Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'Waubura In Need Os Action Not Talk

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second in a
three part series concerning the development of
Camp Waubuig.)
Plans for development of Wauburg -a
recreational area and lake approximately 10
miles from campus have long been under
discussion.
Student chairman of the latest Wauburg
committee, Mel Sharpe, said groups have been
talking about developing the area for years, but
these have never been definite plans until now.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd said
tiie' project has been supported by every
president since he has been at UF, since 1963.
The present site of Camp Wauburg is on the

'Patti

Vol 62, No. 104

INACCURATE APPRAISAL

OConnell Knocks
Bothwell Contentions

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
State Rep. Cecil Bothwells
(D-Winter Park) study of
classroom space at state
universities was obviously
limited and based on unsound
assumptions, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said in a
letter to Bothwell dated March 6
and released to the press
Tuesday.
Bothwells study said the UF
had 2,408 empty classrooms
between the hours of 7 am. and
9 pm. He said by utilizing the
unused space Floridas state
universities and junior colleges
could add 52,000 students
without spending more money
for classrooms.
It is, however, my firm
conviction, O'Connell said,
that a university education
ought to and must encompass

Senate Seeks Removal
Os BSPs Authority

The Student Senate late
Tuesday night ordered all Board
of Student Publications
authority over the selection of
an Alligator editor suspended
and asked the current Alligator
III!
NUMBER 216 in the current
draft lottery will not be
called according to a Selective
Service official page 2
Classifieds .. 11
Editorials 6
Entertainment 13
Letters 7
Movies 13
Small Society 4
Sports.. 14
Whats Happening 3

The
Florida Alligator
o-
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

more than a cafeteria-line of
classroom and laboratory
instruction.
He said opportunities outside
the classroom have allowed
many persons in leadership
positions in this state and
nation" to serve their
constituents better.
Bothwells UF survey was
based on the Fall, 1969 class
schedule.
OConnell said the study
could not be accurate because
many classrooms are not listed
in the class schedule.
He also said it would be
impossible to have 2,408 empty
classrooms during the day
because there are only 287
general classrooms on the entire
campus.
Although the facilities are
theoretically available 24 hours a
day, OConnell said, they are for

staff to continue on their
present positions pending a
senate investigation.
The decision, approved by a
37-17 vote, was adopted
following heated debate over the
legality of such a move.
The senate ordered Board
powers removed until it can
conduct a thorough and
accurate* investigation of the
recent Board selection of an
Alligator Editor for the Spring
term to determine the legality of
the Boards proceedings.
It also requested the current
leadership and staff of the
Alligator to continue in their
jobs until such time as this
difficulty can be resolved by
the investigation.
For a full text of the senate
authorization, see page six.

SHARPE SAYS

north side of the lake. Proponents of a move to
the south side cite several reasons:
the south side is much larger, approximately
70 acres as compared to 19 on the north bank.
the area leading to the lake is cleaner with
beach-like sand. On the north side, the area
leading to the water is muddy, except in drought
periods.
there is a gradual drop on the lake bottom
on the south side and a sudden, large drop on the
north.
there is no flat land on the north side.
the present site cannot be operated without
a substantial capital outlay. Shepherd said it
would cost almost as much to repair the facilities
on the north side as to build on the south.
The land on the south side was purchased
from the Athletic Association and paid for with
Student Government funds, Shepherd said.
m m m m m m m m mmmmmmwmmm m m m m m m m m m.m m mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm m m m

The University of Florida, Gainesville

the most part used only from 8
am. to S pan., just as are all
other public facilities, including
legislative halls and offices.
He said the study was also
misleading because one-fourth of
the classrooms are either in
temporary structures or more
than 40 years old, and are not
used as frequently as the newer
classrooms.
During the fall quarter,
O'Connell said, available
classrooms were used an average
of 32 3 hours per week, not
including two areas of study
which require specialized
facilities. The Board of Regents
standard is 33 hours per week.
OConnell added that the
major cost of adding more
(SEE 'BOTHWELL* PAGE 4)

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HORRORS PART TWO
For all those who missed the hippie snake waiting to greet you somewhere on campus or,
yesterday, here is a new thrill to warm your hearts, perhaps, under your bed.
Yes, folks, this friendly little tarantula is placidly

At the time of the purchase, improvement of
the property was delayed because of the
construction of the Reitz Union. This was done
so money which might be needed for the Union
would not be committed for development of
Wauburg, Shepherd said.
During the administration of former Student
Body President Bruce Culpepper, 1965-66, a
committee. was appointed to study both UF
property sites.
The committee decided it would be
impractical to operate both sites.
SG approved a grant of $5,000 to employ an
architect and begin planning.
A proposal has been released which will
indude at least partial construction of an open
pavilion, swimming docks, a boat dock, boat
storage, gate house and maintenance shed.

