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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
RoCA

voi. 62, No. sr~/ y o

Price Hike Justification Required


Daniel:
$400,000
Needed
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Writer
The UF Athletic Association
needs $400,000, Ray Daniel,
athletic department budget
director said Wednesday.
The present proposal to get
this money, which would mean
charging students for football
tickets and an activities fee
increase to the athletic
department, is completely
unacceptable, Student Body
President Walter Morgan said
WpH rwH a v
ALTERNATIVE PLANS have
been suggested and action to
improve upon the mechanics of
the present proposal are still
under discussion.
Student Government
Secretary of Athletics Lee
Greene said alumni
contributions should be sought.
However, Daniel said alumni
are being asked for contributions
by many different groups and
individuals already.
He said alumni donations are
approximately $300,000 a year
now.
THE PRESENT proposal also
indudes a 50 cent increase in the
price of general admission
tickets. This is expected to bring
in approximately $70,000 for
the 1970 season.
Greene has proposed an even
greater increase for the general
public, to take some of the
burden of costs from the
students.
Question has been raised as to
the effidency and importance of
the spring sports program.
Director of the Athletic
Association Ray Graves said to
phase out some sports would
adversely affect the entire
athletic program.
DANIEL SAID UF competes
in all the intercollegiate sports
sanctioned by the Southeastern
Conference (SEC).
If we cut some sports, it
will eventually effect football
and recruitment, Daniel said.
He said it is always possible to
cut costs, but one readies a
point where he is practicing false
economy.
A fourth proposal was to raise
the sum allocated from each
student's tuition, without raising
actual tuition.
THE $3250 activities fee
from student tuition is divided
among the athletic association,
SG, the Reitz Union and student
(SEE 'GREENE' PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Writer
The UF Athletic Association
will be required to justify its
need to charge students an
admission fee to football games,
' Ifei'
jf Kl
j wL.
? m ml
y r
WALTER MORGAN
... suggests alternatives

Organizations Criticize
Athletic Association Action

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Writer
The recent action of the
Ticket Committee and Athletic
Association is totally
unacceptable, according to a
statement released late
Wednesday by Florida Blue Key,
Interfratemity Council and
Omicron Delta Kappa.
The policy will prevent some
students from attending football
games for financial reasons, it
said.
AFTER ALL, for every
student who cant afford a $4
seat, the department can sell a
$7 general admission ticket,

UF Workers 1 Union
To Rally In Plaza

This afternoon at 3 pm., in
the Plaza of the Americas, there
will be a kickoff rally for the
Service Employes Union
(AFL-CIO) to begin organizing
UF non-academic workers.
In addition to generating
support for the union, the rally
'^vll*>MvivXvX*XvX*>X;>lvvX^xX>vl^XvX*XX.:-!*X*X
If
WHATS GOOD and bad in
baseball? UPI sports writer
Fred Down writes on the
merits of baseball ... page 19
Clasrifieds . 12
Editorials.. 1 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies ..- 12
Sports..; 18
Whets Happening 3

University of Florida, Gainesville

OFFICIAL DECISION

it was decided Wednesday.
The dedsion came in a
meeting between UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and
representatives of all groups who
receive funds from the student
activity fee.
Jr
L A
RAY GRAVES
... defends increase

said Ralph Glatfelter, president
ofODK.
Specifically, the policy was
found unacceptable because:
At a time when academic
departments and student services
are being cut back or held at
their present level, why should
the athletic department be the
only one free to expand and go
first class?
Maybe the university needs a
radical reorganization of its
values, goals and priorities, the
statement said.
f The Athletic Association
refuses to present figures to
show exact financial needs of
the department and what this

will honor the late Dr. Martin
Luther King.
SPEAKERS will include:
Val Cox, international
organizer for the AFL-CIO.
Rev. T. A. Wright,
president of the NAACP.
Steve Uhlfelder and Alan
Howes, candidates for student
body president.
Joe McCloud, member of
the Black Student Union.
Jay Pffeifer, chairman of
Vets Against the War in
Vietnam.
John Sugg, member of the
Young Socialist Alliance and
Student Mobilization
Committee.
t Ralph Glatfelter, president
ofODK.
t David Kurtzman,
philosophy professor.
Director of UF Personnel
(SEE 'MUSKIE' PAGE 2)

According to Student Body
President Walter Morgan, the
Athletic Association will meet
with student representatives
next Wednesday and disclose
their financial records in an
attempt to justify their needs.
9 BP
yr
JfF B
IN W m
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... asks justification

money would be used for.
FOR EXAMPLE Athletic
Director Ray Graves listed
renovation of Yon Hall as one
need.
Whos he kidding? Does he
expect students living in
Murphree to pay for the
renovation of one of the newest
and finest dorms on campus
Yon Hall? commented
Glatfelter.
The cost to the individual
student is preposterous.
For a student to take a date
to the five home games, it would
cost S3B. If he took the same
girl then the cost would be only
S3O. If a student wanted to
attend the neutral games,
Georgia and Duke, the total
would come to $52 for the
season.
This policy was accepted
on the total projections of
Graves, not on itemized
expenditures or projections of
future needs.
9 The Athletic Association
already stands to earn well over
$ 100,000 for the football season
without the expected attendance
increases generated by a top
football team ($70,000
increase in general admissions;
$40,000 additional game with
Duke; SIO,OOO one dollar
increase in date tickets).
The seating program would
effectively eliminate bloc
seating.
§ The priority system
according to classification is
unfair.
IS IT FAIR for a freshman
who would pay the same season
ticket price as ar senior to sit all
year on the 10-yard line while
the senior sits on the 45? We
dont think it is, said Glatfelter.

\ /
V s

Thursday, April 2, 1970


He stressed that whether the
students are charged for games
or not, it will not alleviate the
financial difficulties of the other
recipients of the activities fee.
In a memorandum dated
March 17, OConnell said when
the activities fee was divided up
in July 1969, it became
obvious to all that the proceeds
of the $32.50 allocation were not
sufficient to adequately fund
existing activities.
OConnell requested each of
the four organizations to submit
budget requests by January 1 to
show how much they would
need for the 7O-7l year
(beginning July 1, 1970) to
maintain the existing programs.
The extra requests bring the
potential activities fee to
$37.50, a $5 increase.
OConnell suggested, as a
solution to the activities fee
allocation problem, that the
state legislature grant authority
to set the activities fee for each
university, up to a maximum to
be set by the legislature.
OConnell said he would have
to go to the Board of Regents
with a list of needs which
ought to be met from this
activity fee.
Basically, two different
proposals for alleviating the
shortages were made: To seek an
increase in the activities fee, or
to charge students for such
services as football games.
The only alternative to these
would be to cut existing services.
Morgan suggested as an
alternative to charging for
tickets, that the other functions
transfer as much as possible of
their proposed added income
from an activities fee increase to
the athletic department.
If we have to, he said,
speaking of Student
Government, **we can cut back
and operate on the $313,000 we
had last year and give the extra
to the athletic department.
Jim Roll, student body
treasurer, agreed that this could
be done but said the Student
Government needed the increase
and he could not consider
negotiating the point.
OConnell warned that we
may all be living on $32.50 if
the legislature and the regents
dont go along with us.
He said there was no real
surety that the increase will go
through.
Defending the need for season
ticket sales as one solution to
the athletic departments
difficulty, Ray Graves, director
of athletics, said it is necessary
to give some idea in advance of
how many tickets would be sold
for any game to the student
body.
This is necessary so the excess
tickets can be sold to alumni,
etc. Failure to be able to do this
in the past has cost athletics
(SEE 'ATHLETIC* PAGE 2)



Page 2

Th> Florida Aligitor, Thwday, April 2,1970

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PHIL BANNISTER
PRINT SALE
Today is the last day to view the prints on exhibit in the Annual
Spring Print Sale. The exhibit is being shown in the Union Ballroom,
II a.m. 9 p.m.
Athletic Budget Head
Cites Fund Shortage

health services.
This figure is set by the Board
of Regents for all state schools
and can only be changed with
their approval.
The next regents meeting is
Monday. UF President Stephen
C. OConnell said he would ask
the regents to allow differences
in the activities fees in various
schools across the state.
OConnell said students can
then decide whether they would
rather pay a slightly higher
tuition and receive more of the
services this money can provide.
IF THE REGENTS do allow
Greene Knocks
Present Policy
J^ompageoneJ
much needed funds, he
explained.
Lee Greene, Student
Government secretary of
athletics, said the present plan was
both unacceptable and
unworkable, because of the
limitations put on students
taking dates to the games.
Greene suggested instead of
selling each student a reserved
seat for the season (as the newly
passed policy would) every
student who wanted to attend
football games be sold a
football card which would
entitle him to a seat at each
home game. Before the game
each student would use his and
his date's card.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
? The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
3 advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
k notice is Diven to the advertising manager within (1) ope day after the
- advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
? more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
j several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
; insertion.

UF to raise its activities fee, the
athletic association could pay
their debts, possibly without
charging the student or at
least not charging $3 s4 a
ticket.
Graves said the activities fee
allocation in Florida is now less
than that of many other states.
Muskie Lauds
Union Efforts
J^OMPAGiniwjJ
Robert Button was invited to
express the UFs viewpoint but
declined the invitation.
John McLaughlin, organizer
of the rally, has received several
telegrams of support from such
people as Sen. Edmund S.
Muskie, D-Maine. Sen. Charles
Percy, R-Dl., and Coretta King,
widow of Dr. King, have also
sent support.
MUSKIE*S telegram stated:
I am impressed by the
reports of your efforts on behalf
of the non-academic employes at
UF. My best wishes are with you
on April 2 when you pause to
honor the memory of the late
Dr. King and to generate support
and understanding for the UF
workers.
UF has 5,500 non-academic
employes.
C 2am > smoxS N
Monday, April 6
for information Call:
372-0038 or 378-6568

$12.5 MILLION GRANTED
UF Receives State Funds
For Medical Construction

UF will receive $12.5 million
in state funds for construction
of expanded facilities at the
Colleges of Medicine and
Dentistry, Walter Matherly,
director of physical planning,
said Wednesday.
The construction, part of the
Health Centers Project I, is
being paid for with the UFs
share of $25 million in tax
money presently allocated for

All Efforts To Make
UAC Reality Continue

Means of funding the
proposed University Activities
Center .are still under
consideration.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, in a letter to
Chamber of Commerce President
Marvin Gresham Monday, wrote
that the* students opposition to
paying for the center does not notmean
mean notmean that the effort to find a
way to make the complex a
reality is ended.
ON THE contrary, he
wrote, we- will continue to

|SG Candidates Face f
i Deadline Today
* v!
_ v,
Qualification applications for Student Government spring :j:j
;!: quarter elections are due in today at 5 p.m.
Students may apply in the treasurers office on the third floor :j:j
of the Reitz Union. j:|:
jij THERE ARE 63 positions open, including student body :j:j
jij president, vice president, treasurer, honor court chancellor, $
traffic court chief justice, Honor Court justice positions and ijij
g senate seats.
jij Fifty-six applications were accepted by 5 pm. Tuesday. Jim g
ij: Roll, SG treasurer, explained the delay in qualifying. jij;
jij This is normal because most political parties dont like to tip jij:
jij their hand, he said. Roll expects 160-180 applications before g
ij* todays deadline. g
jij All applicants must be full-time students with an overall jij:
two-point average. Those applying for student body president, $
vice president, treasurer, Honor Court chancellor and traffic court &
g chief justice must have attended UF for at least three quarters. $
THE TRAFFIC COURT chief justice, Honor Court justices ijij
jij: md senators are required to pay ass registration fee. Those $
applying for the top four SG positions must pay a $lO $
iji qualifying fee. F 7 U
jij The 18 vacant honor court justice positions are filled from |
:ij eac h of the 16 colleges. The 40 student senate seats to be filled
x are apportioned on a student population basis $
1 |
£ Party chairmen for upcoming Student Government elections §
g *. tomht at 9 pm. in room 305 of the Reitz Union &
£ The mee^ n 8 ca hed by Kevin Davey, senate secretary of the &
I Campus blllboard space "d ba nting areas |

