Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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J
PHIL BANNISTER
REFLECTIONS
What better way to think about all the problems of the world and
campus than sitting on your trusty bike? Maybe they're not allowing
amplified instruments on the Plaza of the Americas anymore, but
bikes aren't all that noisy. Besides, you can always hum 10ud...

IN TAMPA COURT

r e Here Personally 1
Krentzman Tells Kirk

TAMPA (UPI) A federal district judge
overruled Gov. Claude Kirks intervention in a
school desegregation case Tuesday and sternly told
the governor to be here personally Friday to
answer civil contempt charges.
Judge Ben Krentzman reinstated the Manatee
County school board which Kirk suspended
Sunday night in a move to foil the court-ordered
desegregation and told the board he wanted the
court-ordered plan carried out by Thursday.
KIRK WAS to appear at Tuesdays hearing, but
sent word he was too busy because of the opening
session of the legislature.
The governor did not appear concerned over the
possibility of being cited for contempt. I dont

Union Os Students NeededHowes

We need a union of students, Alan
Howes, student body presidential
candidate on the Do It party ticket said
Tuesday.
All that we hope to do is centered
around one mechanism student
discontent and the students loss for away
to have their needs addressed and their
problems solved, Howes said.
THE ALTERNATIVES are
acquiescence like the students have used
for the last 50 years; revolt without
violence such as leaving the university; or
revolt with violence destroying the
reasons why we are here, said Howes.
But the main thrust of the Do It Party
is that students will mobilize in opposition
to indifference and complacency. We the
students are the solution.
Students should know, he said, that
a union has other means than the strike.
There is the grievance procedure and

think theyll do anything to a sick, old expectant
father, he said. Kirk referred to his recent kidney
operation, and the fact that his wife is expecting the
birth of a child shortly.
He later told the legislature he intended to fight
the busing issue all the way to the U. S. Supreme
Court.
I cannot accept the philosophy that in every
collision of sovereignty, the state must run for
cover, Kirk said.
I believe the issue of forced busing must be
decided once and for all by the United States
Supreme Court. This is my intent, and this is where
I am headed, if I can just get my day in our highest
court.

mediation, and possibly student
mobilization. Violence will not have to be
used
THE ADMINISTRATION does not
look at Student Government as being
I In
concerned about student effort, he said.
Every avenue for the students has been
closed to SG by the administration.
For specific examples of his platform,
Howes included:
With the ticket issue, the
administration is breaking tradition with

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 62, No. 114

IN LEGISLATURES HANDS

Regents Ask Option
To Increase Fee

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
and
TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Writers
UF students may not have to
pay admission to home football
games next year if the state
legislature passes a resolution
allowing the Florida Board of
Regents to raise the activities
fee.
The Board passed a resolution
Monday, which allows a
maximum $lO increase in the
fee for all state universities. If
this is passed by the legislature,
the Board would then be
authorized to raise the activities
fee at each institution according
to that schools needs, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
said Tuesday.
THIS WOULD MEAN UF
students may pay up to $l6O

University of Florida, Gainesville

the students. The Athletic Associations
deficits in the books are created to
maneuver students into paying for football
tickets. This is false justification.
We will demand to see these books.
The student should not be forced to pay.
There is legal justification in securing state
hinds. Students acting together in mutual
interests will be able to bring force on the
administration.
t Howes is going to Tallahassee on
Wednesday with four members of his party
to talk to legislators and cabinet members
about the current tuition increase. This is
the first way we can bring pressure to bear
by mobilizing the student body, Howes
said. This is really a lobby.
We are going to the legislators and acting
for ourselves. It can be done but nobody
ever does it. If the students dont show
interest in change nothing will happen.
The merchants on the periphery of

tuition in September, to pay for
added services, Chancellor
Robert Mautz said.
Regents Chairman D. Burke
Kibler said tuition for all
universities would be at least
$l5O and not more than $l6O.
However, a Florida newspaper
said the Regents hinted the
resolution would increase tuition
at UF to $167.50 starting next
September. This was denied by
Mautz.
ONE SECTION of the
resolution gave the Board
authority to adjust fees to even
enrollments over four quarters.
This would basically lower
tuition for summer quarter to
encourage attendance, Mautz
said.
After the bill is filed, it will be
referred to the education
committees in the Florida House
of Representatives and Senate. It
will be introduced sometime
within the next few weeks,
Kibler said.
The resolution says the
Florida Board of Regents is
authorized to establish and
charge each full-time student an
additional activity fee and
service fee not to exceed $ 10 per
quarter. This, said OConnell,
sets the maximum. The
minimum would remain at the
$32.50 presently charged.
OCONNELL SAID, This
resolution was simply the first
step to try to get a flexible
activities fee.
He said there was no decision
as to the amount of increase in
the fee UF would request.
I assume that what will
happen is that the Board of
Regents will ask each institution
to furnish a list of needs which
will come out of this fee, he
said.
The Regents will then decide

Wednesday, April 8, 1970

r H':'
; |i||
ROBERT MAUTZ
... university chancellor
how much each university will
get and how much it will
actually raise fees.
NOTHING has been
recommended from this
university as to amount
needed, he said, and we will
not make any recommendation
until a further meeting of the fee
distribution advisory council is
held.
The decision then will be
made to increase the activities
fee, charge for student tickets,
or a combination of the two.
(SEE TEEPAGE 2)
Inside
The Gator
TOO CLOSE to call is how
Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield sees the vote today
on Carswell page 12
Classifieds .. 10,11
Editorials 6
Entertainment 13,14
Letters 7
Movies .. 11
Sports.. i 15,16
Small Society 7

this campus charge prices 10 percent higher
than other Gainesville merchants. We
propose economic boycotts. Gainesville is
here because of the students, we have
economic power in this city.
t Also, there is no reason why
students cannot vote here in the city.
Neither does a person have to own land to
run for office.
About 50% of the students are over 21.
If they register and vote there isnt
anything they couldnt do. We are willing
to take this to court to prove it/*
On the new Public Functions policy
- we feel this is a cheap guise to avoid
enforcing present marijuana laws. The only
reason why the policy was created was to
keep people from congregating and
smoking pot.
They are stifling the right to freedom
of speech and assembly and we are going to
test their right to do so.*



Page 2

I.The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8, 1970

Robot Highlights
Engineer Fair
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
A new, walking Robbie the Robot will highlight the 1970
Engineers Fair, opening at 5 p.m. Friday with a ribbon-cutting
ceremony in the engineering complex.
Engineers Creativity Path to a Better Future is the theme of
the three-day annual fair.
CUTTING THE ribbon Friday will be the three finalists in the
queens competition: Cindy Seago, 3ED; Debbie Dalton, 3JM; and
Pam Turner, 3JM. The fair will be open until 10 p.m.
Florida legislators will tour the fair during Legislative Appreciation
Day on Saturday, when the fair will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The queen and her court will be crowned at the Queens Ball 9 p.m.
Saturday at the Holiday Inn South. Trophies will be presented to the
winning exhibits.
THE FAIR will conclude Sunday with exhibits open from noon to
6 p.m.
Student exhibits will include a demonstration of holography, the
use of laser beams to draw a three-dimensional picture in the surface
of a material, by students in the Department of Engineering Science
and Mechanics.
The American Institute of Metallurgical Engineers will demonstrate
the use of ion microscopy to show an image of an atom. Electrical
engineering students will show the improved model of Robbie.
A MODEL OF the Cross-Florida Barge Canal will be shown by the
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, and P.K. Yonge students will present
the results of their observations of the solar eclipse.
Industrial exhibits will be given by the following firms:
Union Carbide
i Florida Power and Light
Reynolds Metals
IBM
Honeywell, Inc.
General Electric Apollo Systems, Inc.
Trophies will be awarded to the winning exhibits in overall,
individual and industrial categories. First, second and third prizes will
be given in each category, as well as a plaque for each exhibit entered
in the fair.
Judging the exhibits will be UF Executive Vice President Harry
Sisler, Dean of Men Frank T. Adams, Dean of the Graduate School
Harold P. Hanson, Alligator Editor Bob Fraser and Ted Crom,
President of Crom Corp.
Exhibits will be judged on the basis of relevance to the exhibitors
discipline, relevance to the fair theme, presentation and originality.

Accent 71 Seeks Relevant Topic

By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent 7l, still ten months
from its opening date, is already
seeking a controversial topic
which will be relevant to student
life.
Ed Boze, chairman of Accent,
said his group would welcome
divided opinions, and a
Fee Option
Athletic Director Ray Graves
said Tuesday the proposal, if
passed by the legislature,
definitely could do away with
the need to charge students
admission to football games.
WE DID NOT originally
request to charge the students,
Graves said. We originally asked
for funds to come out of the
activities fee.
He explained the Athletic
Department had to raise funds
or cut back on those services
presently offered to the
students.

Fee

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

contrast of ideas.
ACCENT, NOW in its fifth
year at UF, has been constantly
re-evaluated, he said.
We are attempting to avoid
some of the pitfalls of our
predecessors, he said. The
program last year was very good,
and we hope to do even better.
A questionaire for evaluation
of Accent will be distributed on
campus next week. Distribution
and collection points will be
scattered throughout the
campus.
THE RESULTS of this
questionaire, together with
economic considerations and
availability of speakers, will
determine the topic of Accent
next year, Boze said.
Ralph Nobo, assistant
chairman of Accent, said that
applications are being accepted
and interviews for committee
chairman began Monday.
We will probably appoint
chairmen to some of the
committees on Friday, he said.
SOME OF the committees to
which appointments will initially
be made include speakers,
publicity, finance, personnel and
technical.