Seide Is Elected
President Os FSC
George Seide, a senior in political science, has been elected
first president of the newly created Florida Student Congress,
designed to open channels of communication and cooperation
among colleges and universities in Florida.
Seide, as director of inter-university relations, represented the
UF student government at the organizational meeting of the
Congress last weekend in the Reitz Union. During the meeting a
constitution proposed by Seide was amended and adopted.
The Congress was created to be the first state-wide
organization of public and private schools in Florida as well as
bringing together representatives from junior colleges and
four-year universities for the first time.
Through unification of all students in the state, it is hoped
that an effective voice will be provided to influence impending
legislation and secure goods and services such as low-rate
insurance and European travel plans for students.
Thirty-nine delegates from 17 schools attended the
organizational meeting. Plans were being made to get the other
two-thirds of the states schools involved. State-wide meetings
will be held once a year, but the six regions are expected to have
their own conclaves quarterly.
The positions of assistant to the president and executive
secretary are open to UF students as the office for the Congress
will be set up at this campus. Applications may be made in the
Student government office, third floor of the Union.

\ I

Wednesday, March 11, 1970



>Tha Florida AJHgatpr, Wadnaarfay, March 11,1070

Page 2

RECENT SURVEY SHOWS
UF Campus Stores Are
Overpricing Their Goods

By JIM DAVIS
Alligator Writer
A survey by a CSS 112 class
touched off a controversy
Thursday on whether
convenience items are overpriced
at campus stores.
An American Institutions
class taught by Mrs. Rela
Monson developed the idea of a
price comparison while studying
economics.
The students learned that
the consumer used to be the
deciding thing in the market
system, Mrs. Monson said.
Then they learned this is not the
case today, she added.
To demonstrate this, the
instructor had the students
compare prices in different
stores. Some of them priced 25
items in four different places,
she said.
Many students came back
upset by their shopping, Mrs.
Monson said. The students
found that the same item in the
same size cost as much as 50 per
cent more in one store than in
another. And in every case, the
campus stores prices were
highest.
A committee of five
volunteers decided to make a
more thorough study. They
concentrated on campus stores
because, Mrs. Monson said, the
stores have almost a monopoly
on students, especially freshmen
because they dont have
transportation.
The members compared
on-campus prices with those in
Gainesville drugstores,
supermarkets and department
stores.
They planned to release their
results to the Alligator to make
other UF students aware of price
differences.
Their findings confirmed the
class earlier survey. For basic

Ceiling Has Been Set
At 215 For 1970 Draft
All male students with draft numbers above 215 will not be called
this year.
A rumor that a ceiling has been put on the draft lottery call,
possibly for the entire year 1970, has been verified by Major Robert
Bear, communications and relations officer for the United States
Directory of Selective Service.
On March 5 a letter was sent to all state directors (of the selective
service board) reducing the amount of phyafcab to be given. Number
216 will not be called until further notice," Bear said.
All those who are I-A, I-A-0 or 1-0 and have a lottery number
under 215, and all those who will lose their deferment or exemption
within the next six months and have a lottery number between 1 and
215 will be called.
Numbers 216 to 366 will not be forwarded to the local boards
until further notice," Bear said.
This memorandum effects the entire United States, and was issued
at dm expressed desire of the Department of Defense."
Until further notice" will probably extend through the next draft
lottery, Bear said. The next lottery will be in late 1970. Those who
ate in the first priority group for 1970 will drop to a lower group in
1971, decreasing the chances of an eligible male being called in that
year. :
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

items such as soap and
toothpaste, the committee said,
campus prices were up to IVi
tunes off-campus prices.
For example, the Jennings
Hall convenience store is way
out of the price range of
students, said committee
member Ira Gordon, lUC.They
know if the students hungry
enough, hell buy.
If I bought my essentials at
the Graham Area Tri-Shop,
Gordon said, Id lose two or
three dollars a week.
A six-ounce can of shaving
cream sells on campus fpr $1.25
but off campus at two for 92
cents, he said. Soap at four bars
for 85 cents up-town costs 92
cents in a campus shop, he
added.
Its certainly time for the
students to take notice about
what the campus shops are doing
to their wallets, Gordon said.
Other price comparisons the
committee made were:
Cream deodorant, 59 cents
off campus, $1.59 on campus;
notebook paper, 500 sheets for
77 cents off campus, 300 sheets
for 95 cents on campus;
toothpaste, 73 cents off campus,
$1.29 on campus.
It would be cheaper for four
students to hire a cab once a
month and go buy their
necessities than to buy them on
campus, Mrs. Monson said.
Campus shop prices were
closer to those at convenience
stores like 7-11, she said, but
that doesnt justify the prices
at campus shops.
Bookstore manager Sam P.
Getzen Ir. agreed that prices
were higher at campus stores,
but added that the shops were
bookstores first and general
stores second.
They make available to the
student at a reasonable price
things they can get elsewhere at

