Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
OUSTS BOARD AGAIN

Kirk Defiant Os Order

BRADENTON (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk
Wednesday defied a federal judge who has
threatened to cite him for contempt and ousted for
the second time the Manatee County school board,
thus apparently blocking a school integration plan.
Kirk signed an order resuspending the entire
board, including one member who had just
announced he was resigning rather than implement
the plan, which calls for mass busing.
KIRK HAD previously suspended the board but
Federal District Judge Ben Krentzman overruled the

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 62, No. 115

Carswell's Rebuke
Upsets Nixon Plans

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
bitterly-divided Senate rejected
the Supreme Court nomination
of G. Harrold Carswell
Wednesday in a second stunning
repudiation of President Nixons
efforts to restore the kind of
balance he says the court
needs.
By a vote of 51 to 45, the
senate resolved its anquish over
party loyalties and doubts about
Carswells fitness for the high
bench. The votes of five
moderate Republicans were
decisive, but it was not until the
roll call had neared its finish and
Mrs. Margaret Chase Smith, the
Maine Republican, softly uttered
her no that the outcome was
no longer in doubt.
THIRTEEN REPUBLICANS
deserted Nixon to join 38
Democrats in opposing the
nomination. Twenty-eight
Republicans and 17 Democrats
all from southern or border
states voted for Carswell. Four
senators were absent, two of
them ailing and two overseas,
but had they voted, they would
have canceled each other out.
Some Republicans who
helped defeat Nixons first
choice of Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr. for the Abe

Uhlfelder: Student Unity The Answer

By PHYLLIS GALLUB'
Staff Writer
Separately weve been ignored
together well make them listen, Steve
Uhlfelder, Student Government
presidential candidate said.
Speaking at a Focus Party campaign
kickoff rally in Broward Hall Tuesday
night, Uhlfelder said students have not had
a voice in educational policy in the past.
FLORIDA'S education system is sick
he said. Students are not getting the
first-class education they deserve but we
have beautiful buildings and a good
football team.
He said it is now time to examine the
priorities of the university and SG should
take the lead.
Students of this university, and all
universities, are a minority group. It s time
for students speak out, Uhlfelder said.
UHLFELDER SAID students could be

University of Florida, Gainesville,

Fortas court vacancy last
November, including Senate
GOP leader Hugh Scott and his
assistant, Robert P. Griffin of
Michigan, went along with
Carswell this time,
But others who supported
Haynsworth refused to accept
Carswell. These included Sens.
Winston L. Prouty, R-Vt.;
Marlow W. Cook, R-Ky., and J.
William Fulbright, D-Ark.
SCATTERED APPLAUSE
rarely heard in the; senate
chamber greeted Mrs. Smiths
vote, which was considered
undecided to the last. Loud
applause and whistles, and some
booing as well, erupted in the
galleries when Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew was handed the
tally and said:
On this vote the ayes are 45
and the nays are 51. The
nomination is not agreed to.
When the senate rejected the
Haynsworth nomination, 17
Republicans had sided against
Nixon on the 5545 roll call.
CARSWELL a former U. S.
attorney and a U. S. district
judge from 1953 to 1969, had
been elevated with senate
confirmation last year without a
dissenting vote to tthe sth U. S.
Circuit Court of Appeals. When

governor Tuesday and told the board to have the
plan in operation by Thursday.
The judge also ordered Kirk to appear in his court
Friday to show cause why he should not be cited
for contempt for interfering with the courts orders.
The plan requires busing of about 2,700 of the
countys 17,000 students.
The governors second suspension order cited
different grounds than the first, seemingly opening
the way for further legal argument.

effective if they organize.
If we have to strike to make ourselves
heard, then we should strike.
For example, Uhlfelder said he thinks if
STEVE UHLFELDER
y#:/ SB
the present football ticket controversy is
not resolved, students should boycott the
Orange and Blue game May 8.
IF THAT doesnt work, then students
should boycott games next year. When it
gets to the point that alumni cant come,
gat drunk and raise hell at this university, I
guarantee theyll start listening to us, he
said.

Thursday, April 9, 1970

he was nominated by Nixon Jan.
19, leaders of both parties
predicted a quick, smooth
confirmation.
He was regarded as a strict
constructionist of the type
Nixon wanted without any of
the financial indiscretions which
opponents used to block
Haynsworth.
But Carswells 1948 speech
pledging eternal loyalty to the
concept of white supremacy, his
role in turning the public golf
course in his home town of
Tallahassee over to a private
group to avoid the need to
integrate it, and his record as a
judge whose opinions were
reversed more often than is usual
summed up as the
mediocrity issue combined
to defeat him.
SEN. EDWARD Gurney,
R-Fla., who originally suggested
Carswell for the post, told
newsmen if he were the
president, he now would see that
White House goodies be
distributed to loyal senators.
But if the President has any
goodies to distribute around
like appointments ... Id reward
those who were loyal to me,
instead of those who were
disloyal.

Uhlfelder said he is also concerned about
the new joint program to eliminate drugs
announced Saturday. Officials of
Gainesville, Alachua County and UF
pledged the support of their respective
police departments to the drug violation
crackdown.
Uhlfelder, a second year law student,
said students must be informed of the laws
concerning search and seizure and their
rights if they are arrested.
HE HAS organized a rally Friday
afternoon, 1 p.m. on the Plaza of the
Americas for this purpose.
We dont know if a hurricane is
coming, but we are trying to give hurricane
warnings in case.
Uhlfelder said students have to begin
talking about the relevant and significant
issues.
IT IS up to students to take stands and
speak out for what they believe in. If we

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PHIL BANNISTER
'GARBAGE DUMP 9
This 'garbage dump' of people, portrayed by Delta Chi brothers
demonstrates for an environmental petition for pollution control. The
National Environmental Teach-In takes place April 22 and Delta Chi is
getting prepared. See story on page 3.
Vote For 2 0-Year-Old
Up To Florida House Today
The Florida House of Representatives will vote this morning ou
whether to lower the voting age in Florida to 20.
Several UF students, including Student Senate President Jack
Vaughn, are traveling to Tallahassee to deliver personally 600 letters
to the legislature. The letters, written individually by residents of
Graham Area, are asking the legislature to lower the voting age.
House Joint Resolution 59 is the first order of business this
morning, with a three-fifths vote of the legislature necessary to place
the question on the November ballot, according to Ernie Litz,
assistant to Rep. Ralph Turlington.
The original bill called for the voting age to be lowered to 18. But a
legislative committee raised the final motion to allow only those 20
and over to vote.

Inside
The Gator
GREEK WEEK has gone
the way of Sigma Chi
Derby lt wont be
held this year page 5
Classifieds 16
Editorials..-. 8
Entertainment 14
Letters .. 9
Sports .. 21
Whats Happening 4

Election Needs
Poll Workers
Students willing to be poll
workers during Student
Government elections should
apply next week in room 349 of
the Reitz Union.
Louis Kalivoda, director of
elections, said those able to
work all day are preferred. Poll
workers will be paid $1.35 an
hour.
SG elections are scheduled for
Wednesday April 22.

listen to people who are afraid, the
legislature will cut our budget and never
say anything. This university will remain in
the Age of Mediocrity for a long time.
SG Secretary of Academic Affairs Henry
Solares, running for vice president, said,
academic reform is necessary if our
education in the present is to have any
meaning in the future.
Focus Partys candidate for treasurer,
John Dodson said he would strive to
provide equitable distribution of SG
funds to student organizations.
Dan Stephens, candidate for chancellor
of the Honor Court, said the Honor Court
and honor system are cherished traditions,
but traditions which can be changed for
the benefit of the students.
Kathy Spellman, who is running for
chief justice of the traffic court, said she
would institute a re-examination of the
decal and bus systems.



Page 2

!, Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

Black Week Charges Go Unsupported

By CHARLES HEEKIN
Staff Writer
Charges by the Black Student
Union (BSU) that the UF
administration promised to
underwrite the total cost of
Black Week have not been
supported by statements of UF
administrators nor the Feb. 1
report of the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
(HEW).
However, A.B. Myer, one of
the HEW auditors who were on
campus, in January, said he
recalled the statement being
made by Hale, according to
Mitch Dasher, BSU chairman.
PRESIDENT STEPHEN C.
OConnell said Vice president
for Academic Affairs Lester Hale
had never told him anything
about promising the BSU funds
for the proposed Black Week.
Furthermore, OConnell said,
Hale doesnt have authority to
promise funds from the
presidents concessions fund.
The concessions fund consists of
revenue from refreshments sold

Bailey's Political Career
UFs Campus Question:

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Confusion on the UF campus
has centered around one
question recently Can Jimmey
Bailey run for two offices at the
same time?
Bailey has qualified for the
office of student body president
as an independent candidate. He
has also announced he will run
for the Florida House of
Representatives from the 7th
District on the American
Independent Ticket.
FLORIDA STATUTE 99.012
states:
No individual may qualify as
Dont Dread Rain
AUSTIN, Tex. Drivers who
dread rainy days are still back in
the model-T era, according to
Texas highway officials.
Driving in wet weather
requires extra caution, but is
welcomed by professional
drivers as a break in the
monotony of traffic-jammed
highways, a report in the Texas
Highway Department magazine
says.
Improvements in roads, cars
and tires make driving in wet
weather safe for those who
follow precautions, the article
said, but it urged motorists to
drive as if they had no brakes
during rainy weather.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. .The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
atiGainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida. Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
msssi

Ufy HEW HAZY ON PROMISES

at athletic events.
BSU spokesmen said Hale
promised UFs administration
would underwrite the total cost
for Black Week.
THE PROMISE was made in a
closed meeting of HEW officials
with UF Director for
Disadvantaged Students Roy
Mitchell and Hale, according to
the BSU.
Mitchell said Hale did say the
UF would underwrite the Black
Week celebration.
Myer said the session in which
Hales statement was made was
recorded and the exact
statement could be found and
quoted. He promised to look
into the matter.
JAMES HENNESSEY
assistant vice president for
student affairs, said he had
received a bill of $4,000 for
entertainment for Black Week.
This (money) was never
promised them (BSU), he said.
There is only one fund on
campus which could honor this
kind of request, that being the
concessions fund.
Rae Weimer, special assistant

a candidate for public office
whose name appears on the same
or another ballot for another
office, whether federal, state,
county or municipal, the term of
which or any part thereof runs
concurrent to the office for
which he seeks to qualify.
Honor Court officials said the
question was probably not
within their jurisdiction.
BAILEY qualifies under UF
election laws, which are the only
things under our control,
Honor Court Attorney General
Gavin Lee said.
The question of whether
president of the student body is
a state office has not been
answered. Lee said he knows of
no precedent in this area.
Gainesville Supervisor of
Elections Alma Bethea said she
is not sure whether the office
would be considered a state one,
even though he is paid by the
state.
STUDENT BODY President
Walter Morgan said he does not
believe the office is a state one.
Bailey said he has not
qualified for the House, so there
is no problem. He has
announced his candidacy,
BAHA'U'UAH
LORD OF NEW AGE

IHIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIimiHIIIIIIHII
This (money) was
never promised them
(BSU). There is only one
fund on campus which
could honor this kind of
request, that being the
concessions fund.
James Hennessey
IIIIIIIIIIIIItHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIHIII
to the president, said, They
(BSU) came here to see if the
president could contribute any
money to Black Week. We had
none.
WEIMER SAID the
concessions fund had recently
contributed $7,500 to
scholarships through the Loans
and Scholarships Office and
simply didnt have the money.
He said t sx>ther organizations
were also refused funds for lack
of money.

however.
He also said he understood
that the law applies only to
offices at the same level of
government.
BAILEY SAID he feels if he
does win the election for
representative, he can be more
help to the student body in that
area than if he remains
president. He said the office will
help him leam the problems of
SG.
If I am the victor in the
house race, I will be of more
benefit to the student body. It
will let me set up things, such as
working against raising the
activities fee in something like
this football ticket controversy,
he said.
Bailey said campaigning for
the house would not be a
problem if he were president of
the student body.
He said he wasnt really
worried about his chances
because an endorsement from
George Wallace almost assured
him election in his district.
I can buy this election if I
want to. But 1 dont want to. I
think people are smarter than
that.

-
Here we go again ...
INSTRUCTIONS IN THE CATHOLIC FAITH
Every Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30 to 8:15 PM (Never Later)
Instructor: Father George D. Kirkpatrick (with beard)
In the Library of the Catholic Student Center (next to c i)
No exams, no papers, no grades, no Fees (the original
experimental college)
An 8 week course START TONIGHT
Everybody Welcome!

Hugh Brimm, acting regional
director for HEW, said there was
no evidence of the alleged
statement.
BRIMM SAID there was
nothing said about funding in
the HEW report, but that

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9
TRAFFIC HAZARD?
Golly, its only the second week of classes and the pressure's getting
stiff already. But the Reitz Union is no place to drop out. You could
get run over by a Plants and Grounds truck. Remember UF
basketbalier, Tony Duva, last year? He was on Florida Field and it
happened to him.
IxXv:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:;:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;;;.;.;.;.;;;.;.;.;;;;;;;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.^
I Candidates 1 Names!
v X*
v!
1 Incorrect In Gator I
!! v.
A *--. x*
:|:| The following candidates were incorrectly identified in ;|;j
:$ Fridays Alligator: ::
:* David Chafin, 3AS, an independent candidate from the ::
ft College of Arts and Sciences, is running for student senate, not ::
:$ the honor court. ft
i (
j:|: Robert Salveson, a student senate candidate from the College ft
:: f Business Administration, is running from Focus Party, not ::
x Student Freedom Party. ::
:: Bruce Nearon, 2UC, a student senate candidate mistakenly ft
;X had his name spelled Nearson. ft
:: Carol Eisenberg, 3ED, was omitted from the list of jj:j
:: candidates. She is a student senate candidate from the College :<
:: of Education. $
ft Nancy Schaeffer, from lUC, is running on the Do It party ts
:: ticket. ::

OConnell was mentioned in the
report as saying there would be a
Black Week.
There is nothing in the
report that says anything about
promising money for the Black
Week, Brimm said.



