Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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POOL CHAMPIONS BATTLE CLAV PH,PPS

Michael Carella, of Miami Dade\l.C., is one of the
nation's 12 best pool players that are here for the
collegiate championships being held today and

'OBSTRUCTING JUSTICE

Kirk Aides, Deputies
Arrested In Manatee

BRADENTON (UPI) A
federal marshal arrested two
gubernatorial aides, the Manatee
County sheriff and five deputies
Thursday on charges of
obstructing justice, but the aides
locked themselves in an office
and refused to come out.
The gubernatorial aides were
here to administer the county
school system on orders from
Gov. Claude Kirk, who was
trying to block a federal
desegregation order.
ALL SEVEN men were
charged with obstructing justice.
Kirk himself was in
Tallahassee where his wife,
Erika, gave birth yesterday to a
10-pound, one-ounce boy, their
second child.
Kirk suspended the county
school board Wednesday night
and placed the schools under his
own control to avoid a federal
desegregation order which would

SECEDE FROM U.S., FLA.
Flash: 'Dayglo The Plaza Trees

By RICK ROSKOWE
Staff Writer
Robert Flash Matte,
independent candidate, has
released new proposals in his bid
for student body president.
Matte, 4AS, said he is running
for emperor. He revealed his
most important proposal. I
want to dayglo all the trees in
the Plaza of Americas, he said,
so that the giraffes wont bump
into them at night.
PREVIOUSLY Matte called
for UF secession from the
United States and Florida. By
seceding we wont have to rely
on the United States or Florida.
We can apply to the oil-rich

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

%-rji &
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KIRK
... aides arrested
have gone into effect today.
DEPUTY U. S. Marshal
Johnny Barr was meeting with
aides Lloyd Hagaman and Dick
Warner when the two men got
up, went into the
superintendents office and

FLASH
... when asked if he had more to say, he replied yes"

Kingdom of Kuwait for
operating funds.
I reserved the University

University of Florida, Gainesville

Saturday in the Union Ballroom. See story on page
25.

locked the door. Barr told them
they were under arrest but they
refused to budge.
Ten riot-equipped highway
patrol troopers had entered the
room moments before and were
locked in with the aides.
The marshal pounded on the
door for a few minutes, then
left. He said he would return
shortly.
THE ARREST orders were
based on alleged violation of a
federal court order issued in
Tampa Tuesday forbidding
interference with the
desegregation plan.
Sheriff Richard Weitenfield
and the five deputies were
arrested when they refused to
move from the doors to the
superintendents office, federal
officials said.
About 100 Negroes marched
(SEE 'KIRK' PAGE 3)

Auditorium for an April 16 gum
chewing contest among the
presidential candidates, Matte

Senate Passes
Young Vote;
House Stalls
TALLAHASSEE (UP!) A constitutional amendment to lower
voting age from 21 to 18 passed the Senate overwhelmingly Thursday
but the House almost simultaneously added an amendment to a
similar bill which could force a deadlock.
The Senate approved its bill 36-9 but the House delayed a final vote
until this afternoon. Saying it was hypocrisy to let 18-year-olds
vote but not let them drink, make contracts or have a multitude of
other responsibilities and rights conferred upon adults.
THE HOUSE voted 77-38 to remove all disabilities of non-age
from persons in the 18-to-21 age bracket.
You need three-fifths to pass it and you aint got it unless you
pass my amendement, too, Rep. Jerome Pratt, D-Palmetto, told the
bill sponsor, Rep. Gerald Lewis, D-Miami.
A constitutional amendment requires three-fifths approval of both
houses.
PRATT sponsored the amendment giving 18-year-olds full legal
rights and responsibilities, saying he had changed his earlier opposition
to lowering the voting age after being convinced that there were as
many conservatives as liberals and radicals among youth.
But I dont think we ought to go halfway first class citizen and
halfway a second-class citizen.

Next Nominee
From The North

See Editorial Page 8
Related Story Page 3
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon said Thursday
he wants his next Supreme
Court nominee to be from
outside the South because he
feels the Senate will not accept a
conservative Southerner.
Nixon told reproters he had
told Attorney General John N.
Mitchell to recommend someone
from outside the South for his
third nominee for a vacant seat
on the court.
THE FIRST two Nixon
nominees, Judges Clement F.
Haynsworth and G. Harrold
Carswell, were beaten in the
Senate.
Both are Southerners
Haynesworth from South
Carolina and Carswell from

said.
He said Flash would
perform in Fantasy Trips

Florida.
In his first public comment on
the Senates rejection
Wednesday of Judge Carswell,
Nixon said both Carswell and
Haynsworth had been subjected
(SEE 'NIXON' PAGE 6)
Inside
The Gator
THERE ARE no easy
answers for the Lake
Wauburg problems. For a
special report page 2
Classifieds 14
Editorials..; 8
Entertainment 22
Letters . 9
Movies 14
Orange and Blue 18
Small Society 24
Whats Happening 5

Incorporated if the other
candidates didnt show up.
A PROPOSAL to solve the
ticket price implementation
controversy was advanced.
Everybody should disguise
themselves as stadium seats the
night before the game,
I want to get a hunchback to
ring the bells at the Century
Tower, Matte said. I want to
get Albert a woman, a female
alligator.
Ive meditated to the point that
I think I can lay an egg. I
meditate because I want to find
out what is on the other side of of
- of sky.
Asked if he had anymore to
say, Flash said, Yes.



Page 2

!, The Florida AlGgator, Friday, April 10,1970

Wauburg: No Answer To Problems

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
There are no pat answers for the
Wauburg question.
Plans for a new $123,050 camp on the
south shore of the lake have met with
some objections from environmentalists,
but plans and objections alike are
tentative.
MUCH DEPENDS on the biological
state of the lake, which is not precisely
known, and the exact type of facilities
proposed.
The fundamental question is: Do
students want an outdoor water sports,
picnic and camping facility on Lake
Wauburg?
If such a camp is built, the lake could
become choked with aquatic growth like
Alice, or possibly polluted. No one
knows.
IT IS KNOWN the lake is now
eutrophic rich in organic nutrients
which nourish a wide variety of plant
growth.
The lake is not polluted, and pollutants
have not increased over the past three
years.
Old Camp Wauburg on the north shore
is not usable unless most of the buildings
are renovated and the road repaired, at a
cost which could run as high as that of
the new camp.
CAMP WAUBURG had an average of
237 visitors per day during the last
reporting year, for a total of 61,582
visits. Most visitors were students, with
faculty accounting for less than eight per

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... bath house sign on the northside

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.
THE QUARTERLY IS HERE!

plan! objections tentative

cent of the total, according to the
estimate given by Reitz Union Assistant
Director of Operations William Osborne.
There were over 40 days when total
attendance was over 500, and 10 days
when it was over 1,000.
Attendance declined slightly from the
1965 total of 70,803 to 66,349 in 1967,
then dropped off sharply to 49,817 in
1968. Last year brought the total back up
to 61,582.
BUS SERVICE to the lake and
improved facilities, including an open
pavilion and campground, should boost
attendance at the new camp.
In spite of past declines in attendance,
Osborne said the figures justify a
Wauburg facility.
Professionally speaking, I feel that if
65,000 people visited last summer, they
are trying to tell me something.
FURTHER eutrophy of the lake is a
possibility that has not been scientifically
investigated. A SIO,OOO study was
proposed last December by Dr. Patrick
Berzonik, assistant professor of
environmental engineering, to determine
what the present biological state of the
lake is and what the future state might
be.
The proposal was turned down in
January for lack of funds. Without this
study, the new camps effect on the lake
cannot be predicted, according to
Berzonik.
If they are going to spend the amount
of money they are talking about, they
ought to first know whether the lake is
suitable for such a development,

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TOM KISKO
DISREPAIR
... boat shed and other building in poor shape

Berzonik said.
EUTROPHY could be increased by soil
runoff from cleared hill slopes, seepage of
treated sewage effluents from septic tanks
at the new camp, or by present septic
tanks and nearby pastures bordering the
lake. All these sources provide organic
nutrients.
Two septic tanks are proposed for the
initial construction. Effluents from the
tanks arc dispersed over a large area of
soil, but would eventually drain into the
lake.
Land now covered by a blanket of
humus could wash into the lake. Normal
landscaping methods should hold runoff
to a minimum, however.
POLLUTION OF the lake is a remote
possibility. All building plans must be
approved by the Alachua County Health
Department.
I do not foresee approving any plan
that might cause pollution of the lake,
environmental health director B. C.
Pafford said.
Present plans for two septic tanks may
not be adequate, however. State law
requires a septic tank capacity of 10
gallons for each visitor expected per day
for swimming and bathing facilities. If a
maximum of 1,000 visitors per day are
expected, state requirements for
swimming and bathing areas would call
for a septic tank capacity of 10,000
gallons.
ARCHITECT Don Puckett, author of
the feasibility study now for the new

Berzonik said.
EUTROPHY could be increased by soil
runoff from cleared hill slopes, seepage of
treated sewage effluents from septic tanks
at the new camp, or by present septic
tanks and nearby pastures bordering the
lake. All these sources provide organic
nutrients.
Two septic tanks are proposed for the
initial construction. Effluents from the
tanks arc dispersed over a large area of
soil, but would eventually drain into the
lake.
Land now covered by a blanket of
humus could wash into the lake. Normal
landscaping methods should hold runoff
to a minimum, however.
POLLUTION OF the lake is a remote
possibility. All building plans must be
approved by the Alachua County Health
Department.
I do not foresee approving any plan
that might cause pollution of the lake,
environmental health director B. C.
Pafford said.
Present plans for two septic tanks may
not be adequate, however. State law
requires a septic tank capacity of 10
gallons for each visitor expected per day
for swimming and bathing facilities. If a
maximum of 1,000 visitors per day are
expected, state requirements for
swimming and bathing areas would call
for a septic tank capacity of 10,000
gallons.
ARCHITECT Don Puckett, author of
the feasibility study now for the new

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camp, said the plans allowed a total
capacity of 3,600 gallons or less. Puckett
emphasized that the plans were tentative
and would be modified to fit health
requirements.
All you can do in a feasibility study is
make an educated guess as to what
facilities people will want and how much
should be allowed for each building, said
Puckett.
Plans for later construction called for
eventual replacement of the septic tanks
with a sewage treatment plant.
SUGGESTIONS have been made for
directing the septic tank flow southward
into another drainage basin. No action
has been taken yet because planning is still
in a generalized stage, according to Melvin
L. Sharpe, presidential research assistant.
Sharpe, head of the Wauburg
Committee, said he felt the project
should go ahead even though the
proposed study was not made at present.
We feel that pollution of the lake is
not eminent. If pollution eventually
makes the lake unsafe for swimming, the
lake will still have some recreational
value.
We feel that pollution of the lake is
not eminent and that the study can be
completed before the lake is polluted. If
pollution finally rules out swimming, the
lake would have some recreational
facilities.
Last Thursday the committee
presented its plans to a committee of
seven student senators, who are now
preparing their recommendations on Lake
Wauburg for presentation to the student
senate. The senate will decide whether to
appropriate funds for the project.



YSA's Rights
Fought For By
FSU Leaders

Carswell 'Deserted,
Ziegler Charges

LOS ANGELES (UPI) President Nixons
communications director said Wednesday the defeat
of Judge G. Harrold Carswell was wider than
expected because some Republican senators
deserted him when they knew theirs would not be
the decisive vote.
Herbert G. Klein told newsmen the White House
had expected approval of Carswell as a Supreme
Court justice by a very close vote.
KLEIN said he viewed the rejection as a political
move to keep the court balanced to the liberal

Demonstrators
Blast Kirk
PAGE ONeJ
to the county school
administration building earlier
today to protest Kirks action in
taking over the schools.
THE PRINCIPALS are back
in their normal schools, the
teachers are in their normal
schools, and the pupils are
attending their own schools,
said Dr. William Maloy, Kirks
education advisor who was in
charge of the operation.
Kirk suspended the school
board members for the second
time Wednesday night, just
hours before they were to
implement the desegregation
order. He charged them with
malfeasance and misfeasance.
U.S. DISTRICT Judge Ben
Krentzman, who had issued the
order effective Thursday had no
comment on Kirks move.
Kirks move was another step
in his avowed plan to go before
the U. S. Supreme Court on the
issue of busing.
The desegregation plan for
Manatee, which involves the
shifting of 2,700 of 17,000
students and 107 teachers,
would require considerable
busing.
THE DEMONSTRATORS
were peaceful. They marched
quietly around the
administration building with
their leader, the Rev. C. R.
Bryant.
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The Young Socialist Alliance (YSA)
made a gain in their bid for recognition at
Floridas state universities.
Florida State Universitys Student
Body President Chuck Sherman Thursday
said he will go to court challenging the
Board of Regents refusal to recognize
YSA as a legitimate student group.
PLEASE be advised that students will
not tolerate the restrictions of the
freedom of expression of any individual
or group on this campus, said a telegram
to regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler
signed by 17 FSU student leaders,
including Sherman.
Others signing the telegram included
student government officers, editors of

I \ j Mam |

point of view.
He said that if present justices had been subjected
to the same kind of litmus test they would not be
there.
I have never seen such debate over such fine
points of an appointee, Klein said.
The vote illustrates the amount of difficulty the
President has working with the Democratic party in
the majority, Klein said.
He said it also points up the problems of
discipline within the Presidents own party.

' o
the student newspaper and fraternity
representatives.
THE PLANNED lawsuit, Sherman said,
will be paid for by private contributions,
not student activities fees. He said they
had about SI,OOO.
YSA first tried to apply last quarter at
UF. At that time, they were not allowed
to apply pending a decision from Kibler.
Kibler told UF President Stephen C.
OConnell last week that the regents ban
on SDS and Southern Students
Organizing Committee applied to YSA.
CALLING YSA an organization
dedicated to the principle of revolution,
Kibler said it had no place on the college
campus.

END THE WAR NOW!
HELP BUILD
APRIL 15 GAINESVILLE MARCH
April 18-March on I
St. Petersburg
come to the
SMC Meeting Sun., Apr. 12
7PM Rm 361 Reitz Union

Friday, April 10,1970, Tha Florida Alfigator,

YSA members have claimed that
Kiblers and the UF administrations
actions constitute a violation of basic civil
rights such as freedom of speech and
assembly, due process and equal
protection.
Locally, YSA has sought help from the
ACLU but has held off action until *a
Florida Supreme Court decision was
rendered on a case involving SDS at
Tallahassee.
Kiblers statement applied to both
chapters and both UF and FSU
administrations recently adopted
measures forbidding organizations refused
recognition the right to meet under the
sponsorship of recognized organizations.

Page 3



I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

Page 4

Dean Lanzillotti 'Takes Long Strides

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
The College of Business
Administration has a new dean
who thinks young.
This sounds familiar but it
definitely is not because Dean
Robert F. Lanzillotti is one of
that rare breed that follows
through with youthful vigor to
institute ideas.
SINCE COMING to UF in
July, Lanzillotti has, among
other things,
made teacher evaluation
mandatory for all his faculty
members;
increased student
participation at the
administrative level;
0 directed that his colleges
procedures for such matters as
advancement and committee
organization, be written down
into by-laws; and
arranged to maintain
communications with his
students by personally teaching
undergraduate courses.
In less than one year,
Lanzillotti has vigorously
committed the College of
Business Administration to
making itself relevant to the lives
of its students.
He is particularly concerned
with avoiding a trade school
atmosphere.
I THINK YOU have to be
first an academic school. You
can give students professional
training, yes, but you have to
limit it, he said.
Lanzillotti believes society
does business students a serious
disservice in teaching them
better ways to return an
investment or increase
production when it does not also
teach them how to get along
with their employes or preserve
their environment.
There are many hypocrisies
in our society. I can understand
why students stand up in
protest, even though I
disapprove of some of their
excessive methods, he said.
THE BUSINESS community
especially has shown a
continuous insensitivity to the
ills of our society, he adds.
Lanzillotti is convinced the
business executive of tomorrow
will have to be deeply aware of
the social, political and cultural
environment in which business
operates
He therefore strives to give his
students an approach to
learning that will stay with
VINGSf
%FoodHoslf
... giving
Gainesville twice
the service...
1802 W. UNIV.AVE.
1430 S.W. 13th ST.