a better price, Getzen said.
Lack of volume sales also
keep prices up, Getzen added, so
the UF shops cannot buy by the
carload like chain stores can.
When discount buying fust
started, Getzen said,
community interests local
businessmen didnt want our
items priced competitively. An
injunction against the bookstore
in 1952 was lifted later, Getzen
said, but it was also the start of
the universitys assurance that
campus shops wouldnt be like
abigPX.*
People must realize that the
bookstore and its branches must
make a profit, said Ralph
Glatfelter, student government
secretary for consumer affairs.
All stores work on what
Glatfelter termed profit items.
A drugstore makes its profit on
drugs. In the bookstore, what
they make on books wont allow
them to break even, he said.
Their profit item is
convenience items.
PKY Library
Priceless
UFs P. K. Yonge library is
truly a library of record.
Its a library of record that
contains essentially every
available piece of recorded
Florida history known to
mankind.
Thanks to Julien C. Yonge,
the late son of Philip Keyes
Yonge, a former member of the
State Board of Control, known
today as the Board of Regents,
the Florida library was
established in 1944.
In an agreement with UF,
Julien Yonge donated his
fathers collection of Floridiana.
The collection, officials
estimated in 1945, could be
valued at SIOO,OOO.
UFs library, which for years
has served much like an
unofficial archives, rests silently
today, entombed on the fourth
floor of the Research Library.
There are about 22,000
volumes of books, 950 maps,
40,000 issues of old newspapers
and 4,000 reds of microfilm in
addition to the 80 modem
Florida newspapers which are
microfilmed regularly.
The most unique set of
documents in die library,
according to Miss Alexander, is
The Stetson Collection!
The library is open to the
public, particularly the scholars
and researchers of Florida
history.

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
( Kcntidoi fried |
l ISthlt; 11 """ W
m 376-6472 114 S.W. 34th St.
372-3649
lemSi] d, box r 990
M 3 Pc. Chicken K
Mashed Potatoes Keg. 1.40 W
BRING COUPON 1

Road Conference
Begins Today
jarusiias ss sASwa
Hi E'l y eer f con tc 1 tore and state offices prominent in Horida
JS construction will lead a senes of panel discuss.os at the
Ser lnn March 11-12, covering such dwerse subjects as Designing
for Easier Construction and Lower Costs and Labor Relations in
Florida's Construction Industry.
LtGov Ray C. Osborne will highlight-events at the conference
dinner at 7 p.m. March 12 at the Flagler. Other conference speakers
delude R E Amow, Florida Department of Transportation,
Hampton Dunn, vice president of the AAA Pemnsula Motor Club;
Mai Roger C. Collar, Florida Department of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles; Dr. James Schaub, chairman of the College of
Engineerings Department of Civil Engineering, and Robert G. Fisher,
senior planner with the California Division of Highway^
Conference sponsors are UF, the Florida Road Builders
Association, the Florida Department of Transportation and the
Consulting Engineers of Florida.
Other events scheduled this week:
Through Wednesday: Florida Players: Dracula, Constans Theatre,
8 Wednesday: Audubon Wildlife Film: Our Unique Wilderness the
Everglades, Union Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Wednesday: Judo Exhibition, Union Colonnade, noon.
Wednesday & Thursday: Plant Pathology Workshop, Union.
Wednesday & Thursday: 1970 Florida Highway Conference, Flagler
Inn.
Thursday & Friday: Research Foundations of Education
Conference, Union.
Thursday Saturday: Problems in Modem Pediatrics Seminar,
Medical Science Building.


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B
PMi
TO CATCH A BUS
You me, to catch the bus you climb to tho third floor of the
building. Than out through a window and scramble up on the too
Than you wait until the bus comas by...



Militants Trial Halted

BEL AIR, Md. (UPI) The trial of black
militant H. Rap Brown was recessed on its
second day Tuesday in confusion over whether
Brown may have been one of two blacks killed
when an explosion ripped through their car just
south of here Monday night.
Harford County Circuit Court Judge Harry E.
Dyer said Browns attorney, William M. Kunstler,
had raised the question that the body might be
that of the defendant when the trial resumed at
10:30 a. m. EST.
Dyer recessed the court until Wednesday so
that he, prosecutor William B. Yates n and
Kunstler could view the wreckage of the car.
Dr. Werner Spit, assistant medical examiner of
Baltimore, said if the body were Browns it
would have to be identifiedby someone who knew
him and be confirmed by dental records.
State Police who examined the body said they
did not think it was that of the black militant.
The head of the unidentified victim was badly
mangfed and both his hands had been blown off.

Outstanding Profs Chosen

The results of the
lnterfraternity Councils
outstanding professor awards
were announced Friday at the
Winter Frolics show. They are:
i Agriculture Associate
Professor of Animal Sciences
Donald L. Wakeman.
Architecture and Fine Arts
Dr. Leonardo Ricci, visiting
professor in Urban Design.
$ Arts and Sciences
political science professor Dr.
Ernest Bartley.
Business Administration
professor of economics, Dr.


E es aw Seeing t]
111 IjSfi From Reading? Double-Double? J[Sg f 1
P'S) TAKE A BREAK!
] Come to [1
jpr AibyS
j -Jjk Milk Shakes Only 15< jj
| Any Other Drink Free lj
| 4* After 10:00 P.M. With The Purchase ||
j ffl Os Just One Arby's M \\
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\ JiKtSouthofthe'Underpass Qff er Good Thru ThufS., Mor. 12.

RAP BROWN DEAD?

