Injustice Os Youth

Why A Drug Crackdown?

This ties into why such groups
as the Black Panthers and many
radical white groups ban the use
of drugs. It is because when
taking drugs you are usually
more quiet, introspective and
not capable of leading a
revolution. Your mind is being
expanded and your
consciousness is being altered,
and you really cant have full
attention on some of the violent,
highly co-ordinated activities of
such groups. It is not that they
feel the drugs are dangerous to
the person, but rather that the
group will not be served as well
by the person on drugs.
Do drugs really cause suicides
as our President seems to think:
I seriously doubt that they do.
Thousands of people commit
suicide each year who are not on
any kind of drugs. And most
cases of suicide realted to drugs
have showed that the person had
personal problems long before
any problems caused by drugs
could have occurred.
Why dont our government
agencies try to solve some of our
real problems, like increasing
crime rate, slums, lack of
opportunity that creates a sense
of hopelessness in many
minority groups or the racism
evident in our schools?
Instead our government seems
intent on further restricting our

naturally to the mechanical slaughter of
Vietnamese and Laotians by US
population bombings and napaiming, the
mechanical and chemical destruction of
the land of, Vietnam and Laos, the
injustice of voluntary and involuntary
servitude of the American youth in
officially sanctioned murder of people in
their own land and the diversion of public
wealth from the public good into war
industries.
Several more of Mr. Vollraths points
need to be refuted, and my suggestions
need to be amplified and supported.
Unfortunately, there is yet to be shown
any evidence that the Alligator would
provide space for such an extended
discussion.
A.R. TODD, 7AS
Your Duty
MR. EDITOR:
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has
joined with Gainesville Mayor Perry
McGriff and Alachua County Commission
Chairman Jack Durrance in an effort to
eliminate the use of drugs, says the
Florida Alligator.
From the front page article of the
April 6 Alligator, headlined: JOINT
ANTI-DRUG DRIVE BEGUN, I quote a
statement from President OConnell:
There must be developed the
attitude ... that illegal drug use is not the
smart thing to do ... instead it is an
attempt by the user to escape
reality ...
Nowhere in this article does President
OConnell suggest that marijuana is to be
treated differently from other drugs. I
hope that our president does not
anticipate the elimination of marijuana
use on and off campus. That would be as
silly as it would have been in the 1920 s
for the federal government to assume that
prohibition could eliminate the use of
bathtub gin.

freedoms to live our life as we
wish, and to divert its manpower
from the real important issues of
our times. I always feel that this

Staff Writings

Night On The Plaza

There are times when life suddenly hits you and
grabs you and slams you down and demands that
you look and examine and know it as much as you
are able.
A night on the Plaza in the Saturday evening rain
with all the wet shiny crystals getting caught
between your toes and quiet calm except for an
occasional hurrying drumming footstep breaking in
on the patterns you see in the sand ... and car
headlights making lines of four in the cool clear air
and then revolving into whirling shapes of color that
spin and grow and break into drops of prism pure
flakes of cement road as it arrives and pauses and
turns and leaves... and frosted bagels hop out of
their car and ask to see Albert... but we set them
straight that he had died and told them about the
funeral... the Pope came ... the bagels didnt get
it... and then the trees started saying things and
we realized that the bright green branches with the
purple hazed leaves was protecting us... and we
put our arms around it and said thank you ... and
went to see the mechanical cow over the Dairy
something building that my love had seen another
rainy diamond dropping night... and the brown
earth-clean and washed and cool kept mixing with
the crystals in my sandles and it felt so good that we
set off hand in hand to see the mechanical cow that

Says Dr. James L. Goddard, former
director of the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration, one thing we know
about marijuana is that is is definitely not
a narcotic even though our federal laws
(and most of our state laws) restricting its
usage erroneously define it as such.
Marijuana, unlike narcotics, Dr.
Goddard says, does not produce
tolerance, requiring higher dosages to
produce the same effect.
Says the cover of the October 31 issue
of Life Magazine, MARIJUANA: At
lease 12 million Americans have now
tried it. When so many citizens break the
law two questions come up: are the laws
that would treat marijuana users the same
as LSD, heroin and cocaine users fair
laws?
Does the April 6 Alligator headline:
JOINT Anti-Drug Drive Begun, hint
towards the possibility that law
enforcement officers will actually try to
eliminate the JOINT? I hope that
President OConnell and local law
enforcement officials are not so naive.
Such a task smacks of mission impossible.
Mr. Justice OConnell, with your
experience administering to law, I call on
you to stand publicly and say to Perry
McGriff, Jack Durrance, and the people
of this university: Marijuana should be
the small society

, /1/i v fiocoMTfiHT TELUS Mb X
{JO -SHOULPN'T Wopiey Too MiJcW
00 I ABOUT MV TAX PbTUPM PbTUPMw
w PbTUPMw iaAus-ht
T\ / .sympathetic
- r t- t :

is done for merely political
reasons, because the great silent
majority supports busting those
Hippie, rebellious drug freaks

Tuesday, April 14, 1970, The Florida Alliator,

By Mike Hittlemcm

By Ellen Dupuy

gave milk in cans already homogenized and
pasteurized ... but stopped instead to look at the
jeweled flowers that laid heavy and brightly colored
- brightly jeweled brightly beautiful against
the kind of tan hands that held and touched and
looked at them and saw them and knew them as
much as we could ever know and look and see
them,... and our hands touched and talk began
between us and to replace the exuberant joy of
living that had racked our belly buttons and tickeled
something inside to make us hurt almost from
the laughing... and the talk was what we were
feeling after watching a Jimmy Stuart movie and
seeing the Pope at Alberts funeral and the jeweled
flowers... and it came to love and loving and
being loved and having the best of life inside you
and outside you holding your hand and whispering
in your ear and flashing every now and then like the
starry twinkly flashing from the diamond on your
finger...
And that was life on the Plaza and the Dairy what
ever you call it building and beside you walked the
reason for it and you turned and kissed the reason
and life of your happiness and walked home again in
the dropping crystal drops and was glad you
decided to skip the party and be alone together.