AT COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

them long after current business
practices are forgotten or
outmoded.
IDEALLY LANZILLOTTI
would like to see any
improvements made effected at
the overall university level.
Every college in a university
system is affected by the
university structure. You cant
have a good college in a desert,
he said.
In an effort to help UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
fulfill his promise to make UF
first in the South, second to
none in the nation, Lanzillotti
is trying hard to make UFs
College of Business
Administration one of the finest
in the country.
HE STRESSES this does not
mean expanding the number of
courses or increasing the
enrollment, things he labels
academic imperialism.
Rather, he said, it means
improving the quality of the
courses and building a faculty
that will turn on the students.
The College of Business
Administration must constantly
seek out and attract to its ranks

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LANZILLOTTI
. . new dean thinks young
the highest caliber of new
faculty members. Scholars who
will bring new ideas, principles
of varying and sometimes
conflicting philosophies,
stimulating teaching and an
interest in research, Lanzillotti
says.
HE FEELS IN the past too
much emphasis was placed on
dismissing incompetent
instructors and too little on
attracting exceptionally

qualified faculty members.
The issue is not one of
incompetence, the issue is
he explained.
Through aggressive recruiting,
Lanzillotti, who personally
interviews all prospective new
faculty, has supervised the hiring
of a number of young scholars in
business and social sciences
direct from the nations leading
colleges and universities.
ALTHOUGH many of these
new instructors could pass for
students in their youthful
appearance, they have without
exception distinguished
themselves through research and
scholarly writing.
We are competing for young
minds who will turn the young
people on, Lanzillotti affirms.
At the same time Lanzillotti is
attempting to improve the
existing faculty. His major
complaint here is with those
instructors who have retired
early through their failure to
remain keenly aware of what is
happening in their field.
LANZILLOTTI feels the
failure to update material, like
the failure to present material in

a stimulating manner, is an
unintentional fault of most
guilty instructors.
As a means of bringing these
shortcomings to the attention of
those instructors concerned
Lanzillotti has required every
faculty member in his college to
take some form of teacher
evaluation.
While these results are solely
for the benefit of the instructors
this year and need not be
submitted to his office,
Lanzillotti says he will not
consider a request for a salary
promotion, position adjustment
or tenure approval without the
presentation of a persuasive
teacher evaluation report.
SIMILARLY, Lanzillotti has
asked each of his department
chairmen to evaluate his own
department. These evaluations
must review a departments
content, justify it, determine
what areas are not covered and
why, and provide an opinion on
what areas should be dropped.
Still another tool for
improvement is seen in active
student participation in the
colleges administration.



Reuter Calls For
Abortion Law
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A liberalized abortion bill, similar
to one enacted in Maryland last week, was introduced in the
Florida Senate Wednesday by Republican Sen. Cliff Reuter of
Sharpes.
No residence requirement or consent of physicians is required
under the bill.
THIS SHOULD be entirely the mothers decision, Reuter
said.
The only requirement is that the operation be performed by a
licensed physician.
A side benefit, he said, was reported in Japan where very
few cases of child abuse have been recorded since abortion was
legalized.
Reuters bill would wipe out the present Florida law which
permits abortions only to save the life of the expectant mother.

WHAT'S HAPPENING

THE NEW AGE: Aquarius is meeting today.
Everyone interested should go to the Comer
Drugstore at midnight. The address is 1823 NW 2nd
Ave.
SWING ALONG: The Gainesville Singles Club is
holding a cook-out at the Ironwood Country Club
tomorrow at 7:30 pjn. BYOB from 9 ti 11...
MOBILIZATION: The SMC meets Sunday in
room 361 of the Reitz Union. The subject is the
April 15 Mobilization.
WOMEN SIDE: Savant-UF will hold a leadership
conference Sunday, at 2:30 pjn. in the Union. For
more info, call Kathy Corrigan at 378-5789.
CRICKET ANYONE?: All Cricket Players meet
today at 7:45. All interested call 372-2224 or
376-7746.
LEFT MEET: YSA Meets at 5 p.m. in the library

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Black Culture Needed
For Education Students

of the UF Presbiterian Center, 1402 W. University
Ave.
BLACK AND BEAUTIFUL: As part of Black
Week, the Bethune-Cookman Chorus and the
Florida A&M Theatre Group will be at the
University Auditorium tonight at 8.
UNION MOVIES:
Today: Petulia, 5:30,8 and 10:30 pjn.
Saturday: Petulia, Same times.
9 Sunday: Citizen Kane, 7 and 9:30 pjn.
All movies are shown in the Union Auditorium.
RIGHT ON: The Engineering Fair Coronation
Ball is really Tomorrow. This is at the Holiday Inn
South at 9 pjn.
GLEEFUL: UF Glee Clubs sing today, 12:30
pjn., Reitz Union, first floor grand staircase and
Saturday, 8:15 pjn., University Auditorium.

By ROBERT FRASER
Alligator Editor-In-Chief
Confronting UF elementary education students
with black culture is the objective of the College of
Educations Black Studies program.
The need for familiarization with black culture,
according to Dr. Robert Blume, arises out of the
typical education students lack of exposure to an
integrated school system.
MOST STUDENTS, Blume predicts, will be
teaching in an integrated setting after graduation.
The program consists of small group discussions
in which Rev. T. A. Wright, pastor of the Gainesville
Mount Carmel church, presides.
In addition, six lectures have been scheduled by
Rev. Wright, three of which have been held during
the winter and the early part of the spring quarter.
THE NEXT lecture will feature Mrs. Doris

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10 a.m. 5 p.m.

Friday, April 10.1970. Tha Florida Alligator.
A v \*>

Welcome, a UF graduate student, lecturing on
Developing a positive self-concept in the black
elementary school child.
The lecture is open to the public and will be held
April 16.
Rev. Wright is disappointed with attendance in
the first three lectures. We havent had the kind of
attendance that we had expected from the UF
community, he said.
STUDENTS enrolled in the program will also
venture into the homes and churches of the black
community, Blume said, in an attempt to
understand the problems of the black poor.
The Black Studies program is a part of the New
Elementary program being tested by the College of
Education. The parent program involves some 90
students as a test group who attend no classes but
are required to complete certain competencies,
according to Blume.

Page 5



L The WwWe ffrkNc April jo, 1970

Page 6

Plaza Rally Sponsor
Is Freedom Party
Todays rally in the Plaza of the Americas is being sponsored
by the Student Freedom Party, contrary to a report in the April
9 Alligator.
Andy Kramer, party candidate for student body president,
said the main purpose of the rally is to get people together to
talk about the drug crackdown, the plaza issue, and our
platform.
STEVE UHLFELDER, Focus candidate for student body
president, had been cited as the rally organizer but says he is
just with Andy and some friends who were invited as law
students who have done some drug research that will be helpful
to the people at the rally.
The rally will be held at 1:30 p.m. in the plaza with everyone
invited.

Nixon Hits Carswell Opponents

PAGE ON^j
to vicious and unwarranted
attacks.
BOTH HAYNESWORTH and
Carswell were subjected to
vicious assaults on their
honesty and character and
integrity had been falsely
charged with being racist,
Nixon said.
When all the hypocrisy is
stripped away, the President
said, it is their philosophy and
the accident of their birth that
caused their rejection by the
Senate as presently
constituted.
Nixon said that more than 25
per cent of the people in
America live in the South but
only one member of the
Supreme Court is from the
South. This was a reference to
Justice Hugo L. Black.
THE PEOPLE of the South
deserve to be represented,
Nixon said.
But more important than
geographical representation,
Nixon said, was philosophical
attitude.
Nixon said he had instructed
Mitchell to search the federal
and state court systems outside
of the South for a nominee who
reflects the Presidents own
views on rigid constitutional
interpretation.
I HAVE concluded that the
next nominee cannot come from
the South since this senate
presently constituted will not
confirm him, Nixon said.
I believe a judge from the
North who shares my views will
be confirmed.
NIXON made his brief
statement before newsmen after
conferring with Mitchell in his
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oval office.
He said he had talked with
Mitchell about the court
appointment both Wednesday
night and earlier Thursday.
Earlier in the day, the White
House conceded it incorrectly
told some senators before the
vote that Sen. Margaret Chase
Smith, R-Maine, would vote for
confirmation.

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Non-Zionist Speaks Monday
On Mideast Burning Issues

A Jewish student from the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem
who doesnt support the idea of
an independent nation of Jews
will speak on campus Monday,
April 13, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Reitz Union Auditorium.
Arie Bober will speak on The
Burning Issues of the Mideast
Crisis. He is touring the nation
sponsosred by the Committee
for New Alternatives in the

BUT PRESS Secretary Ronald
Ziegler said it was an honest
mistake made in good faith
and based on what Nixons
congressional liaison aides
considered reliable
information.
Nixon, deadly serious,
delivered his extemporaneous
statement in the new White
House press room.

Middle East, a national
organization, and will be
sponsosred on campus by the
Student Committee for
Academic Freedom, headed by

Exemptions Allowed
With Public Functions
The ban against amplified instruments on the Plaza of Americas
does not bar exemptions from the rule, Public Functions Authority
secretary Carol Brunson said Thursday.
Andy Kramer, organizer of many come togethers last quarter and
student freedom party candidate for student body president, didnt
realize he could come to the Authority and ask for permission to use
the instruments, she said.
FOR THIS REASON, a meeting of the Authority has been set for
next Tuesday at 3 p. m. in the Reitz Union. Any interested students
may attend, Miss Brunson said, and an attempt will be made to set up
guidelines for granting groups permission to use the Plaza for
happenings.
The room number for the meeting hasnt been determined, but Miss
Brunson said it will be posted in the Student Government offices
today.

Frank Lord.
Bober, a native of Palestine
has lived in an Isreali kibbutz
and offers insights on the Middle
East situation today.



Atlanta Expects 20,000 Youngsters

ATLANTA (UPI) With an influx of up to 20,000
youngsters forcast for Atlantas hippie district this
summer, a mediation plan to reunite runaways with
their families was unveiled Thursday by four residents of
the long-haired community.
The Metro Atlanta Mediation Center Inc., is designed to
reestablish communication between parents and children
by bringing them together before a neutral mediator in a
neutral place.
RUNAWAYS may constitute as many as 10 to 20 per
cent of the summer visitors, Rev. Harcourt Klinefelter
said.
Klinefelter, along with Rev. David Durrett; Father
Gregory Santos, a Trappist monk attending graduate
school here; and graduate student Bob Griffin proposed
the program.
Klinefelter said two out of three runaways run to get
closer to home by creating a crisis situation. Once
someone is willing to sit down and listen it helps.
KLINEFELTER described the runaways by saying
most of them are whites between the ages of 12 and 17
and more than half of them are girls.
He said they have an especially difficult time finding
housing in the nearly 400-square-block area on the edge of
downtown.
In that area, some 30,000 straight citizens and an
additional 3,000 hippies already are housed away in

f Crucify Fulbright Asks
Attorney Generals Wife

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
wife of Attorney, General John
N. Mitchell telephoned the
Arkansas Gazette at 2 a.m.
Thursday and urged the
newspaper to crucify Sen. J.
William Fulbright, D-Ark., for
his vote against the Carswell
Supreme Court nomination.
The Little Rock paper, largest
in Arkansas, quoted Martha
Mitchell as saying:
IT MAKES ME so damn mad
I cant stand it. He (Fulbright)
could have done a great deal for
the whole vote ... I want you
to crucify Fulbright and thats
it.

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Fulbright, chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, made a rare break
with his Southern colleagues
Wednesday when he voted
against confirmation of Judge G.
Harrold Carswell for the high
court.
CARSWELL WAS rejected on
a 5145 roll call vote.
When informed of Mrs.
Mitchells phone call to the
paper, Fulbright smiled and said,
Mrs. Mitchell has become a
kind of character around here.
The attorney generals wife,
who is a native of Pine Bluff,
Ark., was quoted as informing

RUNAWAYS RECEIVE HELP

varying degrees of comfort.
THE ACCOMMODATIONS are not there, he said.
There were 50 fires last year and numerous
condemnations, driving property values up to the point
where one room might cost $l2O a month now.
Under law, the runaways, many of whom come from
Florida, Alabama, Greenville and Charlotte, N.C;, and
throughout the U. S. as well as the Atlanta area and the
rest of Georgia, are to be turned over to juvenile court
authorities.
IN AN EFFORT to avoid a juvenile record and contacts
with hardened delinquents in a detention center, the
mediation center will try to get runaways and their
parents to the bargaining table.
To do this, the mediation center will use trained
teenagers, ex-runaways and parents of former runaways to
talk to both sides.
In order to stay within the law, the mediation must be
set up with the approval of the parents as well as the
runaway.
THE MEDIATORS themselves will be persons skilled
and experienced in helping relationships, according to
Griffin, who said the hip community itself prefers not to
have runaways.
If one mediation session is not successful, Klinefelter
said, the child will be able to go to a runaway house the
mediation center proposes to establish.

the paper she had talked to three
or four very influential people
from Arkansas who said they
would disown Fulbright
because of his vote.

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The house is to be licensed by the State Welfare Board,
and a runaway will require verbal and written parental
permission to stay there.
THE CASE MAY be turned over to professionals if a
short period of meditation in the runaway house does not
result in a fairly quick decision to return home,
Klinefelter said.
Help will continue in the form of a sort of runaways
anonymous, he said, designed to help young people stay
home.
THE MEDIATION center has set forth a proposed
budget of $112,725 for its work and another $56,900 for
the runaway house.
Included is $15,000 for the dalary of the centers
director and sls and S3O an hour for the services of
mediators.
It looks now like this will be financed strictly by
donations, said Klinefelter.
He indicated the group was looking into the
possibility of government research and training grants,
but the process was a slow one.
Spokesmen for city hall, the Atlanta Police Department
and Atlanta area juvenile authorities said they approved of
the project and would do as much as possible to
cooperate with the mediation center while still performing
their own duties under the law.