By TERRY PITMAN
Staff Writer
Students might get lower
tuition as incentive to attend the
summer quarter at the UF.
N. Carolina
Busing Order
Criticized
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Justice Department suggested
Wednesday a federal judge may
have gone too far in ordering
massive busing to achieve a racial
balance in schools at Charlotte,
n.c:
In proposing that an alternate
plan be considered, the
department said the question
was whether the judge invoked
a remedy so extreme as to
constitute an abuse of
discretion.
The department laid down its
position in a friend-of-the-court
brief filed with the 4th Circuit
Court of Appeals at Richmond,
Va., which opens a hearing
Thursday on an appeal by
Charlotte school officials.
Assistant Attorney General
Jerris Leonard, in line with
President Nixons recent
desegregation statement, cited
31 court rulings wnich he said
suggest that courts might
carefully consider whether, for
the purpose of achieving a
precise, system-wide racial
balance, a plan would require a
school board involuntarily to
make unreasonable increments
in transportation expenditures,
the number of students bused,
distances travelled...
Infirmary Time
Clarified
All students seeking medical
attention between the hours of
11:30 pjn. and 7:30 ajn. should
go to the infirmary first.
This is a new policy regarding
late night emergencies set up by
the infirmary authorities this
quarter.
If the nurse on duty considers
the case to be of a serious nature
she will refer the student to the
Shands Teaching Hospital
Emergency Room.
Infirmary authorities stressed
that all UF students who are in
need of medical attention
continue to report to the
infirmarys late night duty nurse.
The infirmary will no longer
have a staff physician on duty in
the late night hours..
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER i STYLE SHOP
3 Ro filer Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. Unharaity Ava.
~~ 3734 MS

Hot Weather Tuition Possible

RESOLUTION ASKS ADJUSTMENT

Part of a resolution to be
presented to the legislature later
this month asked that the Board
of Regents be granted power to
adjust registration fees to even
enrollments over four quarters..
THE PRINCIPAL part of the
package concerned increasing
activity fees, but a paragraph of
the resolution asks for powers to
adjust tuition on an
experimental basis.
State Sen. Lawton Chiles,
D-Lakeland, chairman of the
Senate Ways and Means
Committee, said the legislature,
faced with high maintainence
costs during the summer, despite
fractional student enrollments,
had asked the regents to come
up with a suitable plan to
equalize enrollment.
We suggested two possible
plans to the regents, Chiles
said. The first was to lower
summer tuition, the second, to
offer certain popular courses
during the summer. Lowering
tuition was our first choice.
REGENTS CHAIRMAN D.
Burke Kibler, however, said the

*
Our far East policy
brings people
together.
The Jade East manifesto. Its aim: to of skirmishes, territorial gains and conquests,
bring men and women all over the world And still keep the peace.
closer together. Just put some Jade East on your
Our policy would allow for all sorts and neck. And anywhere else. If you've got
a girlfriend, take her out as planned. If
you 7 re seeing a few girls, do whatever it is
you 7 re doing.
Now comes the best part. Since all
girls are different, all reactions will be
different. Some will be aggressive. Others,
submissive. But whether our policy leads to
final agreement or not, one thing's for sure.
The negotiations alone will be worth
the price.
i

.
iv
Jade East After Shave and Cologne.
' I
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problem of solving summer
enrollment problems was not as
easy as the legislature thought.
The only real means of
bringing sufficient numbers of
students to state universities
during the summer months will
be to offer certain required
courses only during the
summer, he said.
Kibler said the regents had
discussed no tuition cut at any
of their meetings.
The placing of this section in
the resolution was only done in
order to assure that should such
action ever be neccessary that it
could be done with the prior
approval of the legislature,
Kibler said. We are planning
nothing in that area at this
time.
CHILES SAID the legislature
would definitely favor the
part of the resolution dealing
with variable tuition for summer
quarter.
Its a matter of economics,
Chiles said. We have a great
deal of unused space for three

months of the year, and there is
still as much maintainence

BSP Names Eng

UFs Board of Student
Publications officially named
Karen Eng, 4JM, as managing
editor of the Alligator for spring
quarter Wednesday.
Miss Eng, 22, has served as
interim managing editor since
March 31. She previously turned
down the position, citing
irregular board procedure in
the selection of editor and
managing editor..
A NATIVE of Ft. Myers, Miss
Eng was cited by the board for
a strong sense of duty in their
unanimous vote that she be
named as the papers second top
editor
At the time of elections last
quarter, Miss Eng said, I felt
there were certain irregularities
in the way elections were
conducted. I felt the board had
done an injustice to the students
and I registered my protest.
Since that time, she said, I

Thursday, April 9. 1970, Thu Florida Alligator,

needed on these buildings as
when they are in full use.

HI Hr ;H| 111
KAREN ENG
... managing editor
have found the Alligator to be
far more than just a group of
individuals and the loyalty I felt
for the paper was much stronger
than simple group
identification.
Miss Eng has previously served
on the Alligator as news editor
and associate editor.

Page 3



i. Tlw Florida Alligator, Thursday) Aprtl

Page 4

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PHIL BANNISTER
LAZIN AWAY

What's more to say about a spring afternoon? Temperature up in
Ihe 70s, sunny, but maybe you're short on cash. Haven't seen the
newest Playboy, somewhere there will be a compliant friend who
bought the latest. Now just settle back in the grass ...

WHATS
HAPPENING
DIRTY AIR: The UF
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) meets tonight at 7:30 in
Walker Auditorium, individual
assignments will be given for
Environmental Day.
CLEAN UP: The National
Environmental Teach-In starts
tonight. UF EAG and Delta Chi
will go door to door to collect
10,000 signatures on a human
environment petition.
FREAK OUT: The Comer
Drugstore needs volunteer
workers this quarter. For more
information call Bo Rivers at
392-2331, or drop by the
Drugstore at 1823 NW 2nd ave.
CRISIS TALK: Dialoge
presents a discussion of the
Suicide Crisis Intervention
Center. Listen tonight on WRUF
at 11:05 p.m.
TURN ON: The Blues
Image will be at the Rathskeller
tonight, time 8:30 and 10:30.
CRICKET: The UF
International Cricket Club meets
Friday at 7:45 p.m. For more
information call 372-2224 or
376-7746.
HOW TO STUFF A
WILD . : Humanities
Professor Dr. Walter Marinetti
will speak on the Inside Story
of Museums, or How to Stuff an
Elephant.
Try this one in Little Hall,
room 117 at 3:35 pjn.
SPEAKING IN: UF President
Stephen C. OConnell arid Dr.
Harold Hanson, dean of graduate
school, will discuss die UFs
1970-71 budget tonight at 8
over the Oh: S;"WHET-TV*: * l --

A JAMES WRIGHT
Wm I \MH ne * the Br 9 htest ew Poets
ysv \Nh|| of the Young Generation. Author
of "The Branch Will Not Break."
jtmv k APRIL 9
U Jffll fek J,\ UNIV. AUD
W iPyr Jt 1 A 8:00 pm
l\wl|\ Jfr |||' I //Ja 50 cents general
BLACK DANCE GROUP FOLK FEST
AprH 10 ; April 11
Norman Auditorium p
8:00 p.m. 1 328 of e Americas
Admission Free Noon 4 P m
HkATION 70
J. -' . /' ' _
h .An Bmicrpn Delta Kdppa Student Productions

rvt s> *&, * am 4 >>£ V B #11' a **? f 2 '**% 5 ?
10.000 TONIGHT
UF Students Spearhead
Environment Petition Drive

UF students will spearhead an
organized drive by an
environmental teach-in to collect
signatures on a human
environment petition.
UFs will be the first
organized drive in the country,
said Hal Barcey, 3AS, a
coordinator of the drive. He said
the international goal is five
million signatures.
THE NATIONAL
Environmental Teach-In will get
a head start tonight as UFs

All Campus Residents Due Census Forms

The 1970 census will reach
UF campus residents soon.
According to Bill Modlin,
coordinator of the campus
census, forms will be mailed to
all campus residents this week.
Modlin said the registrars
records were insufficent to
complete the census.
Individual questionnaires
should be received by students
on Monday or Tuesday. They
must be filled out and returned
to dormitory area offices by
Wednesday.
The form is self-explanatory.
Students are asked to fill in their
campus address under their
name in the front of the census
form.
It is important that students
be as cooperative as possible. If
the forms are not filled out and
returned by Wednesday,

Environmental Action Group
and Delta Chi fraternity go door
to door for 10,000 signatures on
the petition.
Barcey and Alan Sandler,
SAR, both coordinators of
tonights petition drive, said
they expected the goal of
10,000 names to be reached in a
single evening.
Well have 60 volunteers out
from Delta Chi fraternity,
Barcey said. We plan to cover
every dorm and apartment

students will be contacted by a
census taker. Law requires that
the questionnaire be completed.
Detailed information will be

Finally a fraternity even
Frank Zappa would join ..
liiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiitX
Come out to the Colony Smoker
at Mu Sorority" House,
1152 E. OelUniclr., on April 9th,
8-ldpm'onTprlHbth^-npm.
j llhHir/ Mlifilllli
hSyi sigma pi . .the unique greek

complex in the city.
THE PETITION r aimed at the
United Nations, calls for that
international body to aid in
solving ecology problems with a
goal of bringing man into
balance with nature by the year
2000.
The petition also calls for the
U. N. to set up a population and
environment council as a major
arm of the General Assembly,
and to call a conference on
environment during 1971.

posted in the dormitories. If
students have any questions or
problems, they should call Bill
Modlin.



Controversy Brews On Greek Week Fote

By ELLEN OUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
If the demise of two major
activities can be taken as a trend,
the traditional image of
fraternities on the UF campus is
undergoing come drastic
upheavals.
Last year, sororities
terminated their participation in
Sigma Chi Derby, ending the
oldest fun day for greeks at
UF.
Now, the remaining group
activity for fraternities, Greek
Week, has gone the way of the
Derby. The IFC Presidents
Council failed to fund the
project this year, bringing Greek
Week to an untimely death
only two years after its

Resolution Opposing Ticket
Fee Passes Student Senate

Two resolutions, one
opposing the Athletic
Associations decision to charge
students for admission to UF
football games, and another
supporting the April teach-in,
were passed by the Student
Senate this week.
The first resolution, on the
football tickets, calls the
decision a prohibitive expense
to students and said it will,
seriously reduce the number of
students attending a function of
the university which is
theoretically designed to be of
and for the students.
THE RESOLUTION said that
there is no such thing as a
temporary increase, and UF
students demand that the
Athletic Association reconsider
its decision to charge said
admission.
It also calls for a re-evaluation
of UF priorities and goals to
determine if it is the intent of
this university to provide an

fJL summerls* qJVb
SOMZ7 in AT SOUTHAMPTON!
I Students at Southampton College are S
M encouraged to actively support and participate j
Hw in any positive new effort which seeks to improve M
things in this wobbly world. W
Os course, Southampton, with its delightful summer 1L
JPp- climate, offers countless opportunities for m
4Ui lighter types of involvement, t 00... like
||r beaches ... boating ... g01f... theatres... JP
If art colonies... and other activities which make |l
i Southampton a synonym for what summer Wjfa
f|L should be all about.
This summer...be where it is.
Southampton College. ||W
# TWO FIVE-WEEK SESSIONS TWO FOUR-WEEK WORKSHOPS
June 22 July 24 IN SCULPTURE, CERAMICS,
JP July 27. August 28 PAINTING AND FILMS
If Concerts and lectures will
II given by resident musi musi-1
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# ENCE EDUCATION plus limited grad-
H uate offerings. Courses are open to are available for students in
|l visiting students who are in good academic courses and work workstanding
standing workstanding at their own college. shops.
Director of the Summer Program,
PTON |
COLLEGE 1
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY j
Southampton, N.Y. 11968 (516) AT3-4000 j
Please send me Summer Program bulletin.
lam interested in Ist session 2nd session
I attend J
College Year Major
Name. I
Address. I
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City State f Zip J

My idea of Greak Week is to break down barriers caused
within the system . showing that greeks are people, too.
John Cosgrove, Greek Week chairman.

inception.
IFC President Charles
Brackins said relevancy was a
major consideration behind the
decision to drop Greek Week.
We have a lot of greek spirit
or energy that is being
mis-directed. The Presidents
Council would rather use our
manpower for more worthwhile
projects, Brackins said.
The IFC has planned two
events for this quarters projects.
It will hold a Gainesville
Clean-up Day May 25 and
collect money for the World

athletic program for the general
public at the expense of quality
academic experiences for its
students.
The resolution supporting the
Teach-in, scheduled for April
20-22, urges participation in the
program on part of faculty,
administration and all members
of the university and local
community. It states that all
have an inalienable right to a
clean and healthy environment.
STUDENT BODY President
Walter Morgan addressed the
senate and asked its support of
the recent drug crackdown
announced by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Morgan said he endorsed the
policy of increased enforcement,
as long as there was a possibility
it would stop, or at least slow,
the increase of the drug problem
at UF and in Gainesville.
He said, however, the present
laws on drug offenses were too
harsh.