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NOT ALL WAS SERIOUS MONDAY NIGHT
... key figures in the ticket price hassle are Lee Greene, President O'Connell and Ken Driggs
OConnell Stresses Need
Os Athletic Fund Increase

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
Theres got to be an increase
in income to the Athletic
Department, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said at the
Students for Athletic Control
rally Monday night.
OConnell said
implementation of ticket prices
is a more equitable means of
raising money to maintain
athletic standards than an
increase in activity fees.
ADDRESSING more than

Applications also are being
accepted for the position of
executive secretary, Nobo said.
Interested persons may pick
up an application and sign up for
an interview at the activities
desk, third floor of the Reitz
Union.
Interviews will be held
through Friday after 3:30 p.m.
at the Accent office on the third
floor of the Union.

Deans Council Meets
Academic deans may be sent back to the classrooms along
with department heads and the academic vice presidents.
Limited tenure for the deans is one of the proposals to be
discussed at todays meeting of the Council of Academic Deans
at 10 a.m. in room 226 Tigert Hall.
Also on the agenda is a discussion on junior college
matriculation. Suggestions on equalizing junior college transfer
credits will be taken up.
The deans will also discuss proposed modifications of existing
promotion and tenure procedures.

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
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ellwand" BRING COUPON )

300 persons at the Sigma Chi
fraternity house, OConnell said
it was unfortunate Athletic
Director Ray Graves was unable
to attend because of a previous
speaking engagement.
The rally was organized by
UFs honorary national
leadership organization Omicron
Delta Kappas and Sigma Chi
fraternitys public statements
rejecting the implementation of
ticket prices.
RALPH GLATFELTER,
ODK president, began the rally
reading his organizations
resolution. He estimated
$200,000 would be added to the
University Athletic Associations
(UAA) revenues this year
exclusive of the proposed ticket
price.
Earlier in the day Glatfelter
explained his interpretation of
the proposed ticket prices. He
said, We expect them (UAA) t o
get over $350,000 of increased
revenue just for the increase in
ticket cost for the general
admission and faculty along with
their share of television revenue
from the Tennessee game and

the additional Duke game.
Glatfelter said last years UAA
budget was $3.1 million. He said
the proposed ticket prices
should boost the athletic
expenditure to $3.7 million.
GLATFELTER ADDED,
Either the Athletic Department
is expanding at an incredible rate
when the rest of the university
has to stand still or even cut
back, or else there has been
financial mismanagement which
requires an investigation.
OConnell explained the
student activity fee- was
providing for the Athletic
Department, Student
Government, Reitz Union and
student health services. He cited
inflation, increasing athletic
expenses due to a first rate
football team, a projected
SBO,OOO UAA loss this year and
a past underfunded Athletic
Department as reasons for
needing increased funds.
KEN DRIGGS, 4 JM,
coordinator of the rally, said,
There hasnt been any real
consultation of student feeling
on these proposed prices. Its
obvious what the student
reaction would have been, but
apparently it has just been
passed over.
UNDER UAAS board
decision fiscal policy may be
released with Graves or
OConnells approval.
OConnell said an advanced
summary on the fiscal standing
of the incorporated UAA will be
released during the week and the
books will be open for review on
Monday, April 13.



Losses Increase
While Cambodia
Battles Guerillas

Ex- f Gator Staff
Plans Magazine

Although nothihg is definite,
former Alligator writers and
editors are in the talking stage
of putting together a news
periodical that will not try to
compete with the Alligator,
according to Sam Pepper, former
Alligator sports editor.
Former Alligator
Editor-in-Chief Raul Ramirez
and Carol Sanger, former
Alligator executive editor, had
no comment on the proposed
periodical.
Pepper said although nothing
is certain on financial backing of
the periodical, he is optimistic
about aid coming from the
Presbyterian Student Center.
Rumor is that the periodical
will be on the format of a news
magazine, with emphasis on
news analysis, like that of Time
or Newsweek magazine.
Pepper said not only former
Alligator people may be writing
for the periodical, but that other
students have shown interest in

gggffigp
f V 7 y/, /y y* (v
Up your Kite.
MBS: 12 beautiful designs printed on clear poly. A whole new thing in flying great on the wall too. Simple
assembly easy to fly with no tails or extras needed. At headshops, bookstores and department stores. A most unusual high.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (UPI)
Russian-made MIGs of the Cambodian air
force joined a battle Tuesday against Viet
Cong guerrillas in jungles 12 miles from the
South Vietnamese border. Cambodian
troops reported killing 40 Viet Cong in
fighting that started Monday night.
Cambodian losses were placed at two
killed and 18 wounded.
THE COMBAT was near the town of
Chipou in Svay Rieng province, the same
general area where five newsmen, including
two Americans, were reported missing and
possibly captured by the Viet Cong.
One of the American newsmen was
identified* as Sean Flynn, a freelance
photographer on assignment for Time
Magazine. He is the son of the late movie

contributing. He said that if it
does come about, everybody will
be encouraged to contribute,
including students and
faculty.

Reitz Unions Rion Honored
By College Unions Association

William Rion, director of the Reitz Union since
1948, has been named co-winner of the
Butts-Whiting Award by the Association of College
Unions (ACU).
Rion received the honor at a recent association
convention in Houston for significant
contributions to the college union movement.
TWO MEN have been given the award each year
since it was established in 1967. Max Andrews,
director of the union at Queens College, New York,
is the 1970 co-winner.
Rion was president of the ACU in 1954-55, and
has served as its regional representative, a member
of its executive committee and chairman of the
Committee on the Future of the Association.

COUNCIL POSITIONS OPEN

Kirk Seeks UF Students

Positions on the Governors
College Student Advisory
Council are now open to UF
students.
Applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk on

actor Errol Flynn. The other was Dana
Stone of North Pomfret, Vt., a cameraman
for the Columbia Broadcasting System.
Military officials in Phnom Penh said an
undetermined number of Communist
troops started the fight by attacking
Cambodian forces near Chipou in the
so-called parrots beak region which juts
into South Vietnam to a point only 35
miles from Saigon.
FIELD REPORTS said Cambodian
troops, many of whom moved into the
region as reinforcements during the past
week, hurled back the attack and counted
40 Viet Cong bodies when the smoke of
battle cleared.
The town of Chipou was virtually
deserted Tuesday, according to newsmen at

The author of several articles relating to college
union work, Rion has conducted research on a
nationwide basis.
FOR 10 years he worked in the planning of the
Reitz Union at the UF, and was professional
planning consultant to seven college unions,
including Stetson University, University of South
Florida and the University of Houston.
A graduate of UF, Rion received a B.A. with
honors in sociology in 1945, when he became
assistant director of the union. He was named
director in 1948.
He received his masters degree in sociology with
minors in recreation and student personnel
administration from the UF in 1950.

Reitz Unions third floor. The
forms are due at Governor
Claude Kirks office by May 1.
THE COUNCIL channels
youths views to the governor in
six meetings a year.

Wednesday, April 8, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

the scene, but several miles to the east MIG
jet fighter-bombers flown by Cambodian
pilots streaked over jungles at treetop level
to rake Communist positions with machine
gun fire and bombs.
Cambodia has a small air force, with
most aircraft supplied by the Soviet Union
and Communist China. A few U. S. planes
are in the Cambodian arsenal.
COL. THONG Van Namuang,
commander of the Svay Rieng military
region, said there has been intensified Viet
Cong activity in the area since March 18
when Prince Norodom Sihanouk was
ousted as chief of state and replaced by a
government which has cracked down on
the Communists.

It also provides a student
sounding board for the governor
and helps coordinate statewide
student opinion.
Between meetings each
council member works on one of
six task forces: environment,
cost of education, youth
advisory council, drug
clarification, Board of Regents
study and black concern.
Membership on the council is
for the rest of a students
academic career. Appointees will
begin serving in June.
Three UF students are
currently on the council. They
are Joe Hilliard, ILW; John
Englehart, 4AS; and Jan
Dickens, 4ED.

Page 3



<*'\* a r ?
, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8, 1970

Page 4

THROUGH EDUCATION

Group Teaches Survival

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNER
Alligator Writer
Preparation to Survival is a
program to salvage the futures
environment through education.
This is an optimistic
organization with a pessimistic
slant, Ken Katz, 4AR, who
heads the program, said. Katz is
working with 10 other UF
students to create an hour
long high interest dialogue to
reach high school students
emotionally and intellectually.
THR PROGRAM is sponsored
by Arnold Butt, chairman of the
department of architecture,
according, to Larry Peterson,
architecture instructor and a
spokesman for Butt.

Education Degree
/
Given Regents OK

The UF, with the states only
baccalaureate degree program in
health education, received Board
of Regents approval Monday to
offer a masters degree in the
field.
In approving the new program
at Pensacola, the board urged
the UF to place major emphasis
on training teachers to meet the
immediate needs of health
education in the public schools.
DR. WAYNE T. SANDEFUR,
chairman of the Department of
Professional Curriculum in the
College of Physical Education
and Health at the university, said
plans are to put the program
into operation in September.
The UF will be the only
institution in Florida offering a
graduate program in health
education.
Noting that a study has
predicted a shortage of 400 to
500 health education teachers in
the public schools over the next
five to six years, Sandefur said
the new program will help to
correct the deficiency two ways.
FIRST AND foremost, it
will give an opportunity for
people teaching the subject out
of their field to move into
health education, become
qualified and earn an advanced
degree, Dr. Sandefur said.
Second, the program will
enable persons currently
teaching health education to
become better prepared and
teach on a more competent level
by obtaining a masters degree.
In design, the program will be
laid out to help teachers meet
state certification requirements
as health education teachers.
The emphasis will be on
recruiting teachers for public
schools.
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Preparation to
Survival is acting as a
result of the projected
failures of the
environment given by
today's doomsday
scientists."
-Ken Katz, 4AR
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The students are each taking
a small section of the dialogue to
be written. They have a
registered nurse working on the
population problem, Peterson
said.
Katz said the entire effort will
be used as a pilot program for
the rest of the nations schools

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Serving Authentic Chinese Dinners at Popular Prices
FAST SERVICE CONGENIAL ATMOSPHERE NO TIPPING
Diningroom is also available for private luncheon
parties and wedding receptions
10 MINUTE CARRYOUT SERVICE AVAILABLE OPEN 4-10 P.M.
in the Village Square on 441 372-6801