OPEN FORUM:
A (Lia mi V'mt
hope for the cor"

treated appart from narcotic drugs. This
is your duty sir.
NAME WITHHELD
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Vollrath states that there is
nothing wrong with being average or
commonplace. I cannot disagree with this
statement, although there is nothing
wrong with being average the Supreme
Court should consist of Justices who are
outstanding legal minds. Mediocre judges
have indeed served in the past and will
continue to serve in the future. The
supreme Court, however, is not the place
for mediocrity, but for excellence.
Mr. Vollrath, you state that the South
has been a whipping boy for northern
liberals for decades. Perhaps the South is
responsible for its own image. Southern
senators and representatives have done
their utmost to block any civil rights
legislation that has come before Congress.
Southern governors have openly defied
the law while attempting to block school
desegregation. Only after the South seeks
to change its own image will its image be
changed in the eyes of others.
LARRY TROPP, 2UC
bv Brickman

with the long hair. And the
Easy Riders will again be
destroyed. Only this time the
Easy Riders are us.

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, April 14, 1070

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
DEADLINE FOR
REMOVING OF "I"
GRADES is Friday, April 17.
by 4 p.m. for candidates for
graduate degrees to be
conferred at the end of the
spring (piaster.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS All teacher
college classification, are
required to satisfy the Speech
Screening Requirements before
being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence
or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE
400 and die elementary block.
Appointments are boine mo do in
Rnom 14J n.e i-SS Caudles
feOOWs ifc WOnWllf tvSla Cn^NR
and Speech majors do not take
the fast as, SCH 201 is required
in an or otW pfvmivgi
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT TESTS in French,
German, Latin and Spanish will
be given at 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 23, in Little 101. These
tests are required for initial
registration at mo uvwvofsity or
Florida in a language m which
the student has any prior

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
Coliege Library* Bam -11 pm Bam -11 pm 2pm -11 pm
Research Library Bam -11 pm Bam -11 pm 2pm-11 pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm -10 pm Bam -12 N 6pm-10 pm
Chemistry Library Bam -5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm- 5 pm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm-10 pm Ipm 4pm 7pm-10 pm
Education Library
341 Norman Hall 8 am 10:30 pm** 9 am 5 pm 2pm -10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm- 5 pm
410 Engineering Budding 7pm lO pm Ipm 4 pm 7pm-10 pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm- 10 pm*** Bam l2 Npm-10 pm
Health Center Library
L 102 Mad. Science Bldg. 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am -5 pm 2 pm- 12M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty HaH Bam ll pm Bam spm 7pm -11 pm
Journalism ft Communications R.R. Bam spm ~
337 Stadium 7pm-10pm* Bam-12N Closed
Law Library
Holland Law Center Sam llpm Bam 11 pm 8:30 am llpm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School) ~
Yongeldg. F. 6am 4 pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam 5 pm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N 2pm- 5 pm
6pm-10 pm 6pm lO pm
lpm spm
* The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nights from 11 p.m. l2 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:80 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 6:60 p.m. on Friday nights.

| -j. GAINESVILLE FLORIOA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
m OILLS9 TAXES? DEBTS?
T KM J7\tv It's Income Tax time again and this year is even worse!
// Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
/Y enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces neceslim
lim neceslim \ / i Hffi W /K lities of life! CONSOLIDATE all of those bills pay
f 1 ) your tax# and Bnd P with > of a monthly output
I ; A i f/ Comem to talk it over...we're specialist at solving
/ /l. Jji tho kindi of problems!

Administrative Notices

knowledge acquired in or out of
class. Testing time is about one
hour.
PREMEDICAL ANJ>
PREDENTAL STUDENTS must
register with the Office of
Prtprofessional Education,
Room 106 Anderson Had,
starting Monday, April 6,
g ApPii wing
with you the full names of aN
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
SALAIRES AND FRINGE
BENEFITS COMMITTEE wiU
meat Thursday, April 16 at 3:30
pm in Room 526, Research
Library to discuss items from
Sub-Committee on Internal
Faculty and Staff Benefits;
possMiity of negotiating group
contract for automobile
insurance; status of proposed
retirement system; and a
proposed faculty salary study.

BLUE BULLETIN

PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz Union
two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
April 20: Burrottfis Wellcome
& Co.; Hystron Fibers, Inc.;
York Air Conditioning; Regional
Administrator of National
Banks; Lamer Shops; Bibb
Manufacturing Co.; Lybrand,
Roes Brothers & Montgomery
April 20-21: Virginia Dept, of
Community Colleges
April 21: The Bell System;
Broward County Board of Public
Instruction; U. S. Dept, of
Agriculture Office of the
Inspector General; State Road
Commission of West Virginia
April 22: Environmental
Science Services Administration;
Nei man-Marcus; Florida Power
Corp.; Jacksonville Electric
Authority; Pilot Life Insurance
Co., Jacksonville
April 23: Watson and Co.;
Firestone Tiro & Rubber Co.;
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance
Co.; Burdina's; Maas Brothers
April 24: Itt Corp.
Semiconductor Division

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

CANCELLATIONS:
April 21: Robertson, May,
Zima & Co.
April 22: Union Camp Corp.;
Stonerock, Hollingsworth &
Simonet
April 23: Union Planter's
National Bank
GENERAL NOTICES
INTERNATIONAL

Tuesday, April 14
Children's Ballet Lesions, C-4
Union, 3:00 pjn.
Journalism & Communication
Dames Meeting, Meet at
Westgate Shopping Center,
6000 N.W. 17th Place, 7:00
pjn.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 363
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Chib Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m. Tournament
Registration.
Modem Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 7:30
pjn.
Military Ball Queen Contest,
Semi-finals, Union Aud., 7:30
pjn.
Bridge Club 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 15
Dialogue with a Theologue, Sam
Banks, "Is Mercy Killing
Moral, 122 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: Twilight Concert,
University Aud. Lawn,
Symphonic Band, 6:45 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 362 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Circle K Meeting, 357 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Union Yoga Lessons, 243 Union,
7:30 pjn.
UndergrMluate Math Advisory
Comm. Meeting, 101 Little
Halt, 7:30 pjn.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
RIL Film, "We Have No Art,"
Union Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Young Republicans Moating,
346 Union, 8:00 pjn.