IS GREEK SPIRIT MISDIRECTED

Universities Services which
sponsors university benefits
through a national organization.
Greek Week Chairman, John
Cosgrove had another
conception of the cut-off.
Mainly the reasons were
financial. IFC just paid off the
bills from the Johnny Rivers
concert, and with no profit to
work with, Greek Week was
cancelled, Cosgrove said.
I was disappointed because
we had put a lot of manhours
into the project and were just
waiting for the word to go,

HE QUALIFIED his
endorsement with a plea that
prosecutions would be held to a
minimum, a bare minimum.
You can no longer afford to
limit enforcement because of
unjust laws, he said. You
cannot enforce one part of the
law and fail to enforce the
other.
He said it was his
understanding, however, that the
enforcement agencies would not
direct their efforts at catching
users unless they get in the way
of investigation of reasons for
the spread of drugs.
HE SAID he supported the
UF policy of helping those users
who seek help without fear of
arrest.

It does 0 to 150
in 21 seconds. M
So we dorit hand r
the keys to just any ki
that comes along.
SEE THE "FLY NAVY" TEAM
Outside game room in
Reitz Union, April 9, 10 and 13. / \
FLY NAVY W /jjS|||^H
Itk an education. m
J fIV/
KWm M W
* ||J
HBISr

Cosgrove said.
Cosgrove said he had planned
to expand last years program,
one of the biggest in the
country, to include the proposed
Gainesville Clean-up, emphasis
on scholarship with an
outstanding students banquet,
and involve a total of about
1,000 greeks.
My idea of Greek Week is to
break down barriers caused
within the system and have a
time for fun and communication
showing that greeks are people,
too. We didnt plan this as a
payoff to show or prove
anything or owe anyone
anything, Cosgrove said.
When the Sigma Chi Derby
was denied sorority participation
by Panhellenic Council last year,
projects concerned with Derby
Week were continued.
May 2 Sigma Chis will host
the Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch to a day of games, and
football watching Sigma Chi
President Ken Driggs said.

CHERRYS DRESS SHOP
FEATURES JUNIOR AND PETITE SIZES
FROM THESE FAMOUS NAME BRANDS
PETITES JUNIORS
PETITE PHILIPPE MINX m6dES
f2^Xf ET,TES MARIE PHILLIPS
LION TREE CAROL KING
JUDY GIBBS COUNTRY JRS.
2 LOCATIONS
DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
7 WEST UNIVERSITY MALL

Thursday, April 0,1970, The Florida AHigator,
*

|8
Mi Wr jfl
thh jh
JOHN COSGROVE
... Financial Reasons
It will be a private thing with
some individual girls involved.
Another day this quarter we
have been invited to go to the
ranch in a reciprocal way,
Driggs said.
Sigma Chi has been involved
with the ranch for five or six
years, Driggs said.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

Measles Endanger
Apollo 13 Mission
For Astronaut

: C, ;; C/ ;' 4-. ..<*£?
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CLAY PHIPPS
ENGINEERING FAIR PROJECT
Byron Carson makes vycor glass in a high temperature fumance in
the lab.

Atlanta Refuses Loan Offer

ATLANTA (UPI) Atlantas
garbage strike dragged on after
the citys aldermanic finance
committee turned down the
unions offer to lent it the
money demanded in.a pay raise.
The board told the union such
an offer a first-of-its-kind
was illegal, and some other
means would have to be found
to settle the stalemante.
NEW TALKS were set up
Tuesday, the deadline strike
supporters set as being the signal
for twice-a-day marches and
economic and school boycotts.
Dan Sweat, an aide to Mayor
Sam Massell, said pickups of
garbage have increased as the
strike entered its fourth week.
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMENT
MustangJ^.
MOHU HOMES moV
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
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WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

Sweat said the city now is
picking up between 610 and 750
tons of garbage daily, compared
with the normal haul of 980
tons.
He said the city put 41 trucks
on the job and that pickups now
are being made from some
residences.
HE DENIED a report that the
city had told residents of a
southwest Atlanta area it was
unable to cope with the
overflow of a sewer line. He said
the city is able to handle
emergency situations such as the
one reported.
The sewerage overflow was
reported near the intersection of
Stewart .and Speed Drive.

ALACHUA COUNTY FAIR SPECIAL
Buy two dinners ..
Get one Free ..
p
!ki FREE ;
1 J Good April 8-9-10
Moryhitd Buy 2 Fried Chicken I
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(in store $1.25 each Get the 3rd Dinner
I Purchase only.) With this Coupon.
I 516 N.W. 13th St. OFFER GOOD THRU I
2205 N.W. 6th St. SUNDAY, APRIL 12
L__

'JPI Space Center
CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
Space Agency officials said
Wednesday they were
considering substituting a
backup astronaut for Thomas K.
Mattingly whose susceptibility
to the measles threatened a
one-month delay in the Apollo
13 moon landing mission.
Public affairs officer Alfred
Alibrando said backup command
module pilot John L. Swigert
was under consideration as a
possible substitute for
Saturdays launch.
SWIGERT, HE said, appears
immune to the measles and is
fairly well prepared for the
mission.
Whether we go with him or
not, that decision has not been
reached, Alibrando said.

PROBLEM
Schools Rooted In Past

By United Press International
In the view of Mario D. Fantini, program officer
for public education for the Ford Foundation, the
problem with American schools is this:
We are expecting an educational system rooted
in the nineteenth century to solve twentieth- and
twenty-first century problems.
1 IF, IN THE 19705, the nation-is to avoid the
costly errors of the 19605, the schools need an
entirely new set of guiding assumptions, Fantini
believes.
In the 60s, Fantini said in an article in the April
issue of Todays Education, journal of the National
Education Association, schools reacted to crash
programs dealing with the poor.
The use of such terms as culturally
disadvantaged, he said, implied something was
wrong with the learner when, in fact, the problem
was with the institution.

Big Bird
A C-130 cargo aircraft has
airlifted enough fuel in one day
to drive an average American car
around the world twice.

Residents said the sewer had
overflowed into a creek that
empties into the South River.
JERRY WURF, president of
the American Federation of
State, County and Municipal
Employes, made the loan
proposal. It was part of a
proposal that the city come up
with a $5 across the board raise
for about 3,500 workers until
present city funds run out.
Wurf said the city could
borrow money from the union
to finance the raises for the rest
of the year, with the city
begining a repayment plan after
Jan. 1, 1971.
The board rejected the
proposal as being illegal.

Such a switch would mark the
first time in U. S. space histoiy
that a backup pilot was called
upon to fly a mission under such
conditions.
ON ONE of the Gemini flights
the two prime crewmen were
killed several weeks before the
launch in a plane crash and the
backup crew flew the space
mission.
Doctors, however, were
continuing to make new
laboratory tests to determine if
Mattinglys condition has
changed from tests run earlier
Wednesday.
Physicians said the tests
showed Mattingly could become
ill with the measles in space if
launched Saturday.
IF THE $375-million
expedition is delayed until the

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to elect Steve Uhlfelder President

IN A PLURALISTIC society, diversity is an
important value that our educational institutions
should express, he said. In the existing institution,
however, there is one way of doing tilings... the
total educational system has been ponderous and
unresponsive to the growing aspirations of those
who use the schools both consumer students,
parents and practitioner teachers, administrators.
Some consumers may therefore seek other
options such as private schools.
But, Fantini said, many others are demanding
change and reform through direct
participation-decentralization and community
control.
The participants who lead reform in the 70s
*will be those closest to the action teachers,
parents, students. Participation of these publics in
the governance of urban schools carries the
potential for triggering changes in substance and
personnel, he says.

next launch opportunity, May it would cost taxpayers
SBOO.OOO, the Space Agency
said. & y
The other two Apollo 13
crewmen, veteran James a
Lowell and Fred W. Haise, were
found to be immune to German
measles, a common childrens
disease.
All three were exposed to the
measles last week when backup
astronaut Charles Duke fell in
with the disease.
DR. CHARLES A. Berry, the
Apollo medical director, said
Monday that if tests on the
astronauts blood showed that
any of the pilots were without
disease-fighting measles
antibodies, the odds are very
high that they would get it.



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Thursday, April 9,1970, Tha Florida AMgator, I

Page 7



KVm f **** AJMgftor, 9, Ig7o

Page 8

vr - - :-;*y.. *.- r .-jfr,g>n*r a* 'W *<* -y'WttW **> *!*** >'' *- ~
17,i _, Robert Fraser Karen Eng
JP loriaa Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
, Alligator (i^Ewl)
Earl Hartman John Sugg V\S3B^y
The price of freedom NeWS Editors
is f/ie exercise of responsibility. I l^
Wouldyou buy a used car from these men?
fs Each Side Right?

NEW YORK Wherever Charles Goodell, New
York's Republican senator, goes these days in his
campaign for re-election, he finds a strong liberal
trend. Wherever Nelson Rockefeller, New Yorks
Republican governor, goes these days in his
campaign for re-election, he finds a strong
conservative trend.
Now liberal and conservative are terms
which are rapidly being emptied of meaning. But
Goodell says his audiences are for. a more rapid
peace in Vietnam and a speedier pace qf integration
in the schools; they oppose the nomination of Judge
Harrold Carswell and the construction of the ABM;
they favor more aid to the cities and less to defense
contractors.
Rockefeller, on the other hand, detects a
weariness with social progress, increasing hostility
toward more civil rights advances and a strong urge
to support the President in Vietnam and the budget
for the Pentagon. Can they both be right?
The answer will be reflected in the November
election results and, perhaps of even more
importance, will be reflected in what is emerging as
the real New Politics.
New Politics, like the words liberal and
conservative, is rapidly being debased. It has been
used to describe political techniques as varied as
saturation television and street demonstrations and
candidates as ideologically remote as John Lindsay
and Ronald Reagan.
There are those and their influence and
canniness is not to be discounted who say the
New Politics is merely Old Politics done well. They
point to the archetypical example the Eugene
McCarthy campaign of 1968 and point out that it
was merely a case of old-fashioned political
organization, precinct work, doorbell ringing,
canvassing done not by hired hacks but by young
people with a mission.
In this terminology, New Politics is simply
modem merchandising of old politics, geared not to
patronage and loyalty to the boss but to ideas and
loyalty to a party which reflects those ideas. It is
with this in mind that the Republicans, who think
thats how they won in Virginia and New Jersey last
year, will spend large sums of money this year
and in 1972 building up local organizations in
order to sell the New Federalism door-to-door.
This approach alsp includes the techniques of
mass media made famous in the Richard Nixon

Alligator Staff Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn Student Publications.
Assignment Editor Sports Editor Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Fred Vollrath Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Wire Editor Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
fan X/ininn Inff Rmin Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
uan wimng JWTT Drain the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant of the university of Florida.
- I'J Si. £i! '.'H

Frank Mankfowicz Mankfowicz_
_ Mankfowicz_ Tom Bradon
campaign of 1968 and set forth with such clarity in
Joe McGinnis The Selling of the President. It
involves massive amounts for television but not to
get across an idea. The trouble with ideas, as the
Nixon campaign men saw it, is that some people
may listen and disagree.
It is this fact that animates the practitioners of a
different kind of New Politics, which will get a test
in California in the primary campaign of
Congressman George Brown for the Senate and in
the campaign this fall of Democrat Jess Unruh
against Gov. Ronald Reagan.
In California, it costs between $1 and $2 million
to run a statewide TV campaign. If a candidate has
that kind of money, he will be wasting much of it if
he tries to use television to say what he thinks,
simply because so much of his audience will disagree
with what he thinks. Therefore, the New Politics
will use television only to show the candidate as a
reasonably attractive fellow who dislikes rioters and
loves children.
That leaves issues to be taken care of by
computers and direct mail. The computer analyzes
each district by vote, socio-economic status and
ethnic origin.
In a white precinct which went solidly
Democratic and where the average income is about
SB,OOO per year, a Democratic candidate will mute
his feelings on, say, integration and emphasize his
fear that the Republicans are heading for
unemployment. In that same precinct, a Republican
may decide not to mail.
The New Politics campaign has the virtue of
appealing to voters on the basis of issues rather than
on the basis of a TV smile, and for those politicians
not interested in virtue it is cheap.

EDITORIAL
A Decision
Long Overdue
The growth of a young society, 200 million strong, has
brought change to American politics.
The idea of one-man, one-vote, for example, did not
achieve respectability until the Baker v. Carr decision of the
early sixties. Although still not a universally popular
concept, apportionment is seen by the experts as the only
method by which a truly representative government can be
achieved.
The theory behind Baker v. Carr is that in a growing,
urban country only direct apportionment will satisfy the
people's needs to be representd.
And so it is with the 18-year-old vote.
This morning, the Florida House of Representatives will
consider House Resolution Number 59, a move for
amending the Florida Constitution to allow the 20-year-old
vote. While we agree with the spirit of the resolution we
dont think the letter of it goes far enough. It does not
provide for an adequate voice.
We can appreciate the difficulties of moving such a
revolutionary concept through the Florida legislature. On
the other hand, legislators who see Florida growing younger
in population can ill-afford to allow the idea to fail.
Florida has catered too long to the idea that its citizens
are old in years and slow in thought. To labor under that
idea any longer is analgous to equipping a sleek new Ferrari
with a Model T Ford engine it simply wont go.
Florida is capable of becoming a sleek new Ferrari, and
its 18-year-olds have the vision and maturity to provide a
bloc with which much-needed progressive legislation can be
passed.
For example, we can see little reason for struggling under
the limitations and inequities of a regressive tax base. Why
not adopt a corporate income tax, as have 41 states, or an
eventual personal income tax, as have 38 states?
We are not saying tax reform is a revelation of the young.
We are saying with a younger voting population such
reforms would be possible.
Obviously, a state growing at Floridas rate must remain
flexible. An 18-year-old voting population can provide that
flexibility, without providing the irresponsibility usually
attributed to the young.
Florida youth, in short, needs the vote as much as young
Florida needs a representative government.