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Ftrkfcy> April 10/W7O Th#-Ffcr *r Amgjfpr,

Page 7



Page 8

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

The
mi Robert Fraser Karen Eng ><£o?n.
loriaa Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Alligator Inn
Earl Hartman John Sugg Y v's3BP?y
The price of freedom NeWS Editors
is rhc exercise of responsibility.
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Speaking Out

On Tuesday, April 7, the Alligator printed an
article by Mr. Mike Hittleman entitled All Power
to the People A Refusal. I would like to answer
a few of the extremist charges leveled against me
and try to set the record straight, so that there will
be no doubt as to where I stand.
To begin with, Mr. Hittleman attempted to place
me in the class of right-wingers making
generalizations from ignorance. I am not, have
never been, nor ever intend to support, believe in or
espouse the hideous and contemptible doctrines of
the right. Social justice, economic democracy and
an end to racism are paramount needs of this
nation. The black man must be given full political,
economic and social rights and great monetary
efforts must be made to rebuild our cities and
educate the deprived.
Mr. Hittleman, typical of the
left and right, has censored the truth. In my letter
of April 1,1 stated: We must steer a course between
left and right... Clearly, I reject the right but
support the moderate elements of society.
There is no need to deny the great social
problems America faces. Greater and more vigorous
efforts must be made for a true social democracy.
On the other hand, we must not lose sight of the
fact that we have made and are making great
progress. We must not fall into the pitfall of
disparaging our achievements.
I will reiterate for the sake of Mr. Hittleman and
those who see nothing of virtue in this nation. It is
time we stopped being sorry we are Americans and
recognize that while we can never rest in striving for
social justice, we must not forget what good has
been achieved and the progress which is being made.
I am not blind to the injustices and misery
around us. I have been around, Mr. Hittleman. I
know what racism is and I have seen it from both
whites and blacks. The left, which is as oldaa
totalitarianism, has not mitigated any of the evils of
society.
The burning down of the Bank of America in
California by leftist anarchists, was an act no less
reprehensible than the doctrines of the Ku Klux
Klan. The Bank of America has extended more than
$1 million to students in California and its
destruction has also threatened the rights of all men.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Future's Not Dark

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

Jeff Brein
Editorial Assistant

We got company

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

When former vice president Humphrey recently
attempted to deliver a speech at Amherst University
he was shouted down. What type of society would
the left give us? The evidence seems to be that it
would control thought, speech and action.
Those who last month bombed a number of
buildings in New York City are not in the nature of
fighters for social justice. Their aim is destruction.
The left would like its own totalitarian dictatorship
to rule this nation with such upstarts as Jerry Rubin
at the helm.
I may want to achieve material wealth, but that is
no sin. Our nation has fought and worked so that
men could live better and more comfortable lives.
But, Mr. Hittleman, I also want every person,
everywhere in the world, to have the same the
same chance, the same rights and opportunities and
the same assistance.
No Mr. Hittleman, I have not created the
problems of America. I am not blind to injustice
and misery. It is you and those of the right and left
who have fanned the fires of hatred and polarized
the nation. Too desperate, too despondent to see
the truth, you have created a world of myths which
you are now living in.
Although the extremists seek to destory the
establishment, November will be a time to pass
judgment on those in government and to reject the
bad and incompetent and applaud and re-elect the
good.
If indeed we have an establishment then we
should be proud of it. Our government provides
medical assistance, social security and
unemployment insurance. It aids the indigent and
lends millions of dollars to students.
Destroying the establishment and tearing
assunder its vital efforts would not solve the
problems of poverty, racism, war and alienation.
Instead, it would preclude any human chance of
progress. The future is not dark, nor filled with evil
and ugliness. It is unbounded in its promise and in
its capacity for Americans to build a new and
improved nation a better creation.
there are no easy solutions, no panaceas, no
instant happiness and social harmony. Nevertheless,
we must continue to strive for the best that is
possible and the highest within us all.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

By Bruce Alper

editorial
Take Hint,
Fla. Senators
If Florida Senators Edward Gurney and Spessard Holland
failed to take the hint when the U. S. Senate defeated
Clement Haynesworths Supreme Court nomination, they
should now.
For the Fust time since Grover Cleveland, the Senate has
twice in a row rejected a presidents Supreme Court
nominations. And Florida has lost out on its first chance to
send a citizen to the high court.
But not its last chance.
Nixon is insisting on the necessity of appointing a strict
constructionist to the Court and he has that prerogative.
For this reason, our state senators should give much
thought to their next recommendations for the position.
For Gurney to say the Senate is too liberal and out of
kilter with the rest of the nation is amusing, for one only
has to remember its quick approval of Chief Justice Warren
Burger, who is both conservative and a strict
constructionist.
Spessard Holland blames the defeat on organized labor,
Negro groups and a variety of ultra-liberal forces. His
argument is defeated by the record itself 13 Republicans
voted against the nomination.
Several senators who voted against Carswell cited his
mediocrity as the reason for their dissenting votes.
Republican Sen. Marlowe Cook of Tennessee after
watching a posthumous Medal of Honor awarded to 21
soldiers for giving their best to their country said he could
not vote for Carswell because he believed he was a mediocre
choice, not the best to be found.
The Senate was, we feel, telling Nixon that he can have
both excellence and his Southern strategy in court
nominations, but not the politics without excellence.
The Senate will accept the South, and it will accept
conservatism, but it will not accept a second-rate nominee.
So, Sens. Gurney and Holland, take the hint, and
recommend a Floridian, recommend a conservative, but
recommend a man whose record and character is acceptable
to the Senate.
Youre welcome



Staff Writings

President Nixon has seized the term Silent Majority
to describe what he feels is the broad spectrum of the
American public which elected him to power.
As a Republican I think such a description is
unfortunate for two reasons.
First, there is no particular virtue in remaining silent in
a time of crisis. One remains silent because he or she is (A)
too gutless to speak out, (B) too ignorant to speak out or
(C) too apathetic, none is a desirable charateristic.
Second, it is presumptuous to conclude that because
someone does not speak out on an issue they are in
agreement with you.
What Nixon has done is obtain political identification
with the only group of people you are allowed today to
ridicule and degrade without danger of being labled a
bigot white middle class America.

MR. EDITOR:
Your editorial of April 17 condemning
Governor Kirk for his actions in Manatee
County causes me to offer strong
criticism of the assumptions underlying
your editorial position on the issue.
You seem to suffer from the
integration for integrations sake
complex that has apparently been
sweeping liberal circles of late. It is
extremely unfortunate that such
integration, involving shifting of school
districts and mass transfer of teachers and
students all over Gods creation, is not
going to solve the race problem in this
country.
What is accomplished by placing black
and white children side by side in school?
The results of so doing have been
negligible in parts of the North where this
situation has existed for at least 30 years.
Each race returns to its own
neighborhood at the end of each school
day. And as for understanding each other,
some of the most violent race conflicts
have occurred in these same areas.
So then, what is the purpose of
integration? Integration serves a useful
and lawful purpose where the races
naturally come into contact and where
previously separation had been forced.
But forced mixing of the races is no more
constitutional than forced separation.
Integration is good and constitutionally
correct when it opens the doors to
economic opportunity and educational
advantage. But beyond that it is
integration for integrations sake and no
useful purpose is served by it.
Claude Kirk may have demagogic
visions in his mind in acting as he did in
Manatee County, which is certainly sad
and deplorable for us all. But by his
actions he raises grave questions about
the governments policy.
What kind of government pursues a
policy that forces parents of both races to
send their children miles away to school
when a school is nearby? What are the
limits of power of such a government? It
can be logically argued that the next step
will be a government policy that tells
people where they must live and where
they must work. A government of this
type could be called many things, but
democratic is not the likely adjective.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
dtows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
is asked to contact the editor and be
prepared to show samples of his work.

Middle Class America

Why Integrate Now?

We must ask this vital question: IS
THE LOSS OF PERSONAL FREEDOM
AND INDIVIDUAL CHOICE WORTH
THE ALTOGETHER NEGLIGIBLE
GAINS ATTAINED BY FORCED
INTEGRATION IN THE SCHOOLS
ACCOMPLISHED BY FORCED
BUSSING?
JEFF SMITH, 3JM
BSU Charges
MR. EDITOR:
This is a copy of a letter I sent to Steve
Deceive OConnell who occupies the
Presidential Suite in Tigert Hall. I want to
show the students how Steve-Deceive is
playing a game on the students and black
students in particular.
First, he told the auditors from HEW
that he would underwrite the cost for
Black Week. Student Government gave
the BSU $2,000 for Black Week with the
approval of the forgotten Charles
Shepard. Two weeks early the
administration refused to give the BSU
the money. The excuse, lack of funds. He
lied to the Black Student Union again as
usual. I have more faith in Mao Tse Tung
than OConnell and Ive never met
Chairman Mao.
My second charge is one of overt
racism. He refused to sign the report that
the contract compliance auditors from
HEW presented the University. OConnell
said the auditors were in error because
the report stated that UF has extremely
racist hiring, firing and promotional
practices. Having been fortunate enough
to see the report that was conspicuously
absent of Stevies signature I think that
Stevie is attempting to play a game with
HEW and the government.
JOSEPH E. McCLOUD,
DEP. MINISTER DEFENSE, BSU
Different Phonies
MR. EDITOR:
In his Speaking Outcolumn of April
8, David Miller wrote of different types
of phonies. He left out the biggest of
them all, himself.
He is the type who has nothing good to
say about anyone. He just bitches about
them. He begins to consider himself an
expert on other people. Naturally, no one
is expected to have any thing to do with
such a conceited ass. So our campus crier
seeks revenge byway of his spiteful essay.
He makes himself believe that he is only
criticizing, but the big phony is really
coping out.
Its sad for a girl to be called a
sorority bitch by the biggest bitch of
them all.
JOE ARTILES, 3AS

This group takes its lumps from knee-jerk liberals and
marxist spouting radicals for crimes not of commission,
but of omission. Not for what they do, but for what they
have failed to do.
For the most part they are as powerless as the poor and
black. Really, how many of our top governmental people
national, state or even local are middle class?
Theyre mostly upper class, wealthy business and
professional people. The ones who have succeeded in
rigging the law in their favor.
It is middle America which carries the financial burden
of government and its functions. It is on them, the burden
for paying for government programs eventually falls. The
rich have managed to shift the taxes off themselves and
the poor pay little.
Yet, it is on them the liberals and radicals heap the

No Benefit
MR. EDITOR:
Recent editions of the Alligator have
expressed the desire and the intention of
the UF Athletic Association to charge
students $4 per ticket to see the UF
football team play on the Florida Field.
If such desires were to become reality
they would mean that students would
have to pay more money, a thought
which comes in the wake of a proposed
tuition hike and similar to a proposal
which was recently defeated by the
students soundly (UAC fee). Such a raise
would also be a bad precedent which
might logically be followed by other
impecunious university affiliated
activities.
The Athletic Association has failed to
explain to the students at large why more
money is needed. Some observations
might be that new positions have recently
been made and filled without adequate
plans for funding. Apparently new
expenses have been created, again
without adequate planning. These
observations may be wrong, but the A.A.
continues to refuse to make their
expenses and the reasons for their
increase known to the students AT
LARGE.
It is interesting to note that the A.A.
does not allow students to make their
decisions and yet if an injurious decision
is made they expect the students to suffer
the consequences.
Since the A.A. is a business, they must
know that no one pays for something
which offers no benefit in return. What
will the A.A. give the students? They will
give students a reserved seat, but what
about those who want to go to, say one
game, and not another and who cannot
afford $24 (for two seats), for an assured
seat at that game.
It is important to note that there will
be MANY students who will never be able
to go to a single game, (for which they
have previously paid via their activities
fee) merely because they were not in line
early enough.
Students come to this university for an
education, so why is it that no one
suggests making the libraries more
the small society

AHoo-goY/
THEY TALK
Jy*3) & ILU
fluVt\ IFT H&^WEKE
as-*-
** }*''M toe

Friday, April 10,1970, Tha Florida AWfrtor,

most scorn. Many have spent a life time trying to bring
themselves up through hard work and sacrifice to rise to a
decent standard of living.
Yet, after sacrificing for some of the comforts of life
they are told they must now sacrifice even more to bring
others up too. They grow resentful because they are now
expected to finance the cure for problems they feel they
did not create.
We have an interesting game of class politics in the
making.
The radicals are trying to turn the poor and the black
against white middle class America and the rich, the rich
are trying to turn the middle class against the poor and
black, and George Wallaces forces are trying to turn the
middle class and the poor against the rich and the black.

FORUM:-^
C Ad*iitl ml VM J
nn fcr the i

By Fred Vollrath

current, more complete and more
competitive with the libraries of better
institutions? Why cant our Law School
Moot Court team travel to the national
contest after winning in the regionals?
Indeed, there are many organizations
made up solely of and for students that
are close to impecunious.
The Athletic Association seems to
selfishly believe that students come to the
UF to pay for a football team which
they, the students, will rarely be able to
see unless they pay more than their peers,
both at the UF and other institutions.
LEE H. SCHILLINGER, ILW
Athletic Greatness
MR. EDITOR:
Perhaps ol Stevie should rephrase his
famous saying to state, bringing the UF
to the height of athletic greatness, under
Bull Cayman, Graves & Co.
In a recent Alligator I remember
reading something to the effect of
remodeling Yon Hall. Ah come on, that is
one of the newer buildings! Why not
remodel the other side of the stadium,
and not just one floor, (guess which one
Uncle Ray) but the whole thing. This
includes WUFTTV studios.
It was really touching to see in
Tuesdays Gainesville Sun that the Gator
band and majorettes have new uniforms. I
am glad to know that UF can buy new
uniforms every couple of years for ol
Bull Cayman so his boys will be proud of
their band and girls, not to mention their
(football players) new onionforms of a
few years ago. Or was it that long? Great
King Ray! Meanwhile I have to work with
1940 television cameras. But I guess it is
worth it, so next year I can sit at home
on Saturdays and think to myself, Boy,
everyone must be bedazzled by all those
new UF Mickey Mouse onionforms. I
wonder how many people have fallen
through the south stands.
I propose that we rename this city to
Gainesville, Home of the University of
Florida's Athletic Association.
DAVID T. WRIGHT 4 BR
by Brickman

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

AT OPENING SESSION

Education Emphasized
For 1970 Legislature

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Senate President John Mathews
and House Speaker Fred Schultz
opened the 1970 legislature by
emphasizing education and
warning legislators the 60-day
session would be a
no-nonsense one.
Both called for hard work,
and Mathews said he was going
to be so tough about the rules
requiring regular attendance at
committee meetings even the
chairmen would be removed if
they have two unexplained
absences.
NO BILLS were taken up
during the Tuesday session, but
thousands of previously prefiled
measures were formally
introduced.
Both houses held daylong
sessions, an unprecedented event
in Florida. Normally, opening
day is ceremonial and the
lawmakers noticeable by their
absence after the governors
noon address.
There were the usual flowers
banked on desks and around the
chamber, and mini-skirted young
girls and older in evening gowns
sang the Star Spangled Banner,
Suwannee and Up with People.
THE HOUSE ADOPTED new
rules streamlining the sessions,
including a cut-off or new bill
introductions after the first 30
days of the session.
But the Senate wrangled all
afternoon before approving
similar changes.
*The Senate also limited
formal sessions to only two days
a week for the first two weeks to
let committees get bills ready for
action.
Speaker Schultz, a
Jacksonville Democrat running
for the U. S. Senate, presented a
15 -minute mini-state-of-the-
Savant Opens
Applications
Savant-UF, womens
leadership honorary, is accepting
applications for membership.
Any women wishing to apply
can pick up an application for in
the Savant office, room 303 or
at the Student Activities Desk in
the Reitz Student Union.
Applications can be accepted
no later than April 20th. If there
are any questions, contact
Barbara Griffin (378-9606).
/ Modern Jazz
I Exercise Lessons
I Tuesday April 14, 7:30 pjn.
I Room 118, Union, or sign up in
I Room 310, Union beforehand.
L J

state address, stealing a march
on Gov. Claude Kirks hour-long
speech 60 minutes later.
HE GOT IN A plug ahead of
the governor for a $2 billion
state bond issue to provide
money for city sewage treatment
plants.
Requiring a constitutional
amendment, it would allow the
state to issue the bonds at low
interest rates and loan the
money to the cities.
Mathews, in an address that

Club Opens Membership
Collegiate Civitan has come to UF.
Organized on this campus last quarter, the club is now on a
membership drive. Collegiate Civitan is primarily a service
organization, as indicated by their motto: Builders of good
citizenship.
THE CLUB is now working on a service project at a Gaineville
nursing home, and as another project they will be doing volunteer
work at the Sunland Training Center.
UF students are invited to a meeting Sunday in room 346 in the
Reitz Union, from 7 to 9 p.m.
Those unable to attend this meeting but are interested in joining
should contact Ken Huchetson at 373-2203, or Frances Jarrel at
392-7624.

Mtk it 'wilt
Extra Seminoles
( Have Been Ordered
YOU MAY RESERVE ONE ONLY DURING THE NEXT
TWO WEEKS! MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE SERVICE
| BOOTH APR 6-17 DURING THE WEEK OR MAIL IN
| HANDY FORM
% V
m Please reserve copies of the 1970 Seminole jig
m O Enclose extra dollar to have it mailed. B|j
w iH be notified in the Alligator when the
R Car 330 JWRL| arriVed Mail t 0 1970 Semino,e Kj

took less than five minutes to
deliver, predicted passage of
effective laws on pollution
control, extention of the war on
Crime and consumer protection.
As far as I am concerned, the
most important issue will be
education and the problems the
state government faces in
providing all of our young
people the best possible career
and citizenship preparation,
Mathews said.

} 'Loan Closet j
I Remains Open i
V 3*J
xhe Foreign Student Loan Closet is still in business, :
§ supplying international students with household goods. |:
£ jhe new closet, at 214 SW Third St., was donated by the :
ij: first Presbyterian Church -at the 11th hour, before the £
:j: operations eviction from its condemned warehouse setting. :
$ THE NEW location is not as big but it is also not as dark, £
£ said Dr. Rolf Hummel, UF engineering professor and guiding £
:j: force for the service. £
:j: We are really grateful, how it worked out, added the £
£ professor, once a foreign student here and among original users j:
:j: of the four-year-old venture.
£ The donation of the house, formerly a dwelling and then a j;
£ church youth center, came after a church member read the :
:j ; notice of the eviction and threatened demise of the loan closet :
: in a local newspaper. :
£ DR. HUMMEL said he was informed March 20 the closet had :
j to be out of the warehouse by 3 a.m. March 23. >
On March 22 the church offered an empty house it owned, if
{ Four hours later the loan closet was back in business at the new :|
:i location. :
: it took 15 international students, three station wagons and
: micro-bus to make the move. :
THE LOAN CLOSET had survived three similar moves. The 5
5 only loss in this one was about one truckload of seldom j:
checked-out items, which we gave to Goodwill Industries and j:
the Salvation Army, Dr. Hummel said. j:
UF was unable to help the endangered service because of a :
lack of space, the fact the closet serves only foreign students,
and the fact that is is officially a community effort with no J
j: official University tie, Col. Glenn A. Farris, foreign student $
advisor and assistant dean of student development at the :
| university, said.