Campus
Calendar

STUDENTS are incited to a
week of home hospitality and
discussion between June
21-27 at FLORIDA
CROSSROADS to be held in
St. Petersburg under auspicies
of the Institute of
International Education.
Application can be made at
Foreign Student Office by
"/lay 1.

Wednesday, April 15
Mensa Meeting, Winnjamer, 8:30
pjn.
Assoc, for Childhood Education
Publications Sale, Norman
Hall, 9:00 ajn. 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 16
Athletic Dept.: Softball
Tournament, Norman Gym
and Field.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 3ST Union, 7:00
pjn.
ACEI Meeting, Speaker: Dr.
Mary McCaully, "Sex
Education," 347 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Celebration 70, Faculty Poets,
Dr. Frank Taylor 8i Mr. Ed
O'Chester, 122 Union, 8:00
pjn.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 356
Union, 8:00 pjn.
Friday, April 17
t
Athletic Dept: Weight Lifting
Tournament, Florida Gym
Gulf Coast Five-Way Track
Meeting, .Florida Track Field
Union Movie, "Sympathy for
the Devil" with the Rolling
Stones, Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 pjn.
Veterans Follow-up Meeting, All
Interested Veterans urged to
attend. Rathskeller, 7:00
pjn.
Celebration '70,: Carlos
Montoya* University Aud.,
8:15 pjn.
Union Dance, R.G.F.," Union
Ballroom, 9:00 pjn.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Carlos
Montoya, $2.00 & $1.50.
Military Ball, $4.50 per
couple. "Sympathy for the
Devil," SI.OO



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1968 Sears 50cc Bike with helmet.
Good condition. SIOO. Call evenings
373-2196. (A-st-114-p)
DON'T merely brighten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them ... eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-23-c)
Pram us 12-String Guitar, not
Electric. Semi-hard shell Case.
Weekdays after 5, weekends anytime.
$22 5. PHONE 378-0167.
(A-st-117-p)
Golfers: Married student needs bread.
7 irons, 4 woods, bag, cart, etc. See
to appreciate. $75 or best offer. Call
Ray 3 7 2-1827, 284-14, Corry
Village. (A-3t-117-p) **
67 CougarX7 4 speed, 4 br. 390
c.i., front disc, feather bucket seats,
posi-tractlon. Call 372-5698 after 6
PM. Best offer. (A-st-114-p)
School bus for sale. Exc. running
cond. Perfect camper. Inquire 1808
N. W. Ist Ave. $550. (A-st-116-p)
1969 HONDA 450 Excellent Cond.
4000 miles not even 1 yr. old, high
rise bars, NEED CASH! C*ll Mike at
392-9488 416 Jennings. Must sell.
(A-3t-116-p)
Kawasaki 650 cc Motorcycle 1968
Take up payments Call 378-9184 ask
for Bruce Gordon. (A-3t-116-p)
A 1969 Modernage Trailor. Brand
new. Two bedroom, 12 x 60, carpet,
and, air condition. Call after 5 p.m.
378-0208. (A-3t-116-p)
1970 Honda CB 450 4000 Miles In
Perfect Condition Best Reasonable
Offer. Steve Coble 342 Thomas F
372-9167. (A-4t-117-p)
White Bell 500 TX helmet, with clear
bubble face shield. Absolutely like
new. $25 call Jim Johnston at
468-1782 or 392-0848. (A-3t-117-p)
Triumph motorcycle 69 250 cc
street-scrambler. Must sell. $595. call
372-2472 between 6:30-7:3oam or
after 6pm. Bell helmet included.
(A-2t-117-p)
1967 Yamaha 60 cc. GOOD
CONDITION 372-0539 leave name,
number $95 or best offer.
(A-3t-117-p)
FOR RENT
Apartments 1 & 2 br's, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close tc
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
2 bedroom duplex apt. Just south of
The University Inn. For Information
call 372-6333. Leave name and
phone no. for J. Pozin. Will contact
you. (B-st-115-p)
One bedroom apt. across from Tigert
Hall. $75/mbnth. 378-7776.
(B-3M16-D1
Sublet this quarter, Village Park
Apts. 85 immediate occupancy
needed. Call 373-1863. (B-st-113-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Sublet for summer quarter Village 34
2 bdr. sum A/C, 115/mo. Call
373- (B-st-117-p)

Help! Need a male to take my place
In 2bdr Summit House Apt. I got
married and had to move. Below cost
only 35 mo. Call Dan 378-9768.
Help. (B-4M16-P)
Sublet thru Aug. furnished 2 br.
Chula Vista apt. 39th&Millhopper
NW ww carpet all elect kitchen
utility room ch-ca children ok
$ 145/mo. 376-3581 after spm.
(B-3t-117-p)
nnnp
I N.W. 13th sT PH. 3*2-9523*
ACROSS PfcOM THE MALL
f ROMEO AND JULIET^
I PLUS CO-HIT B
A LOVE WITH PROPER a
m STRANGER W
A PENTHOUSE 2
M 2 COLOR HITS A
JL FOR LOVE OF IVY*
M AND J
CHARLY
PENTHOUSE 3 #
5 SHOES OF
U THE FISHERMAN f
*** '* y s. r- '

FOR RENT
Sublet thru Aug. Furnished 1 br.
Unlv. Gardens Apt. slio. Contact:
Paul Hoffman, 378-0327 or
376-6720. (B-st-114-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
:%W:WWiW?f:¥:¥5ft¥S5S55SftWSP
WANTED
Roomate wanted this quarter Village
Park apts 85 on pool. 373-1863
immediate occupancy necessary.
(C-st-113-p)
One Coed roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment close to campus $37.50
per month. Call 373-2766.
(C-st-117-p)
Quiet couple need 1 bdrm. furnished
apt. In June, near campus.
SBO/month max. Year lease or
longer. Call Patti 392-8439.
(C-2t-117-p)
Singles! How about a private bdrm.
close to campus, cen A/H, full carpet
complete elect, kitchen, Spanish
furniture, pool, gas grills, laundry
facilities, patio, Dn/area, GIF parties
all for S7O/mo. INCLUDING util.
La Mancha has it all! Openings for
1-4 students. Call 378-7224 Now!
(C-109-10t-p).
1 or 2 roommates needed
immediately 'to share beautiful
Hawaiian Village Apt. Reasonable
rates, Call 378-9810 or 378-0654
ANY TIME. (C-st-114-p)
Wanted! Turned-on female roommate
to share large air-conditioned house
close to campus $45 a month. Call
376-8080. (C-7t-113-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
Whatever need two exquisite apt.
A/C 'stereo quiet 39 month + util.
378-7260 anytime, 6 best 427 S.E.
Bth St. Jim. (At least come look at
It.). (C-3t-116-p)
2 Male Roommates for summer
quarter. Frederick Apts., air-cond.,
pool, wall to wall carpet, Call
378-7104. $41.25. (C-4t-114-p)
Male roomate needed (spring qtr.)
Mt. Vernon Apt. will reduce rent
S2O. Call 378-3922 after 5:00.
(C-3t-114-p)
1 FEMALE roomate wanted
Immediately LANDMARK
$46.25/mo. Call anytime 376-2184.
(C-st-117-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken
As ou can eat 99 ( WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yallow Rice 79<|
HI!