(EDITORS NOTE: UFs Foreign Student Office handles
the business of nearly 1,000 foreign students and faculty,
not 2,000 as reported in Wednesdays editorial. The editor
regrets the error.)
I




Speaking Out

(EDITORS NOTE: Pfcul
Hahn is with Loyola University
in Chicago.)
By profession I am an
anthropologist. In the course of
following my profession during
the past decade, I lived in
Oxford Mississippi, for four
years and then in Gainesville
Florida, for four years before
moving to Illinois in 1967. In
Mississippi, Florida and Illinois I
have had opportunities "to
observe the behavior of
individuals, like G. Harrold
Carswell, who say one thing but
actually do something else as
they act to preserve a superior
status for whites and
second-class citizenship for
blacks and other minority
groups.
During the four years in
northern Florida I had close
associations with civil rights
groups and independent,
grass-roots, black political
organizations. It was through
this experience that I first
learned of the white supremacy
ethos of Judge G. Harrold
Carswell. It was not Carswell of
1948 but Carswell of the 1960s
who was of concern to black
citizens and civil rights groups. It
was G. Harrold Carswell of the
1960s who had helped convert a
whites-only public golf course
into a private, white country
club, a disheartening and
frustrating case of continuing
injustice and evasive racist
action. It was Carswell of the
1960s who by his actions and
inactions assisted white
supremacists in denying blacks
in the Florida panhandle an
equal right to the voting booth.
It was G. Harrold Carswell of the
1960s who approved
segregationists plans to preserve
unconstitutional dual school

MR. EDITOR:
One hears frequently these days about
bringing the UF to the heights of greatness,
yet when one considers the facts and
events that are taking place, there seems to
be a bit of contradiction between the
desires for greatness and the actual
planning. One is led to believe the real
desire is for greatness in recreation rather
than greatness in scholarly achievements.
Ill admit, there seems to be a greater
demand for top athletes than for top
scientists, but maybe thats because I live
in an environment in which people are
more willing to support athletics than
education, or maybe its because I havent
seen a truly great scholar produced by the
university lately.
It is difficult to produce great scholars
LETTERS POLICY
L attars must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just causa. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
liT "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
is ariced to contact the editor and be
prepared tojhow

The Scientific Harassment

Stand Up-Do What Is Right

Those who say that G. Harrold Carswell not only was
but is a believer in and practioner of white supremacy
are not making snap judgements.

systems in the New South.
Through a combination of
apathy,
permissiveness and clear intent
school districts in all parts of the
country have remained partially
or totally segregatd into 1970.
The decision of the Supreme
Court in Brown vs. Board of
Education of Topeka has been
ignored and evaded whenever
possible. We are now
experiencing a crisis situation as
a result. And still today, after
years of tokenism and worse,
large segments of the population
and many office holders in all
branches and segments of the
population and many office
holders in all branches and levels
of government are willing to
assume good faith on the part
of men like G. Harrold Carswell.
Carswellian racists seldom if
ever miss an opportunity to
preserve supremacy status for
whites and second-class
citizenship for blacks. One of
these preserving actions came in
a school desegregation case
heard April 6,1965, five years in
the United States District Court,
Northern District of Florida,
Gainesville Division. Over the
objections of the attorney for
the plaintiffs, seven black and
two white families, Judge G.
Harrold Carswell approved the
school boards freedom of
choice plan with the comment
that it was the best plan in the
South.
School officials and leaders in
this Florida county denied that

without top quality professors. From
recent and continuing evidence, the only
top professors the university is actively
willing to recruit are professors of
football, or maybe these are the only ones
were willing to pay the necessary price to
get. How long has it been since the
university retired one of its scientists at
full pay with an assistant, a benefit not to
be discounted in any recruitment program?
Why is it that we are readily willing to
increase the assessment of students to
maintain a fiscally unsound, non-profit
recreation corporation. This increase will
produce approximately one quarter of a
million dollars which will probably be used
to pay recently added pension plans and
remodeling of the pampered societys new
living areas.
One on the other hand, to insure the
universitys greatness, we harass the truly
great scientists until they vacate the
premises. Consider Dr. Cade for example, a
man whose research has brought much
notoriety to the university, an unselfish
man, who used many of the returns from
his success to help needy and outstanding
students. We cannot tolerate such an
individual, we cannot even furnish needed
funds to move his renal patients out of
their basement ward into respectable
facilities, much less into plush suites. Yet
we are willing to eliminate such really great
professors from our midst over a few
4ftousan&. dollars a| the result of poor

there was any discrimination of
any type. But the schools
remained totally segregated until
the fall of 1964 when, under
permissive transfer, eleven
black students were admitted to
white schools two to high
school, eight to junior high and
one to elementary. These eleven
black students were not
admitted to white schools until
after the 1964 Civil Rights Act
and after the desegregation suit
had been filed. Prior to the
federal court suit, .all requests
from black students to transfer
to white schools were denied.
Going to and from a distant
appropriate school, black
students passed white schools
which in some cases were across
the street from their homes.
With the April 6, 1965,
Carswellian approval, school
officials grafted their freedom
of choice plan onto the existing
decayed dual system of feeder
schools. Two weeks later they
used their plan to exclude black
children from a white
elementary school for the
1965-66 year on the grounds of
overcrowding. The boundry
line for the schools attendance
area was drawn down the middle
of the street in front of black
homes. The excluded black
children were assigned back to
their nearest appropriate
school, which was more than
twice as far from their homes as
the next nearest elementary
school. Two months after

planning by university authorities.
If we are to achieve any semblance of
greatness, maybe we should begin by
defining the word, and then we could all
understand which direction to turn.
JAMES ROVAL, 7AG
The Ball
MR. EDITOR:
Due to the fact that an Anti-Military
Ball is scheduled for Friday night at
Broward Hall, it has become necessary for
the executive council of that area to issue
the following statement.
the small society

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receiving Carswells approval for
their plans, school officials
opened a segregated Headstart
program.
Using freedom of choice,
school officials were able to
maintain a tokenly desegregated
dual system of public schools
until February 1, 1970. Basic
responsibility for the schools in
this system having operated for
another five years in a
discriminatory, unequal,
unconstitutional manner falls to
G. Harrold Carswell. Also,
responsibility for conditions of
violence which have existed in
the schools of this system during
the current year must be shared
by G. Harrold Carswell.
Those who say that G.
Harrold Carswell not only was
but is a believer in and
practitioner of white supremacy
are not making snap judgements.
The record is clear. The values
which Carswell revealed openly
in 1948 have been revealed
repeatedly since then, usually in
less open ways. There is nothing 0
in the public record to indicate
that Carswells attitudes, beliefs,
and values have changed. No one
has presented any substantive
evidence of a single action or
statement by Carswell prior to
his appointment to the Supreme
Court that would show any
change. Testimonials and
petitions from white citizens and
Carswellian neighbors, or from
black employees of government
bureaus or establishment
institutions, are not substantive
proof. To be valid, claims of
change have to be backed up by
demonstrated behavior.
As an anthropology professor,
1 am well aware that individuals
can change their attitudes and
behavior and that many do. I
have observed such changes
taking place in Mississippi,

TtoTkrfKU AMptbr.

OPEN FORUM:^^
( AJai'ui mi Vii&tMt J

We, as Broward Hall residents and
independent students do not support, in
any way, the idea and policies of that
group.
We were not fully informed of the
intentions of John Sugg when he requested
use of our facilities last quarter.
Being too late to make new plans for
this dance, we have little choice but to
allow this dance to proceed as scheduled.
It is important that it be known that we
at Broward had no idea he was planning
such a dance, nor did we know he planned
to charge admission.
In the future, permission will be
necessary from housing officials and dorm
advisers.
THE BROWARD
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
by Brickman

By Paul Hahn

Florida, Illinois and New
Mexico. The beliefs that I hold
now are different from those of
my childhood and youth. My
home town in eastern New
Mexico was homogeneously
white Protestant and segregated
to the point of excluding blacks
from the entire county. My
ethnic group has been
Southern U. S. for generations.
Being aware of change, I am
also aware of the lack of change.
Individuals who claim to have
changed their beliefs and
behavior are far more numerous
than those individuals who have
actually changed. Considering
the record, G. Harrold Carswells
position is quite clear.
From being at Ole Miss during
the 1962 insurrection and its
prelude and aftermath, I came to
understand the necessity of
American citizens exercising
their basic right to speak out.
Americans cannot afford to
blindly and complacently accept
the actions and statements of
politicians, committees,
administrators, experts, and
those who are in charge.
Democracy in America is in
delicate balance, and its
continued existence depends
upon citizens who refuse to be
silent, citizens who question and
challenge ideas and behavior,
citizens who demand justice and
equality as well as law and order.
There is no other way to adhere
to American ideals of
democracy, justice, and equality.
There is no other way to keep
the American dream alive.
Especially those who have
assumed leadership roles must
speak out and do what is right.
The philosophy of doing what
is expected for party or group
loyality, for personal gain, or for
a good guy image can only
have disastrous results.

Page 9



Page 10

>, Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

Governors New Program Draws Praise

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) Gov.
Claude Kirks ambitious program drew
cautious praise from legislators although a
few termed it political and some said it
sounded like he was rejecting a general tax
increase while urging expensive programs
hard to finance with existing revenue.
BOTH DEMOCRATS and Republicans,
however, were nearly unanimous in
labeling it the best speech the Republican
governor has made to the legislature in his
three-and-one-half years in office.
Minority Leader Sen. C. W. (Bill) Young
of St. Petersburg said it signals a new
receptive relationship between the
executive and legislative branches.
The no new tax aspect appeared to
reflect the general mood of this first annual

Carswell Wins Award
At Mercer University
MACON, Ga. (UPI) It wasnt a complete shutout Wednesday for
G. Harrold Carswell.
> Rejected by the U. S. Senate as a nominee for the Supreme Court,
Carswell wound up as a nominee for Mercer Universitys first
Distinguished Alumnus award.
Mercer University is the small Baptist-supported institution in this
middle Georgia city where Carswell received his law degree in 1948.
HE IS SCHEDULED to make the keynote speech at Mercers Law
Day ceremonies May 1 and then will be given the award the
following day.
Also to receive the newly designated award with Carswell were
former Congressman Carl Vinson, class of 1902, and H. H. Ware Jr.,
an Atlanta attorney who graduated from Mercer in 1923.
DR. RALPH Phelps, Mercer vice president for development and
public relations, announced the award in answer to a report published
in Wednesdays Nashville Tennessean stating the Mercer University
Council had rejected a recommendation that Carswell be awarded an
honorary doctors degree at commencement exercises in June.
Phelps confirmed that the recommendation was rejected at a
meeting Monday.
But he said the action was taken as a matter of timing and had
nothing to do with the merits of conferring an honorary degree on the
federal appeals judge.
THERE WAS no discussion of the merits of the degree, merely
that of timing, Phelps said. We thought the timing would not be
proper to give our distinguished alumnus award for the first time
and then an honorary doctors degree only a month later.
But to say that we have turned Judge Carswell down for an
honorary degree is, frankly, dirty pool, Phelps added.
This does not preclude in any way Judge Carswell receiving an
honorary degree at a later date.
WE USUALLY have some 50 to 100 nominations for honorary
degrees each year, and the process of selecting those for the degrees is
long and complicated.
The report of the rejection by the council came only hours before
the Senate started voting on the confirmation of President Richard
Nixons second nomination to fill the seat of former Justice Abe
Fortas, who resigned from the court under fire.
It apparently had no effect, however, on the outcome of the vote.
House Committee Urges
Lower Penalties For Pot

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House Select Committee on
Crime reported at least six
million Americans used
marijuana last year, about half
of them on a regular basis, and
urged that severe penaltied
first-time possession be reduced.
In the growing drug culture
in America, marijuana has very
clearly become big business,
the committee said.
REGULAR USERS spent an
estimated SBSO million last year
on the illegal drug, the report
said.
Summarizing hearings it has
held since it was created a year
ago under the chairmanship of
Rep. Claude D. Pepper, D-Fla.,
the committee concluded that
federal and state laws making
possession of marijuana a felony
were too severe.
Until definitive answers to
marijuanas long-term effects are

session of the legislature in a year in which
the entire house and a third of the Senate
is up for election to some office.
MOST FOUND the 29-page list of
recommendations too comprehensive for
instant analysis, and directed their
comments at the general areas of need
pinpointed by Kirk.
From a political viewpoint, it was
probably the most effective opening day
address ever made to a legislature, said
Sen. Lee Weissenborn, D-Miami, an
outspoken Kirk critic.
But I think a deeper analysis would
reveal that hes still not submitting a real
legislative program in the manner a
governor should.
TO SENATE President John Mathews,

known, Congress should adopt
misdemeanor treatment of the
first-time offender convicted of
possession of the drug, the
report said.
The
Rathskeller
is taking
Applications
For a
Full-time
Salaried
Director
Applications
available
at the Rat