BLUES IMAGE
mb
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%, wlk,r Jr
mmm
This ThursdayTFriday & Saturday^
9:00 pm & 11-.00 pm
Tickets $2.00 members $2.50 non-members
Prices slightly higher at the door
Tickets Sold At: JWRU Box Office, Record Bor, & At the Rat (of course)
AT THE RAT

but the testing ground will be in
Alachua County high schools in
early May.
HIGH SCHOOL students are
being tested first, Katz said,
because they are the people to
go into the world, marry and
ave children in the near
future.
Also, the National
Environmental Teach-In held for
college students this year will
include high school students
next year, Katz said.
Preparation to Survival is
acting as a result of the
projected failures of the
environment given by todays
doomsday scientists, Katz said.
Pollution is becoming a
campaign issue and no one is
trying to do anything about it.
There are plans to redesign
this program and gear it to
elementary students and adult
organizations.

fTeel Named Head f
1 Os Elementary Ed |

*: Dr Franklin Dwight Teel, deputy superintendent in the $
S: Milwaukee Pubic School System since 1956, was named
:j:j chairman of the Department of Elementary Education in the $
uFs College of Education Monday.
g Teels appointment was announced by UF President Stephen $
c OConnell following confirmation at the Board of Regents $
*: meeting in Pensacola. He will assume the position Sept. 16. §
$ AFTER RECEIVING his doctorate in supervision and
:j:j curriculum development from Columbia University Teachers :]
College in 1951, Teel joined the Corpus Christi, Tex., school |
|:j: system where he remained until 1956. ;jj
He has taught summer courses and workshops at the
University of Wisconsin, University of Illinois, Marquette
:|i; University, Emory University, University of Colorado, Columbia -ij
University, University of Nebraska, University of Miami (Fla.)
& and the University of Arkansas.
;*ij v
DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
and
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT:
UCHTERS
IN THE MALL
HEADQUARTERS IN GAINESVILLE FOR DANCEWEAR



the ugliest
words in college:
Quiz Friday over the next six chapters I

Why "Sweat It ?"
You can learn to read and study much
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Reading Dynamics graduates include over
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professors, and many deans. As a matter of

PLAN TO ATTEND A FREE MINI LESSON
Today at 3,3:30, & Bp.m.
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Wednesday, April 8,1970, The Florida AMfetor,

and have all your questions answered. In
short, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to
read and study substantially faster than you
thought possible without skipping a single
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Important Note: We can only help those
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readers. To check your own level of reading,
we suggest you contact the University of
Florida Reading Clinic.

Page 5



I, The-Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8,1970

Page 6

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Now play that funny one about the poor people and the Cadilac'
Teds Answer Must Be No

WASHINGTON lt is, of course, too early to
suggest what alternative to Richard Nixon will be
available in 1972 even perhaps too early to
suggest whether the country will want one. Moods
are transient, and if the countrys mood continues
to be a curious combination of the phlegmatic and
the cantankerous it will not really matter very much
whom the Democrats anoint.
Still, there is always the chance that the countrys
mood will change, that it will seek a leader.
Moreover, whether or not the mood changes, there
will always be those who think it has changed, or
would change if the right man spoke out. Thus it is
possible to envision the scenario at the Democratic
National Convention of 1972, meeting in the
certainty of the renomination of Richard Nixon.
The imaginary scenario is not peaceful. The
candidacies of Hubert Humphrey and Edmund
Muskie the front-runners have stalled, in part,
let us say, because each seeks to draw from the same
pool of delegates, in part because neither is
acceptable to the sizable minority to whom they
represent a past with which to break.
A Southern bloc led, let us say, by John Connelly
of Texas threatens a walkout against the possible
choice of Sen. George McGovern of South Dakota.
A list of dark horses, including, let us say, newly
elected Sen. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois and Sen.
Joseph Tydings of Maryland, has failed to arouse
enthusiasm.
Newspaper columnists are comparing the
convention to that of 1860, when the Democrats
went three ways to defeat.
It is at this point that delegates and party leaders
begin placing telephone calls. The message is easily
imaginable. You can unite this party, the calls
say, and if you dont unite it the party is dead.
Here the scenario must end. Imagination cannot
encompass the myriad feelings which the man on
the other end of the telephone will conjure, and
indeed may well be conjuring how. For the
confrontation suggested by the telephone call in the
scenario has surely crossed Edward Kennedys mind.
That he would say yes to the telephone call is
unimaginable today for two reasons.
First, because whatever happened at
Chappaquiddick will still be cloaked if not in
mystery, then in gossip. Could Kennedy win if he
did run in 1972? By 1976, on the other hand,

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant
i

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
Earl Hartman John Sugg
News Editors

Frank Mankiewicz-
Tom Braden
Chappaquiddick will no longer be a matter for
speculation. For better or worse, so far as Kennedy
is concerned, it will be history.
Second, 1972 provokes the vengeful psychotic.
Twice weekly, at least, Kennedy associates talk to
police about those threats on his life they come
by dozens in the morning mail which they
consider most worthy of being looked into. Will this
shadow which follows him disappear by 1976?
Perhaps not but, just maybe, perhaps so.
That is why the answer from the other end of the
telephone in the scenario envisioned above must be
negative. And that is why the Democratic Party is in
such a desperate search for a leader, while at the
very same time it has one standing by.
Edward Kennedy performs his Senate business
with new-found passion for both detail and
anonymity. Who led the fight against Clement
Haynsworth and Harrold Carswell? Birch Bayh
out in front but Edward Kennedy behind the
scenes. Who with rare parliamentary skill and
informed argument shepherded through Senate
and House the 18-year-old vote, coupled with an
extension of the Voting Rights Act, over the
hostility of the South and the White House? Sen.
Mike Mansfield out in front but Edward
Kennedy behind the scenes.
And yet with all the detail and all the work there
is something less than satisfying about anonymous
leadership, even when it leads to anonymous
victories. Particularly when you know there is no
finish line in sight and that, two years from now,
the answer must be no.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lorida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of I'lorida.

editorial
A Question
Os Priorities
The UF is not what anyone would call a violent, activist
Ca Tnfact, this campus more resembles those Ronald Reagan
pranced across as the Gipper in the 19305. Complete with
chimes and Spanish moss, our campus has epitomized what
the presidents of Columbia University, the University of
California at Berkeley and the University of Wisconsin wish
they could call their own.
About the only issue capable of generating any significant
excitement at the UF is football. By deciding to charge for
tickets, officials of the Athletic Association have managed
to make football a year-round sport; a source of year-round
excitement.
Student reaction has been typical. Several student groups
have voiced opposition to the .charge. Their concern
generally takes the classical, form of The students are
screwed again.
While they have several excellent points, we feel the issue
transcends a charge for football tickets or an increase in the
student activity fee. The issue is one of priorities.
To the average student these priorities will not be felt
until that magic day when he ventures forth to find a job.
The typical personnel manager will be pleased to discuss the
great UF teams but may be somewhat reluctant to talk
salary, responsibilities and advancement.
After all, graduates from third-rate institutions are
plentiful and cheap, even if the third-rate institution has a
first-rate athletic program.
In other words, if the money generated by the charge and
increase was to be channeled into the salary of gifted
instructors or efficient secretaries, we would not complain.
If the money generated was spent on improving the
acoustics in the Norman Hall auditorium or the building
that handles the business of UFs nearly 2,000 foreign
students, we would not complain.
But we take violent exception to students financing a
rumored activities center, a domed stadium or any other
extravagant capital improvement. Our time to finance
capital improvements comes when we are earning a living,
hopefully with what we learn at the UF, and paying taxes.
We hope, then, that President Stephen C. OConnell can
reconsider his priorities and devote his energies into
developing a first-rate academic institution.
If not, we suggest Sen. Robert Saunders and his
sub-committee on Higher Education investigate the entire
student activities problem. Perhaps the legislative view can
clean the muddied waters of this controversy.
And perhaps the UF can return to its world of chimes
and Spanish moss. And education.



Speaking Out

Last quarter I wrote a
Speaking Out column entitled
Plastic People, in which I
described some of the actions of
the many phonies I have
encountered in my three-plus
years at this sandbox.
Like Alexander Pope, I have
decided to smite in print those
who nauseate me in private; I
might, in fact, be called a
Jewish Pope (These are the
puns, folks). Nevertheless, I
herewith list some profiles in
plasticity, an indictment of some
of UFs predictable phonies,
who beg to be stereotyped:
1) The plastic freak: There are
13 sincere freaks at UF, but over
2,700 plastic freaks, those
dropouts from the straight scene
who figure the chicks go for the
degenerate-looking guys and
theyre right.
The plastic freak used to be a
fratman and used to pride
himself on his neat appearance,
but he wasnt getting sex that
way.
So he grew his hair long,
stopped shaving, dressed

OPEN FORUM:-
Aim ml
hope for the

MR. EDITOR:
When I first went into the campus police
station to see Chief Shuler, I thought i
would be facing a sterotype cop, a man
beyond reasoning with his written set of
rules and regulations before him. Was I
wrong!
Instead I faced a man with an open ear
for improvements, a man who reasoned
with me, and a man very interested in any
kind of feedback system for better
understanding between his police
department and us.
He explained to me that it is obvious
that this campus was never designed for so
much traffic, that appropriations for new
buildings never included enough additional
funds for new parking lots close, to these
buildings, and that the new museum, the
new music building and the new
international studies building will also have
parking problems.
With the density of population on this
campus as it is and increasing continuously,
people like some of you (many) and me,
take the chance of parking in NO
PARKING zones. This was especially true
with me around the midterms and finals.
Many of us received tickets and thought it
was unjustly so because all the lots were
filled up. Well, let me tell you why many
of us got these tickets.
NO PARKING zones are there for a
purpose. The main one being that they
provide access for fire fighting equipment
to be moved in when needed.
You and I who parked illegally in these
zones provided a potential barrier for this
fire fighting equipment. Id hate to be
partially responsible for some students to
have lost their lives in a fire just because
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
0 Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
is asked to contact the editor and be
prepared to show samples of his work.