It. the .tuli they add to the Their collectiveHng
word.mo,.e^e ip, um s experience, Very deep Maynard
Fmfteworldsmost expensive JPM
It's also the name of a new group Machito. The Latin Dimension!^
and a new music. Nine of the Lionel Hampton. Eddie Palmieri VV7 ;
weightiest musicians ever AMBERGRIS. JSBel.
together. Blowing as one. It's whale rock. Young soulful l feramoUnt l
AMBERGRIS. spirited. Original. IHj
It's Larry Harlow, Jerry Weiss, AMBERGRIS.
Charlie Camilleri, Harry Max, It's also the name of their first PAS SOI4
Jimmy Maeulen, Billy Shay, Lewis album albumnn
nn albumnn hn rfiU r and On Paramount records and tapes, j PARAMOUNT RECORDS
!r -- Gil Fields. -,Ap AMIIPRPDM r adiiriionof
raGWS i

higher education in the state.
Commissioner of Education
Floyd Christian said last week
higher education bonds worth
sls million, approved by voters
last November, will go on sale
May 12.
The remaining $lO million
will come from surplus funds of
the Gross Utilities Receipts Tax,
Matherly said.
Our greatest single problem

examine all avenues which have
been or will be suggested as a
means of funding...
The letter, sent also to city
and county officials, sets a June
1 deadline for consideration of
the UAC.
Engineering
The 25th Engineering Fair
opens today at the Engineering
Complex Plaza.
The fair, which is expected to
draw more than 10,000 visitors,

is lack of funds for building,
personnel and miscellaneous
costs, he said.
Funds have virtually dried
up for Title I grants in the
last few years, he added.
Title I is the section of the
Higher Education Facilities Act
of 1963 which deals with grants
for undergraduate classroom and
lab facilities.
Goldberg:
No Black
LIBERTY, N. Y. (UPI)
The Democratic state
convention to nominate a
gubernatorial candidate
turned into chaos Wednesday
when former U. S. Supreme
Court Justice Arthur J.
Goldberg indicated he would
not have a Negro for a 1
running mate.
Fair Opens
will have a controversial feature:
a booth handled by the Army
Corps of Engineers explaining
the newly-completed sections of
the Florida Barge Canal.
Exhibits will be presented by
engineering societies, industries,
local high schools and others,
covering such fields as
metallurgical, electrical,
aerospace and bio-environmental
engineering.
UF Vice President Harry
Sisler will greet 10 visiting state
legislators Saturday, according
to fair coordinator Phil Parrish.
The Engineering Fair Queen
will be crowned Saturday, when
exhibit prizes will be awarded, at
a ball given at the S.W. 13th
Street Holiday Inn. Admission is
free to UF students.
Exhibits will be free, and
open to the public. The fair will
be open Friday 5 to 9 pm.,
Saturday noon to 8 pm. and
Sunday noon to 4 pm.
Celebration 7O
Opens Today
Celebration 7O opens today
with a-folk festival at the Plaza
of the Americas.
According to John Hawkins,
who handles public relations for
Celebration 7O, the stress this
time will be in opening the
campus to the community.
THE FUTURE of Celebration
depends on its performance this
year. In the past, much money
and personnel have gone into its
planning.



Faculty To Hear Connor Proposals

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Wrhor
The University College
administration and faculty will
meet today to consider Vice
President of Academic Affairs
Frederick Connors proposal for
University College reform.
The meeting, which is

UF Student Ecologist To Appear Before
House Sub-Committee On Conservation

By JAY GARTMAN
Alligator Writer
The U.S. House
sub-committee on Conservation
WHATS
HAPPENING
BEASTLY BEAUTY: A
beauty contest to choose 1970
queen for the Engineers Fair will
be tonight at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center Auditorium at 9
pm.
MORE CLOAK AND
DAGGER: The movie Knife in
the Water. is being shown
tonight at the Reitz Union
Auditorium, at 5:30, 8 and
10:30 pm.
COPS AND DRUGS? William
Kittle, director of the Law
Enforcement Police Academy
scheduled to open soon in
Tallahassee, will be the featured
speaker at todays drug seminar
sponsored by the UF Police
Department. At the Union,
room 361. The seminar begins at
8:30 am. and ends at 4:30 pm.
ANCIENT ART: The
Maya, a collection of Mayan
art, artifacts and photographs
taken by Roy Craven, director
of the UF art gallery will be
exhibited through April 2 at the
gallery.
a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

restricted to faculty members,
will be held in room 109 Little
Hall.
IN A DEC. 17 note from UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
the administration and faculty
were urged to hold discussions
and debate on the controversial
reforms that face UC.
The UC faculty is expected

and Natural Resources has
requested UF student Hal
Barcey to appear before it
Friday to discuss ecological
legislation.
Barcey, 3AS, will go to
Washington, D.C. today to meet
with environmental groups,
such as the Audobon Society
and the Sierra Club, to see if

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Great lining Britain!

For the price of a stamp, well clue
you in on the British scene.
Naming names of the spots only
we local folk are in on.
Well tell you about our native
haunts. The pubs. Coffeehouses. Dis Discotheques.
cotheques. Discotheques. Boutiques. And the like.
Well tell you where you can bed beddown
down beddown for $2 a night, breakfast in included.
cluded. included. And chow-down for sl.
Well tell you about the doings
in the theatre. So you can see Broad Broadway
way Broadway hits long, before they break on
Broadway. (Tickets: 90^.)
<9

eventually to present a proposal
of its own to the senate.
At present there are three
proposals the University Senate
Curriculum Committee are
expected to hear. Proposals
come from Connor, UC Dean
Franklin A. Doty and Student
Government Secretary of
Academic Affairs Henry Solares,

they can work with newly
established groups to provide
a viable output.
Four measures that I would
like to propose to the
sub-committee, Barcey said,
are, first, a cabinet level post of
population and environmental
control; second, to enact

Well tell you about a crazy little
S3O ticket thatll buy you 1,100 miles
of rail and boat travel.
And fill you in on all kinds of tours
planned especially for the college
crowd.
Weil even show you how to make
it through Shakespeare country.
Even if you couldnt make it through
Shakespeare in class.
Weve got hundreds of ideas. All
wrapped up in our free book: Great
Young Britain. 20 pages big. With
over 50 color photos.

who is chairman of the Student
Commission on Reorganizing
Education (SCORE).
CONNOR IS expected to
appear before the curriculum
committee on April 1.
Connor advocates termination
of UC as it presently is
structured. He proposes general
requirements be fulfilled with

legislation to be used in the
future (i.e. Sen. Gaylord
Nelsons porposed constitutional
amendment guaranteeing every
citizen a clean environment);
third, eliminating jobs that
create pollution by-products,
and fourth, an immediate freeze
on all new goods until they can
be produced without pollution.

Thuraday, April 2,1970, Tha Florida Alllpator,

Its yours for the asking. Mail the
coupon. And see your travel agent.
r t 1
British Tourist Authority
| Box 4100, New York, N.Y. 10017
} Send me your free book: Great |
| Young Britain. j
J Name {
i College i
i Address
i l
| City |
! Stale Zl J>-- 3S
l

numerous alternatives.
Under Conner's plans, general
education requirements would
be included in all bachelor
degrees received from UF. The
requirements could be taken
throughout the four yean of
undergraduate studies.
The curriculum committee
will hear Dotys proposals on
April 8.
Doty is for keeping the UC,
adding the UC would require
students to fulfill the seven basic
comprehensive programs as
opposed to the alternatives. The
proposal allows a student to
fulfill the general requirements
throughout four yean of college.
Solares has suggested the
general education requirements
be spread over four yean, with a
baccalaureate degree offered in
liberal and general education.
Solares proposal contains many
points which are similar to
Connors.

Page 3



> The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 2,1970

Page 4

NVA Attacks Cambodian Army Troops

PHNOM PENH (UPI) North
Vietnamese troops took part for the first
time in an attack on Cambodian forces five
miles inside Cambodian territory, the
government reported Wednesday.
The first report of North Vietnamese
action since the overthrow of Prince
Norodom Sihanouk March 18 prompted
government communiques telling both
Communist and Allied forces to stay out of
Cambodia.
THE BROADCAST on Phnom Penh
radio said the Cambodian forces suffered
casualties in the battle Tuesday near the
border town of Shoul, 100 miles northeast

Paris Asks Parties
To Negotiate Crisis
' ?, ;
PARIS (UPI) The French government warned Wednesday recent
developments in Laos and Cambodia have spread the Vietnam conflict
to the whole of Indochina and called for negotiations by all
interested parties* to make the area a neutral zone.
A government statement issued after a 5Vi hour cabinet meeting
chaired by President Georges Pompidou said:
THE FRENCH government notes that the recent developments in
Laos and Cambodia have considerably aggravated the situation in
Indochina and have contributed to the spreading of the Vietnam War
to the whole of the Indochinese peninsula.
Noting that all hope was not lost that Cambodia could retain and
Laos regain its neutral status, the statement also said there still was
hope the Vietnam War could be settled by a negotated settlement
guaranteeing the existence of a truly independent and neutral South
Vietnam.
THE STATEMENT continued: The French government is certain
that an extension of the war which is becoming indivisible can only be
avoided by negotiations between all the interested parties with the
aim of finding and guaranteeing the basis of an indivisible peace.
Only such negotiations will allow the reaching of a general
agreement for the establishment of a neutral and peaceful zone in
Indochina.

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CASUALTIES UNKNOWN*'

of here. The number killed or wounded
was not revealed.
In separate communiques, the
government denounced the Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese for entering its territory
and condemned the South Vietnamese
hot pursuit policy of crossing the border
to pursue Communist forces.
The Cambodians said they objected to
all violations of its territory by all foreign
forces, regardless of the camp to which
they belong.
THE GOVERNMENT said the hot
pursuit policy used by Saigon to chase
Communist troops across the Cambodian

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border was a violation of neutrality.
Faithful to its policy of strict
neutrality, Cambodia cannot permit this
right of hot pursuit on its territory
without repudiating this policy of
neutrality and thus favoring the violation
of its frontiers, the communique said.
The government which took power last
month previously has accused the Viet
Cong of sending troops on aggressive
missions in Cambodia, but Wednesday s
broadcast was the first such accusation
against the North Vietnamese.
IT SAID THE Cambodian military had

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been ordered to take all necessary
measures to cope with this grave
development.
Thousands of young Cambodians were
reported to be flocking to the enlistment
center in Phnom Penh to join the armed
forces.
A high government official said about
20,000 men throughout the country had
volunteered to join the military services.
He said under present conditions the
army could only equip about 10,000
additional troops beyond the regular force
of 35,000 and the mobilized reserve force
of about 10,000.

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WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Senate rejected a renewed
Southern challenge of federal
school desegregation policy
Wednesday and passed a record
$24.6 billion school aid bill.
Despite appeals by Sens.