GURNEY VS. MUSKIE

Senators Debate Glades

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Edmund S. Muskie, D-Maine,
Wed n e sday proposed south
Florida place a lid on population
growth to safeguard water
pledged to the Everglades
National park.
The proposal came during a
heated people vs. wildlife
debate by Muskie and Sen.
Gaylord Nelson, D-Wis., against
Sen. Edward J. Gurney, R-Fla.,
during a Senate Public Works
subcommittee hearing.
NELSON THREATENED to
muster the conservationists of
the nation to oppose a new S2O
million outlay for long-range
south Florida flood control
unless the park gets an
unbreakable guarantee of

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D-Jacksonville, the speech was the best
hes ever given us.. with a lot of good
some I agree with and some I do not.
My reaction to the overall speech was
favorable, although he seems to be trying
to get too much power for the governor.
House Speaker Fred Schultz,
D-Jacksonville, said instead of attacking
the legislature, Kirk is jumping on others,
but has proposed a number of things that
are good.
But he said he will oppose further
curtailment of Cabinet authority as
proposed by Kirk.
REP. WILLIAM Andrews, D-Gainesville
said he was violently opposed to Kirks
proposal to consolidate 67 county school
districts into 12 arranged along

315,000 acre feet of water per
year.
Otherwise, he said, the watery
Everglades will become a death
valley.
GURNEY, A subcommittee
member, heatedly demanded
that Muskie explain how Florida
was going to limit population
growth and limit industrial
expansion in the burgeoning
Gold Coast area.
You are talking about
one-third of the population of
Florida, Gurney said. Just
exactly what plans would you
put into effect to stop the flow
of population into Florida?
MUSKIE SAID such planning
is commonplace in cities around
the world that face water or

congressional district lines.
Schultz and House Transportation
Chairman Lynwood Arnold,
D-Jacksonville, threw cold water on the
proposed penny gas tax increase, even
subject to voter approval, contending the
state has SIOO million now it could use for
highway building.
Excellent. He should be sick oftener,
Sen. Cliff Reuter, R-Sharpes said.
Hell find a lot of support, particularly
in the areas of education and
conservation, added Sen. Jerry Thomas,
D-Riviera Beach.
Sen. Mallory Home, D-Tallahassee said.
He talked about motherhood things most
people can support, but he gave us enough
to take 10 years to cover.

other shortages.
Are you suggesting an
embargo on people? Gurney
demanded. I know of no other
way. I know of no way to erect
a fence around the border of
Florida to keep people from
coming in.
Muskie pointed out that in
bad droughts, estimated to be
likely every 36 years, there
would be great pressure to divert
pledged water to south Florida
Gold Coast cities.
A vast system of canals now
bear the water from Lake
Okeechobee to three
impounding areas totaling 1.5
million acres which feed it to the
vast park and the growing cities.



the ugliest
words in college:
6 j
Quiz Friday over the next six chapters
V


Why "Sweat It ?"
You can learn to read and study much
faster! The average Florida Reading Dynamics
student increases his reading and study speed
(including skimming and recalling) over 4.4
times and improves concentration over 10% as
tested by our standardized testing program.
Reading Dynamics graduates include over
1,000 University of Texas students, 100
professors, and many deans. As a matter of

PLAN TO ATTEND A FREE MINI LESSON
Today at 3, 5:30, & Bp.m.
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Upstairs at
1015 W. Univ. Ave.
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fact, our graduates include many of the
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The best way to find out about the
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come to a free MINI-LESSON. Here,
crammed into one exciting hour, you'll learn
what it's like to be able to read and study
faster. You will see a short, enjoyable movie

Thursday, April 9,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

and have all your questions answered. In
short, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to
read and study substantially faster than you
thought possible without skipping a single
word with better comprehension.
Important Note: We can only help those
who are NOW average or above average
readers. To check your own level of reading,
we suggest you contact the University of
Florida Reading Clinic.

Page 11



Page 12

2, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

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Tomato Puree 3t?*l Chunk Tuna .. 3£.?*l /rSmi Cake Mixes 3 $ l
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Thursday, April 9.1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

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IS
MICK JAGGER
. . just a rock singer?
Rathskeller Features
Blues Image Tonight

The Blues Image, a
California-based rock group
combining the blues with a Latin
beat, will give two shows tonight
and Friday and Saturday nights
at The Rathskeller.
The Atco recording group has
released two albums, both of
which have been received
favorably by rock critics. The
groups first album was released
after a successful engagement at
the Whisky-A-Go-Go in Los
Angeles.
TV NOTES
The Broadway theaters
annual Tony Awards ceremonies
will be telecast April 19 on NBC,
10 to 11:30 p.m. The program
will come from the Mark
Hellinger Theater, as it did last
year.
* *
t*
Bing Crosby Cooling it is
the singers second
musical-variety special of the
season, and NBC will air it at 10
p.m. April 13. Dean Martin, Flip
Wilson and Bernadette Peters
will assist.
* *
ABC has British singing star
Petula Clark scheduled for her
one one-hour entertainment
special for the 1970-71 season.
' T show, to be produced in
Lc lon, is being created by the
American team of Gary Smith
in Dwight Hemion.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES AH ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

THREE OF the original
members of The Blues Image
Mike Pinera, lead guitarist; and
Joe Lala and Manuel Bertematti,
both drummers are natives of
Tampa. One of the groups
earliest performances was at The
Image in Miami. The other
members of the group are
Malcolm Jones on bass guitar
and Skip Konte, who plays
piano and organ.
The group went on an
extensive tour of the East Coast
in 1907 and then went on a
European tour that same year.
The Blues Image performs
original material nearly
exclusively with the exception
of some songs theyve done then thenown
own thenown arrangements of.
There will be two shows each
night the group is here at 9 and
11 pan. Advance tickets are
priced at $2 for members of The
Rathskeller and $2.50 for
nonmembers. Prices at the door
will be slightly higher.
The show is produced by The
Rathskeller in cooperation with
Student Government
Productions.

Seminole 4
f Hall of Fame j
p Whos Who 3
U certificates have arrived j
F They may be picked up in the
r Seminole Office or the J
/ Business Offic^

The
Florida
Alligator

FILM COMING TO UNION

'Sympathy For The Devil:
Rock And Revolution

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Rock music used to be a thing
we danced to. And the people
who made rock music were
pretty unimportant to us when
they were off the stage or off
the radio. We didnt care much
about their lives or what they
thought about anything.
But now, since The Beatles
and The Rolling Stones and
Dylan, now we seem to pay
more attention to our rock stars
than we do our political leaders
or our social or educational
leaders. We want them to lead
us.
Sympathy for the Devil is a
new film by Jean-Luc Godard.
Its about revolution, about
blacks, about militancy and
violence. The thing that holds it
together is footage with the
faces and voices of The Rolling
Stones. Somehow theyre right
at the middle of everything
were going through now.
THE FILM is to be shown
here the weekend after the
upcoming one. There will be
showings April 17, 18 and 19 in
the Reitz Union theater.
Advance tickets priced at $1.50,
go on sale at the Union Box
Office next Monday morning
and will be sold for two days.
Theyll go fast.
Sympathy is the first film
that Godard has made in
English. Its also the first film to
be made around The Stones.
According to those whove seen
it, the combination is an
incredible one.
The movie is built around
nearly a hours, footage of Mick
Jagger and The Stones in a
recording studio trying to record
the song, Sympathy for the
Devil with Jagger singing lead
and playing the basic chord
progression on an accoustic
guitar. He begins, Please allow
me to introduce myself,
repeating the line and the music
until hes half-satisfied. In the
next tow hours the song
develops, goes through many
changes until it becomes the
version were used to hearing

;&££; £1 : :: iuii 'F '

from the LP.
THOSE SCENES with The
Stones in the studio are a movie
in themselves.
Intercut in the movie about
The Stones working on a song
about the devil is another movie.
The second movie is Godards
movie with scenes about Black
Nationalists, pornography shops
and an interview with a girl
named Eve Democracy. One film
commentator said, Godard is
the didactic part of the film. The
Stones are the illustrative
portion.
A critic in The Daily lowan
said, (ft) is an exciting
revolutionary experience. No

gg J?!r tH B jm| 9flgra|jfr
V d : A yMmwMgmk ..
W *' 111
SHj § :
jBMBg. 4--
THE MAKERS
... Godard (in hat) and cameraman Tony Richmond

PRICES EFFECTIVE y } t
h^iesh
N B W '' litf 1 Filled with Chocolate Butter Icing and
\ g,X > i;r IT )\ Garniched with Nutt A Cherries, 14-ox.
Yffft | U Cocoa Chiffon Roll
Ip )rm: ... 69*
y if I V Ul' 7 No li iitl or Seeded
F'^'xhread
dejelorly 6*c, Garnithnd with
f Mr Strtvul, 12-os.
s3&TApricot Coffee Cake
...h 49*
BAKERY
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-3885
You probably didnt
I but you can order your Florida ///MV///T k
I Quarterly by mail. [H'l 11114 I
I Just send $1.25 to Room 330, . # 1
ijuuru riij

other filmmaker has been able to
express the spirit of revolution
as Godard has in his recent
work.
Apparently one of the nicer
aspects of the film is footage of
Brian Jones, a Stones guitarist
who died last year. Nicky
Hopkins, a rather famous studio
musician whos been a part of
several top groups, also is
featured in the film, playing an
organ during the recording
session.
There will be three shows
bpth Friday and Saturday nights
arid five shows on Sunday. A
valid student activity fee card is
required to purchase the tickets.



SALE CONTINUES'

AFTER 21 YEARS-
DFFERING ENTIRE STOCK OF DIAMONDSWATCHES
JEWELRY-SILVER AND GIFTS

SACRIFICED
*3oo,ooo ; SELL
STOCK OFF
THE GREATEST SALE IN OUR GENERATION

SAVE 20%-30%-40%-50%
EVEN UP TO 75% OFF
SALE NOW IN PROGRESS

343.00 GOOD COLOR-VSI
WAS LADY'S ELGEN WATCH .. MANS MIDO ALL
now 360000 .17 JEWELS... WHITE, PROOF AUTOMATIC Br SILVERPLATED H
niynVflin ONLY s WAS $59.50 WATCH, ALL STAINLESS K TRAY ... 12 INCH 9
KMyuMfl CP*\ nn case...wassllo.oo K WflS ;i7 n 1
LI I W ; 00 W WAS*I7.SO
B J XT 7 nowonly $37.95 nowonly $79.50 B NOW only $9.99 SI
ft 7X50 9 GILSON EMERALD AND
- DOUBLE ROW WED- DIAMOND BRIDAL SET. LOVELY O RII wa ERY
B *00 88 9 DING RING... 18 KT DING RING... 10 .. MARQUISE SHAPED 5250 Oil
i7 9 WHITE GOLD... MOST DIAMONDS... 1.10 MOUNTING, THREE now only $149 50 IftMll *J "j
UNUSUAL RING CARATS WHITE GOLD DIAMONDS ... WAS |M I Pf*VI
WAS $1066.00 ... WAS $495.00 $350.00 WAS IV/*f/ MM
LADY'S ELGEN SgOQ !
IRISH 9 NOWONLY 689.50 NOW ONLY $349.50 NOWONLY $189.50 A -,- IIrMRIh
COFFEE MUGS \ $ 37 95 ISSSSSH
WERE $ 7.50 |- T 1 T 1
K ONLY $4.99 FASHION RING IN 18 BRIDAL SET ... FISHTAIL U* I !!!?L N PETITE |& ladies-mens
P| SET OF 6 f| KT YELLOW GOLD... ... ONE CARAT TOTAL, HAMILTON WATCH 23 JEWELS if 11
IffTllillM 35 DIAMONDS TOTAL- WAS $ 675.00 AUTOMATIC 2 DIAMONDS Ip 1 miiFOLnS -8
WiUuXUJM ING 1.93 CARATS... WAS WAS |E
BWAS $2025.00 100.00 69.50 If a
nowonly $449.50 0^ v o^ v mm 'S
NOWONLY s>lo 88 $ a 0.88 |L
$1399.00 49 | *49 || $1 99 I
SILVER CHARMS BIRTHSTONE RINGS CHARMS TIE TACS <1
REGISTERED JEWELER-MEMBER AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
PSPI ROBERTSON JEWELERS
I ,/Tof F I oN THE souARE downtown [JMH|H