Profiles In Phoniness

sloppily, and went barefoot, and
now hes dropped out; hes
really found out where my
head is at. Oh, wow! Outasight!
Like,groovy, man! heavy!
The plastic freak wakes up in
the morning and looks at his
unkempt face in the minor; he
smiles and says, Fine,
everything looks just gross
enough. I should be able to
make it with a chick today.
The plastic freak will cut his
hair and dress neatly when he
goes home to visit his parents;
that way, he can keep getting
money from home while he
drops out, driving his Mustang
to class.
2) The pseudo-hip chick: This
girl is usually seen clinging to the
plastic freak. The pseudo-hip
chick is a pseudo-intellectual
who really knows nothing more
than Hesses first name and
Dantes last.
She is majoring in psychology,
sociology, or, occasionally
English; she enrolls in a
philosophy course every other

my car was blocking emergency access for
the fire department.
So if you get a ticket for parking where
you shouldnt have, dont feel persecuted.
There usually is a good reason for getting
the ticket.
Chief Shuler is trying his best to keep
this campus safe. The way this is done is
through strict law enforcement. I know its
strict! I paid my share of tickets before I
finally went to Chief Shuler for an
explanation.
HANS-DIETER KIRSTEN, 4BA
A Decision
MR. EDITOR:
The time has come to make an
intelligent decision about the recent
controversy concerning the disturbance of
studying students as a result of noise,
music and crowds on campus.
It should be obvious to anyone
concerned that the university cannot
tolerate the continuation of disturbing and
undisciplined activities on campus at a time
when responsibility is vital to the proper
functioning of the university.
Any function that involves a large
percentage of nonstudents, undisciplined
shouting and screaming, not to mention
the uncontrolled usage of dangerous
stimulants, for the sole purpose of
entertaining a few people, is patently
absurd.
To this end, I would suggest that in light
of the recent administration statement
regarding gatherings on campus that during
the coming school year there be a complete
cessation of football games.
PETER A. KNOCKE, 3AS
Boycott Games
MR. EDITOR:
Obviously the Athletic Associations
current attempt to charge students
admission to football games is a blatant
example of the universitys lack of concern

quarter so that she can get some
CULTURE. She says she wants
to better the world, but shell
get married soon, drop out of
school, and move her 2.8
children to an all-white suburb.
She says,l came to college to
improve myself, but shes really
up here to find a husband. She
loves to make fuss over
intellectuals; shell go out of
her way to talk to you if you
qualify, but you cant date her,
cause shes going with a plastic
freak with a beard and beads.
Sample comment: Gee, Ive
been following your career in
the Alligator! (Oh, wow!)
3) The frat rat: The frat rat
wears two and only two
costumes. One: yellow pants,
with a blue Banlon or a blue
V-neck sweater and a white
shirt. Two: blue jeans and a
long-sleeved shirt. When the
weather gets warm, he wears a
blue Banlon with yellow shorts.
The frat rat can be seen
walking to and from Matherly
Hall, where he studies how to
take over his fathers business.

over the wishes of the students. Apparently
students are a commodity to be dealt with
in dollars and cents.
Yet students need not accept this
incredible treatment; there are means by
which the Athletic Association could be
forced to acknowledge the wishes of the
student body.
Should the admission fee become
definite, the whole plan would backfire if
students would not attend home football
games! Certainly most students would be
disappointed to miss the games, yet for a
change the student body can and should
make its voice heard. Collectively, acting
on principle, students can force the
Athletic Association to allow them free
admittance, as at most universities.
So if this atrocious display of student
neglect becomes reality, let us act together;
there is no other way. Dont go to football
games until theyre free again! Students*?
should not have to pay to see their own
team play.
DOUG OLANDER, 3AS
Drug Abuse
MR. EDITOR:
In regards to Mr. OConnells statements
about drug abuse, Id find them amusing if
it wasnt for the position he speaks from.
By totally lumping all illegal drugs
together he makes a complex problem into
a simple, one Solution: enforcement,
(sweetened with treatment and counseling
the small society

\)/ howshoulpt i :
n?| KNOW WHAT We'pe
RriNo IN LAos? 1 C^N't
v. BV&U KNoW
x / WAJ m
Wo.nmyluo Sla< Svntf.cal* Int 3-25 J|^
-

marry a girl who likes his pin,
have 2.8 children, and move
next door to the plastic freak
and pseudo-hip chick in the
all-white suburb.
He is not as hypocritical as
the latter two, for he doesnt lie
about being idealistic. Sample
comment: Gee, maybe I can
get her drunk and bring her up
to my room?
4) The sorority bitch: This
girl has been described in John
Parkers new book, Sorority
Breast, And Other
Communicable Diseases. The
sorority bitch varies in her mode
of dress; on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday she wears only her
boyfriends frat pin, but on
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
she wears both pins in an
attempt to disguise her breasts as
a candelabra. The sorority bitch,
though wearing bell-bottoms
either once a week or once every
two weeks, generally wears skirts
that are short, but not too short.
This showing off of the legs is
symbolic of the Look, but

Wednesday, April 8,1970, The Florida Alligator,

By David Miller

dont touch, philosophy that
the girl flaunts at onlooking
men. She will sign an occasional
petition, take part in an
occasional march (she will also
go slumming, i.e., hang
around some freaks, every now
and then), but she would rather
have no social life than go out
with an independent. Sample
comment: Well, not EVERY
sorority girl is a bitch. (Wanna
bet?)
There are many other types of
phonies hanging around this
campus. Perhaps some day Ill
write about a few more types
but right now lack of space
requires that I stop at this point.
I am sad that so many
students try to be placed in
categories, grouped with all the
other nauseating creatures to
whom integrity, is a dirty
word.
It is the under-30 generation
that cannot be trusted; it is the
generation to which I belong
that is overwhelmingly
hypocritical.

for those admitting theyre wrong).
His remarks, for me anyway, are
reminiscent of advice given earlier in the
century about masturbation. Young adults
were told in a totally negative way about
the physical and mental evils of that
abusive habit. The recent flurry of
statements about drugs have a similar ring
to them. What scientific evidence we have
at present, does not justify totally
condemning a drug such as marijuana for
example. Nor should it be lumped with
such physically addicting drugs as heroin,
morphine or opium.
If I felt like teasing, I might ask Mr.
OConnell what treatment or counseling is
needed fora pot addict, a mescaline addict or
an acid addict. His remarks seem to imply
that anyone that uses drugs needs
treatment of some kind. Yet much of the
evidence indicates that our brightest, most
aware students are the ones that are
experimenting. Drug use is just one of the
ways theyre trying new perceptions, new
ways of relating, new ways of being.
Mr. OConnells rigid view that drug use
is an attempt by the user to escape reality
rather than meet it and improve it, is
another statement that loses validity by
trying to label and smear a diverse group of
people. Also, reality is a subjective thing
and I question what facts back up this
statement.
As for OConnells parrot, Mr. Morgan
seems to be starting his presidential career
with a Spiro Agnew act, a hard act to
follow.
DEL CAIN, 3BR
by Brickman

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8,1970

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TWIG LANDSCAPE: SILVERMANS LANDSCAPE:
Jk sa>> Country Set girls are spoiled. .. they are, just Shelia models a two-piece fashion bonus by Arpeja in*
ask B.J. Shes ready to entertain at home in her maxi skirt kelly green and white jersey. The shirtdress is great alone aloneand
and aloneand jersey blouse. In Gator colors ... sandles by John the pants are soft and swingy ... a fabulous teammate
Romain. Come by and start landscaping your wardrobe with other tunics.

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MAAS BROTHERS LANDSCAPE:
Kathy flnda a great way to wear the midi, over pants wit Ir Iran
an Iran easy snap front flared open, or closed. Combine a
colorful scarf, wide-brimmed hat, and the look is
~ sophistication plus. -

max* vesf ana pants outjit.
% Accented by a touch of a red
V. blouse. All by Joshua Tree.
|L Modeled by Hedy.
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Fee/ //A:e .you are lounging on*j
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JV7ze ow gef cfown to this season's bare facts: midriff is
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Wednesday, April 8.1970. The Florida Alllfator.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Starting golf this year! Selling First
Flight Clubs: 5 irons 3 woods. Best
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Baldwin electric base with case $365
new, 4 months old for SIBO. Also
webcor compact tape recorder for
$25. Call 378-8810 evenings.
(A-3t-113-p)
3 br IV2 bath 10 x 56 furn. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool A/C. 376-8517.
(A-st-133-p)
Spacious, well-kept 10x47 Great
Lakes, two bedroom, air, carpet, 6x
utility shed. $1995. 378-9426
(A-st-112-p)
AKC registered black male doberman
4 months old. Willing to take any
reasonable offer. Call 376-0953 ask
for Joe. If not there leave a note.
(A-3t-112-p)
1968 Kawasaki 250 ec. 4,060 miles.
Under warranty. Beautiful. Quickest
in its class. $475.00 Call 392-7203.
(A-st-l 12-p)
Fender Jazzbass and bassman amp
both in perfect condition with all
extras. Ask $525 call 378-8670
(A-st-112-p)
1968 VW AM FM Blaupunkt sunroof
must sell to stay in school Mitch
378-8639 (A-3t-112-p)
HOME TAP FOR SALE: Draft Beer
at Home. Only SBO. Call 376-2630.
(A-3t-111-p)
Car & cycle 1965 HONDA CBI6O
tools, good condition 1965, VW 113
Good Cond. cycle S3OO, car S7OO
call 373-2915. (A-st-109-p)
Garrard SL9S turntable S9O. Call
378-4774. (A-lt-114-p)
1968 Sears 50cc Bike with helmet.
Good condition. SIOO. Call evenings
373-2196. (A-st-114-p)
For Sale: More Siamese Arlstocats,
Precocious at 6 weeks. Litter-trained.
Eat. Blue-point mother. Seal-point
father. Call during week after 6 P.M.
any time weekends. Tel.
376-9911. (A-lt-1 14-p)
67 Cougar XR7 4 speed, 4 br. 390
c.i., front disc, leather bucket seats,
posi-traction. Call 372-5698 after 6
PM. Best offer. (A-st-114-p)
Color Organs ( music controled
psychedelic light displays ), 8 channel
(stereo fours) with op. amp. filters,
SBO to $l2O. Call 378-6358.
(A-lt-114-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet this quarter Village Park apts.
85. Immediate occupancy needed.
Call 373-1863. (B-st-113-p)
SUBLET for summer qtr. Village 34
1 bdr furn a/c. 115/mo call 373-1797
(B-st-112-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
Several 1 br. apts, bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, AC $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Avenue.
372-7111 Grad. Students preferred.
(B-109-ts-c).
LARGE 2 bedroom trailer, furn. 5
mins, from campus. Complete
kitchen. sllO/md. Call 373-2679.
(B-3t-114-p)
The
Rathskeller
is taking
Applications
f For a
Full-time
Salaried
Director
Applications
available
at the Rat