Florida Economy
Slowing Down

Floridas economy is slowing
down, says UF professor of
economics, Dr. Elmo L. Jackson.
A sharp increase in
unemployment compensation
claims d-uring the fourth quarter
of 1969 is one of the best
indicators of the slowdown,
wrote Jackson in the latest issue
of Economic Indicators,
monthly publication of the UFs
Bureau of Economic and
Business Research.
For the fourth quarter of last
year, initial claims for
unemployment compensation
reached 2,513, a rise of 472,
from the 2,041 of the preceding
three months.
Although the number of
hours in the average workweek
edged downward and the
unemployment rate advanced
considerably, these two series in
the indicators were too erratic
bn a monthly basis in the fourth
quarter to use as additional
support of the slowdown, Dr.
Jackson said.
The average workweek in the
last three months was 41.7 hours
compared with 41.8 for the
preceding quarter. The total
unemployment rate went up .3
per cent 2.8 for October
through December, compared
with 2.5 for July through
September.
Jackson believes if these signs
of moderation in the pace of
Floridas economy are
reinforced by a decline in the
rate of growth of building
construction within the state,
and the possibility of a national
recession, the slowdown will be
YDs Support
Teach-In; Nix
Tuition Hike
The UF Young Democrats
(YD) passed resolutions last
week dealing with environment
and opposition to a tuition
increase for UF students.
The first resolution deals with
a write-in campaign for
environment preservation. For
this purpose YD has set up an
Environment Preservation
Committee.
HAROLD BARCEY,
chairman of the new committee,
said YD will support the
environmental Teach-In April
22 and work with the
community to halt ecological
imbalance.
The silent majority is subject
to the decisions of the vocal
minority Barcey said.
A YD booth will be set up
during the Teach-In to distribute
information and recruit letter
writers.
THE U.S. HOUSE Committee
on Conservation and National
Resources has called Barcey to
discuss ecological legislation last
Friday.
The second resolution,
opposing tuition hikes at Florida
universities, will consist of a
petition circulated on the UF
campus.
The petition will be sent to
the Florida legislature.
EDWARD MURPHY, YD
president, said the proposals
came because of students
rejection of the proposed tuition
increase for construction of
the University Activities Center
last February.

confirmed.
For 1969 as a whole, an
increase of about 28 per cent
occurred in the value of all
private and public nonfarm
building construction compared
with 1968, Jackson says.
This boom has been fueled
primarily by large apartment and
condominium building in South
Florida, Jackson said.
In Miami, residential
construction during the first 11
months of 1969 was almost
two-thirds greater than in 1968,
. /-
m 1
k
i % m m
Ik jfl|
, sh er anie t obe3 pa,t
**'
Ay '* DtVCICPCD OCCTO*
V NOW USCO 0 r MILLIONS OF WOMtN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY OY
TAMPAX INCORPORATED. PALMER. MASS.

x ST 5
\ Jr
GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
Ithe in-fashion store!
if* v?
y /m& itk.
Ik.
Mi It
*j| mm ij i
PHOTO BY PHIL COPE
I PANTS SUITS FOR THE IN GROUP I
888531 b bbbbb
WA
PANTS SUITS ARE THE IN-FASHION LOOK FOR H
THOSE THAT DEMAND COMFORT WITH FASHION. H
H SHIRLEY HAS CHOSED FROM OUR COLLECTION H
A CREPE 2pc. PANTS SET, IN NAVY, RED & WHITE. H
INCLUDED IN THE GROUP ARE LINENS, POLYESTERS, H
KNITS & COTTONS IN 2 OR 3pc. SETS.
SET SHOWN $17.99
I *. #**.* * **:.*.* *-* *

Friday, April 10, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 11



Page 12

Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Otto senior, Engineering Fair
robot for 20 years, is graduating
this year. His replacement is
510, blue and shaped like a
Michelob bottle.
The new robot can do a lot
more than his predecessor. He
can whistle, dance, sing, hold
out his hand and pinch.
IM looking forward to
meeting some of the UF coeds,
he said. I have never seen
anything better.
In Memoriam
BALLEVILLE, 111. Mrs.
Larry Mueller gave birth on
Memorial Day, in Memorial
Hospital on Memorial Drive
here.
Career Opportunity
WITH SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE COMPANY
OF CANADA, ONE OF THE
WORLD'S LARGEST LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
COMPLETE TRAINING
PROGRAM. ALL BENEFITS
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INCOME COMMENSURATE
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FLORIDA POWER
The company with an engineering future for you.
Immediate opportunity in engineering and a
future in Florida.
Opportunity to work with topnotch engineers and
sophisticated hardware at Florida Power Corporation.
Opportunity to work for a corporation that must
double its capabilities in ten years ... or less!
Our first nuclear-fueled generator will
go on-line in 1972.
Floridas booming future is Florida Powers future.
It can be yours, too!
See our representative. Hell be on campus
Wednesday & Thursday, February 4 & 5.
FLORIDA v /| 1
POWER
CORPORATION

New Robot Highlights Fair

The robot gets top billing this
week at the annual Engineers
Fair. He will be on hand to greet
the fair-goers this weekend.
Asked if he had any opening day
jitters, he said: Ive always been
conscious of my weight lm
between 200 and 300 pounds
now. If I get stuck it will take a
lot of people to move me off the
floor.
OTTOS eyes are black, but
they flash blue, green and red.
See this, he said as he rotated
them in opposite directions.
Pretty good, huh?
Not bad, I said, How do
you do that?
Ive got about 100 circuits
with about three times as many
transistors. I run on two car
batteries.
OTTO explained his financial
situation.
I am a glorious collection of
expensive junk. I would have
cost thousands but the (IEEE)
Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineering members
scrounged through the trash cans
around the building for months.
Sometimes I think they had to
throw the stuff away to find it.
Funny how humans think, isnt
it?
Er, yes, I said. Anything
else youd like us to know?
NO, he said, but what are
you doing Saturday after the
fair?
These robots get more human
every day.

HE PINCHES, TOO

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OTTO AND HIS SUCCESSOR
... Robot readied to greet visitor at Fair 4

Nuclear Energy Is
A Dynamic Force
In The Challenges
Os Tomorrows
Progress In:
Enviroment
And Pollution
Health
Food Supply
And Preservation
Space Exploration
Desalination Os
Sea Water
What
Its All Aboutl
The Nuclear Engineering
Fair
Nuclear Science Center
a iin University of Florida
P n -10 a- Bpm April 11 l2am 9pm



Engineers Fair Exhibits Open today

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
The 25th Annual Engineers Fair opens at 5 pan. today
with a coed-chasing robot, a futuristic nuclear spacecraft
and a hair-strength testing machine among its exhibits.
The fair is a serious attempt to display the
achievements and possibilities of engineering, with
emphasis upon UF student engineers, according to fair
representative Ira Blecker.
EIGHT DEPARTMENTS, seven industries and an
indefinite number of individuals will have exhibits.
The departments are Aerospace, Chemical, Civil,
Electrical, Engineering Science & Mechanics, Mechanical,

Engineers Fair
Shows 3-D Art

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Writer
By the year 2000 we may
have three-dimensional, life-size
television.
The process that would
achieve this is called holography,
to be shown today and Saturday
* &sjhg
, t
B Jm&Mk .'SB
JT '
CIVIL ENGINEERING
... On Display
Legislators
To Visit
The 1970 Engineers Fair,
which opens 5 pin., today will
host at least ten Florida
legislators on Saturday.
Participating in Legislative
Day will be Rep. George
Baumgartner, North Miami; Rep.
William E. Powell, Indialantic;
Rep. William C. Andrews,
Gainesville; Rep. Richard A.
Bird, Ft. Lauderdale; Rep.
Richard Tillman, Cocoa Beach;
Rep. Kenneth H. Mac Kay Jr.,
Ocala; Rep. John R. Clark,
Lakeland; Sen. Lawton M. Chiles
Jr., Lakeland; Rep. Tommy
Stevens, Dade City, and Rep.
William G. James, Delray Beach.
Dr. Harry Sisler, UF executive
vice president is scheduled to
greet the legislators between the
two electrical engineering
buildings at the opening of
Legislative Day Saturday. Each
legislator at the Fair will have an
engineering student host during
the activities.

THE QUARTERLY IS HERE

at the Engineering Fair by three
engineering students Bill
Wilson, Roy Samras and Frank
Hum.
IN HOLOGRAPHY, two light
waves from a laser beam create a
three-dimensional picture that
looks identical to the original.
The exhibit will be in room
338 of the Material Engineering
Building and will show the
theory, technique, and
application of holography.
The engineering students will
show a hologram at the fair.
Seeing a hologram is like looking
through a piece of glass at the
actual object.
BILL WILSON is the head of
the group presenting the exhibit.
He explains that even though the
process of holography has been
known since 1947, its
application was impractical until
the invention of the laser in
1962 which provided the needed
light source for the holographic
process.
Holography is an infant
science that is just emerging
from the pure research stage,
he said. Industry is just
beginning to realize the potential
of this new science.
Holography already has
several practical applications.
Auto manufacturers use it in
making parts. Many
manufacturers use the process to
test for flaws in their products.
ACCORDING TO Wilson,
however, the great potential of
holography is yet to come. He is
certain that within a few years it
will become an art form,
transforming the present method
of making movies.
As soon as 30 years from now
the process may be perfected to
make 3-D pictures on television.
The process would call for the
TV set to project holographic
images into the center of a
room. The pictures would be
life-size and in color.
Wilson, Samras, and Hum
have been working on this
project for some time. They are
doing it as an extracurricular
activity largely to satisfy their
own curiosity about how
holography works. They hope to
improve the technique of
holography and find some more
practical applications for it.
Their research has been done
without help except for some
assistance from the Kodak
Company, which is also doing
research in this area.

Metallurgical and Nuclear Sciences.
Participating industries are Buckeye Cellulose, Florida
Power and Light, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM,
Reynolds Metals and Union Carbide.
FIRST-, SECOND- and third-place prizes will be
awarded in each of three categories society, industrial
and individual.
We try to keep our exhibits general and not too
technical so they can be understood by laymen, Blecker
said. He noted the judges who will award prizes are all
laymen.
The Engineers Fair was started in the mid-30s,
according to Blecker. It contined as a small college event
until 1940, when it was discontinued because of World

Engineering Division
*
The Procter & Gamble Co.
NEEDS MORE ENGINEERS
M.E., CH.E., E.E. (power), Civil Building Const.
Bachelors and Masters Degrees.
June, August and December Graduates.
Sign up at the Placement Office for
Interviews on 5/4 & 5/5
U 5. Citizens Preferred, but no restrictions as to sex; race, creed or color.

We're with you on water and air pollution

We're against pollutionas much as
you are. After all, we live here, too.
So, what are we doing about it?
On Air Pollution the U.S. Public
Health Service estimated that 60% was
caused by automobiles; 26% by indus industry,
try, industry, space heating and refuse burning;
and about 14% by electric utilities.
We felt 14% was too much and we're
spending millions of dollars to find
ways of lessening it.
In the nuclear plants we're now build building,
ing, building, there will be no combustion what whatever.
ever. whatever.

Florida's
Electric
Companies
Taxpaying, Investor Owned
Florida Power & Light Company / Tampa Electric Company
Florida Power Corporation / Gulf Power Company

Friday, April 10,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Warll.
IN 1947 the Engineers Field Day was begun,
emphasizing intercollegiate sports events rather than
progress in the field of engineering. This event was
discontinued in the early 1950s with the resurrection of
the Engineers Fair.
Since then the size and cost of the fair have steadily
increased. An estimated 40,000-50,000 people are
expected to attend this years exhibits. The cost and
effort of building the exhibits has also grown to staggering
proporions.
Nine engineering buildings will house the exhibits.
Visitors will be assisted by student guides, maps and signs
in each building.

We are equally concerned about
water pollution and we're doing some something
thing something about thqt, too.
Each of Florida's four electric com companies
panies companies is supporting continuing inde independent
pendent independent research to try to find out if
there are any undiscovered effects
on marine life caused by our warm
water return.
It's simply good common sense for
us to help in any way we can to improve
the communities we serve.
We're not only with youwe're
doing what we can to help win the
battle against pollution.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
3 br IV2 bath 10 x 56 turn, trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool A/C. 376-8517.
(A-st-133-p)
Spacious, well-kept 10x47 Great
Lakes, two bedroom, air, carpet, 6x
utility shed. $1995. 378-9426
(A-st-112-p)
1968 Kawasaki 250 cc. 4,060 miles.
Under warranty. Beautiful. Quickest
in its class. $475.00 Call 392-7203.
(A-st-l 12-p)
Fender Jazzbass and bassman amp
both in perfect condition with all
extras. Ask $525 call 378-8670
(A-st-112-p)
1968 Sears 50cc Bike with helmet.
Good condition. SIOO. Call evenings
373-2196. (A-st-114-p)
67 Cougar XR7 4 speed, 4 br. 390
c.i., front disc, feather bucket seats,
posl-traction. Call 372-5698 after 6
PM. Best offer. (A-st-114-p)
1969 RCA portable cassette tape
recorder with microphone & 6
cassettes, $35 perfect for sch 301
students or class lectures. 372-4407
after 8 (A-115-2t-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Univ
Ave. Ask for Bob Zuber. Teacher and
performer here for three years!
(A-2t-115-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -100 pm 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
for sale STUDENT.# PHONE.
for rent 1 dav
q wanted 2 days ADDRESS
help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos 4 days (*lO% discount) £|jy STATE ZIR
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
WORDING 7
1 1 II I II I I I H I I I I I I I I I I I TTTT
2l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
aITI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I
4l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 111 I I I I I

VSMSSSSSSSSSWSGS&SSffiSftffISQS&ft
FOR SALE
Yorkshire terrier puppies, must sell,
AKC registered, shots, small adorable
dogs, SIOO,OO, call 376-0289 after
5:00 on weekdays. (A-st-111-p)
School bus for sale. Exc. running
cond. Perfect camper. Inquire 1808
N. W. Ist Ave. $550. (A-st-116-p)
1969 HONDA 450 Excellent Cond.
4000 miles not even 1 yr. old, high
rise bars, NEED CASH! Cill Mike at
392-9488 416 Jennings. Must sell.
(A-3t-116-p)
SOUPS on, the rug that is,, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-8-c)
Kawasaki 650 cc Motorcycle 1968
Take up payments Call 378-9184 ask
for Bruce Gordon. (A-3t-116-p)
HONDA SUPERHAWK 300 cc runs
like a charm. Going to Alaska; Must
sell! You get a real Bargain at
$350.00 Call Egor at 372-8933.
(A-2t-116-p)
Hofner bass guitar, thin acoustic
double 'cutaway. 2 Gibson
humbucking pickups. Original owner.
$225 or so can be seen at 900 NW
31st Ave. (A-2t-116-p)
A 1969 Modern age Traitor. Brand
new. Two bedroom, 12 x 60, carpet,
and, air condition. Call after 5 p.m.
378-0208. (A-3t-116-p)

Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

pQp p
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet this quarter Village Park apts.
85. Immediate occupancy needed.
Call 373-1863. (B-5M13-P)
SUBLET for summer qtr. Village 34
1 bdr furn a/c. 115/mo call 373-1797
(B-st-112-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
Several 1 br. apts, bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, AC $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Avenue.
372- Grad. Students preferred.
(B-109-ts-c).
Sublet thru Aug. Furnished 1 br.
Univ. Gardens Apt. sllO. Contact:
Paul Hoffman, 378-0327 or
376-6720. (B-st-114-p)
1 and 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
fully carpeted and air-conditioned.
Most sound proofed In town. All
electric kitchen, lots of closets,
laundry and pool. Pets Welcome.
Phone 376-06 35 for rental rates.
(B-7t-109-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
Sublet trailer, excellent condition:
cheap, roomy. Andrews and Connell
M oblleer. Call 373-1350 or
373- (B-3t-114-p)
2 bedroom duplex apt. Just south of
The University Inn. For information
call 372-6333. Leave name and
phone no. for J. Pozin. Will contact
you. (B-st-l 15-p)
One bedroom apt. across from Tigert
Hall. $75/month. 378-7776.
(B-3t-l 16-d1
Help! Need a male to take my place
in 2bdr Summit House Apt. I got
married and had to move. Below cost
only 35 mo. Call Dan 378-9768.
Help. (B-4t-116-p)
WANTED
Male roomate to share 2 bedroom
apt. in Village Park with 2 others.
Prefer over 21 but not required. Call
378-8697 apt. 97. (C-3t-113-p)
Roomate wanted this quarter Village
Park Apts 85 on pool. 373-1863
Immediate occupancy necessary.
(C-st-113-p)
Singles! How about a private bdrm.
close to campus, cen A/H, full carpet
complete elect, kitchen, Spanish
furniture, pool, gas grills, laundry
facilities, patio, Dn/area, GIF parties
all for S7O/mo. INCLUDING util.
La Mancha has It all! Openings for
1-4 students. Call 378-7224 Now!
(C-109-10t-p).