OPEN TIL 9PM I
THURSDAY-FRIDAY NIGHT I

Thursday, April 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

SHEAFFER PENS
Extra
VALUE 69i m
V While They

OPEN DAILY 10 AM

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Baldwin electric base with case $365
new, 4 months old for SIBO. Also
webcor compact tape recorder for
$25. Call 378-8810 evenings.
(A-3t-113-p)
3 br IV2 bath 10 x 56 furn. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV in
park with pool A/C. 376-8517.
(A-st-133-p)
Spacious, well-kept 10x47 Great
Lakes, two bedroom, air, carpet, 6x
utility shed. $1995. 378-9426
(A-st-112-p)
-
AKC registered black male doberman
4 months old. Willing to take any
reasonable offer. Call 376-0953 ask
for Joe. If not there leave a note.
(A-3t-112-p)
1968 Kawasaki 250 cc. 4,060 miles.
Under warranty. Beautiful. Quickest
in its Class. $475.00 Call 392-7203.
(A-st-l 12-p)
Fender Jazzbass and bassman amp
both In perfect condition with all
extras. Ask $525 call 378-8670
(A-st-112-p)
HOME TAP FOR SALE: Draft Beer
at Home. Only SBO. Call 376-2630.
(A-3t-111-p)
1968 Sears 50cc Bike with helmet.
Good condition. SIOO. Call evenings
373-2196. (A-st-114-p)
67 Cougar XR7 4 speed, 4 br. 390
c.1., front disc, feather bucket seats,
posi-traction. Call 372-5698 after 6
PM. Best offer. (A-st-114-p)
1969 RCA portable cassette tape
recorder with microphone & 6
cassettes, $35 perfect for sch 301
students or class lectures. 372-4407
after 8 (A-115-2t-p)
Yorkshire terrier puppies, must sell,
AKC registered, shots, small adorable
dogs, SIOO,OO, call 376-0289 after
5:00 on weekdays. (A-st-111-p)
HANNA'S husband Hector hates
hard work so he cleans the rugs with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-7-c)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Unlv
Ave. Ask for Bob Zuber. Teacher and
performer here for three years!
(A-2t-115-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (8-ts-c)
Sublet this quarter Village Park apts.
85. Immediate occupancy needed.
Call 373-1863. (B-st-113-p)
SUBLET for summer qtr. Village 34
1 bdr furn a/c. 115/mo call 373-1797
(B-5M12-P)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
Several 1 br. apts, bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, AC $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Avenue.
372- Grad. Students pretarred.
(B-109-ts-c).
LARGE 2 bedroom trailer, sum. 5
mins, from campus. Complete
kitchen. sllO/md: Call 373-2679.
(B-3t-114-p)
Sublet thru Aug. Furnished 1 br.
Unlv. Gardens Apt. sllO. Contact:
Paul Hoffman, 378-0327 or
376-6720. (B-st-114-p)
1 and 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
fully carpeted and alr-conditloned.
Most sound proofed In town. All
electric kitchen, lots of closets,
laundry and pool. Pets Welcome.
Phone 376-0635 for rental rates.
(B-7t-109-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990'' University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
Sublet trailer, excellent condition:
cheap, roomy. Andrews and Connell
M oblleer. Call 373-1350 or
373- (B-3t-114-p)
2 bedroom duplex apt. just south of
The University Inn. For Information
call 372-6333. Leave name and
phone no. for J. Pozin. Will contact
you. (B-st-115-p)

WANTED
Male roomate to share 2 bedroom
apt. in Village Park with 2 others.
Prefer over 21 but not required. Call
378-86 97 apt. 97. (C-3t-113-p)
Roomate wanted this quarter Village
Park Apts 85 on pool. 373-1863
immediate occupancy necessary.
(C-st-113-p)
1 or 2 roommates needed
Immediately to share beautiful
Hawaiian Village Apt. Reasonable
rates, Call 378-9810 or 378-0654
ANYTIME. (C-st-114-p)
Singles! How about a private bdrm.
close to campus, cen A/H, full carpet
complete elect, kitchen, Spanish
furniture, pool, gas grills, laundry
facilities, patio, Dn/area, GIF parties
all for S7O/mo. INCLUDING util.
La Mancha has It all! Openings for
1-4 students. Call 378-7224 Now!
(C-109-10t-p).
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
Wanted! Turned-on female roommate
to share large air-conditioned house
close to campus $45 a month. Call
376-8080. (C-7t-113-p)
Male roommate wanted for spring qt.
Poolside one-bedroom apt. near mall.
Alr-cond. and private patio. No
deposit. 55/mo. Call 372-5093 after
6 pm. (C-llist-p)

I MJu. a. ...
|/| f-
I Extra Seminoles
I Have Been Ordered
I YOU MAY RESERVE ONE ONLY DURING THE NEXT
1 TWO WEEKSI MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE SERVICE
E**l L
I BOOTH APR 6-17 DURING THE WEEK OR MAIL IN
I HANDY FORM
Please reserve copies of the 1970 Seminole BN
|| jdH I have enclosed $ ($6.00 per copy)
IM EndoM extra dollar to have it mailtd. B|
jj You will be notified in the Alligator when the
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1970 Seminole.

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

Page 16

WANTED
Female roommate Slanted French
Quarter phone 376-0613 45 per
month. (C-111-st-p)
Wanted: One female roommate for
Immediate occupancy. Gatortown
Apts. $65 + util. For spring qtr.
378-6162 after 5. Barb or Helen.
(C-st-114-p)
1 male roommate Landmark Apt.
Phase H pool alr-cond. etc. April rent
already paid. Call 378-3120 Apt.
170. (C-lt-114-p)
Roommate for 2-bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. $36/mo. Call
372-5207 or 372-2137. 1930 NW
2nd Ave. (C-2t-114-p)
2 Male Roommates for summer
quarter. Frederick Apts., alr-cond.,
pool, wall to wall carpet, Call
378-7104. $41.25. (C-4t-114-p)
1 FEMALE roommate needed
IMMEDIATELY Landmark
$46.25/mo. Call ANYTIME
378-4941. (C-10t-107-p)
Need top drummer Immed. Must play
jazz, swing, for night club group.
God pay, regular job. Call Sid
376-9102 til 5, then 376-3852.
(C-2t-115-p)
Roommate wanted female to share 3
br hse near campus air cond color TV
stereo & laundry Call 372-5123 (after
six weekdays anytime weekends).
(C-2t-115-p)

1 male roommate Landmark Apt.
Phase H pool alr-cond. etc. April rent
already paid. Call 378-3120 Apt.
170. (C-lt-114-p)

Roommate for 2-bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. $36/mo. Call
372-5207 or 372-2137. 1930 NW
2nd Ave. (C-2t-114-p)

2 Male Roommates for summer
quarter. Frederick Apts., alr-cond.,
pool, wall to wall carpet, Call
378-7104. $41.25. (C-4t-114-p)

1 FEMALE roommate needed
IMMEDIATELY Landmark
$46.25/mo. Call ANYTIME
378-4941. (C-10t-107-p)

Need top drummer Immed. Must play
jazz, swing, for night club group.
God pay, regular job. Call Sid
376-9102 til 5, then 376-3852.
(C-2t-115-p)

Roommate wanted female to share 3
br hse near campus air cond color TV
stereo & laundry Call 372-5123 (after
six weekdays anytime weekends).
(C-2t-115-p)

help wanted
We are looking for an agressive
couple to move into responsible
management position at new luxury
apt. complex. You must be
personable and have supervisory
skills. Apartment plus salary. Send
resume to P. O. Box i 14038.
(E-10t-l 12-p)
Full time director at the Rathskeller
Interesting work, great experience.
Applications available at the Rat.
(E-2t-114-p)

_ WE'VE GOT A WINNER
BHIKI AND IT'S GREAT!
academyX
/ 1 AWARD \
/ is W,NNER \
/ > W :St [jjp| GIG YOUNG \
/ MJ best supporting^
I I jane
\ I FONDA k
iIN SHELLEY WINTERS /

HELP WANTED
Need top drummer Immed. must play
jazz, swing, for night club group.
Good pay, regular Job. Call Sid
376-9102 til 5, then 376-3852.
(E-2t-115-p)
autos
'67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-114-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
Fish Aimondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
]jf GAINESVILLE MALL
HI HUB
M Co-
I youll I
I get yours I
m i h
1 We try to keep the be glad to send it to I
1 Quarterly on the you 1
I magazine racks. 1
I Florida Quarterly 1
I But like any other 330 Reitz Union
1 good magazine, it Gainesville, Fla. I
I doesn't stay there. 1
You'll get yours. 9
I We hope your local I
1 bookseller is keeping (l/Vfiflfl 1
his stock up. pi'llllU I
I But when he doesn't, CtlittttCTlif I
1 just drop us a line %
I (and $1.25) and we'll You've got it coming. I

Thursday, April 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Airros
SSKsSi-SW SSKsSi-SW-1962
-1962 SSKsSi-SW-1962 Chev. Impala Hard Top Sport
Coupe, In Top condition, one owner,
283 V 8 AT R & H $550 376-3442.
(G-111-st-p)
1962 Austin-Healy Sprite,' Stereo,
New tires & top. Looks good, runs
well. Must sell- immediately! $395
Call 392-8712. (G-st-114-p)
Plymouth Barracuda 1965, VB,
automatic, powersteering, good
condition. SBOO. Call 378-0458.
(G-2t-114-p)
63 VW Yellow Convertible $495.00
excellent condition. Phone
378-4463 after 5:00 P.M.
(G-3M14-P)
Campus wheels... and then some!
Oo you want cheap, dependable
transportation that just cant be
beat? Then come look at my 1967
Flat... clean as can be and in
perfect condition. Brand new tires.
Only $550. Im telling it like It Is.
Call 376-6166 or 378-8211.
(G-st-114-p)
1962 VW good condition. Very
dependable. Must sell by Saturday
$550.00 or best offer. Csll 378-4218.
(G-3t-U4-p)
1965 Plymouth Valiant, 4 dr., heater,
alr-cond., radio, good tires, $450
also large crib, sls. Call 373-1500
after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-114-p)
PERSONAL
x-xx-xx-x-xx-x-x*^^
Do you need a piano player for
dinners or other occasions? Call Mike
at 373-1453 after 11pm only $3 an
hour. (J-st-111-p)
MEN!!! ~:Need your pad cleaned?
Want a party hosted? The Tidy Tigers
are now taking appts. Get yours in
early by calling the Tiger Den at
373-2760 and your leotard clad tigers
will be at your service!!! (JS-st-114-p)
The wind which blows through
cracked chocolate-cake may turn the
wise man Into a maker of wooden
marbles. FLASH SPEAKS. Pd. Pol.
Adv. (J-lt-114-p)
Penny Rich, designer of the famous
Pennyrlch Bra, has a new creation
the Trianderln Bra. She also has an all
new marketing plan for those
Interested in earning unlimited
income. Call 378-0378 or 373-2940
for details. (J-7t-111-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Dresses sl4. Add $3 for
1-day service if desired. Phone
378-0320. (J-10t-107-p)
CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-l 13-p)
Still no summer plans? How about
six weeks in Europe with a highly
experienced graduate couple? For
booklet call 372-5489 Now!
(J-st-115-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Univ
Ave. Ask for Bob Zuber, teacher and
performer here for three years.
(J-2t-115-p)
Getting enough from yours? Come
hear ours. THE FIDELITY SHOP is
having a restocking sale. 420 N.W.
13th St. Ph. 378-8045. (J-2t-115-p)
GUITARIST wipe your steel strings
with liquid wrench and youll be
amazed at their new brilliance! See
ya at the bent card 372-3225.
372-3225. (J-2t-115-p)
2 law students need a cook. Dinner in
return for free food and invigorating
conversation. See Larry or Harry at
145, Landmark or call 378-9534.
(J-4t-112-p)
lost & fotjno
Lost black brief case, containing 2 pr
perscrlp glasses, ID cards, slide rule,
class notes drafting gear. Area of frat
row parking lot last Tues. please call
3 76-8281, reward, ask for Pat
(L-6t-112-p)
I N.W. 13th St -Ph 373-4523 |
I ACROSS FROM THE MALL 1
I 2 COLOR HITS I
I PLUS CO. HIT I
I BENJAMIN I

x-x-x-x*:

Page 17

LO ST A FOUN D
BICYCLE red and black mens
english racer my only
transportation. Please return it where
you found It or call at 372-5796
No Questions Asked. (L-st-114-p)
SERVICES
v:;>:;:v:;:;X::xXXXx : X : xXx : ;*x-x*XwX*X*
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby
Mills. (M-10t-107-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 apd up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)

" "" """""""""""""""J
' ONE OF THE
' YEAR'S 10 BEST!"
ROBERT REDFORD
1 KATHARINE ROSS
S "TELL THEM
1 WILLIE BOY IS HERE
I A UNIVERSAL PICTURE <2s> CJP
La** Day Jenny J
STARTS TOMORROW
: "PURE ENTERTAINMENT!:
I 'Nk, gjj{| United Press International |
presents MM
i BUTCH V> 1 S
i cassidyJnd tle :
i SUNDANCE KID LORBY S DELUXE \GP I
1......---------------...... J
Downtown Goliyil) |
IJIMfI
H" H Scream and
/ 1 Day Scream Again |
J STARTS TOMORROW # J
l The strangest trio a killer.
| WAYNE^J%jIB|rHAt WALLIS' j
i SEBBKI
kim
M % w-.offlp
I Paramount Picture? Presents r
Cr Inn |
I A A Paramount Picture |

SERVICES
XCWOOfrC
BABY CARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
' Monday Friday 8:00 am to 5:00
pm $15.00 per week experience
reliable Christian home.
Phone-376-2072. (M-3t-114-c)
. .- 1 11
TRIUMPH CITY" authorised
Triumph sales & service. 1970 modpls
from $715 to $1750. Located nqarth
of city limits on 441, behindvthe
Handlebar Lounge. New building
soon 376-9345 (M-7t-109-p)
- ... i i i. A- i,.
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-5M15-P)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-37t-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)