yj* NX
1 and 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
fully carpeted and alr-conditloned.
Most sound proofed in town. All
electric kitchen, lots of closets,
laundry and pool. Pets Welcome.
Phone 376-0635 for rental rates.
(B-7t-109-p)
Sublet thru Aug. Furnished 1 br.
Univ. Gardens Apt. sllO. Contact:
Paul Hoffman, 378-0327 or
376-6720. (B-st-114-p)
Sublet 'trailer, excellent condition:
cheap, roomy. Andrews and Connell
M oblleer. Call 373-1350 or
373-2579. (B-3t-114-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
WANTED
2 Male Roommates for 2-bedroom
house, one block north of campus
1316 N.W. 1 Ave -378-8895. 33.75
month + utilities. No deposit ask for
Pete. (C-st-109-p)
[ Guns Guns Guns j'
( Inventory over 500. Buy j.
| Sell Trade Repair. 1
( Reloading supplies, Layaway j!
* plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
] [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j

I||(§P^ / Seminoles
II Have Been Ordered Hj
n|l YOU MAY RESERVE ONE ONLY DURING THE NEXT !
HI! TWO WEEKSI MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE SERVICE IB
Pill BOOTH APR 6-17 DURING THE WEEK OR MAIL IN lljjj
||l HANDY FORM H|jt
i ill i i lips t

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8,1970

WANTED
*:*:*:s
Male roomate to share 2 bedroom
apt. 4n Village Park with 2 others.
Prefer over 21 but not required. Call
378-8697 apt. 97. (C-3t-113-p)
Roomate wanted this quarter Village
Park Apts 85 on pool. 373-1863
immediate occupancy necessary.
(C-5M13-P)
FEMALE ROOMMATE: For
Williamsburg Apt. SSO/mo. Call LOIS
372-4944 after 5 PM. (C-109-st-p).
1 or 2 roommates needed
Immediately to share beautiful
Hawaiian Village Apt. Reasonable
rates, Call 378-9810 or 378-0654
ANYTIME. (C-st-114-p)
Singles! How about a private bdrm.
close to campus, cen A/H, full carpet
complete elect, kitchen, Spanish
furniture, pool, gas grills, laundry
facilities, patio, Dn/area, GIF parties
all for S7O/mo. INCLUDING util.
La Mancha has it all! Openings for
1-4 students. Call 378-7224 Now!
(C-109-10t-p).

WANTED
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
Mature male to share 68 mobile
home spr/and or summer qtr. ac,
private 1 mile from campus $54 per
month. Call Jay 378-0538 after 7
p. m. (C-3t-112-p)

JHL l STEAK house \
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

WANTED
Wanted! Tumed-on female roommate
to share large air-conditioned house
close to campus $45 a month. Call
376-8080. (C-7M13-P)
Coed* roommate for 2 bdrm.
Tanglewood townhouse. no deposits.
Call 376-1015 anytime. (C-st-109-p)
Female roomate needed (spring qt)
for Le Bonne Vie townhouse apt.
SSO a month + V* utilities. Must like
kittens. Call 378-5261. (C-3t-112-p)



GATOR GUAJSSXFXEIDS

WANTED
aswsw:*:^
Male roommate wanted for spring qt.
Poolside one-bedroom apt. near mall.
Air-cond. and private patio. No
deposit. 55/mo. Call 372-5093 after
6 pm. (C-111-st-p)
Female roommate wanted French
Quarter phone 376-0613 45 per
month. (C-111-st-p)
Desperate Male roomate La Bonne
Vie 47.50 a month, cen H/AC. pool,
call 372-7252 after 4:00 p.m.
(C-st-109-p)
Wanted: One female roommate for
immediate occupancy. Gatortown
Apts. $65 + util. For spring qtr.
378-6162 after 5. Barb or Helen.
(C-st-114-p)
1 male roommate Landmark Apt.
Phase II pool air-cond. etc. April rent
already paid. Call 378-3120 Apt.
170. (C-lt-114-p)
Roommate for 2-bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. $36/mo. Call
372-5207 or 372-2137. 1930 NW
2nd Ave. (C-2t-114-p)
*
Male roomate needed (spring qtr.)
Mt. Vernon apt. Will reduce rent S2O.
Call 378-3922 after 5:00.,
(C-3t-114-p)
2 Male Roommates for summer
quarter. Frederick Apts., air-cond.,
pool, wall to wall carpet, Call
378-7104. $41.25. (C-4t-114-p)
1 FEMALE roommate needed
IMMEDIATELY Landmark
$46.25/mo. Call ANYTIME
378-4941. (C-10t-107-p)
Share a nice house with engineering
students, five blocks from campus
$l5O/qtr utilities included, 507 NW
19st 373-2147. (C-111-4t-p)
HELP WANTED
We are looking for an agressive
couple to move into responsible
management position at new luxury
apt. complex. You must be
personable and have supervisory
skills. Apartment plus salary. Send
resume to P. O. Box 14038.
(E-10t-l 12-p)
Male 20 yrs. or older for telephone
solicitation work. 10 hrs. per week,
no experience necessary. Call
376-2043 -for an interview.
(E-st-112-p)
N.W. 13th St -Ph 373-4523 I
ACROSS FROM THE MALL §
2 COLOR HITS
IF I
PLUS CO. HIT 1
BENJAMIN I

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJbY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 79i
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<

Wednesday, April 8, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
STENOGRAPHER: typing &
shorthand requird. Excellent
company benefits, Southern Bell
Telephone Co., Gainesville, Call for
appointment, collect, Orlando
305-422-9082. Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-3t-111-p)
Full time director at the Rathskeller
Interesting work, great experience.
Applications available at the Rat
(E-2t-114-p)
AUTOS
64 FALCON C&NVERTIB LE
excellent condition $495. Call
anytime at 376-2738. (G-st-109-p)
1962 Chev. Impala Hard Top Sport
Coupe, In Top condition, one owner,
283 V 8 AT R & H $550 376-3442.
(G-111-st-p)
Plymouth Barracuda 1965, VB,
automatic, powersteering, good
condition. SBOO. Call 378-0458.
(G-2t-114-p)
Campus wheels ... and then some!
Do you want cheap, dependable
transportation that just can't be
beat? Then come look at my 1967
Fiat .. clean as can be and in
perfect condition. Brand new tires.
Only $550. Im telling it like it is.
Call 376-6166 or 378-8211.
(G-st-114-p)
1962 VW good condition. Very
dependable. Must sell by Saturday
$550.00 or best offer. Call 378-4218.
(G-3t-114-p)
WANTED to buy used bus or van.
Must be in good mechanical
condition. Prefer price under 300
dollars. Call 372-7761 after 5:00
p.m. (G-lt-1 14-p)
1962 Austin-Healy Sprite, Stereo,
New tires & top. Looks good, runs
well. Must sell immediately! $395
Call 392-8712. (G-st-114-p)
1965 Plymouth Valiant. 4 dr., heater,
air-cond., radio, good tires, $450
also iarge crib, sls. Call 373-1500
after 6:00 p.m. (G-st-114-p)
63 VW Yellow Convertible $495.00
excellent condition. Phone
378-4463 after 5:00 P.M.
(G-3t-114-p)
'67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-114-p)
PERSONAL
Do you need a piano player for
dinners or other occasions? Call Mike
at 373-1453 after 11pm only $3 an
hour. (J-st-111-p)
The wind which blows through
cracked chocolate cake may turn the
wise man into a maker of wooden
marbles. FLASH SPEAKS. Pd. Pol.
Adv. (J-lt-1 14-p)
BLOW UP A BALLOON FOR
PEACE At the plaza 12 noon today.
Show you care! FLASH SPEAKS.
Pd. Pol. Adv. (J-lt-114-p)