I Two Declare For Carswell I
*
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon Wednesday attacke
senators opposed to Supreme Court nominee G. Harrold Carswell as
men who would deny him the right of decision freely accorded to
my predecessors of both parties.
( In a letter to freshman Sen. William B. Saxbe, R-Ohio, Nixon said
the traditional constitutional balance between Congress and the
President is in jeopardy in the increasingly bitter struggle over the
nomination.
CITING NIXONS letter, Saxbe threw his support behind the
nomination and another Republican freshman, Sen. Marlow W. Cook
of Kentucky, said he would vote against Mondays move to resubmit
the nomination to the Senate Judiciary Committee for probable burial
there.
But the Senates anti-Carswell forces were heartened by the
decision of Sen. William B. Spong, Jr., D-Va., to vote to recommit the
nomination.
SPONG AND Cook both said they would keep an open mind on
the nomination itself should the move to recommit it fail.
That motion will be voted on Monday. If it fails, the Senate will
vote Wednesday whether to advise and consent to the nomination.
In his Dear Bill letter to Saxbe, Nixon said Carswell has my
total support and dismissed as specious the charges against him.
WHAT IS centrally at issue in this nomination is the constitutional
responsibility of the President to appoint members of the court and
whether this responsibility can be frustrated by those who wish to
substitute their own philosophy or their own subjective judgment for
that of the one person entrusted by the Constitution with the power
of appointment.
The question arises whether I, as President of the United States,
shall be accorded the same right of choice in naming Supreme Court
justices which has been freely accorded to my predecessors of both
parties.
... If the Senate attempts to substitute its judgment as to who
should be appointed, the traditional constitutional balance is in
jeopardy and the duty of the President under the Constitution
impaired.
Tallahassee Joins Forces
Against Liberal Opposition

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Lt.
Gov. Ray Osborne announced
the formation Tuesday of a
bipartisan committee for fair
play to take the offensive
against pseudo liberals who
oppose Judge G. Harrold
Carswells confirmation to the
Supreme Court.
Osborne, a Republican
candidate for the U. S. Senate,
said he and Sen. Mallory Home,
a Tallahassee democrat, would
be co-chairmen of the
committee, composed primarily
of wealthy Tallahassee residents.
Our group will take whatever
action we deem appropriate to
focus attention on the real issue
of Judge Carswells nomination
the right of the silent
majority to have their views
for
H your
TsiL listening
PLEASURE

Senate Passes School Aid Bill

Abraham Ribicoff, D-Conn., and
John Stennis, D-Miss., the
Senate defeated, 43-32, a
motion to return the measure to
a House-Senate conference
committee. A few minutes later
the Senate approved the bill,

represented on the highest court
of the land, Osborne told a
news conference.
The U. S. Senate is scheduled
to vote Monday on a motion to
return the Carswell nomination
to the Judiciary Committee.
Judge Carswell has spent his
life upholding our constitution.
He is a Southerner, Osborne
said. It is for these two reasons
alone that a far-out liberal group
is bent on character assassination
to stop at any cost his
nomination to the Supreme
Court.

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REJECTS SOUTHERN BID

744.
The conference committee
watered down Stennis school
amendment, which the Senate
adopted 56 to 36 Feb. 18.
Ribicoff, whose denunciation
of monumental hypocrisy in
the North sparked approval of
the original amendment,
criticized the revised version as
another step toward the
division of our society into two
camps, one white and one
black.
But Sen. Claiborne Pell,
D-R.1., manager of the bill, said
Senate conferees did our best
in negotiations with members of
the House, which passed a
similar school aid bill without
desegregation amendments.
If we went back to
conference now I dont think we
could do any better, Pell said.
In its original form, Stennis*
amendment would have dictated
equal enforcement of
desegregation guidelines North
and South, with schools
segregated as a result of
residential patterns (de facto)
treated the same as those
segregated by design (de jure).
The conference committee
added provisions requiring
separate federal policies for de
jure and de facto segregation a
wmmmm wmmmm
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Truck drivers joined air
controllers Wednesday in
scattered cross-country
walkouts.
In other labor disputes, the
nations mailmen and New York
Citys newspaper workers were
still talking, and New York
tugboat crews ended a
two-month-old strike.
* *
CASABLANCA, Morocco
(UPI) A Royal Moroccan
Airlines Caravelle jet crashed on
a highway south of here
Wednesday, narrowly missing a
small village before it broke up
and burst into flame. Officials
said 61 of the 82 persons aboard
died.
Airline officials said 57#
persons were killed in the crash
and four others died later in a
hospital from injuries.

reversal of Stennis* intention and
a restatement of policies
presently pursued by the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW).

INVENT A SLOGAN WIN A PRIZE
'Whatever Your Cause, Its a Lost Cause
Unless We Control Population

That's the best population slogan we've
been able to coma up with. Can you top
it? A citation and an honorarium of $lO
are offered for the best slogan turned in
to the advertising manager of this news newspaper
paper newspaper before the forthcoming Environ Environmental
mental Environmental Teach-In on Earth Day, April 22.
The winning slogan from this campus
will be eligible to compete for the
national
SSOO PRIZE
to be awarded for the best slogan pre prepared
pared prepared by a student on any of the 215
campuses where this ad is appearing.
Rules: Simply devise a brief state-

WERE NUMBER ONE!
IN SCHOLARSHIP
PHI KAPPA PSI,
NUMBER ONE IN SCHOLARSHIP,
offers you an opportunity to be involved in a
unique experience, academics combined with a
well-rounded social life. The Brotherhood of Phi
Kappa Psi, chartered in 1967, cordially invites
you to visit our fraternity during Open House on
Wednesday and Thursday 7:30 to 10:30 PM, or
at our Smoker at the Union 7:00 to 9:00 PM.
Phi Kappa Psi 1125 SW 4th Ave. 372-7817.
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Thursday. April 2.1970. Tha Florida AMgator.

The measure goes next to the
House. It would broaden and
extend the program of federal
aid to grade schools and high
schools for three years.

ment of the Importance and urgency of
checking population growth to the
environment, to quality of life, to world
peace. Send it on or before April 22 to
this newspaper, addressed "Population
Contest.* Judges on this campus will be
three members of this paper's staff
appointed by tha ad manager. All deci decisions
sions decisions final and only their selection will
be eligible for big national prize, to be
judged by Paul Ehrlich, David Brower,
and Hugh Moore.
Write your slogan today. One entry
per student. For free literature on popu population
lation population explosion, write Hugh Moore
Fund, 60 E. 42nd St., Now York 10017.

Page 5



Page 6

i, Th* Florida AWgator, Thursday, April 2,1970

By UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
FBI agents and police sought
to determine Whether the
bomb factory turned up by
pest exterminators in a North
Side, Chicago apartment had any
links with similar factories
found in New York.
Investigators said the
third-floor apartment was filled
with enough explosives to blow
up a city block.
Police held Gary Witzel, 22,

FBI Seeks Link Between
New York, Chicago Arms

on charges of possession of
explosives and unlawful use of
weapons and searched for a
young woman who they said
frequented the apartment with
him.
EXPERTS WORKED for
several hours dismantling bombs
found in the factory.
Investigators said they found 50
sticks of dynamite, blasting caps,
explosive liquids, plastic
explosives and hydrochloric and
sulphuric acid.
If the explosives had
detonated, police said, they
would have destroyed the

WHAT DO:
Grand Funk Railroad
The Canadian Embassy
Steppenwolf
The United States Army
The Poetry of James Wright
Krisha Psychedelic Company
Carlos Montoya
HA V EI N COMMON ?
An Omlcron Delt Kiwi. nd

50-unit apartment building and
much of the block in a
neighborhood of medium and
modest priced apartments.
Investigators said the factory
might be linked to bomb
factories discovered in New
York.
Two of the New York
factories have blown up, killing
five persons, and one was linked
to members of the violent
Weatherman faction of Students

ANOTHER ARSENAL DISCOVERED

for a Democratic Society (SDS).
BERNADINE Dohm, a fugitive
leader of the revolutionary SDS
wing Weathermen, was a
frequent visitor to the Chicago
apartment, investigators said
Wednesday.
Chicago detective Herbert
Brown said tenants had
identified Miss Dohm, 28, as the
Judy White who rented the
apartment at 5433 Kenmore
Ave. on Chicago's North Side.
However, Justice Department
sources in Washington said
Judy White was a woman
identified as Diane Donghi.

BOTH BROWN and the
Justice Department investigators
said Miss Dohm had been
identified from photographs as a
woman who showed up often at
the apartment as recently as two
weeks ago and perhaps later.
The Justice Department
sources discounted a report that
Kathy Boudin, wanted for
questioning about the explosion
of a bomb factory in New
Yorks Greenwich Village which

killed three persons, had also
been a visitor to the Chicago
apartment.
Miss Boudin, 26, has not been
reported seen since the
explosion March 6 and is
believed to be in Canada, the
sources said.
HOWEVER, POLICE said
they did find in the Chicago
apartment a book with the name
of Nicholas Freudenberg in it.
Freudenberg is another
Weatherman activist who is also
being sought in connection with
the Greenwich Village blast.

Two pest exterminators
Monday night came upon the
cache of explosives and weapons
in the Chicago apartment.
Police and FBI raiders said
they found 59 sticks of
dynamite, fuses, blasting caps,
plastic envelopes, acid, an Ml
rifle, a .22 caliber rifle, two
12-gauge shotguns, and literature
on the preparation of explosives.
IF DETONATED, authorities
said, the explosives would have
leveled the 50-unit apartment
building and could have
destroyed the residential block.
Bemadine Dohm holds the
title of secretary-treasurer of the
militant Students for a
Democratic Society and is a
leader of die SDS most radical
wing, the Weathermen.
A warrant for her arrest was
issued March 16 when she failed
to appear in court to answer
charges of leading an attack on
three Chicago policemen during
the Weathermens days of
wrath violence here last
October.
In New York police have
identified Ismael L. Brown, a
City College senior who died in
an East Village tenement last
Saturday, as the man who
planted an explosive device in
the Electric Circus discotheque
March 22, it was announced
Tuesday.

Police said the identification
was made from photographs by
an employe of the Circus, which
also is located in the East
Village.
DETECTIVES SAID they
believed Brown set the bomb,
which injured 17 persons!
because the owners of the
discotheque had refused to give
full proceeds from the night of
March 22 for bail for the 13
black Panthers awaiting trial in
Manhattan on 1969 bomb
conspiracy charges.
However, Stan Freeman,
president of the Electric Circus,
said he did not think the bomb
was planted under Panther
orders because Brown was not a
member of the militant
organization.
Freeman said the Circus had
conducted a benefit for the
Black Panther defendants and
the Chicago Seven defendants a
week prior to the bombing and
both groups had expressed
satisfaction with the funds they
had received.
Brown and his roommate,
Godwin A. Bernard, were in the
process of assembling a pipe
bomb similar to the one that
exploded in the Circus when it
exploded in their apartment,
police said. Bernard survived but
is in critical condition at
Bellevue Hospital.



i - (jM'iij' m ~
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MILK THING
Linda Burr (left) and Verna McKinney, are the top students being
saluted in local radio and TV by the Northeast Florida milk producers
association in their "Milk Think" commercials.
O Connell On TV Program
To Talk On Budget Needs

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will provide an
analysis of institutional budget
needs and discuss legislation
being sought by state universities
tonight during a special 8 pm.
program on WUFT-TV.
The 1970 legislative session
begins next Tuesday at
Tallahassee with the university
seeking to restore more than $lB
million in budget reductions
made by Florida Gov. Claude R.
Kirk Jr.
WUFT-TV Program Director

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Mark Damen will question
President OConnell on specific
budgetary effects created by the
governors recommendations.
Governmental reorganization as
it affects personnel management
within the State University
System also will be a part of the
30-minute telecast.
The universitys proposed
1970-71 budget reflected a
request of $112,657,765. Gov.
Kirk sliced that amount to
$94,595,515 a reduction of
$18,062,250.