Page 18

\, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, AprH 9,1970

Saketif £jteeiali %&* DOM DARLING HARD FRENCH 2 39 \ H
STROPEL 49 |jpj^
DIXIE DARLING \t
POUND CAKE 39 c M(*jgg|X ]
mmm *& M JUMBO
\4 B 4 y Wj) Quantity Rights Rosorved
R WINN MXIC STOICS. INC- COmHOHT-)70 DOLLS v :
DIXIE DARUNG LARGE SANDWICH STOKEIY FRUIT
WHITE Bread 4^ $ I Cocktail 4 5 1
I r JB rU B BETTY CROCKER ALL FLAVORS COLLEGE INN NOODLES A
W BLEACH Coke Mix... ,3 -r 1 Chicken 3 1
J UIAC WHITE OR COLORS BATHROOM CHICKEN O'SEA
A AM Tissue 3 s l oo Tuna Fish ... .3 - s l
I THRIFTY MAID THRIFTY MAID
P - W%A\ Apple Sauce. .3 - $ 1 00 Tomato S'ce. .10 s l
CHEK DRINKS
GOLD MEDAL MB
_ -M SELF RISNG OR PLAIN |B
PRBBQi Gr. A Fresh Fla. All Whito MwKw p| hm f* VP
>/*/*( FLOUR f 5 XKi
cum I cm. k W
2OQ \W/^P
THRIFTY MAID GREEN CHEX AU FLAVORS REGULAR MhUMpB
Lima Beans .. 5 - $ 1 00 Drinks ......5 85 e f rtirC m
THRIFTY MAIO CUT SWIFT 666 WHET
Green Beans 6- $ l Lawn Food .50 s l l9 A mP
ASTOR SMALL jL
Garden Peas 5 s 1 00 Mayonnaise... "49 c t
THRIFTY MAID MIXED DOLE SLICED CRUSHED, OR CHUNK
Vegetables .. 5 -? $ 1 00 Pineapple .. 3-89 e
CRACKIN' GOOD BIG 60 FAMILY WHITE OR COLD WATER ARROW
Cremes ~ 39 c Detergent.... 39 c
t ASTOR ALL GRINDS one coffee your choice with $5 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
wArrrr ALL GRINDS
CAN
GIANT COLD POWER DEL MONTE S-ei SFINACH OR RUF CUT DEI MONTE FRUIT
jegularspcpepsodent Detergent 89 Green Beans ... 2/37 c Cocktail \mr21 e
I oomorusn w # Ajax Cleaner 39 Fab Detergent.... 37 c Peaches 2/39*
REGULAROR D *\Q C | ELjJ l iMjJ wSIHft j iDIjT | UIIT j PJ|Â¥ TOPVAITsSmW j
\nffl|f||lf||l l*m.lA- t R ONIS>..< ONIJDH RAG \ ONI < Aaa
VIIMIIIBBWW W # iHfcS# Cherries Eft# UASFHONS ; ;an,TO. mA MW ;Bk ;K &SL RAIAUTTO NASrAS
. Mff JR No. 1 FRS9 ooooTHiuAim is PM* jl ooooiWmi! BBfJB oooonauAMsus IgxaiH oooetmujJnus
11 -o*. COLGATE REGULAR MENTHOL OR LIME . .".TiT'? E GGs^MJl 0 i 2 -^.'l^ir.*7 .V. it l 1 111l 1 11 1 .. .".T;.T'
CL slim fmnm c 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on SUNDAY 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
JIIUVC VICUIII V7 HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, APRIL 15
KM WMITI THICK
' SUCED BACON 2%.*!"
; '< FRESH PORK LOIN CURtD HAMS c
A I FISH FILLETS 69'
,jPr 1 JIM SHRIMP PATTIES ~ 79'
(WNMMTjs/& mKm -49*
Chops 79 c s 4u - v araw.. **
'SL*~ 0 ~* SUCEDHAM Bt|*
Quantity Rights Reserved
IIwIJbI LB WINN DIXIE. STORES, INC.-COPYRIGHT-1970
SUNNYLAND BRAND BONELESS EYE OF
Sausage R0i1... 69 c Round Roast... $ 1 39 W D AN d
EAT-RITE SUCED ALL MEAT USDA CHOICE W D BRAND BEEF, FULL CUT M-W USDA CHOICE CHUCK B
Bologna ...... 69 Round Steak ... -. s l l9 W DA ACT v
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF, ROUND-BONE USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF PORTERHOUSE OR I
Sh'lder Roast.. $ l O9 T-Bone Steak.. $ 1 39 A B
Round Roast . $ l O9 Sirloin Steak... ... $ 1 29
808 WHITE REGULAR SLICED A
RACONT Jar
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- £ A A 1B ,Y
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m H, Green Poos s£ s l Turkey Entrees . 49* Fancy Apples 11 * 99*
ft BBBflr Cookin Bog Meets. .4 oV s l Strawberries 3 89* Strawberries 3 s l
Coffee Rich 4.- s l Perch Fillets 2Xs *l* ConTaloupes 2 -M
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whole or cut up HoriTtel Ham 1 Waffles Beef Sfeakettes Oranaeiuice 200's HUDSON FAMILY I a/n
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3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. H 45. Snacks 43*
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Thurdy, April 9,1970, Th# Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

l. The Florida AlHoator, Thursday, April 9,1970

v.v\
m ijr^M
i^H* *f'l
BL:,* **SSS!9
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Jane Parker Special!
LEMON PIES 39c
Jane Parker Special!
CHERRY PIES £ 49c
Jane Parker Date, Almond or jelly Filled
WT. ROUS 3 l. 00

BKjf ML
-
5 cents off Label) (Limit 1 w/ $5 or more order)
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24 off Labell Mrs. F ilberts Golden Quarters Special I
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BEER Special!
BLACK LABEL 6-d 99 <

L Sultana pranct-h
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(dressing

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& BONELESS ]
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Washington State Red or Golden Speciall
DeliciousApplesJ9(
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Fresh Lettuce Head 19<
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Swt. Potatoes4^s9s
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Pineapples 3 & r $ l. 00
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When you buy
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"Super-flight" ALL MEAT
Sliced Bologaa 69$
CAP*N JOHN'S FROZEN
Fish Stick JK. Z 39$
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Cod Fillets 49$
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Shrimp Creole PKG. 49$
"Super-Right" BEEF BONELESS CROSS RIB
Londoa Broil $ 1.29
'Super-Right" BONELESS BEEF
Swiss Steak S 1.09
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Ground Chock Lb 79$
SMOKED MARKET STYLE
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plaid
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......-..y v.v.*.w.vv.v.v.v,v.v.
1 Halftime
i* _r
o>:.xw-:-:-% : -:-v-v.v.v.v... By Craig Goldwyn
If Mets Can, We Can!
Optimism is the watchword of every baseball team from the drug
store sponsored little leaguer to the New York Mets. The old axiom
that in the spring all teams are contenders has never rung truer.
If the Mets can do it, so can we! is their cry.
ONE THING is sure. Only four of the expanded big leagues 24
teams are right. And its a pretty good bet that nobody knows who
they are. But the world is full of experts, and everybody thinks they
have a hot tip on a long-short or an old favorite thats bound to be in
the money. Well, I havent, but I thought Id give you something to
kick around, or argue about, so Ive made my annual pre-season picks,
more commonly known as Goldwyns Follies. Have a look and see
what Ive done to your favorite team.
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE

EAST
Pittsburg
Chicago
*New York
St, Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

Last years division champ
Now let me briefly explain before you hit the ceiling.
The Orioles won their division last year by 19 games. They were
impressive in the spring. Boog Powell, Frank Robinson, and Paul Blair,
plus the strong arms of Dave McNally and Mike Cuellar could take
them all the way.
NEW YORK may just be on the way back with a fresh scrubbed
bunch of youngsters, including John Ellis, first base, and Thurmon
Munson, a catcher. Mainstays include Curt Blefary, Pete Ward, Bobby
Murcer, and pitchers Mel Stottlemyre and Fritz Peterson. If they can
find a power hitter ...
Boston could be tough with their big stickers like Carl Yastrzemski,
Rico Petrocelli, Tony Conigliaro and Reggie Smith. The big question
is can pitchers Jim Lonborg and Gary Peters (from Chicago) recover
from slumps.
In the West the fireworks sparked by the bats of Reggie Jackson,
Sal Bando, Rick Monday and Felipe Alou could just blast the As to
the top.
MINNESOTA has morale problems, a new manager, and all the
power in the world on the depth chart, all of which point to a
disappointing season. I dont think theyll repeat this year, unless they
move Oakland to the National League.
In the senior circuit, the Redlegs have it all. A little weak in
pitching last year, a few off-season trades might mean the difference.
New pitcher Ray Washbom looks good. An enviably strong batting
order is the key though.
Top hitting and pitching from Roberto Clemente, Willie Stargell
and Matty Alou and pitching from Steve Blass and Bob Moose should
take the Pirates to the top of the toughest division in both leagues.
The National League East.
HOPING TO GIVE the Pirates a run for the money is last years
choke champions the Chicago Cubs. The Cubs possess perhaps the
finest infield in baseball, but average hitting and last years memories
should keep them down.
Then there are the Mets. Last year they were an impossibility. This
year the same holds true. Poor hitting and an average defense wont
win it in this tight division in 1970. Tom Seaver and Jerry Koosman
cant pitch no hitters every game, and Cleon Jones and Tommie Agee
cant be expected to repeat their world series performance regularly.
For my money itll be Cincinnati and Baltimore in the Series, and a
championship in the Ohio Valley.
But as the Mets proved last year, anything can happen. Can you
visualize a world series champ in Milwaukee, Houston, San Diego or
Montreal?
Last year could you visualize one in Shea Stadium?
fs^Mhay
SWIMMING
AAU Swim Meet in Athens, Georgia
TENNIS
Gators vs. FSU, 2:30 at Varsity Courts
I TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
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WEST
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Houston
* Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego

EAST
Baltimore
New York
Boston
Detroit
Cleveland
Washington

WEST
Oakland
Minnesota
Kansas City
California
Milwaukee
Chicago

The
Florida
Alligator

Pro Handball
CHICAGO Organization of
the Professional Handball
Association to play a nationwide
tour was announced by
promoter Ted Tannebaum.
Tannebaum said that Paul
Haber, national champion for
four of the last five years,
already had signed with the
group and that contracts had
been sent to 23 other players of
similar ability.
He said that a portable glass
court was under construction to
permit matches in large arenas
from coast to coast. The tour
was to offer a minimum of
SIOO,OOO in purses.

Student Special H
Any car or color!
1^49.95^^1
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave. 0
Ph. 373-1665

A good cry
cleanses the soul
AV t
\ } J 'i# I
\ tea
After all is shed and jHnfe. ings permits the
done, your soul may be jf 9rowth of bacteria on
saved ... but your contacts j the lenses. This is a
need help. They need Len- sure cause of eye ir irsineLensine
sineLensine irsineLensine is the one con- l||||gf ritation and in some
tact lens solution for com- jnxT cases can endanger
plete contact care...preparing, SR W your vision. Bacteria can cancleansing,
cleansing, cancleansing, and soaking. w not grow in Lensine be be
be There was a time when you .... . .... cause its sterile, self-sanitiz self-sanitizneeded
needed self-sanitizneeded two or more different lens | s a com P a,lb le. isotonic solu- jng and antjsept j c
solutions to properly prepare and tion, very much like your eye s nat- Lensine ... the sou/ution for
maintain your contacts. No more. urai tiuids. complete contact lens care. Made
Lensine. from The Murine Com- Cleaning your comacts with b he Murine Com|iany lnc
pany, makes caring for contact Lensine retards the bu,ld-up ot
p 1 foreign deposits on the lenses. j
enses as convenient as wearing A . ; II
And soaking your contacts in Len Lene
em Lene '. . sine between wearing periods as-
Just a drop or two of Lensine , .
. i sures you of proper lens hygiene, i
coats and lubricates your lens. y soakina-storaae iffwTTl
This allows the lens to float more You 9 t a re s ak,ng storage Uflffllili
, n ut case with individual lens compart compartfree
free compartfree y in the eye, reducing tearful \.
-x : i ments on the bottom of every bot botirritation.
irritation. botirritation. Why? Because Lensine 7 HBHHH
r tie of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated the
improper storage between wear- L;ti .& Sj'ilf
not your
contacts
t.
-u, __ . r ..- /
I

GATOR SPORTS

Jax Tops Gators
A hapless Florida Gator baseball team fell prey to the long-ball
hitting of Jacksonville University in the late innings and dropped a 6-3
contest in Gainesville yesterday.
With a tie game in the eighth the Dolphins tagged Gator starter
Wayne Rogers for two round trip tickets. A Gator rally in the bottom
of the ninth produced two runs, but fell three short of saving the UF
team from dropping their record to the .500 mark, with 11 wins and
as many losses.
ONLY TWO of the Dolphins runs were earned. Rogers was replaced
by Dave Thomas, who gave up another run in the ninth.
JU scored their six runs on 10 hits with no errors, and the Gators
scored their three on five hits with four mistakes.
The Gators go on the road for a two game series with Georgia
Friday and Saturday, and return home against Rollins on April 14.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
VjSsKci "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771