Irving J. Goffman.
Education Samuel D.
Andrews, assistant professor in
the Foundations of Education.
Forestry Associate
Professor P.W. Frazer.
Health Related Professions
Assistant Professor in
Occupational therapy Miss Anna
D. Scott.
t Engineering lndustrial
Systems Engineering associate
professor Dr. Richard S.
Leavenworth.
Journalism lnstructor
James E. Couch.

police officials said, making the possibility of
identification difficult even with dental charts.
The other body was identified as Ralph
Featherstone, 30, a close friend of Browns and a
long time activist in what is now the Student
National Coordinating Committee. The
unidentified body was reported to have carried
three sets of identification but police would not
release the names.
State Police Lt. Col. Thomas S. Smith said it
had been determined that the explosive or
explosives were being carried on the front floor
of the car, not planted under the floor.
Yates indicated his belief that the explosives
were meant to do away with him, Cambridge
Police Chief Brice Kinnamon and Special
Investigator Donald Cox.
Browns whereabouts were unknown. Kunstler
said he called Browns wife and brother in New
York this morning just before 100 prospective
jurors filed into the courthouse and that neither
had heard from Brown since Monday.

Law Professor James J.
Freeland.
Medicine professor of
pathology Dr. George H. Collins.
Nursing Miss Josephine
Snider, teaching associate.
Pharmacy Dr. Elbert
Voss.
t Physical Education and
Health professor of
curriculum Dr. Owen J.
Holyoak.
t University College
assistant professor in
Comprehensive Logic Dr. David
B. Lee.

Access Advised
Selective softening of regular admissions standards at colleges and
universities was endorsed Wednesday by the prestigious Carnegie
Commission on Higher Education.
The 19-member group said in a 41-page report it would like to see
universal access to Americas colleges.
The group was quick to add that it was not advocating universal
attendance, nor any lowering of academic standards nationwide.
The report said colleges must reach out for more students poor
and black students especially to ward off what it called a severe
domestic brain drain.
The commission chairman is Clark Kerr, former president of the
University of California. The report is the second in a series financed
by the Carnegie Corporation, aiming toward a comprehensive
assessment of American higher education.
THEYRE HAVING A CAVE-IN: Miss the Solar eclipse? Go caving
and have a total solar eclipse for an unlimited time. The Florida
Speleological Society (Caving Club) will have a meeting tonight at 7
pm. in the Reitz Union.
SOMEONE WHO NEEDS ME: The Befrienders will meet today in
front of the infirmary at 5:30 pm. Bring your dinner.
APPLE PIE, MOTHERHOOD AND THE SMC: Newsreel, a group
of radical filmmakers, will show several films Thursday at 7 pm. in
McCarty Auditorium. The films include Laos, the Forgotten War,
ROTC, Interview with Bobby Seale, Summer *68.
VETS AGAINST THE TET: Veterans Against the War in Vietnam
will meet today at 8:30 pm. in room 150 D of the Reitz Union.
CRICKETS FLY TO NASSAU: All members of the UF Cricket
team are asked to call one of the following numbers immediately for
details of the tour and match in Nassau over the Easter holidays. Call
372-2224 or 376-7746.
THE POPULATION BOMB IS EVERYBODYS BABY: Dr. Robert
Hatcher, pediatrician in the department of obstetrics and gynecology
at Emory University school of medicine will speak on family planning
and population control tonight in room 345 of the Union. The
meeting is sponsored by Environmental Action Group, Zero
Population group, and the first year medical students.

Vfedhtaday, March 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



L, Tlm Florida AMgrtor, WadnMday, March 11,1970

Page 4

Dr. Todd Runs For Board Post
Eugene A. Todd, professor instruction for all students,
and chairman of the UF non-college bound as well as
secondary education college bound,
department has announced he His proposed platform
run or a e includes encouraging members
Alachua County Board of Public Qf
~ interest in their school districts
He is the first to announce his
candidacy for the Sept. 8 aCT^ raeS
primary. He is running on the The parents, citizens,
democratic ticket. taxpayers and educators should
Todd said, if elected, he be equal partners in the
would encourage individualized educational enterprise, he said.

Male Dances Because Os A Feeling

By JOHN M. BOGERT
Alligator Conwpondant
Modem Dance is a great release of tension, a
good body conditioner, and a lot of fun, says Jim
Fish, 2UC, the only male member of Mrs. Sharyn
Robbins dance composition class. He is one of the
three male students in the UF modem dance
program.
I began dancing because of a feeling I had, he

AWARDED SI,OOO
Combs Named Top Prof

Dr. Arthur W. Combs, College of Education professor since 1954,
has been chosen the UFs outstanding teacher-scholar for the
1969-70 academic year.
An educational psychologist in the Department of Foundations of
Education, Combs will receive a SI,OOO award and a cast medallion
from UF President Stephen C. O'Connell March 31.
Following the presentation ceremony, Combs will deliver the ninth
annual faculty lecture at 8 pm. in the Reitz Union Auditorium.
Combs, probably best known as the author of Individual
Behavior, had written or collaborated in the publication of eight
other books on problems relating to human personality development
and the helping professions.
Last month, he was an invited speaker at the 18th annual
presidential prayer breakfast in Washington. He has published
approximately 90 articles in the various professional journals.
Combs, who received his bachelor's degree in 1935, his masters in
1941 and his Ph.D. in 1945 from Ohio State University, was the
winner of the 1966 John Dewey Award for Distinguished Service to
Education.