Tuesday, April 14, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
Wanted: One female roommate for
Immediate occupancy. Gatortown
Apts. $65 + util. For spring qtr.
378-6162 after 5. Barb or Helen.
(C-st-114-p)
ra-x-x-xvx ; :^
HELP WANTED
S&SSSSSSS&9SMB66SB6B6SB&SBSS6BS^
We are looking for an agressive
couple to move into responsible
management position at new luxury
*Pt. complex. You must be
personable and have supervisory
skills. Apartment plus salary. Send
resume to P. O. Box 14038.
(E-10t-112-p)
Ladies! Do you know someone who
would like to learn professional
makeup techniques, have fun, and
make money, too? Call Cindy.
392-7673. (E-st-116-p)
English Masters, Doctoral student
capable of proofreading scholarly
material, high academic average,
work weekends, Call Primack
392-0724, 378-5866. (E-st-117-p)
AUTOS
Corvette convert, blueprinted
427-high-perf., 4 speed, 456 posl, ET
mags, hurst, crane, hooker, mallory,
etc. runs in mid. lls beautiful,
$2975,373-1524. (G-3t-116-p)
63 Corvair, 60,000 miles, new tires,
recently aligned, radio, body and
engine In good condition. S2OO. 914
SW Bth Ave., Apt. 29, La Mancha".
(G-3t-116-p)
1965 Plymouth Valiant, 4 dr., heater,
air-cond., radio, good tires, $450 *
also large crib, sls. Call 373-1500
after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-114-p)
Campus wheels . and then some!
Do you want cheap, dependable
transportation that just cant be
beat? Then come look at my 1967
Fiat... clean as can be and In
perfect condition. Brand new tires.
Only $550. Im telling It like it Is.
Call 376-6166 or 378-8211.
(G-st-U4-p)
1962 Austin-Healy Sprite, Stereo,
New tires & top. Looks good, runs
well. Must sell' Immediately! $395
Call 392-8712. (G-st-114-p)
VW-BUS 66 body, motor
excellent 40,000 mi s9so after
5:30 328 NW 14 St. (G-3t-117-p)
1970 V.W. BUG 4 months old, 5000
miles SIOO and assume balance call
376-2804. (G-st-117-p)
62 Austin Healy 3000, Radio, WW
Overdrive, Completely Rebuilt,
Immaculate Condition, 1235 39th
Ave. after 6:00 M F, all weekend.
(G-st-117-p)
PERSONAL
Uneasy Rider? Want to be a walking
Woodstock? The Thing for Spring Is
BIG AL'S Tie-Dying Service.
392-7329 eves. (J-117-2t-p)

Page 11

;.*.X.;.;.X:.:-X-;*X :*X-X*l*X-: X-X*X'X*: X;X;:;Xv
>X;X:XxXxXxXyXxXx;yX:XxXvXyX
PERSONAL
The square stars hide behind a mask
of melted gumdrops; therefore
happiness is assured FLASH SPEAKS
Pd. Pol. Adv. (J-lt-117-p)
ENCOUNTER GROUPS now
forming. Ugrads in 0 or 1 group
before leave name & number :
Jeffrey Hutter 392-1575(day)
376-8540(eve). (J-st-117-p)
Flea Market You have 23 2" ties in
every color. You need a captain
america cycle helmet, man. Display
your ties get the bread & do your
own thing. Union tent Apr. 28.
(J-lt-107-c)
Campus Yo Yo, hulahoop. Jump
rope, and ballbat contest. Take our
your old yo yo and work It back Into
condition. At the Union May 1.
(J-5M14-C)
Reitz Union tent revival Thurs.
Apr. 30 from 2-6 P.M. The empty
tent will be provided this one day for
anyone to come rap on anything.
(J-st-109-c)
The SPANISH MAIN. Guess what
were doing this week folks? All
posters are 25% off thats nothing,
so are we. While youre here or
there ... well whatever, take a look
at our new styles by Mary Ann and
Wanda. Like the new channel shirt
and muslin dresses, or even better a
new shipment of Male slacks from $6
to $8 (that arent here yet). But hold
on, we have something to top that:
Indian silk scarfs made by a 200 year
old Maharlshi in our back room (that
will be out to lunch when you come
in). Open Mon. Sat., 10-10, At
1642 W. Unlv. Ave. (J-4t-227-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, -WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English < dressmaker, KATHLEEEN.
Bikinis sl6, Dresses sl4. Add $3 for
1-day service If desired. Phone
378-0320. (J-10M07-P)
2 law students need a cook. Dinner in
exchange for food and conversation.
See Joe or Bill at 718-104 S.W. 16th
Ave. or call 378-3767. (J-3t-116-p)
Still no summer plans? How about
six weeks in Europe with a highly
experienced graduate couple? For
booklet call 372-5489 Now!
(J-st-115-p)
MENU! -Need your pad cleaned?
Want a party hosted? The Tidy Tigers
are now taking appts. Get yours In
early by calling the Tiger Den at
373-2760 and your leotard clad tigers
will be at your service! 11 (Jkst-114-p)
CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-113-p)
ENCOUNTER GROUPS now
forming. U. grads in 0 or 1 group
before leave name & number: Jeffrey
Hutter 392-1575(day)
376-8540(eve). (J-3t-117-p)
tmiMl I |
j 378 204 iT I fcSLI
THE WINNER £
GIG HIKSUPPORTING
YOUNG *| ACTOR
JANEFONPA
HK] u f j
I t.wh | qays
SHELLEY WINTERS
!N
JB
j