I II ll

1 or 2 roommates needed
Immediately to share beautiful
Hawaiian Village Apt. Reasonable
rates, Call 378-9810 or 378-0654
ANYTIME. (C-st-114-p)
Wanted! Turned-on female roommate
to share large air-conditioned house
close to campus $45 a month. Call
376-8080. (C-7M13-P)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
Whatever need two exquisite apt.
A/C stereo quiet 39 month + util.
378-7260 anytime, 6 best 427 S.E.
Bth St. Jim. (At least come look at
it.). (C-3t-116-p)
Female roomate needed (spring qt.)
For Le Bonne Vie Townhouse apt.
SSO a month +*/ .utilities. Must like
kittens. Call 378-5201. (C-3t-112-p)
Wanted: One female roommate for
immediate occupancy. Gatortown
Apts. $65 + util. For spring qtr.
378-6162 after 5. Barb or Helen.
(C-st-114-p)
Roommate for 2-bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. $36/mo. Call
372-5207 or 372-2137. 1930 NW
2nd Ave. (C-2t-114-p)
2 Male Roommates for summer
quarter. Frederick Apts., alr-cond.,
pool, wall to wall carpet, Call
378-7104. $41.25. (C-4t-114-p)
Roommate wanted female to share 3
br hse near campus air cond color TV
stereo & laundry Call 372-5123 (after
six weekdays anytime weekends).
(C-2t-115-p)
1 FEMALE roommate needed
IMMEDIATELY Landmark
$46.25/mo. Call ANYTIME
378-4941. (C-10t-107-p)
HELP WANTED
>x*:*:*:*:w
We are looking for an agressive
couple to move into responsible
management position at new luxury
apt. complex. You must be
personable and have supervisory
skills. Apartment plus salary. Send
resume to P. O. Box 14038.
(E-10t-l 12-p)
Clerical Assistant, Female, Some
Typing Ability, $1.65 Per Hr., 10-15
Hrs. Per Wk. Til End Os Qtr. See Dr.
Silverman 116 Bldg. E. DO NOT
PHONE. (E-lt-116-c)
Male over 21, approx. 30 hrs. a week.
Apply in person after 10 A.M. PIZZA
INN. 316 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-4521.
(E-115-ts-c)
Ladies! Dto you know someone who
would like to learn professional
makeup techniques, have fun, and
make money, too? Call Cindy.
392-7673. (E-st-116-p)
AUTOS
67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-114-p)

AUTOS
Corvette convert, blueprinted
427-hlgh-perf., 4 speed, 456 posi, ET
mags, hurst, crane, hooker, mallory,
etc. runs in mid. ll's beautiful'
$2975, 373-1524. (G-3t-116-p)
63 Corvair, 60,000 miles, new tires,
recently aligned, radio, body and
engine in good condition. S2OO. 914
SW Bth Ave., Apt. 29, La Mancha"
(G-3t-116-p)
1965 Plymouth Valiant, 4 dr., heater,
alr-cond., radio, good tires, $450
also large crib, sls. Call 373-1500
after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-114-p)
63 VW Yellow Convertible $495.00
excellent condition. Phone
378-4463 after 5:00 P.M.
(G-3t-114-p)
Campus wheels ... and then some!
Do you want cheap, dependable
transportation that just cant be
beat? Then come look at my 1967
Flat... clean as can be and in
perfect condition. Brand new tires.
Only $550. Im telling It like it is.
Call 376-6166 or 378-8211.
(G-st-114-p)
1962 VW good condition. Very
dependable. Must sell by Saturday
$550.00 or best offer. Call 378-4218.
(G-3t-U4-p)
1962 Austln-Healy Sprite, Stereo,
New tires & top. Looks good, runs
well. Must seir immediately! $395
Call 392-8712. (G-st-114-p)
PERSONAL
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, -WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEEN.
Bikinis sl6, Dresses sl4. Add $3 for
1-day service if desired. Phone
378-0320. (J-10t-107-p)
Mobile contest s2s first prize,
deadline Apr. 20, applications at the
union rm. 310. (J-3t-115-c)
MEET FLASH, your answer to
everything. Picnic, Plaza- of the
Americas Saturday 1 PM. Bring you
own food and share. Bananas. Pd.
Pol. Adv. (J-lt-116-p)
RJA: Only an impish scamp could be
born on double fools day, and only a
nut like me could give you the right
kind of love. Happy 25th. Love, your
Miss Mac. (J-lt-116-p)
2 law students need a cook. Dinner in
exchange for food and conversation.
See Joe or Bill at 718-104 S.W. 16th
Ave. or call 378-3767. (J-3t-116-p)
UNION: Please forgive me, I didnt
know. Jim after 7PM 373-2 etc.
(J-It-116-p)
Still no summer plans? How about
six weeks in Europe with a highly
experienced graduate couple? For
booklet call 372-5489 Now!
(J-st-115-p)
Penny Rich, designer of the famous
Pennyrlch Bra, has a new creation
the Trlanderin Bra. She also has an all
new marketing plan for those
Interested In earning unlimited
income. Call 378-0378 or 373-2940
for details. (J-7t-111-p)
SPECIAL PREMIERE PREMIERETHREE
THREE PREMIERETHREE DAY^ONLT
Sympathy
For The Devil (1+1)
A New Feature Film
by Jean-Luc Godard,
Starring Mick Jagger, Brian Jones,
Keith Richard, Charlie Watts.
Friday, April 17 thru Sunday,
April 19 in the Union
Auditorium. Eleven Showings
in all. Students tickets on sale
at the box office next Monday
to Friday, 12:00-4:30 p.m.
Two tickets per Student Fee
Card only. General University
Community tickets available
Wednesday-Friday. Admission
is $1.50.
Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

-*
PERSONAL
MEN!!! Need your pad cleaned?
Want a party hosted? The Tidy Tigers
are now taking appts. Get yours in
early by calling the Tiger Den at
373-2760 and your leotard clad tigers
will be at your service!!! (J>st-114-p)
Getting enough from yours? Come
hear ours. THE FIDELITY SHOP is
having a restocking sale. 420 N.w.
13th St. Ph. 378-8045. (J-2t-115-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA I
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
LUNCH AND DINNER
I Fish Almondine I
I and French-Fried Potatoes I

I
We try to keep the
Quarterly on the
magazine racks.
I
But like any other
good magazine, it
doesn't stay there.
w We hope your local
J f wll bookseller is keeping
his stock up.
But when he doesn't, I
(and $1.25) and we'll
be glad to send it to
you
Florida Quarterly
330 Reitz Union
Gainesville, Fla.
i ft--.--.. H
You'll get yours.
florida I
quarterly I
You've got it coming.
I

PERSONAL
GUITARIST wipe your steel strings
with liquid wrench and youll be
amazed at their new brilliance! See
ya at the bent card 372-3225
372-3225. (J-2t-115-p)
CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-113-p)

Friday, April 10, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Univ
Ave. Ask for Bob Zuber, teacher and
performer here for three years.
(J-2t-115-p)
LOST <& FOUND
BICYCLE red and black mens
english racer my only
transportation. Please return it where
you found it or call at 372-5796
No Questions Asked. (L-st-114-p)
LOST: Rm 227, Sta. White
Windbreaker with wallet. Need wallet
and car keys. Contact Ron at
378-6174. (L-lt-116-p)

iife
with
Orson Wells ShH
Joseph Cotton
Everett Sloan
Reitz Union
Auditorium S
mm-
Sunday ji 'Pfa
April 12
7:00 & 9:30

Page 15

LOST <& FOUND
Lost black brief case, containing 2 pr
perscrip glasses, ID cards, slide rule,
class notes drafting gear. Area of frat
row parking lot last Tues. please call
3 76-8281, reward, ask for Pat
(L-6t-112-p)
FOUND: Car keys, McCarty Hall,
Call 392-2180. (L-3t-116-nc)
-gy%y Td|*^!Tn Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)

SERVICES
RubyS ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby
Mills. (M-10t-107-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
ROBERT BEDFORD
KAIHARME ROSS
THE SUNOANCE KID
and his
rwVw. ijTr\WM i '
j smrspfch^/
'Winner of 4
Academy Awards'
PAUL NEWMAN
ROBERT BEDFORD
THE SUNOANCE KID
m W. IWversNy 4ve^r"
'Academy Award Winner'
JOHN WAYNE Best Actor
reooucTioN
v/Hj y V
fl h 'jj vjss



GATOR CLASSIFm^S

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
JULIE 0-IRISTIE GB3RGE (.SCOTT )
IN A RICMARD LESTER LESTERRAYMOND
RAYMOND LESTERRAYMOND WAGNER PRODUCTION _ BOW
...the uncommon movie.
for mature auoiences] TECHNICOLOR FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS W
Fri. and Sat. April 10 & 11
5:30, 8:00, & 10:30 Admission 50)6
sponsored by J.W.R.U.
Together at Last
The Womens Glee Club
and
The Mens Glee Club
present a joint
Noon Day Sing
12:30 today
Ist floor Grand Staircase,
Union
sponsored by JWR Union

The Quarterly is here and
the waiting is over.
The Quarterly is here with
fiction and poetry that are
alive today, written by
people that are alive today.
People you might know.
The Quarterly is here with a
TUB portfolio of photographic
I art (that really is art).
II B TP E B I The Quarterly is here with
R I Elmk I our best wishes and our I
greatest efforts.
I IS HERE! The Quarterly is here I
I stacked on a little card table 1
I in the Plaza of the Americas I
I and Little-Walker Plaza I
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. I
I Tuesday through Friday of I
I this week. I
I flmia I
I oiuirterly I
I We only did it for you. I

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

SERVICES
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
BABY CARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
Monday Friday 8:00 am to 5:00
pm $15.00 per week experience
reliable Christian home.
Phone-376-2072. (M-3t-114-c)
Need help PROGRAMMING?
trained, experienced programmer is
available to help you. Call 376-6054
between 8 a.m. and 12 Noon for
details. (M-4t-114-p)
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-115-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-37t-p)
] Guns Guns Guns -j
( Inventory over 500. Buy -)
I Sell Trade Repair. J
. ( Reloading supplies, Layaway \
* t plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
' [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. \
[lflZfe W. UNIVERSITY AVC.
[QpeTjT&sb unnL fiuTjflr
TREE coffee 4 snack
LIVE MUSIC f MOVIES
THi? TO the n\oo/j' / itz fMues

medium 1
I IN TECHNICOLOR I
ICOOI I
is dynamite! |
THIS PROGRAM IS RATED X
f NO OWE UNDER 17 ADMITTED g
I Mia Farrow John I
lna osSnarvS' ioo Cassavetes*
riV any Technicolor
KHI ALWAYS J.
A WINNER
AT W
THE X
PLAZAj^
GIG
YOUNG
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTOR
JANE
FONDA
I 2nd WEEK
_: '. 1 ~
] I The family that | I
I slays together |
| stays together! i|l
|j| -MA BARKER J;j|
' fijf : T
PRISCNT
' ( Or ifmal Sound track Album avatiaoic I __
1 5/ 1Q" AMUHCAN INKRNAIIQNAt RtCORPS | COLOR a, MQVItLAB
"~PAT DON DIANE
IHINGLE STROUP Va|si I



Nixon Plans Vietnam Announcement

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon will make a
nationally televised address on
Vietnam next Thursday night,
the White House announced
today.
He is expected to announce a
further U. S. troop withdrawal.
Press Secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler said the speech, on radio
as well as television, would be at
9 p. m. EST April 16 and would
concern Nixons decision on

Cornell Under
Restraining Order

ITHACA, N.Y. (UPI)
Cornell University early today
obtained a temporary restraining
order against any further
violence on campus.
The order was obtained from
State Supreme Court Justice
Harold E. Simpson following a
rampage by 100 black students,
which prompted the university
president to clamp a 2 a. m. to 7
a. m. curfew on the campus.
PRESIDENT DALE R.
Corson, announcing the court
action, said it was taken on the
unanimous recommendation of
the faculty council.
The Cornell president said the
restraining order applied to
every single person on campus
and any violation would be an
act in comtempt of court.
I want to make it crystal
clear that the handling of
violations is no longer in the
hands of the university but in
the hands of the court Corson
said.
HE SAID THE court would
be advised immediately of any
violation, and violators would be
subject to the full penalties of
the law under the jurisdiction of
the court and with the use of
such law enforcement personnel
as the court deems appropriate.
Corson also said the normal
operations of the university
would continue without
interruption.
NVA Down
Helicopter
At Dak Seang
*!>
SAIGON (UPI) North
Vietnamese troops besieging Dak
Seang shot down a U. S. medical
evacuation helicopter Thursday
but the situation improved to
the point where the Communists
failed to shell the camp today
for the first time in 10 days.
The situation is substantially
cleared up, a South Vietnamese
officer said of the siege of the
Green Beret camp 290 miles
northeast of a Communist
offensive that pushed the U. S.
death toll to a seven month high
last week.
THE MILITARY sources said
there were no income rounds at
Dak Seang today but that just
before midnight four 122
millimeter rocket rounds struck
an artillery base four miles to
the south, inflicting light to
moderate casualties on
government rangers.
Military sources said 100
rounds of Communist fire struck
the camp Wednesday.

Vietnam troop levels.
THE SPEECH will come one
day after the latest phase of the
gradual troop pullout process
started last year by Nixon is to
be completed.
Previously ordered
withdrawals will reduce the
ceiling on U. S. forces in
Vietnam to 434,000 on April
15.
Ziegler told reporters that the
President wanted to update his

The curfew was clamped on
after students set a bonfire on
top of the campus store
building, broke about 65
windows and overturned a car.


Should Student
Government
gouern? wT 7
It niust lead. And represent. t
To solve our problems, we Jj j J
students have to stand A I |J 1 S|i\
alongside of. and support. Ihl
strong leadership who I I\M j, hK\
will force the admin- |U| jHSB.
istration to recognize Jm 1 jHfISBTS
and fulfill our needs.
wor* do *. Cam
Councils wont jy#. t
do y V
Boards
do
Alan Howes, Don Tucker, Robert
Wattles, John Maynard, Carol
Brunson can do it! Thev will do it!