Bothwell
Criticized
£frompageonT|
students is not in building more
classrooms, but in paying the
salaries of faculty and staff.
'it would be tragic indeed for
this state, and its people,"
OConnell replied, "if because of
cannibalistic tendencies
motivated by any cause, but
particularly by political
expediency to serve local
interests, this institutions
quality and opportunity for
greater progress and service were
to be eaten away to satisfy such
appetites.
"It would be equally tragic,"
he added, "if the further
progress and upward climb of
this university were stultified
because of a failure of the
people of this state and its
leaders to recognize the value of
what they have built here, and
the great expense and expanse of
time that will be required to
reproduce it elsewhere.
B in
i, Mexico |
lummer School, a 1
ersity of Arizona t
une 29 to August
aphy, history, po-#
ige and literature i
; board and room, j
B. Rael, Office of/
ersity of Arizona, A
!l. \

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said. A psychology major who is also active in judo,
yoga and dramatics, Jim said he became interested
in dance when he read in a dance text book that a
student should be taught to dance from within.
At first I felt self-conscious, Jim admitted, and
the girls in the class seemed a bit defensive about
file male invasion of their territory, but we all got
over it.
Mrs. Robbins, Jim's dance instructor, said, Jim
came here inexperienced but he has shaped up and
made a lot of improvements.

* jjfp
- >... -j
jjgg M
DR. ARTHUR COMBS
... education prof.

he small society

Linda Senn, a member of the class, said she sees
the male dancer as a natural and needed balance.
The old stigma of feminine label in the dancing
field still keeps many males from entering it, says
Jim, but he believes a male can still become
graceful and retain his masculinity. Dancing requires
a great amount of strength, and body control and
conditioning like judo only more graceful.
As an emotional release, Jim has found dance to
be helpful to him. It's been worth the trouble that
I get from people, he said.

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by Brickmqn



WASHINGTON (UPI) Murder charges were
lodged by the Army Tuesday against Capt. Ernest L.
Medina, commander of the Army company involved
in the alleged massacre of South Vietnamese
civilians byUJS. troops at My Lai in 1968.
Another captain also was accused of murder in
the continually unfolding case. In addition, charges
also were brought against three more enlisted men
in connection with the incident on March 16,1968,
in which scores of civilians allegedly were slain.
The Army announcement said Medina, who has
said previously he was not present at the spot where

2 Commit Suicide
After Hijacking Fails

BERLIN (UPI) Two
bandits attempted to hijack a
Communist East German airliner
Tuesday and committed suicide

IN BEIRUT MELEE
Cops, Refugees Clash

By United Press International
Fighting broke out Tuesday
near Beirut between police and
Lebanese refugees who fled to
the capital from the southern
border region following a series
of clashes with Israeli troops.
One person was killed and 20
wounded.
Arab guerrilla sources said the
refugees went to Beirut from the
border areas of Itroun and Bint
Jbeil and began erecting
makeshift shanties at the A1
Mokalless area, site of a refugee
camp three miles from Beirut.
Lebanese gendarmes brought
bulldozers which had been put
up on private property and in a
brief burst of shooting one
refugee was killed and 13
refugees and seven policemen
iiyured.
Earlier, police broke up a
womens anti-American
demonstration near the U. S.
Embassy in Beirut and seized
their banners.
Kirk Could
Yield Power
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirk did not turn
over the authority of his office
during surgery Monday night,
but he could have without fear
of losing it permanently.
The states new Constitution
provided for a lieutenant
governor of the governors
choosing, as well as a means of
temporarily giving up the office
of governor during an illness.
The governor could file a
certificate with the secretary of
state declaring himself physically
disabled, and the lieutenant
governor would take over.
When the governor decides he
is well enough to resume full
powers, he can do it by filing
another certificate with the
secretary of state.
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Medina Charged In My Lai Massacre

when they failed, the East
German news agency ADN
reported.
ADN said the hijack attempt

French Ambassador Francis
Hure conferred today in
Jerusalem with Foreign Minister
Abba Eban. Diplomatic sources
said Eban told Hure that guerrilla
attacks from Lebanon have
increased and it is the duty of
the Lebanese government to
curb them.
Official sources in Paris said
Hure was ordered by France to
urge Israel to curtail drastically
its attacks on neighboring Arab
countries.

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SATURDAY, MARCH 14
a/ 8:30 p.m.
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TicketOfficeandColiseum
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: Phone Auditorium 354-2041

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* K* I E OFF REGULAR PRICE. 3 RACKS
oc^Dif 4 r dresses-now y 2 off and even less! I
BEFORE. OTHER DRESSES AT LOW, LOW SALE
l&mmmEwAlm prices.

CASE CONTINUES TO UNFOLD

the Mayings allegedly took place, has been charged
with murder of two persons on or about 16 March,
1968.
It was not immediately clear how many murder
counts were alleged against Medina. They were
formally brought by the commanding officer of
Fort McPherson, Ga., where Medina and others
involved in investigation of the case are now
assigned.
The Armys announcement of charges against
Medina said in part:
Capt. Medina has been charged with murder of

was made early today aboard an
airiiner of Interflug, the national
airline, during a scheduled flight
from East Berlin to Leipzig.
The agency said Two armed
bandits forced the crew of the
airiiner to alter course briefly.
The attempt failed, however,
thanks to the security measures
taken by the crew, it said.
The would-be hijackers in
view of their frustrated plans,
committed suicide during the
landing maneuvers in order to
avoid the legal penalties, ADN
said.
It said the plane landed safely
without any of the occupants
sustaining injury.
ADN did not say how the
suicides were carried out, where
the attackers tried to force the
plane to head nor the type of
aircraft involved.

two persons on or about 16 March, 1968, maiming
and murder of one suspected enemy person and
murder of another during their interrogation late in
the day of 16 March, 1968, and assault with a
deadly weapon on a third individual while
interrogating him on or about 17 March, 1968.*
All those charged, with the exception of an
intelligence officer accused Tuesday as a result of
interrogation of prisoners, and another captain
previously charged were connected with Medinas
outfit. Besides 10 military men charged so far, five
other military men and 22 civilians were said to be
under investigation.