UNIVERSITY SENATES PLAN

Evaluation Brings Criticism

By GINA SCHRAMM
Alligator Writer
Initial reaction to the
University Senates adoption of
the teacher evaluation resolution
by Omicron Delta Kappa and
Florida Blue Key was that it
wasnt damaging.
However, Ralph Glatfelter,
7AS, president of ODK, feels
unhappy about it because it had
not provided for making the
results public.
TEACHER evaluation
without the results being made
public just does not meet the
needs of the students, 4
Drug Talk
Tonights Dialogue will
feature as its guest speaker, Djr.
Kenneth Finger, dean of the
College of Pharmacy.
Dialogue, presented every
Tuesday and Thursday over
WRUF, will feature a discussion
on drug abuse, and why certain
drugs cost more under a
different name.
The program is produced by
Florida Blue Key and is aired at
11:05 pm.
Telephone response is taken
over 392-0772 and 392-0773.
THE GOLD COAST
BOOMS AGAIN!
featuring
Bettar Sarvicas for U of F
College Inn Restaurant
undar naw managamant
Gator Shop
Mena Sportswear
Malones Bookstore
Books and Supplies
The Copy Center
5 cant Xarox Copies 4 cants
ya'll Come
Thank you
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THERE WAS A TIME WHEN,
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YOU HAD TO WEAR SOMETHING WRONG.
You went to a party. And
the guys wore pretty *B"
the same
blazers
whenever someone
tried to break the boredom
by
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ipp*'
gV->
Because he was
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they were
new
a costume for
the
Then the liberation.
People like us started | l|ir
making shaped clothing.
Soft shoulder shape. With And with expensive tailoring. So long as it's tasteful, '
wide lapels, high vents and And now it's become of course.
deep pocket flaps. s£afptabletb wear anything ADM*|f tTfTtD
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Glatfelter said.
FBK President Don
Middlebrooks said his
organization agreed with ODK
on the results being made public,
and we feel that more attention
should be given to evaluation,
especially in areas of
promotion.
ODK will have to accept the
resolution, Glatfelter said,
even if it does not go far
enough. We have every intention
of making teacher evaluation
mandatory and every teachers
results made public.
GLATFELTER also said ODK
will go before the Board of
Regehts and the administration
again to get this mandatory
evaluation passed.
We have one of the best
evaluating systems in the
country it is not biased, and is
fair. We have teachers at UF
who cannot teach and ODK
intends to do all it can to see

Florida
Experimental
College
Registration Week: March 31 -April 4
in the Plaza of the Americas
11:00-1:00
or call: 376-7539 (9-4 PM)
376-8044 (4-midnight)

Thursday, April 2,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

that these teachers improve or
do not get tenure, Glatfelter
said.
Vice President Frederick W.
Connor, Office of Academic
Affairs, coordinator of the
evaluation program, said,
ODKs system is very good;
however, each college was asked
to work out the best system to
serve its needs.
There will be teacher
evaluation and it will be used,
Connor said.
Welcome Back A TO's
Best of Luck This
Quarter
j Love
Little Sisters

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 2,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

You think the pressure is getting to old Smitty?
Submarine Deterrent

WASHINGTON It is the custom of the armed
services to bow politely to each others weapons
systems -in public at least which is why Adm.
Hyman Rickover, who directs our nuclear underseas
fleet, makes periodic statements on behalf of the
ABM.
But if Congress were to call Adm. Rickover and
ask him to testify under oath, it might be possible
to save the more than sl2 billion Richard Nix-on is
about to venture on the second stage of the
antiballistic missile system.
Rickover would certainly have to say that his
own Polaris fleet could overwhelm an ABM system;
and if Polaris can do it, the Russians can do it, too.
That is why the sl2 billion we are about to spend
on ABM is a tragic waste of money. If the SS-9 has
the accuracy that the Pentagon says it does,two
SS-9s equipped with MIRV would have a 99 per cent
chance of destroying the ABMs missile site radar.
Mr. Nixons Safeguard will have 12 of these radar
installations. Simple arithmetic leads to a cost
exchange ratio of $1 billion worth of SS-9s to
render a sl2 billion ABM system blind, and
therefore useless.
The Senate will probably take a hard look at the
Nixon proposal, first because it is a lot of money in
an election year and second because so much expert
opinion asserts that it will not work.
But a third argument is beginning to surface
among those who study life and death matters. It is
that the Safeguard ABM system is designed to
protect a land-based ICBM which is on its way out
and will be useless as a second-strike weapon by
1980.
Thus the case for enlarging our submarine
capacity emerges as both an anti ABM argument and
as a positive alternative.
Three arguments are presented on behalf of the
submarine. First, it is undetectable except by
chance. Naval experts have searched in vain for any
developments which seem likely to make it less so in
the future.
Second, it is reliable, far more so than the
Minuteman missiles which now stuff our land-based
p silos. The first Polaris submarine put to sea in 1961.
For three years thereafter, when unreliability was to
be expected, no submarine was late in deployment,
no patrol was aborted, no submarine returned early

Alligator Staff
nwp wsvmn wwp uoviwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor
Den Vining Jeff Brain
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
Earl Hartman John Sugg
News Editors

Frank Mankiawicz-
Tom Bradan
from patrol, no communication message was missed,
most of the missiles each ship carried were ready for
firing 99 per cent of the time and, as of 1968, 59 out
of 61 test firings of the current version of the
missile were successful.
Compare that, if you will, with the record of the
land-based Minuteman. The Air Force says test
firings have been 70 per cent effective for
Minuteman I and 89 per cent effective for
Minuteman 11, but the observable record is worse. It
has a distressing tendency not to go off at the
moment when distinguished visitors (Sen. Milton
Young of North Dakota, for example) are standing
by to ooh and aah.
Finally, the future of the submarine deterrant
seems promising. The Navy is now in the predesign
stage of an underwater long-range missile system to
be known inevitably as ULMS which will extend the
range of a submarine-launched missle from the
present 2,800 miles to at least 5,000.
It will require a larger submarine, and would
carry at least 24 instead of 16 missiles. It would run
deeper and would probably be somewhat slower.
But it would give the United States a real deterrent
to replace the obsolescent land-based system which
we propose to defend with another system that
many experts think will not work at all.
It may be added, even if impudently, that it
would also give us a system which would not require
Mr. Nixon and Defense Secretary Melvin Laird to
change their minds regularly as to whether it
defends against Russia or China.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
'Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
v of the University of Florida.

editorial
The Federalist
Era Revisited?
The Federalist Era in America was marked by a belief
that the landed gentry should rule.
&
The theory held that those with the most to lose should
be in control of Americas destiny.
The little man was ignored. He, without education or
money, was powerless to improve his lot. The growth of
education and increased voting rights rescued him from the
bottom of the political order.
Unfortunately, this era may be returning to the UF in the
form of a $5 hike in tuition; pardon us, the student activity
fee.
Perhaps we have a warped sense of priorities and perhaps
we have a narrow understanding of education, but we feel
the classroom is still the reason we attend school. Any
tuition increases should go to education, not activities.
At this time particularly, when Florida is ably led by
Gov. Claude Kirk in a war of attrition against higher
education, the UF needs staples, not caviar. To paraphrase
William Jennings Bryan, Governor Kirk seems intent on
crucifying Florida education on a cross of pennies.
The demands being considered for the student body are
similar to dressing a scrawny Christmas tree with 14 carat
tinsel. The UF may need capital improvements in other
areas more.
Faculty and staff salaries are not the best either. One
graduate student who left to teach in Georgia claimed that
teaching in Florida would cost him SI,OOO a year.
Fortunately, more of our professors do not use that
rationale.
In light of these facts, we are opposed to the increase in
the student activity fee. If the money were going toward the
improvement of the UF educational facilities, the story
might be different. But under these circumstances we
cannot condone another burden upon the student of
marginal means.
Twenty dollars, four quarters activity fees, may not seem
like much until you need it and dont have it.
And besides, twentieth century federalism has little
appeal to us.

-

J ikitr
ip



Staff Writings

A test. How do you lower the
crime rate? A. You make more
things legal. This simple
approach to the problem soaring
national crime rate should be
considered by those who call for
a war on crime.
It is open to the charge that it
is a too simple solution to a
complex problem but, I never
thought a complex solution
should be sought for its own
sake.
Consider the offenses that are
crimes in the legal sense of the
word that never really hurt
anyone. The crimes without
victims: the so-called vices;
gambling, prostitution, most sex
offenses, etc.
This conduct which is
considered by segments of the
population evil is being forced
on those who choose of their
own free will to engage in it. The
irony is that few are hurt in
these activities, if indeed anyone
is hurt, except those freely
engaging in it.
The outlawing of these
practices doesnt stop them.
It brings the free enterprise
principle into play. Where there
is a market and a strong demand
for a particular product someone
will provide it. In this case
organized crime.
While it is becoming
increasingly unsafe to walk the

The Communistic State

MR. EDITOR:
The U.S. has an interesting arrangement
with the communist world. Somehow this
country manages to allow pro-red-groups
to operate in the U.S. while the red
government does not even allow the
existence of an opposition group
anywhere.
If that reasoning seems illogical, consider
the position of all the red universities in
the world that do not allow any kind of
group except those that are party oriented;
because supposedly they do not represent
the will of the people.
The reds are smart. Why allow a group
that is openly opposed to the regime
operate anywhere. The communists know
that the final goal of these groups is to
dedicate themselves to revolution.
Therefore, the communist leader
maintained that groups with such liberal
ideas and imperialistic philosophies could
not be tolerated in the communistic state.
The last statement is the key one: In
the communistic state. Obviously the
communists concern is with the people.
The fact that they will not like
proimperialistic groups is the crux of the
communist leaders reasoning. If these
pro-westem groups are allowed recognition
in communistic campuses, the people may
LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear In the Alligator,
letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300
words in length. A writer's name may be
withheld from publication only if he
shows just cause. No letters signed with a
pseudonym will be accepted for
publication. editor reserves the right
to edit interest of space.
accompany all letters.
11 jiii ...

Consider The Offenses

streets of our cities, while four
out of five serious crimes go
unsolved, while the incidences of
violent crime skyrocket, the
police are wasting valuable
manpower and time raiding
houses of prostitution, breaking
into gambling establishments,
and staking out restrooms.
These crimes could be
eliminated by repealing the laws
that pertain to them. They can
be placed in the category of
picking your nose and eating
eggs with your fingers
repulsive but not illegal.
New laws are probably not
needed to deal with the crime
problem. A libertarian approach
of repealing laws rather than
passing them is better.
Research into the laws making
certain types of conduct a crime
would probably turn up dozens
which could be repealed.
The prestige of police officers
is going down partly because
they are compelled to enforce
laws a larger and larger segment
of the population regards as
stupid and repressive.
Repealing laws instead of
passing them has a multitude of
advantages.
The prestige of police will
raise as they are enforcing those
laws which really important,
crimes of violence and

get very upset, stop paying taxes, and retire
to Siberia.
The denial of recognition reaches all of
us. No campus group on any campus is
beyond such decisions. No matter how well
established, or how well respected it be.
Definitely the world is naive in matters
of education. Education is supposed to
expose all students to all ideas, from which
the students could choose and pick for
themselves, and use those ideas as they see
fit.
The communist worlds denial of
recognition of groups that oppose the red
doctrine on campuses carries an insult to
s the red students. Since a minority of the
imperialistic group on red campuses could
not hope to overthrow the government of
the people it must hope to do so with ideas
of free elections, freedom of expression
and association and all the other
imperialistic freedoms of a true democracy.
The inability of the communist students to
see through the loopholes of the
imperialistic ideologies is a serious
indictment of the communist educational
system.
Therefore, the communist leaders should
reconsider their denial of recognition.
Granted, such an action would require a
great communist courage. Granted, two
wrongs do not make one right, but neither
a one wrong make one right. POWER TO
THE PEOPLE.
JAY SOTO, 7AS
Pay Tribute
MR. EDITOR:
I sent a letter to the Alligator on Feb.
14, which in essence^was Supposed to be a
tribute ftSHPete Maravich! The letter was 1/
written the night after Maravich arid 1 LSU
had defeated the Gators, with Maravich
- - ~ +

independent redistribution of
the wealth (theft).
The police will have more

Satire

Old MacDonald Vs. DSU

The ducks have declared war on the racist
UF, according to a statement by Duck Student
Union chairman Ritz Quacker. The challenge
came in the wake of charges that the DSU
Information Minister was consumed at a duck
dinner in the J. Wayne Reitz Unions plush
Arredondo Room.
This is just another attempt by old
MacDonald to get the bad ducks out of the
university system, said Quacker. The DSU
chairman was referring to UF President Stephen
C. MacDonald, whose policies while manager of
his well known farm have come under fire of
late.
Old MacDonald had a farm, shouted
Quacker as assembled DSU followers chanted the
DSU solidarity song, Eeie. Eeie. Oh. And on
that farm he had some ducks, said Quacker.
Amongst a quack, quack here and a quack
there, were legitimate calls for improvement
treatment for ducks, charged Quacker. He
d; limed many ducks for freedom ended as
pillows.
Meanwhile, there were reports that a duck bit
a student who threw a Batman T-shirt in the
Reitz Union duck pond. Ducks have, in the past,
complained that battered beannies, draft cards

scoring a record of 52 points. I remind you
that the letter was written 3 weeks before
Winter Frolics.
Finally you printed my letter over a
month later, making it appear to say that I
would have preferred Pete Maravich to
Winter Frolics. Let it be known that I was
only attempting to pay tribute to a great
basketball player, not making any
reference to IFC frolics.
RODNEY MARGOL, 2UC
Reflections
Reflections upon leaving the UF leave
me with mixed emotions. I am pleased that
there is a more general awareness with will
known problems that abound in all areas of
our existence. But, there have never been
problems as overwhelming as there exist
today and it is not noble but normal to be
concerned with them.
That leads to the displeasing side of the
general movement of awareness that exists
today. It resembles throwing a match in a
pool of gas, a big flame at first, then
burning out.
The flamers are all around. They are the
super straights from a year ago who are
now heavy and into it.
the small society