T
rAA .\A./A a; a .. % .
On new troop levels

report to the nation on
conditions in Vietnam
amplifying his earlier policy
statements.
NIXON TOLD newsmen at an
informal news conference March
21 that Vietnamization the
administration term for turning
a larger burden of the war over
to the South Vietnamese was
progressing well and he saw at
that time nothing to slow the
rate of U. S. withdrawals.
Nixon has ordered three
phases of withdrawal so far,
reducing the authorized strength
of U. S. forces in Vietnam by
some 115,000. The actual
number of troops to be pulled
out as of a week from
Wednesday is expected to be
about 105,000.
NIXON ANNOUNCED the
25,000-man reduction in the
ceiling last June and

subsequently ordered two more
reductions.
Gen. William C
Westmoreland, former Vietnam
commander who is now the
Army chief of staff, and Gen.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
RALDWHf^^A
1 STARKE, FLORIDA l^H|J
SOON HR OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

Friday, April 10, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Creighton W. Abrams, currently
the U. S. commander in
Vietnam, have favored a
slowdown in the withdrawal
because of an increase in
Communist activity.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

Orange
and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
DEADLINE FOR
REMOVING OF "I"
GRADES is Friday, April 17
by 4 p.m. for candidates for
graduate degrees to be
conferred at the end of the
spring quarter.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS All Teacher
education majors, regardless of
college classification, are
required to satisfy the Speech
Screening Requirements before
being admitted into the
Advanced Professional Sequence
or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE
400 and the elementary block.
Appointments are being made in
Room 124 Norman Hall. English
and Speech majors do not take
the test as SCH 201 is required
in all of their programs.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT TESTS in French,
German, Latin and Spanish will
be given at 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 23, in Little 101. These
tests are required for initial
registration at the University of
Florida in a language in which
the student has any prior

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bam ll pm Bam llpm 2pm llpm
Research Library Bam 11 pm Bam 11 pm 2pm 11 pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm 8:30 am l2 N
Special Collections 8:30 am spm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library ~
341 Norman Hall 8 am 10:30 pm** 9 am 5 pm 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm spm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm lO pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm lO pm
Health Center Library
L 102 Med. Science Bldg. 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am-5 pm 2pm-12M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam ll pm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam spm
337 Stadium 7pm lO pm*** Bam l2 N
Law Library
Holland Law Center Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 8:30 am ll pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N 2 pms pm
6pm lO pm 6pm lO pm
Ipm spm
* The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. l2 M.
The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
* The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

CN til I GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
J3L r~^7?r 0 S? TAXes ? debts?
/ f [s ,t s ,ncom e Tax time again and this year is even worse!
fiviAit / Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
rpflPwiwjr-- /x enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces neces'==
'== neces'== / J V /\ sities of life! CONSOLIDATE all of those bills, pay
1 \ \ your taxes and end U P with ,ess of a monthly output.
\ m W Come in t 0 talk it over...we're specialist at solving
Am) y / A ~~ ,hose kinds of problems!

Administrative Notices

knowledge acquired in or out of
class. Testing time is about one
hour.
PREMEDICAL AND
PREDENTAL STUDENTS must
register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education,
Room 105 Anderson Hall,
starting Monday, April 6,
through Friday, Apiil 24. Bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors and the course
and section numbers.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
SIGN-UP sheets are posted
in the Placement & Career
Planning Center, Room G-22
Reitz Union, two weeks in
advance. Companies will be
recruiting for June and
August graduates unless
indicated otherwise.
APRIL 13: Union Camp
Corp. Res. & Dev. Div.;
Cessna Aircraft Co.; Sears,
Roebuck & Co.; McGill
Manufacturing Co.; Inc.;
Army Medical Dept.,' Chase
Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
APRIL 13-14: Procter &
Gamble Distributing Co.
APRIL 14: Blue Bell, Inc.;
U. S. Gypsum Co.; Grand

BLUB BULLETIN

Union Co.; Mohawk Data
Sciences Corp.; Soroban, Inc.;
Northwestern Mutual Life
Insurance Co.
APRIL 15: First Florida
Ban Corp.; Los Angeles City
Unified School District;
Keller Industries; Georgia
State Merit System;
Clearwater Finishing Plant;
Atlantic National Bank of
Jacksonville; R. H. Macy &
Co. (Davidson's Atlanta);
New England Oyster House;
Hudson Pulp & Paper Corp.
APRIL 16: NASA John F.
Kennedy Space Center;
Eastern Engineering Co.;
Eglin AFB Air Proving
.Ground Center; Good Humor
Corp.
APRIL 16-17:
Westinghouse Electric Corp.;
Robins AFB School System
APRIL 17: United Fruit
Co.
CANCELLATIONS:
APRIL 13: Stromberg
Datagraphix, Inc.; Jordon
Marsh (Changed date to April
29); Regional Administrator
of National Banks (Changed
date to May 4)
APRIL 15: Montgomery
Ward & Co.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

GENERAL NOTICES
o
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS are invited to a
week of home hospitality and
discussion between June
21-27 at FLORIDA

Friday, April 10
National Intercollegiate Billard-
Tournament, Union
Ballroom, All Day.
Engineering Fair Displays, All
Engineering Buildings.
Union Movie, "Petulia," Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00 & 10:30
p.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, Israeli Dancing
Afterwards, 7:30 p.m.
Black Dance Group, P. K. Yonge
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: Marvin
Blickenstaff, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, 9:00 p.m.:
"Winchester 73," 11:00 p.m.:
'Tales of Terrors," Southhall
Rec Room.
Rathskeller, "Blues Image,"
9:00 & 11:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 11
National Intercollegiate Billiard
Tournament, Union
Ballroom, All Day.
Fair Displays, All Engineering
Buildings.
Engineering Fair Legislative
Appreciation Day.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.,
Luncheons Afterwards.
Union Movie, "Petulia," Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00 & 10:30
p.m.
Music Dept.: Men's and
Women's Glee Club Concert,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Engineering Fair Coronation
Ball, Holiday Inn, 9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, 9:00 p.m.
"Winchester 73," 11:00 p.m.:
'Tales of Terror," Southhall
Rec Room.
Rathskeller, "Blues Image,"
9:00 8i 10:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 12
Engineering Fair Displays, All
Engineering Buildings.
Hillel Foundation, Bagel & Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Music Dept.: Sinfonietta,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.

Campus
Calendar

CROSSROADS to be held in
St. Petersburg under auspicies
of the of
International Education.
Application can be made at
Foreign Student Office by
May 1.

Collegiate Civitan Club Meeting,
346 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Union Classic Film Series,
"Citizen Kane," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C 8t D Union,
7:00 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, Alpha Omega Pi
House, 9:13 p.m.
Monday, April 13
Cicerones Meeting, 122 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Sigma Xi Lecture, Dr. Melvin
Rubin & Dr. Alfred H.
Krezdom, McCarty Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Committee for New Alternatives
in the Middle East, Speaker,
Arie Bober, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m
Young Democrats Meeting, 361
Union, 8:00 p.m. Speaker:
Dr. Goffman
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
ROTC Soldier's Show, "Where
It's At USA," University
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, April 14
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
363 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C4, Union, 7:00
p.m.
Chess Club Meeting,
Tournament Registration,
361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Journalism & Communication
Dames Meeting, Meet at
Westgate Shopping Center at
7:00 p.m., 6000 N. W. 17th
Place, 7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 7:30
p.m.
Modern Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Carlos
Montoya, $2.00 & $1.50.
Rathskeller, "Blues Image,"
$2.50 & $2.00. Military Ball,
$4.50 per couple.



Communist Offensive Endangers Negotiation

PARIS (UPI) The United
States warned the Viet Cong and
the North Vietnamese Thursday
their spring offensive which has
pushed U. S. and South
Vietnamese losses to a
seven-month high threatened to
jeopardize any serious
negotiations in Paris.
The Hanoi and Viet Cong
negotiators disregarded the
warning by U. S. Ambassador
Philip C. Habib and said there

Nixon Asks Broadcasters 1 Help
To Fight 'Serious 1 Drug Problem

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon asked the
broadcast industry Thursday to
help the government warn young
people of the dangers of drug
abuse, which he described as a
very serious problem

Wesf Berlin Officials
Close 'Red Freedom School
BERLIN (UPI) The West Berlin city government Thursday
ordered the closing of a leftwing experimental school whose records
showed it taught children sex games, assassination and how to combat
police.
Professor Werner Stein, head of the city higher education
department, ordered the Free University to stop subsidizing the Red
Freedom school run by the Universitys Psychological Institute.
HORST KORBER, head of the youth department, said the institute
used the school to indoctrinate children politically, stimulate them
sexually, and encourage hatred of the police and authority.
The school, officially called Red Freedom, was established last
July for working class children aged 6 to 12 with the announced aim
of anti-authoritative education to promote the democratization of
society.
One game was demonstrators and bulls, with the children taking
the part of demonstrators who fight the police the bulls.

SEE THE "FLY NAVY" TEAM
on
Outside game room in H
Reitz Union, April 9, 10 and 13.
Ift an education. f /
Fyi
M /i
i ppr r
...._

wifi be no peace in Southeast
Asia until all of the 500,000
American troops are evacuated
from South Vietnam.
THEN, ADVERTISING their
lack of faith in the deadlocked,
15-mo nth-old peace conference,
the North Vietnamese
announced their chief delegation
supervisor, Le Due Tho, a
ranking Hanoi party member,
had been ordered home and
would leave today aboard a

nationwide.
Nixon spoke to 37 radio and
television executives,
representatives of seven motion
picture companies and several
advertising executives at the
start of a day-long White House

U S. AMBASSADOR SAYS IN PARIS

Russian jetliner.
Hanoi diplomats said Tho has
had no contact, private or secret,
with President Nixons
negotiators since he flew here in
January after a prolonged
absence.
They said he will discuss the
conflict in Peking and Moscow
before going to Hanoi to report
on the Paris deadlock. \
HABIB PUT Communist
negotiators on notice at todays

conference on drug abuse.
IF WE COULD tell a story
and hold the interest of these
young people and at the same
time get the message across, that
would serve an enormous public
interest, he said. The power in
this room can make a
difference.
Drugs have destroyed
civilizations in China, Southeast
Asia and the Middle East, the
President said, and they are
weakening the character of a
strong and great people in the
United States.
THE TIDE has not yet
engulfed the country, but it is
very serious, he said. We can
turn that tide, if you can get at
them through the medium that
has their ear.
Nixon noted in his 15-minute
talk that by the time children
have finished high school, they
will have watched television for
about 12,000 hours, more time
than they spend with their
parents or in church or in
school.

62nd session the United States
will not be swayed by any
Communist stalling in Paris or
by military actions in South
Vietnam.
He was referring to the
Communist offensive that killed

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DATSUN 510
SEDANS TAKE TOP
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AFRICAN SAFARI RALLY!
KAMPALA, UGANDA March 26-30
Datsun rally teams upset the favorites in one of the most
grueling tests of man and machine the 3,200-mile, four-day
East African Safari Rally to win first, second, fourth and
seventh place finishes out of the top ten and to capture the
* team prize for Datsun for the second straight year.
Pulling in top prize money was the Datsun Sedan of West
Germans Edgar Hermann and Hans Schuller. Hermann and
Schuller compiled the least amount of penalty points (395) to
finish ahead of the second-place car, another Datsun Sedan
entered by the Kenya Team of Joginder Singh and Ken
Ranyard. Singh and Ranyard compiled 446 penalty points.
Taking third with 489 points was the Peugeot team of Bert
Shankland and Chris Rothwell of Tanzania, with fourth going
to another Datsun driven by Jamil Din and AM Mughal of
Uganda.
Considered to be one of the most competitive events in the
world, the East African Safari Rally covered 3,200 miles over
some of the most treacherous roads in Uganda and Kenya.
Ninety-one entries started the grind with only 29 finishing the
event.
Datsun's win marks the first time a Japanese car has won a
Federation Internationale Autombile (FIA) Rally.
GODDING & CLARK
"DISCOVER DATSUN'S FULL LINE"
2nd AVE A 2nd St SE
378-2311

Friday, April 10, 1970, The Florida Alligator

138 Gls last week, the highest
death toll in seven months.
He also accused the guerrillas
of having openly violated the
neutrality, sovereignty and
integrity of Laos and Cambodia

Page 19



Page 20

ULJtfO

WILL CLEAN UP CORRUPTION

Clip Joints, Speed Traps,
Maddox Signs Warn

ATLANTA (UPI) Gov.
Lester Maddox confirmed
Wednesday that two signs
warning tourists of cancerous
conditions in Long County,
including clip joints and
speed traps, were erected
Thursday.
Maddox said he is taking the
drastic step of putting up the
signs on U. S. 301 at the
northern and southern
approaches to the southeast
Georgia county to correct a
situation that requires drastic
action.
THE GOVERNOR threatened
last month to move to clean up
what he called corruption in
the county after a local minister
was charged with lying to a
grand jury.
The jury was investigating the
latest charges made by Maddox
that gambling and other illegal
activities were being conducted
there.
He said Wednesday that
placing the 12 by 25 foot signs
at the county lines was about
the most he could do. He added
the signs will be protected by
state troopers.
MADDOX HAS been feuding
Carswells
Glad Fights
Finally Over
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Judge G. Harrold Carswell said
Wednesday he was relieved the
fight was over, and although
disappointed, he had no
intention of becoming bitter
over the U. Si Senates rejection
of his nomination to the
Supreme Court.
The 50-year-old jurist said
President Nixon personally had
requested he stay on as a justice
of the sth U. S. Circuit Court of
Appeals.
CARSWELL SAID he intends
to do so, after a brief rest.
Unsmiling, but speaking in a
steady tone of voice, Carswell
capsuled his reaction to the
days events in a brief,
two-minute statement which he
gave to newsmen in the Florida
Bar Building two blocks from
the state Capitol.
His wife, son, son-in-law and
Gov. Claude Kirk were at his
side.
FIRST, LET ME say its a
relief, he told newsmen upon
entering the crowded room. Its
always disappointing not to win,
especially when so many friends
expressed confidence.
The President expressed
disappointment, Carswell,
dressed in a navy blue suit and
white shirt, laconically told
newsmen.
He then went on to express
thanks to the President for
nominating him, and to the
senator? who fought for more
than four months to try and get
him confirmed.
HE ALSO expressed his
appreciation of those in the legal
and judicial profession who
declared their confidence in his
ability.
To have taken up the
gauntlet and joined the fight
would have been unbecoming,

with Long County political boss
Ralph Dawson, charging that
Dawson is responsible for the
situation there.
But Dawson said Wednesday
Maddox is being misinformed
by a bunch of defeated
politicians and denied that
speed traps or any other illegal
activities are going on there.
Dawson called for an
investigation by impartial
observers.
Maddox said the two signs,
put up at a total cost of $3,000,
will read.
BEWARE, YOU are now in
Long County, approaching
Ludowici the county seat. Do
not get fleeced in a clip joint. Do
not get caught in a speed trap,
signed Lester Maddox,
governor.
Maddox said he has ordered
the Public Safety Department to

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place two state troopers at each
of the signs on 24-hour guard to
prevent destruction of the
billboards.
He said he considered the
assignment of the patrolmen
hazardous duty and
expensive, but I think when we
compare the cost of trying to
correct this intolerable abuse
which has been going on for
decades, it will be nothing as
compared to the cost if we
continue to let it go its
cancerous way and hurt the
people of Georgia and the good
people of Long County.
Maddox said he knows there
are many good people in the
county who might be offended
by the signs, but if I have to
offend even some good people in
order to get the county cleaned
up, then it will be worth
whatever it costs;

| Is Earth Day |
IA Commie Plot?!
£ ¥
§ ATLANTA (UPI) State Comptroller General James L. :j
£ Bentley Jr. critized Thursday the incredulous timing of Earth
: Day, a nationally scheduled demonstration against g
£ environmental pollution. }
: Bentley pointed out the observance is scheduled for April 22,
: the birth date of Vladimir Lenin, founder of modem v
:j Communism. £
: It is a date observed as an international holiday by the :
£ Communist party.
: BENTLEY SAID while the idea of the demonstration is
£ laudible, its sponsors, mainly young people throughout the £
£ nation, are polluting the issue of pollution itself by taking jj
£ that bait.
Bentley sent telegrams, mostly at state expense, to the
: President and vice president, congressional leaders and governors :j:
: of the 50 states urging that the date of the observance be £
: changed.
: ASKED IF HE thought the timing was a communist plot, j:
:* Bentley said If it is a coincidencen its a whale of a £
: coincidence, and it could make us a laughingstock around the ;
: world.
Bentley pointed out that news reports have indicated the :
: militant Students for Democratic Society haye taken this as a g
: thing to play with and become involved in the planned £
£ demonstrations. £
^V.V.VAV.V.V.ftV.V.V.V.VAV.V.V/.V.V.V.W.V.SV.'.V.V.'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V



the ugliest
words in college:
Quiz Friday over the next six chapters
-

Why "Sweat It ?"
You can learn to read and study much
faster! The average Florida Reading Dynamics
student increases his reading and study speed
(including skimming and recalling) over 4.4
times and improves concentration over 10% as
tested by our standardized testing program.
Reading Dynamics graduates include over
1,000 University of Texas students, 100
professors, and many deans. As a matter of

PLAN TO ATTEND A FREE MINI LESSON
Today at 3, 5:30, & Bp.m.
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Upstairs at
1015 W. Univ. Ave.
(next to University City Photo Supply)

fact, our graduates include many of the
world's most famous respected
people ... Presidents, Senators, Movie Stars,
Scientists, and Business Leaders.
The best way to find out about the
remarkable Reading Dynamics course is to
come to a free MINI-LESSON. Here,
crammed into one exciting hour, you'll learn
what it's like to be able to read and study
faster. You will see a short, enjoyable movie

Friday, April 10, 1970, The Florida Alligator

and have all your questions answered. In
short, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to
read and study substantially faster than you
thought possible without skipping a single
word with better comprehension.
Important Note: We can only help those
who are NOW average or above average
readers. To check your own level of reading,
we suggest you contact the University of
Florida Reading Clinic.