PERSONAL
The tent is where its happening.
Monday, Apr. 27, 11a.m.-6p.m.
Student Art Sale. Cali 392-1611 if
you'd like to participate. (J-3t-117-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous Kree method. Edmund
Dwyer Electrotogist. 372-8039 102
NW 2nd St. (J-21t-ll 7-p)
LOST St FOUND
BICYCLE red and black men's
english racer my only
transportation. Please return It where
you found it or call at 372-5796
No Questions Asked. (L-st-114-p)
FOUND: Car keys, McCarty Hall,
Call 392-2180. (L-3t-116-nc)
LOST. Pair of wire framed glasses.
Lost at Plaza of Americas. Call
392-8779. (L-3t-117-p)
SERVICES
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-115-p)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Unlv.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
Learn more advanced techniques of
enameling in special fri. AM class in
union rm. G-41. Call 392-1611 for
registration Information.
(M-117-2t-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-37t-p)
BsaSpi
mi w. w. im st. V lyl
HURRY! LAST 3 DAYS
HHf KATHARINE ROSS
i-M ROBERT BLAKE
WJ SUSAN CLARK
W(( TELL THEM
)) WILLIE BOY IS HERE
WINNER OF 4 ACADEMY
AWARDS INCLUDING
BEST SONG
/tTA THE SUNDANCE KID
yJpMWfISION* COtOW SYDtUWiSH
LaWSlllfcJ anAvs
mW. Am. |
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
BEST ACTOR
igikJOHN
WAYNE
AND
o** be



Page 12

!. The Florida AHiprtor, Tuesday, April 14/1970

$2222222222222?'
? fa', fy/tsSt iftalffr -1
# f
:^SwbP^' ''
A"
JIMMEY BAILEY
I QOil x Know

By ELLEN DUPUY
A mc-Um
wXvi PffXOY
Where the money for student
election campaigns conies from
is a simply complex
procedure.
Its a ample procedure in the
soliciting process Candidate
A says he*H win and asks for
support.
WHERE IT*S complex is for
the reporter to learn. Fraternity
presidents and campaign
treasurers all stare suspiciously
at the wage earner who is trying
to get a story.
For some reason its
considered bad politics to tell a
reporter who gives you money,
acknowledge you have more
money than your major
opponent and give your name as
a source if you do confess
your money sources or amounts.
But it is considered good
politics if the campaigner can
under-confess the amount of
money he has, change the
identity of the campaign
treasurer fast enough so the
reporter never catches up with
him and make money sources an
issue in you favor if youre
losing.
WHAT n* all boils down to is
campaigner evasiveness when
plain, straight, clear-cut
questions are asked. A reporter
should know better, though
these are politicians.
Focus Party Campaign
Treasurer Bruce Bokor said he
expects about $ 1,700 to be used
in the campaign for such things
as printing costs and advertising.
I have open books, but they
aren't completely filled in yet,
Bokor said at the beginning of
the campaign.
COSTS IN AN election
campaign have run from
advertising and printing costs to
the purchase of a cape and
aviator helmet to the purchase
of alcoholic refreshments for
campaign workers.
Campaign treasurers have
attributed sources of income to
fraternities, alumni associations,
individuals, and university
professors.
Do It Party Treasurer Herman
Hohen said his costs were
5 tf[ Delnufr Tm/...
...COEDS
Practical applications of
Karate Judo Aikido
-a two-month course
never before offered in
Gainesville Black Belt
instructor low rates
all interested call
378-4126 for
information

Politicking Fun Requires Funds

s?s7s?s7s7s?s7s?s?s?s7s?s7s?s?
"itifi'A- ~ iv ||P '| /in I 1 LjMBjL
ALAN HOWES
... whatever Focus says

about whatever Focus says
they are going to use. he cited
$1,500 for his partys use and
said, Unlimited funds arent
usable in the limited type of
campaign you deal with in a
campus election.
STUDENT FREEDOM Party
doesn't have a campaign
treasurer.
Its candidate for president,
Andy Kramer, said, We are not

Lett show them
who's boss!
Lets tell the administration "We mean
business!
lap) Theres only one way this can bedone:
' Re-orient our thinking towards action
and support.
_ Form a Union of Students. One
KTJB with strong and competent leader-
H wes Tucker,
W y Wattles, Maynard
' j J? and Brunson are
A y" ready to do
" hMtk one more
Your support.
Paid for by Do it! Party
For copies of the "Do it! Concept" send your name and address to Do it! Box 26-0220 South Hall
' Prtd Fdittlol Advertisement H?***fc
a

WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?

S?s?s?s?s7s7s?s7s7s?s7s?s?s?s?s?!
pipi;:'' |
SlpA B
H
KRAMER^
... doesn't require funds"

running a poop sheet' type of
campaign. We will use the
contact approach that doesnt
require funds.
Independent candidate
Robert Flash Matte has
submitted his financial report of
$17.98 to the Alligator.
JIMMEY BAILEY, the second
independent candidate, said, I
dont have any money and I
dont expect any, but Im not

*?s?s?s?s?s?s?s?s?s?s2£.?s?s?s?!
ip?*
'flH
' sf?; .....
M' ',
tmr
"FLASH" MATTE
... $17.98 submitted

going to reveal my sources
because I dont know who is
going to donate.
Campaigning costs in past
elections, according to a reliable
source who also thinks it bad
politics to give his name, said
that last years First Party spent
$4,500 with Charles Shepherd
winning the election.
In 1968 United First, with
Clyde Taylor, spent $6,500. The

: %^^^hi
STEVE UHLFELDER
... books open

defeated Bill Mcride of
Forward Party spent $5,000.
THE 1967 election, with the
original First Party and Charles
Shepherd again, spent $1,200.
The defeated United, with
Robert Blue, spent $4,500.
Campaigners are required to
submit a concise weekly
statement of the party finances.
But few reports have ever come
in.