Page 11

PERSONAL
I-:-:-:-:-:*:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:.:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:*:-:-:-:-:-:-:
Spring flea Market: Dont know what
to do with the crinoline Aunt Hilda
gave you for Christmas? Come sell it
& buy someone elsefringed parasol.
Union tent Apr. 28. (J-lt-114-c)
Flea Market is your old hot dog
board all washed up? Sell it! BUy a
used gator raider beanie and
matching red ascot. Keen! Uhion tent
Apr. 28. (J-lt-114-c)
GSM, Happy Birthday and Many
More: JAY, Maria, Phillepe, Vilma,
and all of your friends Mima, Cilia
etc. (J-lt-114-p)
Gloria S. Mathis, Happyness Is a
Birthday your Husband remembers,
tu esposo. (J-lt-114-p)
Campus yoyo, hulahoop, jump rope,
and ball bat contest. Take out your
old yoyo and work it back into
condition. At the Union May 1.
(J-st-114-c)
T.H.E. BEAR, How about a boofle or
snarfle or anything else you might
feel like? Its the real thing! Ibve,
Wiffy. Grizzle Grizzle. (J-lt-1 14-p)
Murphree K. Needs a crowd-pleaser.
Experience desirable, not necessary.
Many positions available. Phone
2-7298, 2-6087, 2-7104, 2-7111
Please? (J-2t-114-p)
Mobile contest s2s first prize,
deadline Apr. 20, applications at the
Union rm. 310. (J-3t-114-c)
Reitz Union Tent Revival Thurs.
Apr. 30, from 2-6 PM. The empty
tent will be provided this one day for
anyone to come rap on anything.
(J-st-114-c)
MEN!!! "Need your pad cleaned?
Want a party hosted? The Tidy Tigers
are now taking appts. Get yours in
early by calling the Tiger Den at
373-2760 and your leotard clad tigers
will be at your service!!! (J-st-l 14-p)
Penny Rich, designer of the famous
Pennyrich Bra, has a new creation
the Trianderin Bra. She also has an all
new marketing plan for those
interested in earning unlimited
income. Call 378-0378 or 373-2940
for details. (J-7t-111-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Dresses sl4. Add $3 for
1-day service if desired. Phone
378-0320. (J-10t-107-p)

a JANE FONDAI
] .
11^
HKOI SHELLEY WINTERS -sl
last
3 W j 1 liTiTi vA\I FTTnTrM
DAYS
Ii- I

CLO has a limited amount of room
for new members. S6O/mo. for room
and board. Call sec. at 376-9473, just
one block from campus.
(J-10t-113-p)
2 law students need a cook. Dinner in
return for free food and invigorating
conversation. See Larry or Harry at
145, Landmark or call 378-9534.
(J-4t-112-p)
LOST <& FOUND
BICYCLE red and black mens
english racer my only
transportation. Please return It where
you found it or call at 372-5796
No Questions Asked. (L-st-114-p)
Lost black brief case, containing 2 pr
perscrip glasses, ID cards, slide rule,
class notes drafting gear. Area of frat
row parking lot last Tues. please call
3 76-8281, reward, ask for Pat
(L-6t-112-p)
SERVICES
TRIUMPH CITY authorided
Triumph sales & service. 1970 models
from $715 to $1750. Located north
of city limits on 441, behind the
Handlebar Lounge. New building
soon 376-9345 (M-7t-109-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
Need help PROGRAMMING?,
trained, experienced programmer is
available to help you. Call 376-6054
between 8 am and 12 noon for
details. (M-4t-114-p)
BABY CARE 311 NW 15th Terrace
Monday Friday 8:00 am to 5:00
pm $15.00 per week experience
reliable Christian home.
Phone-376-2072. (M-3t-114-c)
Housewives will do ironing in your
home and repair. One weeks ironing
for two persons 3.00 a week. Call
before 10 oclock P,.M. 372-5269.
(M-99-4t-p)
Overland expedition to India via
T urkey, Persia, Afghanistan,
Khatmnuda. Lvs. London late June
$5 45 fully inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 manor house dr.,
London, N.W. 6 (M-94-12t-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)

SERVICES
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-37t-p)
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby
Mills. (M-10t-107-p)
2
DAYS
TOGETHER
// AGAIN!
/ ROBERT fISHX
I REDFORD^y^II
II (SUNDANCE KID) W
V KATHARINE %U Mll
MmaWTsSfr
, LAST
Ljjnjy jj 2
LSIUULuIaI days
j and funny
1 / of love story! |
| MARLO THOMAS
1 Mm''
IV I m.
j| Pewfewii ftel tvllh | LAST



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8,1970

Viet Cong Capture Several Newsmen

CHIPOU, Cambodia (UPI)
Several newsmen, including Sean
Flynn, son of the late American
movie actor Errol Flynn, were
reported missing today and
possibly captured by the Viet
Cong guerrillas.
Two of the newsmen were
Americans Flynn, a freelance
photographer, and Dana Stone, a
cameraman for Columbia
Broadcasting System.
THE OTHERS were
correspondent Akara Kusaka

Mansfield; Too Close To Call

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield said Tuesday the
confirmation vote today on

£ v
|G reen Beret Suspect!
| In Familys Death |
!;
£ FT. BRAGG, N.C. (UPI) The Army Monday placed Green £
£ Beret Capt. Jeffrey R. MacDonald, 26, under guard and advised £
: him he is a suspect in the slaying of his wife and two daughters :
| last Feb. 17. £
£ During the course of the investigation the Army had said £
: MacDonald, a physician, was not a suspect. £
£ MacDONALD WAS placed on restricted status under guard £
£ and relieved of duty as a doctor of preventive medicine with £
£ the 6th, Special Forces group. £
£ Until Monday, he had been free of any restriction. £
£ j Military police were called to MacDonalds on-post apartment £
£ early the morning of Feb. 17 by a telephone call from
£ MacDonald, who said he had been stabbed and needed an £
£ ambulance. £
£: THEY FOUND his wife, Collette, 26, dead on the floor of £
$ their bedroom. Kimberly ,6, was dead in her bed and Kristen, 2, £
5 was dead on hers. $
V V
: Collette and Kristen had been stabbed and Kimberly clubbed. £
£ MacDonald told authorities his family had been attacked by £
£ three men and a blonde woman in a floppy hat who repeated, £
£ Acid is groovy, kill the pigs, hitem again. £
£ The Army at first said it suspected the couple and their
jj children had been attacked by four suspects on an LSD trip. £
jj MacDonald is from Patchogue, Long Island, N.Y. £
i^\W,V.S\N%W.V.W.V.V.VWAS\W.V.V,V.VV.V.V.V. .V.V,V. .V.W-. .V.V.V.V. .V.V

New Bombs
NEW YORK (UPI) A
patrolman found a dozen
Molotov cocktails Monday
neatly packed in a vegetable
crate in a vacant lot in Harlem.
The bomb squad was called to
remove the incendiary devices
pint wine bottles filled with
gasoline and capped by wicks.
fill U
... giving
Gainesville twice
1802 W. UNIV.AVE.
1430 S.W. 13th ST.

and camerman Yujaro Takagi of
Fuji Television of Japan, and
French photographer Claude
Arpim who was on assignment
for Newsweek Magazine.
Kusaka, Takagi and Aprim
went to Chipou Monday with 50
other newsmen for a briefing on
the military situation in Svay
Reing Province which borders
South Vietnam.
While the briefing was going
on the three left and drove to an
area four miles away where Viet

Supreme Court nominee G.
Harrold Carswell will be so close
it is now too close to call.
Mansfield had indicated

PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLY
HEADQUARTERS
for all
Art & Journalism
Students

IN CAMBODIAN JUNGLE

Cong were operating.
VILLAGERS LATER
reported to Cambodian troopers
that the three and their
Cambodian driver-interpreter
were seen being led into the
woods by Viet Cong soldiers.
Their car was later found
abandoned on the road.
Flynn and Stone had traveled
to the same village by motorbike
on Sunday and remained there
overnight.

Monday he believed Carswell
would win. But he said today,
Its a real horse race. It could
go down to the wire.
PRIOR TO Mondays senate
vote rejecting a move aimed at
killing the nomination,
Mansfield said that he thought
that if Carswell survived that
vote, it would indicate the
margin of confirmation.
The recommital was rejected
by a 52-44 vote but Mansfield
said the final outcome would be
much closer than that.
Senate observers believe that
Carswells chances of
confirmation hinge on seven
senators not publicly committed
on the confirmation vote.
AT THE WHITE House,
Senate Republican leader Hugh
Scott reported after a meeting
with President Nixon today that
Nixon remained confident that
Carswell would win.
The seven crucial senators
consist of five Republicans and
two Democrats who have not
made their stand public on how
they will vote on the nominee at
1 pjn.
Books For Borrow
The first free public library in
the United States was
established in Dublin, N. H.

They were seen by other
newsmen who visited the area
Monday, and they indicated
they did not plan to return
immediately to Phnom Penh.
Cambodian soldiers said they
later received unconfirmed

/roy t is coming...
listening
PLEASURE
watch for us!
high fidelity center
Teacher's Aides in Adult Community Assoc.
Basic Education Volunteers
Community Center § DAYCARE
Volunteers Volunteers
Forest Hill School Transportation
For Girls Volunteers
Construction Crew g Tutoring
Recreation Physical Rehabilitation
Outreach center
The success of many of these programs depends
entirely on SAMSON'S strength, and SAMSON's
strength depends entirely on its volunteers. If
you have a desire to help others, come to:
SAMSON
7:00 TONIGHT
DON STEEGER-GUEST SPEAKER

reports that Flynn and Stone
also were seen being led away by
Communist troops.
But the motorbikes the men
were riding were not found. It
was believed the Americans
could have driven elsewhere.