Page 21



Page 22

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

The
Florida
Alligator

iWEEKENDMOVIEFARE

THEY SHOOT HORSES
DON'T THEY? -Qf course, the
major thing to be said about this
picture at this point is that it
was up for all kinds of awards
from the Academy and won at
least one that I remember. Gig
Young got one for his
supporting acting in this flick.
Basically, the movie is about
marathon dancing. Jane Fonda
stars and some of the critics have
said that this picture could be
the actual start of Miss Fondas
acting career. Its directed by
Sidney Pollack who came to
work on the picture after it was
already started. From all reports,
he did a terrific job. This isnt
one to be missed. Its at the
Plaza One.
TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS
HERE This is a cowboy and
Indian picture unlike all the
others because the people on the
screen have hearts. Robert
Redford is a sheriff and
Katherine Ross is in (isnt she
always?) with an Indian played
by Robert Blake. Its the story
of discrimination against the
redskin and his subsequent
death. My friend John Burgess
says it stinks to high heaven and
his roommate Joe says the same.
But I kind of liked it. It has a lot
of faults but its so refreshing in
its idea and approach that Im
impressed. Its showing at the
Center One.
*
TRUE GRIT John Wayne,
with a patch on his eye and
fourty years of cowboying under
his belt, chases after a desperado
who killed a little girls dad (Kim
Darbys dad). Glenn Campbell is
in it and hes not bad either.
Wayne is dynamite. Watch for
the scene where he takes the
reins in his teeth, pulls out both
pistols, cusses, and charges into a
crowd of 317 bad men and
doesnt get shot. Os course it
isnt realistic. Who ever said it
should be? Its showing with
The Sterile Cuckoo, another
good movie, at the downtown
Florida.
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE
SUNDANCE KID I really
didnt watch the Academy
Awards very closely, but I do
remember Butch Cassidy getting
something or being nominated
for something to do with an
original screenplay. Its a pretty
good movie. Paul Newman and
Robert Redford star. Katherine
Ross is in this one too, again
loving someone. Its about two
guys and a girl who rob banks
across the country and then get
themselves in Bolivia where they
do the same. Youll probably
like it. Its across the hotdog
stand from Tell Them Willie
Boy is Here at the Center Two.
IF ... What happens when
you keep putting pressure on
young people and give them no
way to have that pressure let
off? Thats the question thats,
in my opinion, behind this
picture. Its a very good movie

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with real power and an
incredible tension. A bunch of
relative unknowns star. Maybe
there are a few too many tricks
in it photographically, but not
enough to keep the film from
being one of the strongest
pictures Ive seen this year. Its
with Benjamin at the
Suburbia Drivein on the big
screen.
BLOODY MAMA Shelley
Winters stars in this thrilling saga
that is about Ma Barker and her
offspring-hood sons. I havent
seen it but some who have said it
wasnt bad, kind of exciting.
Maybe so. See it, if you like, at
the Plaza Two.
ROSEMARYS BABY
Roman Polanski directed this
story of witchcraft and black
magic in New York City
involving Mia Farrow as
Rosemary, some kid as
Rosemarys baby, and the devil
as Rosemarys lover. Its on the
bill with Medium Cool, a

ITS RAINING THE BLUES v
AT THE RAT
THIS FRIDAY + SATURDAY Vv \\ V.
9:00 PM + 11:00 PM \J \J
TICKETS $2.00 MEMBERS $2.50 NON-MEMBERS V K
PRICES SLIGHTLY HIGHER AT THE DOOR \) V\
TICKETS SOLD AT: JWRU BOX OFFICE, RECORD BAR, N/
+ AT THE RAT (OF COURSE) V. V.
BLUES IMAGE

picture about black pressure in
the ghetto in New York. What in
the world is happening to New
York Citv? The pictures are at
the Gainesville Drivein.
PETULLA This one stars
Julie Cristie and George C.
Scott. Its billed as the
uncommon movie. I know
absolutely nothing about it
except its showing Friday and
Saturday nights at the Reitz
Union.
CITIZEN KANE This is
Orson Welles production of a
story about William Randolf
Hearst with some adaptation and
some near slander. Joseph
Cotton stars in addition to
Welles who plays Kane. Agnes
Moorehead is in it too. The total
effect is terrific. Its one of the
biggest and best pictures ever
made. Its this weeks offering
from the Film Classics
Committee and will be shown in
the Reitz Union Theater
Sunday. Dont miss it.

Blues Image At Rat
Tonight And Saturday

Blues with a Latin influence is
op tap this weekend at The
Rathskeller when Atco recording
artists The Blues Image performs
two shows each night.
The California-based group
has three members from the
Tampa area and much of the
groups early success came here
in Florida.
THERE ARE two shows at
The Rat tonight and Saturday
night, one at 9 pm. and a
second at 11. Admission for
members of The Rathskeller is
$2 and nonmembers may

EXPERT SERVICE
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
w
Speed Equipment jL_ Service on All
and Accessories / Foreign Mkes
535 SW 4th Ave. 376-9381

purchase advance tickets for
$2.50. Prices at the door will be
slightly higher.
Blues Image has recorded two
albums. The most recent was
released several weeks ago. The
group has received favorable
reviews on both recordings and
both albums feature a
predominance of original
material as does the groups on
stage performance.
The show is produced by The
Rathskeller in conjunction with
Student Government
Productions.



mB \S ;
'^'V S'VV
M iNt
v ' "v* t/-, t,*'" i?. ',,' ~ ., yysp
Hh H hP:
JANIS JOPLIN
... here for Frolics
Collection Os Graphics
Opens Monday At Union

A collection of original
graphics will be presented by
London Grafica Arts at the
second floor of the Reitz Union
beginning Monday from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
The collection is making a
nation-wide tour of universities,
enabling faculty and students to
view works usually seen only in
art galleries or museums.
The exhibit covers works of

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the old masters, such as
Rembrandt and Durer and has a
wide range of contemporary
prints by Picasso, Braque, and
Chagall.
All prints are original and are
priced from $lO to $3,000.
A London Arts representative
will be on hand to answer
questions about the prints or the
graphic arts in general.

,,% -y *dftt #*T.OS
Janis Joplin Tops Bill
o
For IFCs Spring Frolics

Janis Joplin and her seven
piece backup group will perform
here May 29 in Florida Gym for
the Interfratemity Councils
annual Spring Frolics.
The program also include The
Rotary Connection, a popular
seven-member rock group that
performed here several months
ago to overflow crowds at The
Rathskeller.
JOPLIN GAINED the
majority of her fame as lead
singer with a hard rock group
called Big Brother and the
Holding Company in San
Francisco in the latter part of
1967. She first appeared at the
Monterey Pop Festival in the
Summer of 67 and has repeated
success since then.
She split from Big Brother in
1969 and formed her new band
which includes a brass section in
addition to regular rock
instruments. Joplin and her new
group released their first album
Kosmic Blues, late last year.
Miss Joplin has secured a
reputation as one of the top
female performers working in
America today and has been
called the white queen of soul
among other things.
THE ROTARY Connection
has recorded four albums
featuring original tunes and
creative arrangments of the work
of other rock composers. The
group depends heavily upon the
But No Buffalos
Mines at Sudbury, Ontario,
produce 75 per cent of the
worlds nickel supply.

vocalizations of two lead singers,
a black chick and a black guy
Minnie Riperton and Sidney
Barnes.

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MAKES IT RIGHT! I
MILLER BREW. CO.

SSSSSSSSSSi:3*S

Friday, April 10,1070, The Florida AMfator,

Tickets for the show will be
on sale later. Cost for admission
will be $5.50 per couple for the
show.

Page 23



The
Florida
Alligator

*!
j Halftime
* *
& x x : .;. x >: .:. : x x By Craig Goldwyn *
It Takes Leather Balls
Australian Phil Whyatts car bumper tells followers that it takes
leather balls to play rugby.
In fact there is a regular fleet of cars that inform the unaware that
Americas roughest, toughest, fastest growing sport has arrived on the
UF campus.
WHY ATT IS A co-coach and teacher of the UF ruggers, who thus
far have kicked, pushed, stampeded and trampled the first-year sport
to a very respectable 54-1 record.
Two weeks ago they hosted George Washington University for two
games in what was to be a the First Annual Gator Rugby Invitational
Tournament.
As a tournament it wasnt much, since Texas A&M and the
Pensacola clubs never showed. The show went on anyhow, with the
visitors handing the UF B-squad a resounding 22-10 trouncing.
A HARD PRESSED first team managed to chase down the
Washington 15 on a flooded field and slosh to a 16-16 tie on a flooded
field.
Afterwards the battered warriors sloshed through a bit of beer at
the Rathskeller.
Rugby is a game of tradition dating back before football, and beer
sloshing is as much a part of it as halftime at football games. Another
tradition is sportsmanship. When GW showed up a man short Friday, a
Gator filled in. Thats why Whyatt thinks rugby will never achieve
varsity status in colleges, but why he and the teams other
player-coach, Tony Baker, want to see the sport added to the 1976
roster of the Olympics.
RUGBY HAS already been played in two Olympics, 1920 and
1924. The United States won the gold in both.
Whyatt and Baker plan to push for Olympic status at the upcoming
meeting of the Eastern Rugby Union representing over 120 teams in
the eastern U.S.
Several players on the UF squad have the raw talent to qualify for
the Games, but their tremendous lack of experience would make it
highly unlikely. Only two other members of the team have ever
played the sport before. When one realizes that these newcomers are
holding their own against teams like GW, where all of the members
have played at least three years, he gets an indication of the calibre of
the program the two Austrailians have instituted.
THE INTRAMURALS department has outfitted the 35-man roster
with new uniforms, the athletic department has offered to let them
play an exhibition game during half-time of one of the freshman
football games, President OConnell kicked out the opening ball in a
contest with New Zealand, and crowds have been averaging close to
200.
To Whyatt, sportsmanship is the byword. The game really isnt as
bloody as it seems. Sure people get fyurt, but the human body isnt
meant to be used as a weapon.
Its a gentlemans game. His team is testimony to this fact. At the
Mardi Gras Tournament in New Orleans they were awarded the
sortsmanship trophy above eight other teams, although the Gators
placed only third.
Tomorrow at 1:30 p. m. the Gator 15 play their final home game
of the season against Miami on the drill field. And Whyatt will be
playing in his first gentlemans game in several weeks. You see he
broke his leg trying to kick some big leather ba11...
* *
THERE HAVE been reports that black militants have threatened to
harass South African Golfer Gary Player in this weekends the Masters
Tournament. Arthur Ashe, a black U.S. tennis player was barred from
participation in a South African tournament, went so far as to say he
feared for Players life. Several FBI agents are reportedly taking in
the good golf in Augusta, Georgia.
* *
GAINESVILLES STAR quarterback of 1969 Eddie McAshan is
currently the man to watch as far as who will be Georgia Techs
quarterback come this fall.
McAshan, Techs first black football player, is presently listed
fourth on the Yellow Jacket roster, but many observers feel hell be
number one before the 7O campaign is very old.
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GATOR SPORTS

State Horse Tracks Lose Permits

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Secretary of State Tom Adams
Thursday authorized state
attorneys to seek removal of
business permits for three race
tracks accused of illegally
contributing to political
campaigns of former Gov.
Hay don Bums.
I have determined that there
are facts which indicate that a
violation has occurred, Adams
said.
He said he was referring
findings of his investigation to
State Attorneys Richard
Gerstein of Dade County and
Philip S. Shailer of Broward
County for appropriate
action.
GERSTEIN SAID LAST week
that officers of Hialeah Race
Course, Tropical Park, and
Gulfstream Park agreed in 1964
to contribute to the Bums
gubernatorial campaign. As a
result of this agreement, he said,
Hialeah kicked in $22,500;
Tropical Park, $24,947.50 and
Gulfstream $22,500.
He said Thursday the Hialeah
track later gave $25,000 to
Burns unsuccessful bid for
renomination in 1966.
Iroftwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
SPECIAL RATE
THREE MONTHS FOR 525 + TAX
WEEKENDS )3 ALL DAY
For information call
376-0080
IZCNWOOP
coif emo

Bf H
mWih
-. wr. s
1 ''' V s-jtfVr: 3
'- v-" IssPl m&w IMHliiliilil
PLAYER of the WEEK
' ... '. - ; 4
This week's award goes to Julio Faz, SEG, for his brillant bungling
on the Conga drums last Friday at the POWER dance in the Union
Ballroom.
As the dance was about to break-up around midnight, Julio decided
that the whole thing needed some more percussion. So he hopped up
on stage and gave a magnificent one-hour performance with POWER.
Best bets for the next Player of the Week award are the Center Dance
Group (a local black extravaganza) at P. K. Yonge Auditorium April 10
at 8:00 p. m., or the Folk Feat at the Plaza of the Americas April 11
from noon to 4:00 p. m. Freak out at these free freaky events and who
knows maybe you'll be the next Player of the Week.
' ;, u
CELBBRAfnDN 70
An Omicron Kappa Student Government Production

CRAIG GOLDWYN CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

Page 24

GERSTEIN SAID HE is also
asking that state attorneys in
Duval and Orange counties be
authorized to file suits charging
election law violations against
businesses.
He declined to identify the

BASEBALL
Gators vs. Georgia in Athens, Friday and Saturday
BILLIARDS
National Collegiate Billiards Championships, in Reitz Union
Ballroom at 9a. m. Friday and Saturday
FOOTBALL
Scrimmage at Florida Field, Saturday at 2:30
RUGBY
Gators play Miami on Drill Field, Saturday at 1:30
SKIING
Spring Intercollegiate Invitational at Lake Wauburg, Saturday
at 8:30
SWIMMING
AAU Swim Meet in Cincinnati, Ohio, Friday, Saturday and Sunday
TENNIS
Gators vs. Jacksonville on Varsity Courts, Friday at 2:30
Gators vs. Columbus College in Columbus, Georgia on Saturday
I i ~l
MON 8 AM Student Special
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t. The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10.1970

offender in Duval County, but
said the Orange County case
involves the Orlando Sentinel,
which he claimed accepted a
$14,488 check on a phony
account to pay Bums campaign
bills.



Association of College Unions International
jjJ [

Union Director Remembers
By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor
In 1944 Bill Rion was crowned collegiate Three Cushion Billiards
Champion.
Now Rion is hosting a similar contest to the one he won while a
junior at the University of Florida. Hes worked long and hard to
make this Intercollegiate Billiards Championship at his Reitz Union a
reality.
1 DOUBT that Ill be spending much time in the office Friday, he
said. Hell be attending the competion on the next floor above his
Director of the Union office.
Rion graduated from UF in 1945 and returned to his alma mater to
direct its Union, which he has grown up with and babied into its new
multi-million dollar home.
I NEVER had a que in my hand until my freshman year. When I
saw the ,Union games area with pool tables and ping pong side-by-side
- I used to be big on ping pong somehow I got involved in billiards.
I became interested and intrigued by watching some touring champs
that stopped at the school, so I studied and learned the game.
The whole concept of billiards in college Unions, the Director
and Player insisted, is to uplift the game out of the gutters it was in
in the 20s and 30s. Why, 150 years ago it was a gentlemans game for
royalty! Thats why modem billiards is played in carpeted rooms with
glass front and is called a family game, not in the dark green
eye-shaded ... He left the picture for me to complete.
A twinkle came to his eye when I asked him to recall some of his
more thrilling moments with the sport. He decided that his
relationship with the great Charles Peterson was perhaps his fondest
memory. Peterson was a man who devoted his life to billiards,
traveling from college union to boys club to YMCA. In 1948 Peterson
gave him a Willie Hoppe monogrammed que-stick, a memento that he
has cherished since.
But there have been other moments too: his matches with Ralph
Greenleaf, Andrew Ponzi, Willie Hoppe, but I could never even
scratch good against these fellows.
And now theres his 12-year old son whos taken an interest in the
sport. Rion warned him, as he would advise anyone contemplating
taking the sport seriously, if youre going to get proficient youre
going to have to work like a son-of-a-gun.