Hot Vool A&K&W IT TZ> -rWOSB BoTTeN rev
A / MrT f^V^ALAW
Te&NA^e^S
in- ,..>., - 4-2 tCtfAc**

man hours to work on those
crimes, the courts case load will
be reduced and hence a speedier

FORUM:
C Aim ml Viaut J

Thunday, April 2,1970, The Florida Alligator,

By Fred Vollrath

By Reg Crowder

and discarded Rockefeller buttons thrown into
the water made swimming dangerous.
We are the most oppressed minority on the
American continent, said Quacker.
The ducks on this campus have no voice in
the administration, no voice in student
government, and have been segregated to the
Reitz Union duck pond, said Quacker.
When is the last time you read about a great
duck in out nations history, queried Quacker?
Farley Shepherd, student government
president recently re-nominated by the Sheep
and Goats party said, Some ducks just dont
know their place.
Shepherd said if the ducks arent happy with
their pond, we ought to ship em all back to the
swamps.
MacDonalds legal aid Chicken Little would
not indicate what action the university might
take, but noted, Birds of a feather flock
together, and A bird in the hand is worth two
in the bush.
Hearing this Shepherd said, I didnt realize
we had a bush left on campus, and launched an
investigation to find that bush and away to erect
a building in its place.

It will be interesting to see the Andy
Kramers ten years from now, settled
comfc r table in their middle class positions,
with their fundamental principles
concerning everything having changed as
completely and easily as they have done
with the advent of the current fads.
We can only hope that when the peace
and awareness fad is over, some residue will
remain that will justify it as having been
worthwhile.
TOM ASKEY, 4AS
7.
Rotary Thanks
To All The Students At The University
of Florida:
We would like to express our deep
appreciation for the tremendous warmth
and sincerity shown the Rotary
Connection by the student body.
The campus is really out-of-sight, and
things are getting together in Gainesville
more so than anyplace else we have been in
the country.
We feel that Gainesville will always be a
second home for the Rotary Connection.
ROTARY CONNECTION
by Brickmon

trial, and individual freedom will
be increased and the power of
the government reduced.

Page 9



l, Tha Florida Aligotor, Thursday, April 2, 1070

Page 10

WINN OIXU SIOIS. INC -COfYWGHT-I*7o
fakem Special* 'Hs&Ek ASTOKALtOMNDS |1
Rolls .. 2 39 c gmgm rflLlftt n Bar
DIXIE DARLING GEM SUGAR OR COCONUT rIDF Dr BP Bn****- (P' : ID
nnniitc Q0 C w " 1
WIIUI9 PKG W # WQjFmmWj Limifon* of your with $3 or more purcha.e DP.
.ji^ H^^9l3lmr^ maxwell house all 1.|,8
COFFEE .. s 59* JQ
Tlff\B AD BAI v% l wmitf MONOGRAM LONG GRAIN
9 C Fancy Rice 3 * 39*
aUITfcKUCN I S Crt Green Beans... 6 W Peanut Butter 79*
I i gKk a a a acrarr. 6 $ r j e ii y w
A fjf 1 White Potatoes .... 6 s l Briquettes 20 *= 89
w| THRIFTY MAID VEGETABLE OR BLUE ARROW OR 5 LBS. COLD WATER A
Tomato Soup 8 S*1" Detergent 89
sizf
afejir beans
KLEENEX FACIAL ML'c%SgS Plw JAV£
i f/rOMAIOEsk
HMI-....4 *i" A A Iff f ,^m^SHSTU^Z
Paper Towels *1- MR 3 A W% I P
Tomato Catsup 3 BCIW
DIXIE DARLING BUTTERMILK fl Wk 3CQ
BREAD 4 I
W REGULAR SWEET JUICY YOUNG TENDFR
M D Potatoes .10 69 c Oranges .. 5 & 49* Pole Beans... 23*
Rnnnnnc 1/ { ****** 2 19 ** berries. 3. *1- AppTesT:ri3
DUnUIIUd # T 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N W 6TH ST
U * HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.
i ISM I Kitli/ iisl*- I m/ OWSIS? IKJ If |M gisHD;
E ilpf IW J=SJ iffry ""IHIHf |



PRICES GOOD WED. NOON THRU jHHk bTJj' ilZ* 5Q<
WED. NOON, APRIL 1- APRIL 8 ST
KVJW Franks
W-D BRAND U.S. CHOICE BONELESS BOTTOM I £Sf ~TIT.
Round RoastHMi-
L EXTRA LEAN BEEF
LB
CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF BONELESS EYE OF SWIFT PREMIUM SAVE 70c #
Round Roost $ 1 39 Canned Hams. .4 *3 AQ<
Round Roast *1 Fresh Picnics 49 e
Round Steak s l l9 Chuck Roast 69 c
U.S.D.A. CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF SIRLOIN OR
Top Round Stook M 29 Shoulder Roost . 99 c s. choice boneless delmonic^^^^^
T-Bone Steak ... $ 1 39 Sliced 8ac0n.... 59 c jTeAK
Ground Beef. .10 $ 5 59 Rump Roast *1 29 IM 49 W
W-D BRAND SEMI-BONELESS RIB T I Iq! A
mk KJ
p STEAK*
UnfeS I 9 BORDENS SLICED SINGIV WRAPPED AMERICAN w-D BRAND LONGHORN
Kffil IP A |M39 Cheese Food ss*!** Cheese 89'
fyHTi SI M hhbm 4 V HE"rL A o< - t
tt save u IIH# vIIGGSG pkg O # 3iICK vIIGGSG p G 39
"E-Z CARVE % W sy Biscuits .. 2 Ahs 19 c Fish Fillets . 79'
LB*
WINN-DIXIE STORES. INC.-COPYRIGHT-1970
fcAi e ",Pk ",PkdH
dH ",PkdH OCOMA ASSORTED
2T £ ea< 3?l
# WHIP 1 Ip ~m,iera A
I XlPk DIXIANA WHOLE Jk ESKIMO ICE CREAM
SB W Kernel Corn E2 59 c W Sandwiches 79 c
v quarts I IP Cake Roll PKG 59 c w Corn-on-Cob 49
V Fry Potatoes ... 2 r 49 c W Orange Nip 'Ss 39 c
O Green Peas.-. ES 59 c fp Perch Diaaers 59*
MRS. FILBERTS PAN
V Margarine 2 p KGS. 66* V Breaded Oysters p KG. 79*
w Hawaiian Punch Mm s l W Vegetables JL ... S 59*
Q Salisbury Steak... s l 4 Cooked Shrimp %: S I M Coffee Rich ~
U.S. No. IGA. RED SWEET FRESH CHILLED CM AO U.S. RUSSET BAKING "Wt\r
Potatoes 15* Orange J ce3o s l Potatoes 10 79
JUMBO SUNKIST LARGE FRESH HEADS ESCAROLE. ENDIVE. ROJU.NE T IZZQ . W
Lemons.. .6 49* Lettuce... 2 . 49* Salad Greens .10* |ej R 59
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. N
HI WAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST. morion nonk
SUPERBRAND "Soft" GOOD LUCK (100 FREE STAMPS) VINE RIPE wuns p KG. 39*
Margarine 3 s l Margarine 5 *1 Cantaloupe 2- *1 Asr, ^c o
Margarine 2 !i 66* Margarine 3 £ s l #o Eggs 2. 1*

Thursday, April 2.1970, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April */ lfe7o

FOR SALE
A FREE QUITAR LESSON Phone
372-3229 of come by 1826 W. (Jnlv.
Ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(A-109-st-p).
1966 Honda 305 Scrambler Excellent
Condition, low mileage,, new front
and rear sprockets, extra sprockets,
and plugs S3OO 373-2319 or N. W.
4th Lane. (A-109-3t-p]j.
Reel to reel component stereo, cralg
deck, criterion spkrs., dyna amp,
scotch tape clear, new, sell for loss
call Mac at 373-2394.
(A-109-st-p).
1970 Honda SL9O Scrambler. 1700
miles. Perfect condition. Call
392-8302 between 3 and 5 PM. 8300.
(A-109-2t-p).
Microscope, new Olympus Binocular
with 4 objectives 3 sets oculars reho
light and camera adapter, case save
S2OO Call 372-0590. (A3t-109-p).
Surfboard for sale: 10 foot king;
local make; good condition no dings,
clear with blue foam stringer; S3O.
Call Shelia 392-9631. (A-109-st-p).
1963 Rambler station wagon classic,
V-8 automatic, radio and heater.
Excellent condition. Call 372-7821
After IPM. (A-109-st-p).
Adorable part poodle puppies. Have
excellent care, shots. Good with
children. 6 wks. old. Must see to
appreciate. $25. Call 372-3489
anytime. (A-3t-109-p).
1967 Honda S9O. Excellent
Condition. Runs like new. Less than
4,000 miles. Helmet Included $165.
Call Bob at 373-1751. (A-109-3t-p).
_ /^j LAST P.A P.A-rISIS
rISIS P.A-rISIS M~ W litk St \1 A
e Dunwich Horror S
J STARTS TOMORROW J
One of the years
10 best pictures!*
Robert Red ford and
Katherine Ross
e 'The Sundance Kid l
and his girlfriend' ?
S this time they J
enforce the law
J they don't break it. J
tell them Willie J
m BOY IS HERE

~~
A I e
I33UUiI X, J e
I itn m. w, im si, e
| MARIO A tm\
: THOMAS aALDA
w

jqb
it
.J
PwiHf GmimiivllU 1 LAST DAY
BT7TaIIIiTIVf e
I mw. UrivmHr 4w. I 5
J "BEN HUR" :
J
l STARTS TOMORROW £
: vincent price :
: CHRISTOPHER LEE l
PETER CUSHING t
: TERROR AND l
l TORTURE RUN \
l RAMPANT! :
iwinrmvireTnvyni