the ugliest
words in college:
Quiz priday over the next six chapters
*

Why "Sweat It ?"
You can learn to read and study much
faster! The average Florida Reading Dynamics
student increases his reading and study speed
(including skimming and recalling) over 4.4
times and improves concentration over 10% as
tested by our standardized testing program.
Reading Dynamics graduates include over
1,000 University of Texas students, 100
professors, and many deans. As a matter of

PLAN TO ATTEND A FREE MINI LESSON
Today at 3, 5:30, & Bp.m.
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
i ** -
Upstairs at
1015 W. Univ. Ave.
(next to University City Photo Supply)

fact, our graduates include many of the
world's most famous respected
people .. Presidents, Senators, Movie Stars,
Scientists, and Business Leaders.
The best way to find out about the
remarkable Reading Dynamics course is to
come to a free MINI-LESSON. Here,
crammed into one exciting hour, you'll learn
what it's like to be able to read and study
faster. You will see a short, enjoyable movie

TN*V, April 14, 1970, Florida AMprtor,

and have all your questions answered. In
short, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to
read and study substantially faster than you
thought possible without skipping a single
word with better comprehension.
Important Note: We can only help those
who are NOW average or above average
readers. To check your own level of reading,
we suggest you contact the University of
Florida Reading Clinic.

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

DICKEY BOLSTERS KICKING GAME
Frat Punter Goes Big Time

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Sports Writer
A few weeks before spring
football practice began, a young
man walked through the open

Intramurals
-.7, .. 1 =By Steve Rohan =
Amid protests, upsets, and spectacular performances, the Orange
League moved into a five team race so tightly knotted that the
eventual winner may not be determined until the very last softball
game.
To straighten out the mess, a fraternity by fraternity evaluation of
the situation is necessary.
BETA THETA Pi remains, as of this day in first place but only by
13 points over the TEPs. The Betas were hurt by an early elimination
in tennis but will win back some of the points in golf.
The Betas are currently in fifth place in the golf tournament. Dale
Allem registered a blistering 35 on the back nine to pace the team.
The Betas may lose their first place ranking at the end of tennis but
stand a good chance of returning to the top position at the end of
golf.
The TEPs are headed for a share of first place at the close of tennis
as they defeated the SAEs. The TEPs failed to make the cut in golf
and will necessarily vacate the number one position after golf. The
TEPs are expected to make a better than average showing in track this
year but the recent decision by TEPs top softball players to play
independent instead of fraternity ball could cripple the TEPs in the all
important softball campaign. Sluggers Howard Hammar and Mike
Gordon have supposedly defected.
The Pikes are expected to take over the Orange League lead if they
can win tennis. They received an unexpected break in golf when their
team missed qualifying by one stroke but it was discovered that the
SPEs were using an illegal player. The Pikes moved into the eighth
qualifying position. The Pikes will be counting on a championship in
track and the loss of Andy Cheney and Carlos Alvarez to the ATOs
will help them. But the addition this year of FIJI poses a new problem
to the Pikes.
THE SIGMA CHIS fate looked bleak when they lost their opening
round tennis to the SAEs but golfer Rick Spain has almost
single-handedly reversed the fortunes of the Sigs. The Sigs were in
third place going into the second round of the tournament but the
curly haired, mop topped slammer posted a five under par 31 on the
back nine to put the Sigs in first place in the tournament, 11 strokes
ahead of their nearest competitors, the Delts. Spain missed a two foot
birdie putt on the 18th green that would have given him a 30. Spain
had a good deal of help in the tournament from his teammates, Kipp
Minter and Kent Whitmore who shot 37 and 38 respectively. With a
first place in golf the Sigs could move preciously close or even into
first place in the league.
The SAEs moved into fourth place in golf despite a lack-luster
performance Thursday and can stay in contention for the Cup with a
good performance in the sport.
BASEBALL
Gators Take On Rollins College, 3:00 at Perry Field
FOOTBALL
Spring Drills on Practice Field

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
| Kjmtidoi Tried I
I 214 N.W. 13th st.
t7fi479 114 S.W. 34th St. V
m J/0-04/Z 372-3649
m ;"' y jTi
1 jg 1 DINNER Dun I
I BOX vvy I
3 Pc. Chicken Reg. 1.25 V
Mashed Potatoes
I c% G sl BRING COUPON I
Rolls ________ _ J

GATOR SPORTS

door of Coach Doug Dickeys
office looking for a job as a
punter.
After exhibiting his talents on
the field, he got the job.
JOHN JAMES, a junior from

Panama City, never played
football in high school, but it
looks as though he will be doing
quite a bit of punting for the
Gators next fall.
James is a pre-law student
majoring in economics. He said
he went out for the team
because they needed a punter,
and he felt he could kick pretty
good.
James has good form,
Dickey said of his new prospect.
He has fine leg action and is
showing progress. During the
scrimmage Saturday at Florida
Field, James kicked 40-yard
punts, constantly, under the
pressure of a rushing first-team
line.
I WAS KIND of worried at
first, James said of the
pressure, but Im getting used
to it.
The coaches have really been
great, James added, especially
Bobby Joe Green. Green
punted for the Gators in 1958
and 59 setting records that still
hold. He played pro ball for the
Steelers and is now with the
Chicago Bears. Green comes out
twice a week to instruct the
kickers.
James said he has learned a lot
since practice began two weeks
ago.
HE PLAYED basketball and
golf in high school at Panama
City Bay and he played in the
fraternity league for Sigma Chi
last fall.
When asked what his longest
kick has been, the 6-1, 165
pounder said, I dont know. I
just kick it as high and as far as I
can every time.
In the place-kicking
department, the Gators have two
possibilities. Richard Franco,
who kicked last year, has
returned along with sophomore
George Wester.
FRANCO KICKED a 47-yard
field goal during the scrimmage
Saturday and Dickey praised the
juniors improvement.
Fish Story
The way to catch a king is
with a silver spoon.
Thats what Randy Tichner
and his wife reported Saturday
after fishing southwest of
Egmont Key.
The couple reported in with a
kingsized catch, 81 kingfish
ranging from six to 19 pounds.
All were caught with lures called
silver spoons.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor
BO BERRY
Sports Writer