FIJI Aces
Intramural competitor Tom
Jepson, shooting for Phi Gamma
Delta Fraternity, polished off
the second hole yesterday in one
quick shot. Jepson scored his
first ace on the 150 yard hole at
the University Golf Course
during the final round of
competition. He went on to
score 3842 for an 80 total.
The ball landed back of the
hole and rolled downhill into the
cup.
r
4 Jepson said that he was
shocked and excited. My
fraternity was pretty well out of
the competition, so I was just
shooting for the hell of it. The
Fijis placed 14 out of 16 teams
in the league.

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Behind The Eight-Ball
National Intercollegiate Billiards Tournament

The 12 best of the nations collegiate billiards players will meet at
the Union Ballroom today and tomorrow to compete in The National
Intecollegiate Billiards Tournament.
Among the 12 are two returning nationl champions: Donna Ries
from the University of Kansas and Mick Varner from the Purdue
University.
THE TOURNAMENT has three categories: womens and mens
pocket billiards, and three cushion billiards. Four regional champions
will participate in each of the events.
From the Southeast region are: Pablo Fernandez from the
University of Miami, and Michael Carella from Miami Dade Jr.
College.
Pocket billiards is the game where a player calls his shot and shoots
until he misses. Each ball pocketed is one point with the winner being
the first to reach 100.
Three cushion is a game played with three balls, one white and two
red. The player shoots the white ball at one red ball and after hitting
it the white ball must bounce off three cushions before hitting the
second red ball. If the shot is successful the player recieves one point,
to win he must get 50 points.
Todays competition starts at 9 a.m. and runs until 9:30 tonight
when Jimmy Caras, a past world champion will give an exhibition of

trick shots.

lIHH Bm, M MF
Caras Teaches
Boy Wonder of the Billiard
World is the title Jimmy Caras
earned at the age of 17 after he
defeated the worlds champion
Ralf Greenleaf in an exhibition
match in 1927.
That was the beginning of a
long life with billiards. In 1936
he won the first of his five world
championships.
THE LAST championship he
won was in 1967 when he made
what has been described as one
of the greatest comebacks ever
seen in the sport. He dropped
the openning match, then
proceeded to win 11 straight in
the double elimination
tournament to become
champion again.
Caras will give an exhibition
today at 9:30 p.m. and one
tomorrow at 3:30 p. m. after the
National Intercollegiate Billiards
Tournament competition.

"" BE A
MARINE CORPS OFFICER
PLC PROGRAM
UNDERGRADUATES ENROLL NOW
COMPLETE COLLEGE BACHELOR/MASTERS
NO ON-CAMPUS TRAINING
CHOOSE AIR OR GROUND
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FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
GUARANTEED OCCUPATIONAL FIELDS
AVIATION PILOT/FLIGHT OFFICER
Marine Officer Selection Team will be at the Student Union
20th thru 23 rd April at 9 AM 3 PM

PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLY
HEADQUARTERS
for all
Art & Journalism
Students
W. Univ.

Friday, April 10,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

W mk
W
HR
PHIH
Bi '* i j I^BB
l'~:-.; x.-;^iji^ft- N - ,* ''Ay. s aHRP
DONNA RIES
... University of Missouri

Page 25



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

Page 26

! On Wheels I
% i
:WBy Bo Berry & Bob Thomas£
Lee Roy Yarbrough, NASCARs biggest all-time money winner, is
out of it.
The winner of seven super-speedway races last season confirmed
reports that he has split with car builder Junior Johnson and will no
longer drive the number 98, black-and-white Ford.
THE SPLIT WAS attributed to lack of money, a result of Fords
announced racing budget cut. Yarbrough was chosen Fords Driver
of the Year just last winter.
Yarbrough said his future plans are not definite, although he is
signed to drive an Eagle-Ford for Jim Robbins in the Indianapolis 500
next month. He also indicated he would like to try Can-Am-type road
racing, the worlds fastest machines on a road course. Yarbrough has
never driven one of these 750 h.p. cars before.
The Columbia, S. C. driver is the third big-time Ford driver to leave
the ranks of the Dearborn firm this year. Richard Petty and Dan
Gurney both left Ford in favor of Plymouth earlier.
* *
Commedian Dick Smothers, after three years of amateur racing has
decided to launch a major racing career in the 1970 Sports Car Club
of America (SCCA) Continental Championship.
I plan to do several TV specials this year, but on a schedule which
allows me to wheel into a full-time road racing career, said Smothers.
SMOTHERS WILL DRIVE a Lotus-Chevy Formula A racer
sponsored by Ecklin Manufacturing Company in all 14 races of the
series.
I dont feel Im over my head at all, Smothers said. I dont see
myself winning the championship but Im very comfortable in the car
and it should be competitive.
Formula A cars are open-cockpit, single-seaters, powered by 5-liter
American stock block engines. The open-wheeled machines are
capable of speeds of 180 miles-per-hour.
* *
Dan Gumey, who won last Sundays 150-mile US AC road race at
Sears Point, Calif., will have his choice of two Eagles entered for the
annual Indianapolis 500-mile race.
THE EAGLE CARS are built by Gumey, and will have four
cylinder, turbo-charged Offenhauser engines. This will be the ninth
consecutive year Gumey has entered the race. He has never won, but
finished second the last two years in his own cars powered by Ford
stock-block V 8 engines.
The entry list for the memorial day race now totals 47 with twice
that many expected by April 15.
* *
The Alabama 500 stock car race will be broadcast live by ABC
Sunday at 5 p. m. It will be the first live showing of a NASCAR event.
Bobby Isaac, driving a winged Dodge Daytona, qualified on the
pole with a speed of 199.658, shy of the closed course record of
200.466, set by Buddy Baker at Talladega last month. David Pearson,
in a Ford Talladega, will start on the outside of the front row with a
time qualifying speed of 200.447.
CHARLIE GLOTZBACK in a Dodge was third fastest; Bobby
Allison in a Dodge was fourth; Buddy Baker was fifth in a Dodge; and
Daytona 500 winner Pete Hamilton was sixth in a Plymouth. Cale
Yarborough missed qualifying when his engine blew in practice.
The only previous Grand National race held at the Talladega track
last September was boycotted by the Professional Drivers
Association.

Lebanon Forfeits To Israel

TEHERAN (UPI) The
Mid-East conflict reached into
the sports world Wednesday
when Lebanon withdrew from
the Asian Soccer Tournament
because it was paired with Israel
in a semifinal bracket.
Tourney organizers, however,
refused to back down before
bealy Lebanese demands that
the action would be taken if it
was matched with Israel.
The withdrawal automatically
sent Israel into Fridays final
round against Iran, which beat
Indonesia, 2-0, in the other
semifinal match. Indonesia
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gained third place honors since it
had no opponent in the
consolation match.

'.Â¥4. Seminole 4
£_ Hall of Fame 1
r- Whos Who 3
t certificates have arrived j
r They may be picked up in the
I Seminole Office or the
/ Business Office^^^^S^^v

UF Nelters
Crush FSU
The Gator netters crushed
FSU Thursday afternoon 9-0,
after losing 6-3 to the Seminoles
earlier in the season.
The decisive victory rekindled
hopes to retain the SEC
Championship won last year.
SENIOR GREG HILLEY,
defeated Herb Rapp in the first
match,64, 64. Hilley had lost
to Rapp when the two played in
Tallahassee and the match was a
revenge for the number one
Gator.
Buddy Miles, a freshman,
squeezed by John Dezeeuw in a
close match, 6-1,2-6,9-7. In the
third match, Will Sherman beat
A1 Procopio, 7-5,6-3.
Paul Lunetta, a junior,
defeated Scott Bristol in the
fourth match, 6-2, 64, while
Kenn Terry beat Hamid Faquir,
6-1, 6-3. Freshman Ralph Hart
whipped Mike Basinger, 6-1,6-1,
in the final singles match.
Hilley and Terry teamed in
the doubles to beat Rapp and
Basinger, 4-6, 9-7,6-2. Miles and
Hart defeated Dezeeuw and
Bristol, 6-2, 7-9, 64, while
Bruce Barlett joined Sherman to
take the final match from
Procopio and Faquir, 9-7,6-1.
The Gators now have 10 wins
to six losses, while FSU has a
12-5 record.
*
' H
GREG HILLEY
... singles winner

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WIPE OUT! TOM KENNEOY
Gator skier John Bedingfield takes a spill while preparing for
Saturday's Intercollegiate Championships at Lake Wauburg. "Big
name" skiers scheduled to attend include World Champion Liz Allen,
and Allan Kempton. Competition begins at 8:30 a. m. on Lake
Wauburg.
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MEET KNICKS SATURDAY

Alcindor, Bucs Underdogs

NEW YORK (UPI) -For
perhaps the first time in his
career, Lew Alcindor finds
himself in the role of an
underdog on the eve of a crucial
series.
The 7*l giant, who knew
defeat only four times in high
school and college, leads the
Milwaukee Bucks into New York
Saturday afternoon for the start
of their Eastern Division final
playoff series against the Knicks.
ALCINDOR WAS the
outstanding rookie of the
National Basketball Association
this season, and he almost
single-handedly was responsible
for Milwaukees rise from the
cellar to second place. In fact,
the Bucks had the best record of
any team during the second half
of the season although they were
unable to catch the
quick-starting Knicks.
New York, for its part, never
has won an NBA championship
although it is a charter member
of the league. Relying on a
balanced team attack, in which
any of its starters can assume the
major scoring burdens, and the
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 3 0 1.000
Detroit 2 1 .667 1
Boston 11 .500 l/2
New York 11 .500 iVi
Washington 1 2 .333 2
Cleveland 0 3 .000 3
E
WEST W L PCT GB
California 2 0 1.000
Minnesota 2 0 1.000
Oakland 11 .500 1
Kansas City 11 .500 1
Chicago 0 2 .000 2
Milwaukee 0 2 .000 2
THURSDAYS RESULTS
Baltimore 13 Cleveland 1
New York 4 Boston 3
Minnesota 6 Chicago 4
Oakland at Kansas City, Night
(ONLY GAMES SCHEDULED)
FRIDAYS GAMES
California at Kansas City
Boston at Washington
Milwaukee at Chicago
Detroit at Baltimore
(ONLY GAMES SCHEDULED)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Philadelphia 2 0 1.000
St. Louis 2 0 1.000
New York 1 0 1.000 Vi
Pittsburgh 0 1 .000 lYi
Chicago 0 2 .000 2
Montreal 0 3 .000 2Vi
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 3 0 1.000
San Francisco 2 1
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 3 0 1.000
San Francisco 2 1 .667 1
San Diego 11 .500 I Vi
Atlanta l l .500 1%
Houston 1 2 .000 2
Los Angeles 0 2 .000 2Yi
THURSDAYS RESULTS
St. Louis 7 Montreal 3
Philadelphia 5 Chicago 3
San Francisco 7 Houston 4
New York at Pittsburgh (Night)
Atlanta at San Diego (Night)
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (Night)
(ONLY GAMES SCHEDULED)
FRIDAYS GAMES
Chicago at Montreal
New York at St. Louis
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
Atlanta at Houston
Cincinnati at San Francisco
San Diego at Los Angeles
(ONLY GAMES SCHEDULED)

best defense in pro ball, this is
the best chance the Knicks ever
have had to claim the elusive
crown.
Willis Reed, the 6-10 center
and leagues most valuable
player, yields several important
inches to Alcindor in what
should be the key duel of the
series. Alcindor has improved
during the season, and he
averaged 36.2 points as
Milwaukee ousted the
Philadelphia 76ers in five games
in the Eastern Division
semi-finals.
808 DANDRIDGE (19.0),
Jon McGlocklin (18.8), Flynn
Robinson (14.4) and Greg Smith
(11.6) also averaged in double
figures in the Philadelphia series.
The Knicks, meanwhile, had
to struggle through seven games
before subduing the Baltimore
Bullets in the other semi-final.

Aaron Tops Masters;
Melnyk Low Amateur
AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI) Tommy Aaron, the curly-haired Georgian
who penciled Roberto Devicenzo out of a Masters title two years ago,
took the opening round lead in this one Thursday with a 4-under-par
33 on the back nine of the tough Augusta National despite a final-hole
bogey and finished a stroke ahead of Gene Littler and Bert Yancey
with their 695.
Chi Chi Rodriguez, Bob Lunn, Charles Coody, Dan Sikes and R. H.
Sikes all had 70s, and three-time Masters champion Jack Nicklaus, the
pre-tournament favorite, and Frank Beard, the PGAs leading money
winner last year, both had 725. Only 10 golfers in a field of 83 were
able to break par over the dried-out course with its lightning fast
greens.
Defending champion George Archer, who hasnt won a tournament
since taking the title here last year, was well back at 73. South
Africas Gary Player, guarded by special police because of alleged
racial threats, was at 74. And four-time champion Arnold Palmer,
predicting scores would continue high until rain comes to Augusta,
had a 75.
As for Thursdays round, Aaron said, I feel like anytime I shoot a
68 Ive shot a good round. However, I was especially pleased with
todays round because the course is playing much harder than usual.
U. S. amateur champion and former UF All-American Steve Melnyk Melnykwas
was Melnykwas the low man among the 13 amateurs entered with his 73.
["TOW SHOOTING I
i ACICI EXHIBITION
by the Worlds
Champion Rifleman
m , The Marlin Man
IS*. g ee t he man .. and the Marlin ..
iV that hold six world records for shoot shootffc.
ffc. shootffc. 4. ing accuracy! Its Colonel Larson,
the former All-American football
hero who triumphed over polio to
IT become todays World Champion
Hr HER Professional Rifleman.
f§j§||iy|i['. With his M-arlin Rifle- Colonel Lar-
WHIP 1 MB son splits playing cards in half ..
shoots a paper cup from under a stack of cups and saucers
without upsetting them . makes many incredible shots!
| ft §
Be sure to see Colonel Larson perform the shooting skills
that have made him the Worlds Champion Rifleman. Come
as out guest. Theres no charge!
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2 SHOWS 10 A.M. & 3 P.M. |
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Reed led the New York scoring
with a 21.3 average, but fell
down in rebounding. The other
Knick starters are Dave
Debusschere and Bill Bradley up
front and Walt Frazier and Dick
Barnett in the backcourt.
New York won the first four
games it played against
Milwaukee this season, but the
Bucks came back to win the
final two in impressive style. The
Knicks counter this statistic by
saying they lost some of their
competitive edge by running off
such a huge lead in the East, and
they claim the Baltimore series
has put them back into
mid-season form.
The second game in the
best-of-seven set- will also be
played here Monday night
before the series shifts to
Milwaukee.

( JU Nation's Top Scorer j
j: NEW YORK (UPI) The free-wheeling Jacksonville ji
is Dolphins, scoring at a feverish pace, finished the 1969-70
ji; college basketball season with a 1003 average for 28 games to jj:
$ set a national record among major schools. jj:
J Figures released Wednesday by the National Collegiate Sports
Services, statistical arm of the NCAA, credits Jacksonville with ij:
jj: 2,809 points. The Dolphins bettered the previous high of 99.0 ij:
jj by Syracuse in 1965-66 as they went over the century mark. ij:
ij: A strong bench averaged 21.0 points for Jaconsville, while the jj:
ij: Dolphins starting five hit 79.3 points a game. Runner-up j:;
ij: IOWA scored 2,467 points in 25 games for a 98.7 average. The jj;
ij Hawkeyes starters averaged 91.9, but their reserves scored j:j
j: scored a weak 6.8 pace. jj:
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Friday, April 10,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 27



Page 28

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, April 10,1970

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