LOS r bright carpet colors... restore
them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-tf-c)
Car & cycle 1965 HONDA CBI6O
tools, good condition 1965, VW 113
Good Cond. cycle S3OO, car S7OO
call 373-2915. (A-st-109-p)
VESPA Scooter runs perfectly.
Current Inspection sticker, parking
decal. Two seats, new paint, 100 mi.'
per gallon. Only $99. Call 376-5962.
(A-3t-110)
MICROSCOPE leltz binocular, 3x,
45x, 100 X oil objectives, lOx oculars,
variable light, med. school approved,
4 yrs. old, $450, Call 378-1762 after
5 PM. (A-110-4t-p).
Tired of walking to classes? Financial
Problems Forqss Sale of 1970
HONDA CL-90 Less than 100 miles
373-2912 evenings. (A-2t-109-p)
foh rent
For Rent: l-arge Bedroom, Private
Bath, Porch, and entrance, S6O/mo.
Call Ann Sheridan 392-3581.
(B-109-3t-p).
1 or 2 MALE ROOMMATES.
Landmark Apts. no. 26. 1111 S.W.
16th Ave. Most beautiful Apartment
Complex In Gainesville. (70%
GIRLS) Call 378-1074.
(B-109-st-p).
Sublease Uni. Gardens 2 bdr. grad
student bid $l7O/mo. until June 15.
Call 378-5 955 or UG office.
(B-109-3t-p).
One male roommate Lankmark Apt.
60 1111 S.W. 16th Ave. Lease until
Aug. or June A/C on pool. Full
kitchen Call 373-2207 $46.25 mo.
(B-109-2t-p).
Single rooms utilities linens, maid
$l5O/quarter. Near campus Call
378-7222 or see 115 N.W. 10th St.
Evenings. (B-109-st-p).
Nice two bedroom apt. only five
blocks from campus. Air
conditioned, gas heated. Immediate
occupancy. $125/mo. Call 378-5038,
or 392-9367. (B-109-3t-p).
2 Bedroom duplex apt. Just south of
The University Inn. For Information
call 372-6333. Leave name and
phone no. for J. Pozln. Will contact
you. (B-109-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts, bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, AC $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Avenue.
372-7111 Grad. Students preferred.
(B-109-ts-c).
Need two roommates $45 a month
$135 for the quarter + utilities,
security deposit payed. Lease runs
only to end of quarter. 373-1698
past 4. (B-3t-109-p).
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
1 and 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
fully carpeted and alr-conditloned.
Most sound proofed In town. All
electric kitchen, lots of closets,
laundry and pool. Pets Welcome.
Phone 376-0635 for rental rates.
(B-7t-109-p)
Room for single man across from
S.F.J.C. Quiet neighborhood S4O.
mo. 378-5868. 104 S.W. Bth Str.
(B-3t-110-p)
Large comer room 4 windows, 2
closets 2 blocks campus. Phone,
kitchen privileges, day, week, month,
ample parking 378-4645.
(B-lt-109-p).
WANTED
Singles! How about a private bdrm.
close to campus, cen A/H, full carpet
complete elect, kitchen, Spanish
furniture, pool, gas grills, laundry
facilities, patio, Dn/area, GIF parties
- all for S7O/mo. INCLUDING util.
La Mancha has It all I Openings for
1-4 students. Call 378-7224 Nowl
(C-109-10t-p).
Roomate wanted to share apt. 32.50
per month. 1 block from campus.
Call 372-6205. (C-109-2t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE: For
Williamsburg Apt. SSO/mo. Call LOIS
372-4944 after 5 PM. (C-109-st-p).
One male roommate wanted (spring
t/or summer) for 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
central air Apt one block from
Morman Hall $45 plus utilities
I7&-1272. (C-109-2t-p).
1 FEMALE roommate needed
IMMEDIATELY Landmark
$46.25/mo. Call ANYTIME
378-4941. (C-10t-107-p)
HELP!!! Desperately need femfle
oommate La Bonne Vie immediate
>ccupancy till June. For more Info.
>lease call 376-3056 or 373-1368.
C-IQ9-st-p).
Female roommate for house 3 miles
from campus. Own room; central air.
SSO/month, share utilities. 373-1027.
[C-3t-109-p)
Male roommate wanted for Spring
Quarter. Gatortown apt. No Deposit
g$U ?7§-JSUP. anytime. (c-st-io9- P )

WANTED
PR. ADV & MKG MAJORS:
Representatives needed for
on-campus marketing & sales
promotion program. Liberal
commissions. Call Fred 372-9705.
(C-109-4t-p).
Listeners Wanted Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
engllsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (C-109-10t-c).
One Male Rmmate: to share 1 bdrm.
apt In Sin City. Pool, Cable TV and
air. cond. S4O/mo. Call 373-1742.
(C-st-109-p).
Female roommate for 2 bedr.
poolside + woodslde Landmark apt.
107 spr. and/or summer qtr.
dishwasher, good parking call
anytime 373-1208 or come by.
(C-3t-109-p).
Wanted: Male roommate to share 3
br. apt. with 3 others A/C ww carpet,
pool, cable TV, very reasonable,
poolside, Call Sandy 392-8860.
(C-109-2t-c).
Non smoking grad, student wanted to
share lovely house near Mall.
$ 15-week. Call Susie 378-3606.
(C-109-3t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE: two
bedroom apt. to share with one other
girt. Close to campus. A/C S6O per
mo. Grad student preferred.
376-7611 anytime. (C-109-4t-p).
MAN'S BICYCLE NOW Call Mike
Henson 378-0952 apt. 22.
Williamsburg. (C-3t-109-p)
Need one male roommate for strlite
apart. 38 per mth share util, AC etc.
Call 372-4168 convinlent to camp.
(C-3t-109-p)
2 Male Roommates for 2-bedroom
house, one block north of campus
1316 N.W. 1 Ave 378-8895. 33.75
month + utilities. No deposit ask for
Pete. (C-st-109-p)
Help good people 2001 S.W. 135th
SL needs a couple (In any form) ora
single for roomates. Large bedroom
private bath AC good price.
376-7402. (C-2t-109-p)
One female roommate wanted to
move Into Landmark Apt.
Immediately. Call anytime 378-4849.
(C-3t-109-p)
Desperate Male roomate La Bonne
Vie 47.50 a month, cen H/AC, pool,
call 372-7252 after 4:00 p.m.
(C-st-109-p)
Wanted: One male roommate for La
Bonne Vie apt. Pay an average of $34
per month + V* utilities, Phone
373-1448. Lease ends in June Apt.
354. (C-3t-109-p)
HELD WANTED
Male 20 yrs. old for telephone
solicitation work. 10 hrs. per week,
no experience necessary. Call
376-2043 for an interview.
(E-st-109-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON Phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Unlv.
Ave. and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(E-109-st-p).
SECRETARIES-TYPISTS: 70 WPM
Shorthand and 45 WPM Typing.
Positions open on the main campus
and In the Health Center. Apply at
Central Employment, 2nd Floor of
the Hub, or telephone 392-1201 for
testing appointment. UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-107-st-c)
AUTOS
64 FALCON CONVERTIBLE
excellent condition $495. Call
anytime at 376-2738. (G-st-109-p)
MERCEDES-BENZ 1964 190 Sedan.
AMFM airconditioning. Radial
tires, excellent condition $1,595. Call
378-5068. (G-st-109-p)
Red bug-eyed *69 Sprite. Rebuilt
engine and carburetor. New Interior.
Needs work on transmission. Will sell
for $225. Call 378-9129.
(G-109-lt-p).
LEMANS 1968 Alr-cond. full power,
HURST 4-speed Mags and Polyglass,
engine In perfect cond. must sell
soon. Evenings 373-2827.
(G-109-st-p).
1963 Corvalr, excellent condition,
60,000 miles perfect for second car
call Bob at 376-9781 after 7:00 p. m.
(G-3t-109-p).
1962 roll over V W engine In great
shape, would make excellent beach
buggy must sell now, call 373-1451.
(G-st-109-p).
PERSONAL
Roommate wanted to share 2
bedroom apt. Furnished, complete
kitchen. Very large and nice.
Immediate occupancy 314 N W 14
St. Apt. 3 Apt. 378-0898.
(J-2t-109-p).
GIRLS blstlnctlve CUSTOM'
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Dresses sl4. Add $3 for
1-day service if desired. Phone
378-0320. (J-10t-107-p)
bestowed
(J-st-IQ7-p) ...

PERSONAL
WANTED Former Peace Corps
volunteer to speak at high school.
Transportation provided. Martha
Oestrelch 378-3430. (J-3t-109-p)
Welcome Back Special! with first
purchase everyday this week a SI.OO
coupon toward any article at THE
BAUBLE BAG custom-made jewelry,
535 SW 4th Ave. Open 1 pm.
(J-st-107-p)
Spring Hea Market: Don't know
what to do with the crinoline aunt
hllda gave you for Christmas? Come,
sell it & buy someone elses fringed
parasol. Union tent Apr. 28.
(J-It-109-c)

Mobile eonte< s2s first prize,
deadline Apr. 20, applications at the
Union rm. 310 (J-3t-109-c)
Campus Yo-Yo, Hulahoop, Jump
Rope, and Ballbat contest. Take out
your old yoyo and work It back Into
condition. At the Union May 1.
(J-st-109-c)
Reitz Union tent revival Thurs.
apr. 30 from 2-6 P.M. The Empty
tent will be provided this one day for
anyone to come Rap on anything.
(J-st-109-c)
CHI PHI BROTHERS
Congratulations on moving Into your
new housel Best of luck this quarter.
Love your little Sisters, (j-lt-109-p)
WELCOME BACK FOLKS the bent
card coffee house presents real music
real movies real coffee (free) real
fun for real people! (J-3t-109-p).
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Unlv.
Ave and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(J-St-109-p),
no. 24 the games peopleplay! Cat
and mouse was ours. Maybe our
paths will cross again. I dig baseball
too. Beat JU. (J-2t-109-p)
I did for both of us. A trip to New
York Is always great, but this time It
was special. The reason? The most
exciting just out collection of
underground clothes ever. Plus
exclusive represntation of a
collection of Imported clothes sold
only In the best N. Y. shopes. Marsha
Dave Stan or Susie will be glad to sell
them to you at the SPANISH MAIN
1642 W. Unlv. Ave. open 10-10
Mon-Sat. (J-3t-109-p).
Chlqulta Rlaz: On this, the 22nd
anniversary of your birth, with the
tacit approval of my agency I reveal
to you, an immigrant, my true
Identity. At considerable risk I
remain, Edward Everett Horton.
(J-lt-109-p)

MlrtiftpE I HELD OVER EXTRA DAYS... HURRY!
I yjs V ||T -- WV#
Walt Disney jiles veuves
wfL ystawavs
J IfTTV "THE
pjalEar LOOK j? LASS
I Telphw 370-2434 Li I WAR
|| TheSatnilythat I
laytogether fl
ytays together! I
-MA ;j|
MNGLE STROUD VARSI

LOST & FOUND
LOST campus Mar 16, male
miniature collie, sable, white. Mack.
City tag 1352. Call 372-4542 or
392-0277. REWARD. (L-st-107-p)
Lost BOOTS IE, black & white cat w/
I. D. tag In vlscinlty of Unlv. P. O.
Reward for return. Call 372-5713
after 5 P p. M. (L-3t-109-p).
Lost Deltzgen slide rule. If found
please call 378-5901. The name Is
Ralph Barlow reward. (L-3t-109-p).
FOUND: Camera left at 624 N.W.
19th Ave. Sophomore from Beacon,
N.Y. with 3.9 average. Please call
372-3203 624 N.W. 19th Ave.
(L-3t-109-p)
SERVICES
Ruby's ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby
Mills. (M-10t-107-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
WEDDING INVITATIONS
PRICES ARE LOW IN IDAHO, 100
custom printed only $5.95. Send for
free catalog and samples, to Arnold
Agency, 206 East Main, Rexburg,
Idaho. (M-4t-107-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-3 7t-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
TRIUMPH CITY authorized triumph
sales & service. 1970 models from
$745 to $1,750. Located north of
city limits on 441, behind the
Handlebar Lounge. New building
soon. 376-9345. (M-7t-109-p)
LATIN AMERICANISTS Need
biographic data for your research?
Write the Caribbean Information
Institute, P.O. Box 4824, El Paso,
Texas 79914.