The
Florida
Alligator

Nobody Knows: Enduring Paradox

Nobody Knows, by Jeremy Larner.
(Macmilliam, $4.95)
One of the enduring paradoxes of the 1968 presidential campaign is
the fact that Sen. Eugene McCarthy probably would have won, if he
had been anybody else, but if he had been anybody else, he probably
wouldnt have run.
Two years later, McCarthys friends and enemies are still trying to
understand why he decided to challenge President Lyndon Johnson
and why he ceased to fight when Johnson backed away from the
contest and Robert F. Kennedy was killed in the middle of it.
Now Jeremy Lamer, a young novelist who was on McCarthys staff,
has written probably the best account of the campaign.
No one realized then, and few have realized since, the extent to
which McCarthy was a self-contained man who decided all things in a
silent dialogue with his own soul. Larner has captured traces of
McCarthys remote and frozen character, but the man is still best
summed up in a remark he made to a reporter, which Larner uses to
introduce his book:
What my intentions were ... I think I knew better than some of
the people who are telling what they were. And if Im not saying what
they were, why nobody knows.
Thomas Powers (UPI)
* *
Sal Si Puedes, by Peter Matthiessen
(Random House, $6.95)
This book is subtitled, Cesar Chavez and the New American
Revolution. It tells of Chavez attempts to organize farm workers,
mostly in California, and of the long grape boycott against California
growers which has continued into the 19705.
The title is Spanish idiom, which means roughly, escape if you can.
The man who is trying to escape is the migrant farm worker, usually
Mexican American. His prison is the ignorance and poverty into which
he is bom, and in which he usually dies.
Chavez is a near mystical figure, drawing on the passive resistance
techniques applied successfully by Gandhi and Martin Luther King
against the British and Southern White power structures. Like them he
has attracted passionate followers and detractors.
This book gives new insights into Chavez, with whom Matthiessen
became good friends. He is a simple man and one who, despite the
pain he feels for his people, is quick to smile, to laugh at a joke or tell
a tall tale.
Still one who reads this will want to know more about the man,
about where he has been and where is going. A definitive biography
remains to be written.
Robert Cary (UPI)

Lindsey
PEWTER MUGS
with a Free Interlocking Monogram! Q Q /T
see-through glass bottom
a beautiful gift! a $ 13.00 value
ff mi
ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL PRICES FOR GROUP
PURCHASES OF 10 OR MORE. BRING YOUR
CLUB OR ORGANIZATION.
IN THE GIFT DEPT.
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

\ liiiiii^^.,^ 4AiA^ ,^iiii>^!i!i!ijl-, .- '^A^A..VAL .'. ,^ > ~ v>. t !'lvlvl'lvXl!llvv.''' 'l Ny'! < !lv < lv- t< l !vlv!vl t
WBBMO*' .flt wm flKsv iar, flfl gn m Hi fIH HUH HhH flit fl| MHHK&
a 'IMS' Hpl fl fl |H. fl^flp^
fl. fl fl fl Wm
JBL-- Biflflp S £ jB J S It . ifll hB JBfl IB Iflflfl S
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flfl Bfl Wm mm flflfl fli fll Isl flr Isl flB BB IB fll Isl .fl 9fl mm fl|
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Angell, Pearl and Little God by Winston Graham.
(Doubleday, $6.95)
Three quite unlikable individuals are the principals in this novel of
modem London.
Wilfred Angell is a pompous, greedy, self-centered snob, a
dilettantish solicitor (lawyer), the sort of man who takes an
uncomfortable night flight on business so he can pocket the difference
in fare flight for which he charges his client.
This prosperous penny-pincher is the last person youd expect to
take up with, let alone marry, beautiful but dull shop girl Pearl
Friedel. But marry her he does and fits her into his well-ordered life
much as he would a newly-acquired painting or piece of antique
furniture.
Pearls sexual interest in Godfrey Little God Brown, an
_animalistic, small-time boxer, is more predictable.
Jeanne Lesem (UPI)

j Paid Political Advertisement 1

People.
Competent people.
People who are going to work for you, work for me, and
work to make Student Government what it should be.
Effective.
The people who are behind "Do it!" Party, from Alan
Howes down to our freshmen senators, were selected and
brought together because they know what to do and have the
ability to get it done. They all add to the University a special
quality we call "strength through capability."
We're proud of what we are going to do and want you to
ask us how we're going to do it. Ask the others, too.
We don't tolerate politicians who tell students to "look to
the stars" then pull out the rug from under their feet!
We abhor politicos who are put-up by the "bloc-vote
establishment" and whose only aim is to feed the
bureaucratic dragon they've created.
The "Do it!" hand has strength because it is competent
and has force because it believes in action. That's more than
any other group on this campus can claim now or at any
other time.
\
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Presented and for by
Wumm
11fcii
Paid Political Advertisement

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Wednesday, April 8, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13

SFJC Plans
Art Festival
A spring arts festival at Santa
Fe Junior College for the first
weekend in May now is being
planned at the East campus of
school.
Festival organizers are looking
for artists and entertainers who
would like to take part in the
three day series of events.
Exhibitors who would like to
sell their work are invited to set
up displays.
The weekend will begin
Thursday night with an
autograph party with novelist
Harry Crews at the SFJC East
campus.



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8, 1970

Astrology And Footwear
Is There A Connection?

NEW YORK (UPI) Mens
socks are more than
foot-coverings.
Theyre tell-tale signs of a
mans innermost nature, says
Michael Lutin, a New York
astrologer. So if you want to
know about a man, become a
sock-watcher.
LUTIN LINKS socks to
astrological things for this
reason; feet are connected to the
Twelfth House of the horoscope.
This house is where mysteries
and secrets lie.
Lutin feels very strongly
about socks revealing a mans
inner-self or hidden side. When
buying socks for the men in
your life he suggests you be
guided by their birth dates and
Zodiac signs.
For the National Association
of Hosiery Manufacturers Lutin
looked at dozens of different
socks, thought of the stars and

New Orleans Jazz
Festival Planned

NEW ORLEANS (UPI)
Newport was manufactured,
but New Orleans is the real
thing.
George Wein, the creator of
the Newport Jazz Festival, was
talking about his latest
challenge, the New Orleans Jazz
and Heritage Festival, April
22-26.
NEW ORLEANS, in the long
run, should become bigger than
Newport in jazz festivals, Wein
said. Heritage, he added, is going
to be the key to the success.
Here and here alone is the
richest musical heritage in
America, he said.
But the optimism for the
third New Orleans festival also
stems from the showmanship
and know-how of the
44-year-old Yankee commuter,
who can still recall being
considered one of the hot shot
young promoters when he
started the Newport festival 16
years ago.
The 1968 and 1969 New
Orleans festivals developed
enthusiasm for the idea, but did
not shake either the jazz world,
the tourist trade or even this
city. Money was lost. Crowds
were not always capacity. Artists
squabbled. And audienced
sometimes squirmed
uncomfortably for hours at what

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then classified the foot coverings
astrologically. He calls what
resulted the Soxology Guide.
It goes like this:
ARIES: For this
boom-boom man select shiny
green boucle socks. Secretly he
senses his lack of touch with the
universe and longs to develop
the highest octaves of human
feeling and love in the watery
depths of neptune.
TAURUS: Underneath a
facade of stamina and elegance
this man hides the fiery streak of
Mars. Fire engine red socks hint
at the rarely shown side of him.
GEMINI: The gray ribbed
socks are what the mental twins
will wear to show that inside
their seemingly frivolous nature
there is a dream of developing
stability.
CANCER: Beige and blue
plaid socks will show that the
personality isnt as

was more of a concert than a
festival.
BUT STILL the idea
persisted: What could be more
natural than a jazz festival in the
cradle of jazz?
For the second time, Wein
was invited down to run the
show.
Back in the early sixties I
came down here and told the
people they could not put on a
jazz festival, he recalled. The
major problem then, Wein
recalls, was segregation. You
could not, he said, bring the
black and white jazz greats
together in a city that was
mostly segregated.
The scene has since changed.
Schools, hotels, streetcars,
restaurants, bars and the
municipal auditorium all operate
on an integrated basis now.

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self-contained as it seems.
These moon men would like
to be carefree.
LEO: The me, me, man is
he. This proud Lion always
seems on stage. But beneath his
show biz flair he does best in
light blue socks, hinting that
inside clear, still waters run
deep.
VIRGO: One who is modest,
simple, pure, upright, perfect.
To release the creative spark is
the hidden ambition. This is
symbolized by bright orange and
green flame stitched socks.
LIBRA: A man who is
charming in red and blue plaid
socks but sometimes too
ingratiating. He gracefully
see-saws through relationships to
keep it all together. But he
would like to develop a cold
computer-like precision.
SCORPIO: The power of
regeneration lies in this man.
Dark, sexy and intense in his
brown and black subtle argyles.
SAGITTARIUS: Although
he is jovial, enthusiastic and fun
loving, his black socks give him
away. His carefree, adventurous
spirit is only a front for his
profound, serious and secretive
nature.
CAPRICORN: The straight
establishment man, but secretly
he resents the system that made
him. His search for greater
horizons often goes unseen
except in his red and green
windowpane socks.
AQUARIUS: He may be
heralding the new age when all
men are brothers, liberated from
the convention of decaying
society, but secretly in his
brown textured socks, he needs
the staid somber structure of
Saturn.
PISCES: This is the sign
naturally associated with the
feet. Here is the universal man
who possesses a secret need to
further the group cause and aid
the evolution of mankind. Socks
with the peace symbol would be
appropriate.