Page 14

Wester is a safety man who
kicked on the freshman team
last fall. He kicks with the side
of his foot, soccer-style, and has
kicked seven out of nine extra
point attempts this spring.
Westers father taught soccer
in Miami where George played
for North Miami High. He
wanted to play soccer here, but
was unable to go out due to
conflicts with football.
Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information coll
3 76 0080
g? HZOMWOOP
coir emo
H I 391 AVfNUt

voi-Krwcr* or Kci)ir. inr.
i||ByiiMflpdf:^^^B
Sometimes we get the feeling
were being followed.
. J*.
Everybody's getting into the act.
Everybodys making a small car.
And since we've made more of them than any anyone
one anyone else, we thought wed pass along some things
weve learned about the business over the years:
First off, there's no doubt about it, the only way
to make an economy car is expensively.
So Rule No. 1, dont scrimp.
Get yourself the best engineers in the business
and then hire 9,000 or so top inspectors to keep
them on their toes.
Next, try to develop an engine that's not a gas gasguzzler.
guzzler. gasguzzler. If you can get it to run on pints of oil
instead of quarts, great. If you can get it to run on
air instead of water, fantastic.
Work, on things to make your car last longer.
Like giving it 45 pounds of paint to protect its top
and a steel bottom to protect its bottom.
Important: Make sure you can service any year
car you make. There's nothing worse than having
someone find out that a part they need to make
their car go is no longer available.
Finally, spend less time worrying about what
your car looks like and more time worrying about
how it works.
Perfecting a good economy car is a very time timeconsuming
consuming timeconsuming business. So far it has consumed 25
years of our time.
MILLER-BROWN /ft
MOTORS, INC
| DEALER
4222 NW 13th STREET
PHONE 376-4552

~ The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 14, 1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
808 THOMAS
Sports Writer

S&lMHBpb U§f
Wm
JOHN JAMES
... consistent 40-yd punts
i 7 |
Student Special
Any car or color!
|
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665



RECORDS broken

Swimmers Seventh In AAU

The swimming Gators closed
out their 1970 season in
record-breaking fashion as they
placed seventh out of a giant
field of 45 teams entered in the
National Amateur Athletic
Union Championships.
The four-day meet, which
started last Thursday and drew
nearly 700 of the nations best
swimmers, saw the Gators break
all kinds of UF records in
Cincinnatis short course 25-yard
Keating Natatorium.
NONE OF THE Gator
swimmers, however, were able to
break any of the national
records. Gator Coach Bill Harlan
said there were just too many
outstanding swimmers entered.
Over-all the Gators broke nine
of their own records in
qualifying and championship
heats.
The UFs medley relay team
of Bill Strate, Jimmy Perkins,
Steve. McDonnell and Bruce
Williams produced the Gators
best performance, finishing
fourth in a field of 30 teams
entered. Their time of 3:29.7
was a new Gator record that will
go down in the books until next
season.
THE UFs 400-yd. freestyle
relay team, which qualified in an
extremely tight field of 16
teams, finished fifth over-all.
Kevin Kierstead, Mark McKee,
and Jamie Murphy and Williams
set a record there with a 3:07.9
time.
The Gators top individual
performer of the meet was
All-American Williams who
recorded a seventh in the
100-yd. freestyle and an eighth,
in the 200-yd. freestyle. Both
times were good for new UF
records.
Other top Gator performances
include freshman Gary
Cheloskys seventh in the
200-yd. breastroke and 11th in
the 200-yd. individual medley,
which were both new UF
ABA Gets Miami
NEW YORK (UPI) The
American Basketball Association
officially took over the
operation of the Miami
Floridians franchise Monday,
and commissioner Jack Dolph
said the ABA would attempt to
restructure the ownership of the
Floridians, one of the poorest
teams financially in the league.
The commissioner added that
the league may try to operate
the Floridians on a regional
basis, with games being played in
other sections of Florida and
Miami serving as home base. The
Carolina Cougars operate
successfully in this manner.
Dolph said the major reason
for the financial failure in Miami
was the lack of a suitable place
to play. The Floridians played
their home games in two arenas
- at Dinner Key Auditorium
with a seating capacity of 6,713
and at Miami Dade North Junior
College with a capacity of 5,500.
Â¥d pin qX
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

records. Bill Domeys 16th place
finish in the 100-yd. backstroke
was also another UF record.
THE TEAMS performance
was topped off with the 800-yd.
freestyle relay team of Pete
Orschiedt, Kierstead, McKee and
Williams finishing 11th out of
approximately 30 entered teams.
Sixteen national records were
snapped with Olympic
Champion Debbie Meyer leading
the way as she lowered her own
record in the womens 1,650-yd.
freestyle marathon swim by
10 with a 16:54.64
performance.
John Kinsella followed suit
and picked up his second
American record Sunday night
in the mens 1,650 event with a
15:35.93, eliminating the record
held by Mike Burton. Kinsella
previously set a new mark in the
mens 500-yd. freestyle.
IN ADDITION to Kinsellas
two record swims, other double
record breakers included Brian
Job of the Santa Clara (Calif.)
Swim Club, Susie Atwood of the
Lakewood (Calif.) Aquatic Club,
and Gary Hall, the Indiana
University star.

Twuwi)
RADIO
DIAL 1390
FIRST
* GATOR SPORTS REPORTS
TOP POPULAR MUSIC
CAMPUS AND LOCAL NEWS
"COME SEE US IN THE MALL

Hall set new American records
in the mens 200-yd. backstroke
and the 400-yd. individual
medley.
Job, a Stanford University
freshman, set new marks in the
mens 100-yd. and 200-yd.
breaststroke events.
MISS ATWOOD set her
records in the 100-yd. and
200-yd. backstroke events.
Miss Atwood and Hall were
the recipients of this years
Robert J. H. Kiphuth award as
the individual high point winners
in the mens and womens
competition of the AAU. Both
are repeaters from last year.
Coach Jim Haines Santa Clara
Club teams outdistanced
everyone in total points to
capture both the mens and
womens AAU club
championships for 1970.
The womens team amassed
327 points to finish ahead of
arch-rival Lakewood Aquatic for
the third straight year. The
mens team picked up 286
points in staying ahead of the
University of Southern
California.