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"Super-Right" western Beef Chuck End Sliced Smoked Brillient Frozen Golden Fried
ROASTt6BS BACONsi49c SHRIMP ss-89c
"Super-Right" Sliced Beef
LIVER 49$ ROAST 59$ FILLETS jrs9s
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With This Coupon When You Buy £ or/ta a mm a a Mya Sj) OWEN SPRAY 79C I
WHEATIES CEREAL I|B WbAZOLA |g| | 000 th*ouh *4.70 | I
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Thursday, April 2,1970, Th FKyhto AlMgrtor,

Page 13



Page 14

l Th Florida ANigator, Thursday, April 2. 1970

CJ|i ?amp2^
[fl
I Zestabs Vitamins Arrid Extra Dry ;j§ Visine
Plain or with Iron Deodorant i f Eye Drops V/
pkg. of 60 $1.79 4.3-oz. can 79c | IS cc. $1.29 A T
r^nnnnnnnT^nTilw^ l ol Ul " -r* ".*' ~ ;jf 21. wJ. m,. f*7*>
Gillette Super S. S. Pond'sCoYdCrea m | " Alko-Se Itxer-pYu s
Double Edge Blades SVz-oz. 89 or ;i| Cold Tablets A JK /VSl\ / *^
Pk9> of 5 . 75c or Pond's Dry Skin Cream If pkg. of 20, 89c or TvV \ /
pkg. of 10. .$1.45 j n nn nnnnf| ft fl fl' I.- -?! l >|llr * w d- April 1*70) ~ EXTRA P B!!^| PfTI EXTRA **ip?s§jprV 1 0
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Noxzema Cream Contac ; PAG£AQR*
(Feminine Deodorant 6-oz. 93c or Capsules ;
pkg. $1.39 j j 10-ox., $1.19 pkg. of 10, $1.19 I A ijfA>y//£Y)
3* (fepir*. Wad.. April 1. 13. (tapir*. Wed.. April 1*70) Regular or Super Dr. West ;|; JAJ
I TompaxTampon. J j "Wh |j Cosmetic Puff. i| \'V\lA7\^
|> pl*9- of 40, $1.49 each 48c ;|j pkg. of 260,69 cj|
G reenSta mps re enStamps
Tablets ;j| Swabs
13-oz. can $1.19 pkg. of 40, 99c ![| pkg. of 400,99 c XT J
(pirn Wad.. Ml 25.
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White Rain Shampoo J ; Heir Dressing Bowl Cleaner if 3-oz., 39c or ;| Anv 2 Pkat fi.*k f
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Talcum Powder }| 4-ez., 39c er if $1 er more of any |f Pints or Quarts Glamorene I ; I
10-oz. can S9c || 12-ox., 89c || Anchor Mocking Glass-Ware Si Rug Cleaner or Shampooxer I; i
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VV A A laR'W // %\ \V\ A\ B> \nm >Oraa.a *aaH lifcl IwWi realm rt*N* M
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fmh MarMa Trapkaaa | | M | c teener
U.S. Na. I Naw Fl.rMa Patataa. *&-' infirn^ TA P^^l
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tol Stoata Craaa Ityl. a. Wtoto Kanwi KndeSt
Kidney Beans... 3 *. ._.*.
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C Acir#eell A $1 store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri,- *7 Sat M H mT Fried Haddock ....
Brevard, Orange, Osceola, Lake, Seminole, Volusia, Marion and Alachua. HHHIH

Thursday, April 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



, Th* Florida Alligator, Thurafay, April 2,1970

Page 16

BOOK REVIEWS
(By United Press International)
The Making of an Un-American by Paul Cowan
(Viking Press, $6.95)
The basic premise of the New Left has been that significant changes
can be brought about only by going outside established institutions to
confront problems directly. It is ironic that Paul Cowan's memoir of
the last decade, the finest piece of writing yet produced by the New
Left, should be infused with a bitter sense that people can do little to
help each other.
Cowan worked on a kibbutz early in the decade, taught school in
an integrated project in Cambridge, Md., went to Mississippi during
the summer of 1964, and then spent nearly two years with the Peace
Corps in Ecuador. He began with a sense of the brotherhood of
people, and ended with a feeling that helping people change their lives
invariable destroys them.
Cowan's book is honest, sensitive and evocative, a far subtler
document than the political framework in which he has chosen to
enclose it. By instinct he is a traveler like T. E. Lawrence or Sir
Richard Burton, more interested in the way people are, than in
helping them become something new. It is a sign of the times that he
has allowed his literary instincts to be constrained by politics.
Thomas Powers (UPI)
* *
Howard Hughes in Las Vegas By Omar Garrison.
(Lyle Stuart, $5.95)
The elusiveness of billionaire Howard Hughes is known to all and
this book on his wheelings and dealings in Las Vegas tells little more
than the news media have previously reported.
Purported to be the inside story of Howard Hughes since he went
on a colossal spending spree in Las Vegas,'' the book fails to dispel the
mystery of the man but does present an interesting look at Las Vegas
itself the gambling and hotels and political figures who have been
drawn into Hughes' deals.
But like all books on Hughes, it tells little of the current life of
Hughes himself Hughes remains the mystery man he fully intends to
be.
Patricia E. Davis (UPI)
* *
Return to Black America, by William Gardner Smith.
(Prentice-Hall, $4.95)
Any book that elucidates the attitudes of the black man in todays
racial crisis has value. This one has special interest because of its
viewpoint that of a 40-year-old Negro journalist who was raised in
Philadelphia but has lived abroad for 16 years.
He has recorded his reactions and opinion on his return, after
touring all sides of Black America. For the most part, it is a
straightforward report, factual and frightening. Even more dismaying,
however, are the conclusions he has drawn.
The black revolution has begun, says the author, thrust forward by
a growing national liberation movement." The black is being
transformed into a prideful race bound together in a new
brotherhood.
There must be a change in American society but the transition will
be long and painful and may be bloody. And radical white students
and intellectuals will help bring the change about. He contends that
the United States is progressing to a fundamental transformation"
that will place Black America in a strong enough position to
negotiate its status on an equal footing with the white leadership."
Joan Hanauer (UPI)

FZ
W your
w#4l listening'
PLEASURE
|/ioy^
florida
quarterly
Hte on/y did it for you.
1

V, W f
* ..- *.
NOT AT PHI PSI!

The
Florida
Alligator

Albums Combining Music,
Astrology On The Market

NEW YORK (UPI) Gerald
W. Purcell and Herb Alpert set
their sights on the stars at a time
when man was content with
setting foot on the moon.
Both had noticed the
increasing interest in astrology as
mankind entered the age of
Aquarius. They believed the
time had come to move into
astrology on a big scale.
SO THEY EACH issued 12
long-play records, one for each
sign of the zodiac.
Purcell, a businessman who
owns the GWP Record Co.,
limited his albums to music only
although each record is
accompanied by a booklet
especially written for the sign by
Carroll Righter, the noted
authority on astrology.
Alpert, leader of the Tijuana
Brass band and president of the
small but powerful A&M Record
Co., used Moog synthetizer
music and commentary to tell an
Aquarius or a Virgo what the
stars have in store.
EVEN THOUGH the rival
albums were offered to the
record-buying public at the same
time, the difference between the
two concepts of presenting the
'Knife In Water
At Union Tonight
Knife in Water, a highly
acclaimed film directed by
Roman Polanski, will be shown
at 7 and 9:30 tonight in the
Reitz Union theater.
The picture is the second in a
three day festival of Polanski
films which began Wednesday
night with Repulsion," a film
dealing with the subcondous
and fear. The festival ends
Friday and Saturday night with
showings of Rosemary's Baby,"
a film starring Mia Farrow and
dealing with witchcraft.
Knife in Water" has been
called by many critics Polanski's
best film to date.
Admission price is 50 cents.

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zodiac eliminated the nuisance
of competition. Thus, a Pisces or
a Leo who takes his astrology
seriously probably would want
to own both an A&M and a GWP
record relating to his sign.
Carroll Righter is more than
an astrologer, Purcell said in an
interview. He is president of
the Philadelphia Opera
Association, a lawyer and a
musicologist.
RICHTERS knowledge of
astrology and music was a good
combination for selecting
appropriate music for each sign.
I decided to record music
only because any comment

I EMPLOYMENT j
OPPORTUNITY |
(IN MAJOR FLORIDA CITIES) \
A
ARE YOU MONEY HUNGRY ???
DO YOU LIKE GIRLS???
Let us help you satisfy BOTH interests! Our company
will train college men to present our investment plan to
, single employed girls in major Florida cities this
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'
EARN SIOO TO $175 WEEKLY
1
| Qualifications: Man or woman 18-28 years of aga; must bo neat,
1 personable, own a car, and be willing to work evenings.
v Interview: Thursday, April 2,4:00 PM Room 118 Reitz Union.
PRICES EFFECIVE .p _. /
i 11'| f] lcd with sweat chocolate, S*lnch
\lf|| | Bavarian Cream Pla
||| HPr 79*
M Plata or with ralelae, with
g asserted fruit toppings
Rolls
..45*
, Wo Italtl D.lklMi frmlt
Butter Bread
- 29*
IfllMtf 6reenStamps K£s ~
|2mm * tui caaras a i \ A TW£H VT "W
I lced with Sweet Chocolate I1 f\ [XI IW I I
8-inch Bavarian L/ili V Ak3ll
Creaa Pie
(Expires Sat., April A, 1970) I BAKERY
OoinesviHe Moll
Special Orders Call 372-3885

would be distracting, Purcell
said. The records can be played
as dinner music or as a
background for conversation.
We chose music we thought
was most suited for each sign.
The music was recorded in
England and arranged by
musicians bom under the signs
of the indicated albums.
Purcell, who is married to
glamor girl Monique van Vooren
and owns a number of
restaurants, said the public
response to the recordings was
good.
We expect to sell $3 million
of astrology albums, he said.



Julio Gonzalez Exhibit Opens

The University Gallery will
present beginning Sunday an
exhibition of the work of the
Spanish artist Julio Gonzalez, a
forged and welded iron
sculpturer with widespread
influence.
The Gallery will display 54
works on paper and five
sculptures by Gonzalez through
April 27. The works range from
the artists early figurative
drawings of the *2os to his open
form constructions of the 3os
and 4os.
this exhibition,
organized by the Museum of
Modem Art in New York, is the
result of collaboration between
the Museums Director of the
Department of Drawings and
Prints, William S. Liebermann,
and Temple Universitys Asst.
Professor of Art History,
Josephine Withers. The
exhibition presently is on tour
of the United States and
Canadian museums and galleries
after a successful premiere in
Puerto Rico.
Julio Gonzalez was trained as
a metalsmith in his fathers
workshop in Barcelona. In 1900
he moved to Paris where he
worked as a painter, supporting
his family by making jewelry
and decorative metalwork.
During World War I he worked
in a factory where he learned
the newly developed techniques
in welding which he
subsequently used in sculpture.
BESTSELLER
BOOKLIST
(UPI)
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
Fiction
THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS
WOMAN John Fowles
THE GODFATHER Mario
Puzo
TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT
Graham Greene
THE HOUSE ON THE STRAND
- Daphne du Maurier
MR. SAMMLERS PLANET
Saul Bellow
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT Jimmy
Breslin
FIRE FROM HEAVEN Mary
Renault
THE INHERITORS Harold
Robbins
IN THIS HOUSE OF BREDE
Rummer Godden
PUPPET ON A CHAIN
Alistair Maclean
Nonfiction
THE SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinniss
EVERYTHING YOU HAVE
ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW
ABOUT SEX David Reuben
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
PRESENT AT THE CREATION
Dean Acheson
AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
William Morris, editor-in-chief
THE PETER PRINCIPLE
Laurence J. Petter and Raymond
Hull
THE GRAHAM KERR
COOKBOOK Galloping
Gourmet
CULTURE AND
COMMITMENT Margaret
Mead
IN SOMEONES SHADOW
Rod McKuen
JOURNAL
John K. Galbraith

AT UNIVERSITY GALLERY

In 1928 he assisted Pablo Picasso
(a friend of many years) in the
creation of several iron
sculptures, numbered among
Picassos finest. From this
collaboration, which was
immensely rewarding for both
artists, Gonzalez gained the
inspiration for the open-form
welded metal constructions
which were to place his name
among the most esteemed and
influential of 20th-century
sculptors.
The present exhibition shows
a sampling of the many styles
Gonzalez used in works on paper
throughout his life. Drawing and
painting continued to be
important, although much work
made after 1928 was preliminary
to constructions in metal. The
watercolors and pastels of
1905-1920, in their depiction of
women, reflect his admiration
for Degas; color is often applied

", x y/yv \ 1 a t f|~ sbjp s & 41 11 2 T 8 4 r^ 1 $ 11 r
il liU I Mil 1111 IfllJ 11 HI I mill fill riPHi 11 gW % f 111 Pi
-

onto dark backgrounds, giving a
lumnious effect, as in the two
delicate BOUQUETS (c.
1912-1915).
SCENES OF PEASANTS in
the field (1920) comprise the
next series of works in the
exhibition. The series following
dates from 1932. During this
interval the collaboration
between Gonzalez and Picasso
took place and in the heads and
figures presented can be seen a
new direction, an abstract
post-cubist style which Ijegan to
dominate his paintings and his
sculpture. One is conscious in
the drawings, as in the sculpture,
of planes and rods which
surround and mold the
contained space. Gonzalez
described his intent, to project
and design in space with the help
of new methods, to utilize this
space, and to construct with it,
as though one were dealing with

a new acquired material.
The figurative HEAD OF THE
MONTSERRAT CRYING
(1939) is repeated in an abstract
rendering in 1939 and 1940.
These figures are matched in
mood by figures from the
famous Cactus series of
1938-1940, whose mouths
opened in a scream, arms raised
in supplication, protest the
tragic world horrors of the
Spanish Civil War.