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372-2900
Office Hours
Mon-Fri
9 LAST WEEK
FOR
PASSOVER RESERVATIONS
SEDERS WEEKDAY MEALS
Mon & Tues April 20-28
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Halftime
By Craig Goldwyn i
Tennessee Backs Down
Athletic Director Ray Graves can attest to the old maxim gdi it in
writing. Apparently he and his counterpart at the University of
Tennessee, Bob Woodruff, forgot it and now it looks as though
Gatorland will miss a real sports treat.
Graves scheduled a dual track meet with the Volunteers for this
Saturday at the Florida Track. The meet would have matched the
perennial SEC champion, Tennessee, and her perennial bridesmaid,
Florida. For five years Tennessee has beaten Coach Jimmy Carnes
cindermen for the conference title. It has been three years since the
two teams have met in dual competition in Gainesville. UF won that
contest.
CARNES SAID thaUhe and Tennessee Coach Chuok Rohe had
agreed to have the meet here this year, but never signed a contract.
Apparently Tennessee Coach Chuck Rohe felt that because UT sent a
few of his boys to the Florida Relays two weeks ago that the Gators
owed him a return visit.
Rather than argue the matter, Graves said, I cancelled the
meet.
Coach Carnes said that he was not very happy about the
cancellation. There always seems to be some sort of problem with
them. After all, were the two leaders in the conference and leaders in
the country, it only seems right that we run against each other.
I SENT THEM the contract six months ago but they never
returned it. Their coach said go ahead with the meet and so I
scheduled it. But now Woodruff wont let them come. I just dont
think thats the way to run a program or a business, and this is just
like a business.
According to Carnes Tennessee pulled the same trick on Baptist
College of Charleston. Baptist had invited them to a dual meet, and
heavily publicized then-Tennessee hurdler Richmond Flowers (now of
the Dallas Cowboys), and several outstanding athletes on the team.
They were expecting a record gate, but Woodruff cancelled the meet
at the last minute.
Other than the Conference Championship meet, the last time
Florida and Tennessee met was an indoor meet in Tennessee. Florida
lost that contest. The Gators did manage to beat the Volunteers in an
outdoor meet in Gainesville in 1967. Florida has lost only one home
meet in three years, that to national champion Kansas last year.
Graves and Woodruff are scheduled to meet at a conference May 29
and will discuss the future of track competition between the schools.
Graves said that this time hell get it in writing.
* *
HOW ABOUT THIS one? While going through some FSU basketball
propaganda I discovered that their best shooter Willie Williams, who
was third in the country with .636 per cent, only hit .611 per cent
from the foul line. The rest of the team averaged well over .700 as do
most average players. Their second leading foul shooter, Ron Harris
with .852, averaged a low of .387 from the floor.
SPORTS TiBMII
BASEBALL
Gators play Jacksonville, 3:00 at Perry Field
FOOTBALL
Spring Practice
LEVI'S FASHION FLARES
The aware ones . that make things happen . are in
Levi's Fiara bottom pants. They've got it all from Sta-
Prest to wide belt loops. It's the new look and it happens
at Fremacs.
Levi's Flares 7.50 to 11.00
Gainesville Mall

The
Florida
Alligator

DICKEYS DEFENSE
Monster Man Invades UF

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Sports Writer
What is a monster man?
Its something new to Gator
fans.
According to Head Football
Coach Doug Dickeys defensive
plan, the monster man is a guy
who can play several positions
strong, and Jack Bums is a likely
candidate. Bums was a first team
safety last season.
DICKEY SAID the monster
man is the key to his defense
and must have speed, size and
good football sense.
Hes a man who gets blocked
on every play, explained
Dickey. He is the unbalanced
man on the defense and moves
to where we think the action
will be.
Jacks got good sense on the
passing game and hes tough.
WHEN ASKED ABOUT
Bums size, 6-0, 185 pounds,
Dickey said Bums is about the
same size as other monster men
he has worked with.
Doesnt the name monster
man give the fans the wrong
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GATOR SPORTS

impression? asked one reporter.
Theres nothing wrong with
that, Dickey replied with a
laugh.
DICKEY ALSO singled out
another weakness of the Gators,
lack of speed. He said the
problem applies to the whole
team and not just a few of
players.
Weve got too many people

l IHING
2035 N.W. 13th St. / Gainesville, Florida / 378-2304

Wednesday, April 8, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

with slow feet, he said. Were
going to play some awfully
quick football teams this year.
We need to work on our speed if
we want to keep up with them.
Speedy All-American flanker
Carlos Alvarez was out running
and catching a few passes.
Dickey said Alvarezs knee is still
bothering him, but hopes he will
be back in shape soon.

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 8, 1970

Page 16

I Intramurals i

v !

gy Steve Rohan
Beta Theta Pi hung on by an eyelash to first place in the Orange
League but the rest of the league is preparing to tighten the rope
around the Betas neck.
The Betas squeaked by Lambda Chi Alpha in tennis action but now
must face the favored Pikes who wiped out the FIJIs.
THE PIKES, PLAYING without one of their top performers have now
established themselves as the fraternity to beat not only in tennis but
in the entire Orange race. They trail the Betas by only 53 points and
could narrow the gap considerably by winning the sport.
In the lower bracket, last years champions TEP defeated Sigma Nu
and moved into second place in the league moving ahead of Sigma Chi
who bowed to SAE. The TEPs now face the SAEs in a rematch of last
years finals. The TEPs however have lost several of their top players
from last year.
Should the Pikes beat the Betas, it is likely the eventual winner of
tennis will take over the Orange League lead. In other action, SPE
topped AEPi, Phi Delt beat Delta Chi, Pi Lam knocked ATO out of
the Orange race, and Phi Tau beat the Delts.
BLUE ACTION: Bill Leedys 36 and Johnny Foxs 39 paced the
KAs to an opening round six stroke lead in the Blue League golf
tournament. Both*golfers hit their score on the challenging front nine.
League leading Chi Phi stayed in contention with a total score of
83 on the front nine. Bruce Weeks shot a 36 to lead the Chis.
Second place DU found itself in danger of not qualifying for the
finals after hitting an 87 for the day. Third place Pi Kappa Phi is in
second place in the tournament with an 81.
THETA CHI FINISHED the day with an 82, TKE an 82, and AGR
hit an 85.
The poor showing by DU considerably diminishes the chances of
DU catching Chi Phis in the Blue League race.
Other top performances included a 37 by John Lynn of Theta Chi,
and 39s by Tony Price of Pi Kappa Phi, Tim Colbert of AGR, Mike
Coury of TKE, and Bill Brainard of Phi Kappa Psi.
Gehrigs Successor?

NEW YORK (UPI) Ball
players are always getting notes
from girls.
This wasnt the usual note,
though. Nor from the usual girl.
It even was delivered by a special
messenger.
Recipient of the note was
John Ellis, a big, blond first
baseman who was with the New
York Yankees briefly last season
but still qualifies as a rookie
because he didnt put in enough
time.
THE NOTE SAID:
To John:
For thirty years I have been
looking for Lous successor (if
not better), and I am rooting for
you.
THE NOTE WAS signed by
Eleanor Gehrig, widow of the
Yankees late all-time great first

liO y/ is coming
m
H your
V#!] listening
PLEASURE
a a watch for us!
/royr

baseman and she added the
parenthetical notation (Mrs.
Lou) after her name in case the
21-year-old Ellis was a little
confused.
Ellis, who played first base for
the Yankees in Tuesdays opener
against the Red Sox at Yankee
Stadium, was handed Mrs.
Gehrigs note before the game
by Larry MacPhail, 80-year-old
former baseball executive.

Young Walk Vs Old Wilt
In NBA West Showdown

PHOENIX (UPI) Former
Gator star and All-American
Neal Walk, now in his rookie
year with the Phoenix Suns, has
suddenly found himself in a
pressure-packed position.
The 6-foot-10 Walk will have
to go against Wilt (the Stilt)
Chamberlain in the sixth game
of the Suns battle to win their
semifinal round playoffs from
Los Angeles Lakers.
WALK IS IN the predicament
because regular center Jim Fox

Gators Lose At JU
Play At Home Today

In the first of a two game
series with Jacksonville
University, UF baseballers
dropped a 6-2 decision to the
Dolphins Tuesday in
Jacksonville. The second half of
the series brings JU across the
St. Johns River to meet the
Gators in Gainesville today.
Unlike last years 28-16 team,
the 1970 Gator squad is
presently struggling with all-10
record with little more than half
the season to go in the 45-game
schedule, jhe Gators are 3-1 and
leading in the Southeastern
Conferences Eastern Division.
Wayne Rogers starts for the
Snow Go
Snowmobiles can go up to 35
miles an hour.

Norelco can shave you closer
than a blade, and count how many
times it does it
| The heads actually float, to follow the
curves of your face.
(Q? They n where V ur face curves in, and
7 fr J 0,3 V out where your face curves out.
V UC2/ / / shave your beard in every direction at once.
v >// (If you dont think that means anything, feel
your face. Feel how your beard grows in different
~ I directions on different parts of your face?)
1 97/it; 1913 U It; lAl7lch The NorelcoTri P |eheader also has a
1,43,4,D, 0,/,0,y,1U, 11,1410,14,1D,10,1/,losnaves. pop-up trimmer, so you can see exactly what
On a single change. 1
The Norelco Rechargeable Tripleheader ~7 /
Shaver was made to do two things:
To shave you as close or closer than a v
stainless steel razor blade. \
And to give you up to twice as many shaves // 'A/ ( J
per charge as any other rechargeable shaver. // \
Heres how it works. 2-4 n Q £
) ) ).. you're trimming.
\ '* has a Charge Indicator tnat lights up
\V .. when its charging.
\\ \ It has a Shave Counter to count your shaves.
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feel around your chin and neck and upper lip.
The Rechargeable Tripleheader has 18 If it feels like you could use a closer
self-sharpening rotary blades, inside of shave, get yourself a Norelco Rechargeable.
3 Microgroove shaving heads. And shave your whole face for a change.
you any closer
1970 North American Philips Corporation, 100 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. 10017.

was listed as very doubtful
Monday due to a severe ankle
sprain.
If the Lakers win, a seventh
game will be played at Los
Angeles Thursday night. The
Suns lead the series 3-2.
Fox was missing Sunday night
and the Lakers belted the
second-year Suns 138-121 with
Chamberlain going for 36 points.
IF WE CANT win in
Phoenix, we dont figure to win
the series, Suns guard Gail

UF in todays home game
against the Dolphins at 3 p.m.

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Buy two dinners ...
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r Jftary/and ( Buy 2 Maryland Fried Chicken
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Goodrich said. But I dont
think they can beat us at
Phoenix.
The winner of the
Phoenix-Los Angeles series will
meet Atlanta, a 4-1 winner over
Chicago, in the Western Division
finals. New York and Milwaukee
will decide things in the East in
another best-of-seven series.
Chamberlain, who missed
most of the regular season with a
pulled tendon, had his best
effort of the series Sunday night.
In addition to his 36 points, he
blocked nine shots and grabbed
14 rebounds.
If Walk cant handle
Chamberlain, Phoenix Coach
Jerry Colangelo may switch the
6-8 Hawkins from forward to
center.