IN GREENWICH RUBBLE
Second Body Found
NEW YORK (UPI) lnvestigators found the
explosion-dismembered body of a young woman Tuesday in the
charred ruins of a wealthy radio station owners townhouse which
may have been a bomb factory for New Left revolutionaries.
Police said there was no identification on the body found in the
basement of James Platt Wilkersons SIOO,OOO Greenwich Village
home and the body was so battered and fragmented it would be
definitely difficult to identify. They said it was found near what
appeared to be a work bench.
It was the second victim of a series of explosions last Friday to be
found in the leveled house. The body of William Gold, 23, onetime
leader of Columbia University rioting and a member of the
revolutionary Weathermen organization, was found Friday night and
identified Sunday through fingerprints from FBI files.
Eyewitnesses said they saw two women and three men flee the
Wilkerson home after the first blast and they are still being sought by
police and the FBI. Assistant Chief Police Inspector Albert Seeman
said he believed Wilkersons daughter, Cathlyn, 25, was in the house at
the time of the explosion and was one of those who escaped.
Wilkerson, owner of Star Stations of Indiana Inc., has appealed to
his daughter to give herself up. He and his wife had been away several
months on a Caribbean vacation when the explosions occurred.
Police sources said the other woman sought was believed to be a
good friend of Miss Wilkersons a Bryn Mawr College graduate of
about 26.

NOW PLAYINGI!
Florida Players Present
DRACULA
March 10-12,1970 HP. Constans Theatre
8:00 pm Admission: $.25
Union Box Office: 392-1653

i. * . ~. /, t ,* s', *
Wednesday, March 11,1970,'T1ie Florida AMf ator.

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Wednaaday, March 11,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Lets play Freedom of Choice you beat up that one with
an axe handle and Ill bash this one with a chain

Speaking Out

Americans Contributed To Hue Bloodbath

I am led to write this because it has been often
said in letters to this paper and others that the
bloodbath in Hue is evidence of the Vietcongs
ruthlessness and that the alleged massacre in My Lai
really ought to be considered in the light of what
happened there. In other words, war is hell, and My
Lai and Hue are merely further examples.
War is hell; of that, we have no doubt. Whether
die crimes of one side mitigate the crimes of the
other is a point I dont intend to debate. I would
like only to point out that those who wish to use
Vietcong atrocities to offset the alleged events at
My Lai might be well advised to choose another
place to make their point. , lx :
Lets look at a few, admittedly selected, sources
which cast doubt on whether all those dead bodies
in Hue were killed by the Vietcong.
Tran Van Dinh, The New Republic, Dec. 6,1969:
The 1968 Tet offensive took two victims in my
own family: my younger brother, a noncomissioned
officer in the ARVN and a published poet, and my
nephew. ... They were both killed not by the
Vietcong, but by American bombings. He then
went on to point out that the number of casualties
due to American bombs and artillery has never been
revealed.
Inasmuch as the siege of Hue was a considerable

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

effort, it does not strain the imagination to asm my
the number of civilian casualties due to the siege
was also considerable. You will recall that parts of
this beautiful and ancient city were substantially
destroyed by American artillery and bombings in
order to recapture and save it.
Len. E. Ackland, Christian Century, Nov. 5,
1969: When on the first day of the attack, about
20 Vietcong entered Gia Hoi (a precinct of about
25,000 residents in Hue) in order to secure the area,
they carried with them a list of those who were to
be killed immediately as enemies of the people.*
According to Le Ngan, director of Hues special
police, the list contained five names, all those of
officers of special police. Further on, Mr. Ackland
states that the Catholic priest in Gia Hoi told him
that none of his parishoners were harmed by the
NLF. y
One can cite still other commentaries, but these
should suffice to cast doubt on a Vietcong
bloodbath. This is not to say that the Vietcong
did not kill a lot of people or that they were not
responsible for the deaths of many civilians.
But of all those dead civilians, how many were
killed by the Vietcong and how many by the ARVN
and die Americans? The answer is not clear.
In light of the above, it would appear that the