<;-w.v.vo:w:t:o:.:.:.v..v.v.v.AVMV.vv.w.V.v.vwMV.v.vw^WAV//^A .v.V
j Cassius Suggests |
Frazier Retire. Too 1
I §
NEW YORK (UPI) Cassius Clay Muhammad Ali, writing
| in the latest issue of Esquire Magazine, has reiterated his ij:
5 permanent retirement from the ring and suggested that Joe §
: Frazier do so too and join him in a battle for Biwack freedom in ij
ij theU.S. ij
ij: ... I dont need no prestige at beating up nobody, the ij
ij former heavyweight champion wrote in commenting on any ij
ij possibility of a return to professional boxing. Im tired. And I ij
ij want to be the first Black champion that got out that didnt get ij
ij whipped ... boxing ... is childs play ... the glory ... is ij
j nothing compared to what a man gets for taking a stand for the ji;
: freedom of his people ... $
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Tuesday, April 14, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Floride Alligator, Tuesday, April 14, 1970

WINS MASTERS PLAYOFF

Casper Beats Littler

AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI)
Two-time U. S. Open champion
Billy Casper finally added a
Masters green coat to his huge
collection of gold trophies
Monday when he crushed his
long-time friend and California
neighbor, Gene Littler, by five
strokes in an 18-hole play-off.
Casper, who failed by one
stroke of gaining his first Masters
title last year, made good on his
14th try by shooting a
3-under-par 69 over the
sun-baked Augusta National
Course while Littler, who had
played sub-par golf on each of
the previous four days, had a
2-over-par 74.
THE TWO HAD finished the
regulation 72 holes of the 34th
Masters Sunday with matching
9-under-par 2795, one stroke
ahead of South Africas Gary
Player, who lost his chance to
join them in the playoff by
missing a seven-foot putt on the
final hole.
For his victory, the
38-year-old Casper, one of three
golfers ever to win more than a
million dollars, earned $25,000
more and that green coat that
had eluded him for so long.
Littler, who had been making a
similar unsuccessful effort since
first coming here in 1954 as the
MAJOR LEAGUE STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
(Night Gaines Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 5 1 .833
Detroit 3 3 .500 2
Washington 3 3 .500 2
Boston 2 3 .400 2Vi
New York 2 3 .400 2V4
Cleveland 2 4 .333 3
WEST W L PCT GB
California 5 0 1.000
Minnesota 3 0 1.000 1
Milwaukee 3 3 .500 Vh
Kansas City 2 4 .333 3%
Oakland 1 3 .250 3%
Chicago 1 5 .167 4%
MONDAYS RESULTS
Kansas City at Minnesota, post postponed,
poned, postponed, rain and snow
Milwaukee at Oakland, night
(Only Games Scheduled)
TUESDAYS GAMES
Kansas City at Minnesota
Cleveland at Detroit
New York at Boston
Seattle at Oakland
Chicago at California
Washington at Baltimore
NATIONAL LEAGUE
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Philadelphia 3 2 .600
St. Louis 3 2 .600
New York 3 2 .600
Pittsburgh 3 2 .600
Chicago 1 3 .250 VA
Montreal 1 4 .200 2
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 6 2 .750
San Francisco 4 3 .571 ltt
Atlanta 3 3 .500 2
San Diego 3 3 .500 2
Houston 3 3 .500 2
Los Angeles 1 5 .167 4
MONDAYS RESULTS
Los Angeles at Houston, night
San Diego at Cincinnati, night
San Francisco at Atlanta, night
(Only Games Scheduled)
TUESDAYS GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York
Philadelphia at Chicago
Montreal at St. Louis
San Francisco at Atlanta
San Diego at Cincinnati
Los Angeles at Houston

defending U. S. Amateur
champion, got a $17,500
consolation prize.
Mondays playoff before a
huge gallert that swarmed across
the course in hot sunshine, was
almost over as soon as it began
as Casper leaped into a
four-stroke lead on the first four
holes with some great recovery
shots and dead-eye putting.
THE STONY-FACED Casper,
golfs Player Os The Year in
1966 when he made up seven
strokes in the fourth round to
win the U. S. Open and again in
1968 when he won a record
$205,000, wasted no time taking
command. K
Casper turned the front nine
in 3-under-par 33, five strokes
ahead of the 39-year-old Littler
who was struggling at 38.
Mondays victory was a
personal triumph for Casper who

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49e]|

was the third round leader in
both the 1969 Masters and this
one. Casper lost to George
Archer by a stroke last year and
failed to win this year in
regulation play when a 10-foot
putt on the final hole hit the cup
and spun out.
The winning prize jumped
Casper from 18th to fifth on this
years money list with $53,966.
Littler, who hasn't played nearly
as well so far this year as he did
in 1969, doubled his previous
earnings for the year to $34,850.
Double Talent
NEW YORK (UPI)
Broadcaster Kyle Rote is best
known as Southern Methodist
and New York Giants football
star, yet Rote was good enough
on the diamond to be offered a
major league baseball contract.

| 1
(Dolphins Hooked!
P |
gj NEW YORK Football Commissioner Pete Rozelle charged
gj Monday that the Miami Dolphis were guilty of tampering in
I their signing of former Baltimore Coach Don Shula, and he
awarded Miamis first round choice in the 1971 National
Football League draft to the Colts.
Shula, the head Baltimore coach since 1964, signed a Miami j
contract Feb. 18. One of his assistants, Don McCafferty, later j
was elevated to succeed him with the Colts.
Holzman Top Coach t
' I
NEW YORK Red Holzman, who was hesitant in taking the |
New York Knicks head coaching job in 1967 because he was |
§ happy being the teams chief scout, Monday was named the
g National Basketball Association Coach of the Year by a panel of
40 sports writers.
I did not want the job when they offered it to me, |
Holzman confessed. But they told me they wanted me to have
§ it, and when you work for people eight years and they tell you |
they would like you to do something, what else can you do?
:c You do it, right? Os course you do. gj:
::< Holzman received 17 votes in the balloting for coach of the gj
ijij year, with Los Angeles Joe Mullaney second with nine votes. :$