Thuraday, April 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

MMMJL4-Q N

By BO BERRY
Sports Writer
Most people think they are going fast in their cars
when they do 70 miles per hour, but to Steve Misus
thats just playing. Speeds of 140 m.pJi. are more
normal for him, and he does it on two wheels. While
not studying engineering at UF, Steve is racing
high-powered motorcycles.
Not only is he a racer, but he is the current
National Motorcycle Champion in the Sportsman
175 cc class.
LAST YEAR he raced Hondas and Kawasakis all
over the Southeast in 25 races to win the title. The
tracks were dirt ovals and paved road courses
requiring different bikes and techniques of riding.
Both riding styles demand that Steve drive at
what is called the ragged edge. He has to make the
bike slip and slide, but still have it under control.
His secret is to finish well every race, and thats just
what he did, winning 10 races last year.
When Steve was 16 he raced for the first time at
Palm Beach on a 2.5 mile road course. He had a
street Honda 160 that he used to drive to the track
before the race. No, he didnt win. In fact he
finished back in the pack. But now after four years
of experience he leads the pack all over.
STEVE SAYS he races because it is fun, thrilling,
and gives him pride. One such time was at Dade City
when he was given a Triumph to ride for the first
time. I finished third, but it was great to have
everyone wondering who I was after I smoked off
the supper guys.
For racing to be fun Steve has to win. It used to
be thrilling just to be in the race, but after winning a
race it is not good enough to be back in the pack.
That is the way Steve explains it and races it.
Before a race starts he is very serious. He sits on
his bike and thinks of what he Will do. The
butterflies come and he worries about his
competitors. But when the race starts it is total
concentration on making the bike move and handle.
HE IS CONFIDENT about his own bike because
he does his own mechanical work and preparation.
He has a production racing Kawasaki 250 cc set up
for road courses. Already a racing bike, he went to

'' ' v . Jt .;w v ;;.,
} : -<3^^lW^ U --
~ *- : ife z-" ***
A CHAMPION AND HIS TROPHIES
... and the machine that won them
*

work to improve it. Among the changes he made on
the engine were different rotary valves, expansion
chamber, heads, and a special carburetor. It goes
too. On the banks of Daytona he was doing 140
m.p.h.
To most people racing a motorcycle has to rate as
dangerous. To Steve it is safer than riding on the
streets. He doesnt like the street, Its too
dangerous with so many people not knowing what
they are doing. He thinks everyone should watch
out for the other guy, and that is the way he drives.
For a street bike Steve likes a four-stroke engine
because it is easier to care for than a two-stroke. Its
just the opposite he says for a racing bike. A
two-stroke has more power.
ON THE TRACK he does all out as much as
possible. He is successful too. This year Steve turned
professional with his new Kawasaki. That means a
chance for another national championship and
money.
Weekends are taken up with working on and
racing his bike. It takes time away from school, but
he does it anyway. One of those weekends next
month he will spend making his bike scream around
a road course at the Gainesville Dragway.
Daytona last month was one of his first
professional races. He qualified 10th in his heat, and
ran well until his engine broke. Steve feels the pros
are tougher competition with better riders and new
bikes.
IT TOOK FOUR years to win a national amateur
championship. Steve figures he would need a
factory ride to win another. The American
Motorcycle Association awards the national
championships to riders gaining the most points in
races on dirt tracks and road courses all over the
nation.
That means Steve would have to race full time to
make enough points, and he doesnt plan to. He
wants to be an engineer and race motorcycles as a
hobby.
But there is always the possibility of making a
career of racing. A number of motorcycle
champions have gone from bikes to cars to become
world champions. Steve would like to try auto
racing too. It is all in the future. Motorcycles get in
your blood, explains Steve.



BRINGS KEMPTON, ALLEN

Wauburg Ski Tournament

By 808 THOMAS
Sports Writer
Some of the best collegiate
water skiers in the world are
coming to Gainesville this
weekend for the Spring
Intercollegiate Invitational
Championships at Lake
Wauburg.
UF is undefeated in
intercollegiate skiing
competition, but five schools are
out to break the Gators string
of victories. They include the
Seminole Jr. College team with
world champion Liz Allan.
MISS ALLAN won all three
womens events, slalom, trick
and jumping, at the Tampa meet
last month where she set all
three intercollegiate world
records. This is only her first
year of intercollegiate skiing, but
she is no stranger to
competition. Miss Allan has

iS i
| Intramurals |
By Steve Rohan l
Delta Tau Delta and Sigma Nu paced the First round of the Orange
League golf tounament with incredible 109 and 110 scores.
The Delts had Matt Thomas and Henry Iler at 36 and Bemie Smith
at 37 take the first round lead. Kim Schwenke shot a 36 for the Nus
and he was followed closely by 37s from Kerry Schwenke and Larry
Mueller.
A 36 BY Kipp Minter and a 37 by Rick Spain led the Sigma Chis
into third place with a 113.
A 36 by Steve Saver and a 37 by Buddy Peoples paced the SPEs
into fourth place with a 114. John Johns and Jerry Becket each fired
38s for the SAEs to move them into fifth place with a 116.
Phi Kappa Tau is in sixth position with a 118 and Beta Theta Pi is
in seventh with a 119. Earl Trefry shot a37 for the Phi Taus and
Charlie La Clair fired a 36 for the Betas.
The eigth and last qualifying position is currently held by the Pikes
with a 123 but the TEPs and Phi Delts are right on their heels with
1245. ATO follows closely with a 125 and AEPi is next at 126.
OTHER TOP rounds for the day were shot by Howard Rankin of
Pikes, 37; Stu Kalb of TEP, 37; and Bob Anderson of ATO, 37.
The Delts, Sigma Nus, SAEs, SPEs, and Phi Taus all hit their rounds
on the less difficult back nine. The Betas and the Sigma Chis hit their
rounds on the front nine.
The tournament goes into its second round today. The eight
qualifying teams for the finals will be selected from the total scores of
the two rounds. The finals will include two nine hole rounds and the
total 36 hole score will determine place position.
SIGN UPS: Today is the last day for Independent teams to sign up
for softball. Ail signups should be made at the Intramural Office in
the gym.
VOLKSWAGEN NO LONGER Ist IN GERMANY
February registration showed Opel ahead of Volkswagen
in Germany. In the Gainesville area February registrations
show DATSUN far and away ahead of Opel. Change even
revolutionary change comes about slowly. Knowledge is
t easily gained and is less easily updated.
GODDING A CLARK
HOME OF DATSUN
"A NEW KIND OF ECONOMY CAR"
Straight shot from the University on 2nd Ave.

skied in dozens of world events.
Allan Kempton of Tampa
University is also out to upset
the Gator skiers. He won all
three mens events at the Tampa
meet and is the only college
skier in the world to hold a full
athletic scholarship in that sport.
Other schools entered include
Florida Technological College,
South Florida, and Rollins. St!
Petersburg Jr. College is also
expected to enter although they
have not confirmed an entry.
GATOR SKI Club president
Sonny Craddock said his team
will be meeting their stiffest
competition yet, but has the
depth to place every member
well.
Skiing for the Gators in the
mens division will be Ed
Aigeltinger, Bill Cox, Jim
Cleveland, Sonny Craddock,
Ronny McQueen, Richard

Moffett and 1968 Intercollegiate
Slalom Champion John
Bedingfield. Five of them will
enter each event.
In the womens division,
Linda Aust, Pat Boutchyard,
Trish Green and Poppy Johnson
will enter every event for the
Gators.
Each school will be allowed
five entries per event, with
trophies being awarded in both
individual and team categories.
The meet starts at 8:30 a.m.
on Saturday on the south end of
Lake Wauburg. There is no
admission charge.

Z
! 3sf s p tc^ s |
S ROYAL S
{ GUARDSMEN
i LAST THREE DAYS M
No Increase In Price For This Engagement £
; ... ....... m ...... v .. .... ?;
FREE BEER MINI SKIRT CONTEST
Monday nights Thursday nights
From 9:30-10:30 Cash prizes
{H HAREM NIGHT DRINKS 11* HR
+ Tuesday nights Every night for
4nn :: V 25.00 to the man the ladies from
4*jjjjjg|M who brings the most 5-9 HPlipjC
ALWAYS DANCING IB
Something happens EVERY IVKiIIJ at r
1 Dubs Lounge f

38 Letters Awarded

Varsity letters have been
awarded 10 basketball players,
nine wrestlers and 19 swimmers
at the UF, Gator Director of
Athletics Ray Graves
announced.
Basketball letters went to
Andy Owens, Ed Lukco, Robert
Agee, Tom Purvis, Dan Boe, Jeff
Miller, Jerry Hoover, Cliff Cox,
Earl Findley, Scooter Houston
and manager Les Loggins.
Wrestling letters went to Jon
Barres, Francis Brzezinski, Chris
Corder, Tom Derrough, William
Read, Jeff Shaffner, Mark
Schwartz, Steve Shomion and
Dean Tibbetts.
Swimmers earning letters are
Robert Appleget, Gary
Chelosky, Bill Domey, Steve
Hairston, Eric Hallquist, Greg
Hardee, Kevin Kierstead, Bob

Thursday, April 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Link, Steve McDonnell, Mark
McKee, James Murphy, Pete
Orschiedt, Jim Perkins, John
Plemons, Phil Sheehe, Ray
Smith, Bill Strate, Brian Wilder,
Bruce Williams. Managers letter
went to Albert Peek.
Sailing Regatta
The Gator Sailing Club
members will compete Sunday
in the traditional Admiral
Alberts Regatta at Lake
Wauberg.
Doug Halsey, internationally
rated skipper who won the event
last year, has graduated from the
UF and will not return to defend
his title.
Halsey finished second in last
years international sailing
championships in France.

Page 23



Page 24

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 9,1970

UPI SPORTS SHORTS

Nets Sign JUs Mclntyre

NEW YORK (UPI) Rod
Mclntyre, 6-fooMO forward
who teamed with 7-2 Artis
Gilmore and 7-foot Pembrook
Burrows to give Jacksonville
University the tallest front line
in college basketball last season,
Wednesday signed a three-year
contract with the New York
Nets of the American Basketball
Association.
* *
JACKSONVILLE Art Tolis,
head coach of Indian River
Junior College, will take over the
assistant coaching and chief
recruiting under Jacksonville
University basketball coach Tom
Wasdin.
Tolis Indian River teams have
averaged 105 points per game
and posted a 94-23 record over
Tolis four years at the helm.
We feel Art will be an asset
in every respect to our program
at Jacksonville University, said
Wasdin, who held the job before
taking over as head coach from
Joe Williams, new Furman
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
New York 1 0 1.000
Philadelphia 1 0 1.000
St. Louis 1 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 0 1. .000 1
Chicago 0 1 .000 1
Montreal 0 2 .000 1 -Vi
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 2 0 1.000
Houston 1 0 1.000 Vi
San Diego 1 0 1.000 Vi
Los Angeles 0 1 .000 IVi
Atlanta 0 1 .000 IVi
San FranciscoO 1 .000 1 Vi
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
St. Louis 7 Montreal 2
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (Night)
Atlanta at San Diego (Night)
Houston at San Francisco (Night)
(Only Games Scheduled)
THURSDAYS GAMES
St. Louis at Montreal
Chicago at Philadelphia
New York at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
Atlanta at San Diego
Houston at San Francisco
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 2 0 1.000
Boston 1 0 1.000 Vi
Detroit 11 .500 1
Washington 11 .500 1
New York 0 1 .000 IVi
Cleveland .0 2 .000 2
WEST W L PCT GB
California 2 0 1.000
Minnesota 1 0 1.000 Vi
Oakland 1 0 1.000 Vi
Chicago 0 1 .000 IVi
Kansas City 0 1 .000 IVi
Milwaukee 0 2 .000 2
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
Baltimore 3 Cleveland 2
California 6 Milwaukee 1
Oakland at Kansas City (Night)
Detroit at Washington (Night)
(Only Games Scheduled)
THURSDAYS GAMES
Oakland at Kansas City
Minnesota at Chicago
Baltimore at Cleveland
Boston at New York
(Only Games Scheduled)

coach. His record speaks for
itself and he has proven himself
as a capable recruiter in junior
college.
* *
LOS ANGELES Earl
McCullough, standout flanker
for the National Football League
Detroit Lions, Tuesday signed a
five-year contract with World
Sports Promotions Inc. to
compete in professional track
and field meets.
He is scheduled to compete in
all of World Sports first 16
meets before reporting to the
Lions training camp in July.
Three other pro footballers
high hurdlers Richmond Flowers
of the Dallas Cowboys and Don
Shy of the New Orleans Saints,
and sprinter Jim Hines of the

\ilfou only go around once in||pN|
Even in die beer you drink, I \\
settle for less. \
\ Wljen youYe out of Schlitz,
i youVe out of beer. JUS JUSmm
mm JUSmm Kmi? wmm ssip i
1w |
HH I :-..A
Hu

Miami Dolphins previously
signed pacts.
* *
AKRON, Ohio Don
Johnson, who claims Akron,
Ohio, as his bowling town, heads
the money winners in the
Professional Bowling Association
after he won the SIOO,OOO
Firestone Tournament of
Champions here last weekend.
The slender Johnson formerly
of Kokomo, Ind., pocketed
$25,000 after last weekends big
win here. He now has won
$35,690, and surpassed George
Pappas of Charlotte, N. C., who
had been the leader.
Pappas fell to second with his
$25,840 after winning $1,175 in
the Firestone. Third is Davie
Davis of Miami, with $24,885.

Walk Holds Wilt,
Suns Still Lose

hL v mpUr
wjmjf&Ej^^K^Em
NEAL WALK
... Phoenix rookie

Former Gator All-American
and now Phoenix Suns starting
center, rookie Neal Walk did his
job Tuesday night, but the Los
Angles Lakers did theirs better
as they tied their NBA playoff
series at 3-3.
Walk held Wilt Chamberlain
to only 12 points, but the rookie
center was forced out by the
Stilt, who grabbed 26 rebounds.
We are concentrating more,
Jerry West said following his
35-point performance in Los
Angeles second straight win.
We may have taken Phoenix
too lightly and have been too
lackadaisical in the first four
games.
If the Lakers win at Los
Angeles tonight, and they will be
favored, they will become the
second team in the leagues
history to overcome a 3-1 deficit
and capture a series.