Senate
Resolution
(EDITORS NOTE: The Alligator is relinquishing its editorial space
today to print the fall text of the motion approved by the Student
Senate late Tuesday night. The bill was approved by a 37-17 vote of
die student legislative body and at least one senator said he would
question its constitutionality before the Honor Court.)
SENATE BILL NO. 70-1017
INTRODUCED BY: Jack Vaughn (Off Campus)
Stu Hershey (Off Campus)
Ralph Nobo (Off Campus)
- Dottie Hamblin (Jennings)
Jim Gundry (2UC)
Herman Hoehn (2UC)
Judiciary Committee
TITLE: SUSPENSION OF BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
AUTHORITY OVER EDITOR SELECTIONS
Whereas, the Student Senate (Legislative Council) of the University of
Florida acting on behalf of the Student Body on December 5,
1967, asked the President of the University to establish a Board
of Student Publications under his office instead of under Student
Government with the main intention of reducing political or
ideological pressure upon the Florida Alligator, and;
Whereas, this intention is expressly stated in that act of December 5,
1967, calling for a guarantee of free press on this campus for the
exchange of ideas and opinions, free of prior censorship and
control in its editorial policy and contents, by either the
administration or Student Government, and;
Whereas, the recent proceedings of the Board of Student Publications
in selecting the editors of the Florida Alligator have raised serious
doubts as to whether the intentions of the Student Body in their
action of Decembers, ,1967 (Chapter 617 of the Student Body
Statutes) have been violated due to strong allegations and
evidence that the Board of Student Publications attempted to
invoke their own ideas upon editorial policy through the selection
of the editors of the Florida Alligator, and;
Whereas, the Florida Alligator is an institution of the Student Body,
THEREFORE THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA IN THE STUDENT SENATE ORDER THAT, all authority
of the Student Board of Publications as it pertains to the selection
of the Florida Alligator editors be suspended until such time as
the Student Senate may conduct a thorough and accurate
investigation of the recent selection proceedings of the Florida
Alligator editors and whether or not they were conducted in a
manner consistent with the intentions of the Student Body in
their act of December 5, 1967, establishing the direction and
authority of the Student Board of Publications.
BE IT FURTHER ADDED THAT, the Student Body in the Student
Senate requests the current leadership and staff of the Florida
Alligator to continue in their jobs until such time as this difficulty
can be resolved by the Student Senate.

events in Hue may not be all that one might desire
as an excuse for the My Lai incidents. In fact, one
coidd use Hue as another indictment of American
policy and some people have.
If there is any conclusion to be drawn, it seems to
be that all arguments on these issues are
double-edged and must be used with care.
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Editorial Assistant
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
eature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
lorida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
of th. n r of the writer of the and not those
of the University of Florida.

By Michael Parkinson



Solares: New Blood
Equals Censorship

STUDENTS:
The recent actions and proceedings of the
Board of Student Publications are obnoxious and
revolting to say the least. The open meeting of
March 9 was a sham to decency and democracy.
Chairman Cunningham appeared as an
authoritarian figure in a well rehearsed scene of a
Perry Mason courtroom drama. It makes me
wonder if the prior hour and a half closed session
was not used for rehearsing the scene which
lasted only half an hour.
I ask you is it fair for those who have
dedicated themselves to the Alligator for so long
to be looked over in favor of new blood?
Again 1 wonder if their definition of new blood*
means conservatism on the editorial page.
It is obvious that some members of the Board
feel Alligator editorials of the past are too liberal.
Their concept of new blood seems to be a
glorified step towards censorship.
It seems that political overtones are also
entering the picture. Is the Board or any member
feeling the pressure from Representative
Bothwell? The Gainesville Sun seems to think
that there is a definite intervention from the
Orange County legislator.
Remember the Alligator crucified Mr.
Bothwell for his derogatory comments and
actions toward the University of Florida students
not too long ago.
It seems very peculiar that after receiving only
two applications for the position of editor and
that due to time the meeting was postponed and

The Alligator Controversy
Free Press Vs. New Blood?

Alligator Does Not Present 'Correct Image

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to make it clear
at the outset that though
admittedly partisan in this issue
I am not, nor have I ever been,
affiliated with the Alligator as a
staff member.
But then, one need not be a
staff member to share the sense
of outrage (or is it impotence?)
provoked by the actions of
certain parties in their disregard
for the principles of institutional
integrity and journalistic ethics
upon which the Alligator or any
newspaper is founded.
I say certain parties rather
than specify the BSP and/or any
of its members because I believe
that the move to bring new
ideas and fresh perspective to
die Alligator in the form of one
Robert Fraser has its origins
somewhere above the heads of
Cunningham and company.
The question then is who and
why?
I am not privy to the
information which would allow
me to answer this dual question
authoritatively but that is not
my aim.
I suggest that if recent events
axe put into a broader context
then their real significance may
be perceived as they relate, not
just to the Alligator but to the
UF as a whole.
It is no secret that President
OConnell and the Alumni
association have been concerning
themselves of late with
cultivating a salable image for
UF.
With the legislature

simultaneously building new
universities and refusing to fund
UF at a level compatible with
the concept of one truly great
university, UF must increasingly
look to the munificence of
private donors.
With this in mind the old
alumni magazine was refitted as
a promotional vehicle under the
able tutelage of Jim Paterson
and Laue Boyd. In its first two
quarterly issues the UF Magazine
has done well in presenting the
university to potential
benefactors.
Apparently, however, the
Alligator editors and staff have
either been unaware of or
unwilling to pursue OConnells
new image polishing line.
It is important to remember
here that the Alligators
circulation is statewide and its
potential for both good and
bad as an image purveyor is
considerable.
Now enter Robert Fraser,
whose idea of journalistic
professionalism is putting out
the kind of news the readers
want and whose editorial
experience is limited to a junior
college weekly which folded
under his editorship. Perhaps an
operational example will clarify.
In the March 9 Alligator the
top of page two sported a
picture of smiling, frisby
throwing, body painting, pot
smoking, and just plain beer
drinking students, the occasion
was last Saturdays Come
Together.
Now, journalistically this
picture and caption do seem to