SWINGERS
THE SELECT PLACE
New Swinger Bar and Cocktail Lounge
Only 18 Minutes From Gainesville At Williston
DANCE SWING
THE CAVE ROOM
THE POLYNESIAN ROOM
THE PSYCHEDELIC ROOM

Thursday, April 2, 1970. Tha Florae

Yoko Expecting
LONDON (UPI) John
Lennon told thousands of
rock fans Sunday that his
wife, Yoko Ono, may be
pregnant and cited that as
one more reason for World
peace.
Speaking over a telephone
hookup from his home,
Lennon told 12,000 persons
gathered in Londons Bethnal
Green for a rock concert: I
think she is pregnant.
Dont be ashamed to take
your trousers down for
peace, Lennon concluded.

Page 17



Page 18

I, Tt Florida Alligrtor, Thursday, April 2,1970

The
Florida
Alligator

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PRECIOUS KNEES
... Alvarez, Cheney
Sweat, Blood
Sweat, blood and body
contact comprised the second
day of football practice
Wednesday as Coach Dickey
followed the same format but
got better results.
We accomplished much more
today, said Dickey. The boys
really showed enthusiasm;
Dickey said both Mike Kelley
and Bob Harrell received minor
injuries. Kelley cut his nose,
requiring stitches and Harrell
was shaken up in a practice drill.
Several players were given the
opportunity to try punting,
including quarterback John
Reaves. Dickey said no
super-punter was discovered, but
everyone will get a chance to
try.

THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINES
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GATOR SPORTS

Hurricanes Roar
Past UF Netters
The University of Miami tennis team demonstrated why its rated
among the nations top three teams with a 9-0 tromping over the UF
netters Wednesday afternoon.
Miamis win avenged last years 6-3 loss to the Gators and boosted
their season record to 14-0. UF was unable to win one set from the
Hurricanes.
MIAMIS ALL-AMERICANS Pat Cramer and Luis Garcia easily
won their singles matches over Greg Hilley, 6-2,6-1, and Buddy Miles,
6-1,6-1, respectively and then teamed up in doubles to allow the same
Gator opponents only one game, 6-0,6-1.
The largest crowd of the season was in attendance, almost 300 fans.
In other singles competition Eddie Dibbs of Miami defeated Gator
Captain Will Sherwood, 6-1, 6-3; Paul Lunetta (UF) lost to Raz Ried
in the number four singles; in the number five singles Steve Siegel of
Miami beat Bruce Bartlett, 6-1, 6-4 and Sven Ginman won six singles
over UF freshman Kenn Terry, 13-11,6-1.
IN THE OTHER doubles competition, Sherwood and Lunetta lost
to Dibbs and Ried, 6-4,6-4 and Ginman and Siegel downed Terry and
freshman Ralph Hart, 64 64.
Cramer, a senior, plans to join the pro ranks but says,it all depends
on how well I do in the tournaments such as Wimbledon and Forrest
Hills.
UF, now sporting an 84 record, will test their ability in the
Southeastern Conference when they meet their first SEC foe LSU.

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the quarterly cometh



HEAPS INTO 70s
Baseball In Shaoe

(EDITORS NOTE: In this
first of several articles on the
status of major league baseball,
UPI Baseball Editor Fred Down
examines the good. In the
second article he will analyze the
bad.)
By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Major league
baseball heads into the 1970 s
with the caliber of its play and
its financial strength at all-time
peaks.
Whether baseball has lost its
status as the National Pastime
is a pointless quibble. More than
220 million fans paid their way
into major league parks during
the 1960 s and they probably
saw the most exciting decade in
the games history. A few critics
long for the good old day of
baseball but any realistic analysis
reveals that they really were the
bad old days.
GONE FROM THE scene are
the little old unkempt parks
with their narrow aisles,
uncomfortable seats, inadequate
parking lots, dirty rest rooms
and pop-fly home run distances.
In their places are gleaming new
stadiums with wide aisles,
comfortable seats, vast parking
areas, clean rest rooms and more
or less standard home run
distances.
Gone, too, is the old train
circuit linking 16 teams in
10 cities with a northeastern
boundary in Boston and a
western outpost in St. Louis.
The sport is now truly national
from a geographical point of
view even international
considering Montreal and its
players travel first class by air
and stay at the best hotels in
every city they visit.
Baseball rests on the most
solid financial rock in its history
thanks to a combination of
television and corporation
ownership. In the old days, there
was no television and many
clubs were owned by men who
actually lived off the game. They
had an identification with their
communities which is lacking
today but they often were
forced to sell stars to pay their
bills. Their teams became
chronic weaklings and laid the
foundation for such a dynasty as
the New York Yankees enjoyed
from 1921 through 1964.
IT IS ESTIMATED that
baseball has S4O million in
television contracts this year
compared to $6 million in 1960.
That new money plus the
corporation ownership of most
clubs means that weaker teams
can hold onto their stars. This,
in turn, has produced an era of
competitive uncertainty
dramatized by the New York
I for
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C I sterling'
PLEASURE
I lio'l*

Mets rise to the world
championship in 1969.
Gone, too, are the old
farm-bred players of baseballs
pioneer days and the
depression-reared players of the
19405. The modem ball player is
a business-man ball player. He is
bigger and stronger and the
product of a bigger manpower
pool than his predecessors. He
has the benefit of better
coaching, he uses superior

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equipment and he plays on
better-kept fields. He keeps in
shape the year round. He is
more educated and knows
baseball can make him a wealthy
man. He has a player-pension
fund which makes other athletes
drool and may make him
goldbrick or play it safe at times.
He has his faults he can sound
pretty greedy at times but, all
in all, he is a far superior athlete
to the old-time ball player.

Pilots Downed,
Brewers Toast

SEATTLE (UPI) The Seattle Pilots, a big league club plagued by
money problems almost from the day the American League granted
the franchise 14 months ago, passed into history Wednesday and
surfaced in Wisconsin as the Milwaukee Brewers.
Federal Bankruptcy Court Referee Sidney C. Volinn, to whom the
Pilots had turned for help from their financial woes, ruled Tuesday
night that a SIO.B million offer from the Milwaukee Brewers to
purchase the franchise was in order.
Since the American League had voted approval for transfer of the
franchise from Seattle to Milwaukee in a telephone conference call
Monday, the moment Volinn gave his consent to sell the Pilots
became the Brewers.
Wednesday, Volinn issued the formal order for the sale of the club.

Thunday, April 2,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 2,1970

BACK JULY 1

Kuhn Suspends Denny

NEW YORK (UPI) Painting
a picture of star pitcher Denny
McLain as a man who was duped
by his own gullibility and
avarice into thinking he was
buying into a bookmaking
operation, baseball
commissioner Bowie Kuhn
Wednesday slapped the Detroit
Tigers star with an half-season
suspension.
McLain, said Kuhn after a
two-month investigation of
gambling charges against
McLain, was guilty of conduct
not in the best interests of
baseball. McLains suspension is
until July 1,1970.
THE RULING BY the
baseball commissioner was
revealed by him to President
Nixon on Tuesday, and Kuhn
said the President had called the
action very fair.
McLain, who won 31 games
for the Tigers in 1968 when they
won baseballs world
championship, was at home in
Lakeland, when the decision was
announced. He has been under
indefinite suspension since Feb.
19 while Kuhn conducted an
investigation of charges made
against him in a magazine.
In general, Kuhn, himself a
lawyer, found McLain guilty of
two items of conduct in 1967:
FIRST, HE BET on college
basketball games on at least two
occasions. The commissioner
stressed that there is no
evidence to indicate that McLain
ever bet on a baseball game
involving the Detroit Tigers or
any other team, and that
there is no evidence to indicate
that McLain gave less than his
best effort at any time while
performing for the Detroit
Tigers.
Jujitsu Meets
The UF Jujitsu Club will hold
its first meeting of the spring
quarter tonight at 7 pm. The
class will last until 8:30. All past
students are invited to attend.
Membership will be limited this
quarter to all past members and
those who will be attending the
spring and summer quarters and
beyond.
The instructor is Mason York,
first degree brown belt.
This is not judo nor karate,
but Jujitsu. All persons who
meet the above requirements
and are interested in taking
Jujitsu should meet in the south
end of the gym at 6:45 pm.
' &
One-Sided
BOSTON (UPI) The Boston
Bruins defeated the Toronto
Maple Leafs by scores of 10-0
and 7-10 in the first two games
of their Stanley Cup playoff.
m
M your
VttL listening
PLEASURE

More serious was the second
count that McLain had turned
over $5,700 to gamblers in the
belief that he was buying into a
Flint, Mich., bookmaking
operation as a partner.
Actually, said the commissioner,
the deeply-in-debt Detroit
pitcher was being played for a
sucker by the gamblers.
WHILE McLAIN
BELIEVED he had become a
partner in this operation and has
so admitted to me in the
presence of his personal
attorney, it would appear,
in fact, that he was the victim of
a confidence scheme, said
Kuhn.

LSU Drops Hester,
Pistol Pete Maravich

BATON ROUGE, La. (UPI)
All-American Pete Maravich of
Louisiana State and his LSU
teammate Danny Hester were
suspended from school
Wednesday for missing too many
classes.
LSU officials said both
players had been on attendance
probation since last semester,
but will be eligible to reenter
classes this summer.
MARAVICH SAID HE
intended to resume classes as
soon as possible.
Due to the pressures and
demands made on me during the
past two months, Ive been
unable to put forth my best
effort academically, he said. I
take complete responsibility for
my actions and regret that Ill be
unable to finish my education
this year. I plan to return at a
later date.
Maravich and Hester were
both seniors majoring in business

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The commissioner indicated
that if McLain actually had
become a partner in
bookmaking, his judgment
would have been harder. He
compared the difference to
murder and attempted
murder.
In addition to the suspension,
McLain was placed on probation
by the commissioner, forcing
him to make regular reports on
his financial condition. Calling
Denny irresponsible, Kuhn
said this was designed to keep
him from falling into the kind of
debt trouble that got him mixed
up with gamblers in the first
place.

administration.
SINCE LSU ENDED its
season in the National Invitation
Tournament in New York, both
Hester and Maravich have signed
pro contracts.
Maravich, who scored more
points at LSU in his three-year
career than any other collegian
in basketball history, signed to
play with the Atlanta Hawks of
the National Basketball
Association.
Hester was also drafted in the
second round of the NBA draft
by Atlanta, but he passed up a
chance to join Maravich and
signed instead with the Denver
Rockets of the American
Basketball Association.
COLONIZATION
SAM SMOKER
Monday, April 6
for information Call:
372-0038 or 378-6568
after 2 P.M.

First Round KO
HOUSTON (UPI) Unbeaten heavyweight George Foreman
knocked out Rufus BrasseU of limca, Ohio, in 2:42 of the first round
Tuesday night with a left hook to the body.
The jarring left sent the 199-pound Brassell to the canvas for the
fourth time in the round although Earl Keel ruled Brassell slipped the
first time.
BRASSELL SAID AFTERWARDS, however, he was knocked
down the first time by a right to the forehead which was actually the
hardest punch of the round and the hardest he had ever been hit in his
career.
Brassell, who is 25 and ranked 10th nationally, suffered his third
loss against 15 victories.
The victory was Foremans 18th in a row and 15th by knockout.
The former U. S. Olympic Champ, 217 pounds, is ranked ninth by the
World Boxing Association.
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Having a downer?
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