more applications were accepted. This action
appeared to me as an obvious affront against the
persons of Miss Sanger and Mr. Bailey.
Then there enters the factor of sex. Are some
members of the Board sexists? There is a good
possibility since there has never been a woman
editor of the Alligator and Mr. Cunningham
personally favored a male.
This is also tied into the aspect of
qualifications. From the printed qualifications I
fed it is obvious that Miss Sanger should have
been chosen editor.
But Chairman Cunningham stated after the
meeting in response to questions that
qualifications were not important.
Im beginning to wonder what is.
k
The students created the Board of Student
Publications for the functioning of a press free of
intervention and censorship.
In fact, Chapter 617 of the Student Body
Statutes guarantees a free press on this campus
for the exchange of ideas and opinions, free of
prior censorship and control in its editorial
policy and contents, by either the administration
or Student Government.
I feel the actions of the Board of Student
Publications merit an investigation by the
Student Senate into their procedures, motives,
and directions in the selection of editors of the
Florida Alligator.
HENRY SOLARES, SECRETARY
SG DEPARTMENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

.*fsrz 7 MJ
Florida '
Alligator

convey the real meaning of the
occasion. That is in fact the way
it was though not at all the way
the administration would like
people outside the university
community to see it. Surely
something more innocuous
would have sufficed.
Another case in point might
be the Alligator Editorial
Bluebottle Fly which
castigated state representative
Cecil Both well. An associated
press article in the St. Petersburg
Times characterized the editorial

BSP Defended

MR. EDITOR:
I congratulate the Board of
Student Publications in its
recent selection for Editor-elect.
Perhaps this new man can
lift The Florida Alligator out of
the gutter of subjectivity and
sensationalism it has hopelessly

Megill Says Goodby
MR. EDITOR:
Since this may be the last letter of mine the Alligator will ever
print, I just wanted to say goodby to you all. I never knew that you
were a left-wing paper, but it seems the administration found out
what no radical would have believed.
I remember a conversation with the outgoing editor last year during
the Slade Affair. At the time I asserted that there was need for a
real student newspaper free of administrative control and censorship.
You said at the time that this was already the case with the Alligator.
I hope someday there will be a real student newspaper on this campus.
So, Goodby and Power to the People.
KEN MEGILL
PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT
LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300 words in length. A writer's
name may be withheld from publication only if he shows just causa. No
letters signed with a pseudonym will be accepted for publication. The
editor reserves the right to edit all letters in the interest of space.
Addresses and telephone numbers must accompany all letters.

as venomous. No doubt it
raised a few eyebrows.
Yes, it would appear that the
Alligator staff has gone too far
too many times. Hence, it is
time for new ideas and fresh
perspective.
The whole affair has the
pungent odor of unreality
around it. But lets not forget

' t - % % j ? ; p* ? f r # t l
Wednesday, March 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

that this is the era of Pentagon
cost watchers fired for cost
watching and HEW civil rights
attorneys like Leon Panetta fired
for enforcing the law. Why then
should our own situation disturb
us?
Why indeed?
_ RUSSELL TAYLOR

x( /

been stuck in under the present
leadership.
All the indignant
squawking coming from the
Alligator newsroom lately
reminds me of a little child who
cried when his toy gun was
taken away after he misused it.
NORM WHITE, 4JM

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th Florida Alligator, Wsdmaday, Maroti 11.1*70

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This pant dress modeled by Carole is found in Sear's Junior
Bazaar.

fashion layout by... joyce gahrke
photography by... case & cope

Wadmday, Marsh 11,1970, Tha Florida ANipator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
* .*
1968 Vandyke 12 x 57 Central Air
two Bedroom 2 bath like new,
Graduating must sell S7OO equity +
take over payments, Gall 378-6529.
(A-103-st-p).
1966 HONDA 305 Scrambler
excellent condition, extra sprockets,
spark plugs, turn signals, S3OO,
372-9167 ask for JIM, room 364.
(A-103-3t-p).
Mobil home 8 x 30 Bachelors
paradise, getting married, must give
up excellent condition AC,
complete kitchen, great for single
person. Call 376-9924. (A-103-4t-p).
1966 Kawasaki 125 cc. Dependable
Transportation SIOO or best offer.
Price Includes helmet. Call Steve
378-7801. (A-103-4t-p).
35 mm Nikon os self contained
under-water camera with wide angle
lense SIOO. PHONE: 378-0612.
(A-103-4t-p);
1968 Yamaha 180 In good condition.
S3OO or best offer. Call 373-1818
after 8:00 p.m. Graduating so I must
selL (A-103-4t-p).
63 Chevy wagon air cond. Power
steering, Call 376-4244. (a-100-st-p).
1957 Yellowstone trailer, 8 x 20,
aluminum, air conditioned, heater,
fully equipped, $750, Browns trailer
park, cheap living, 378-2193.
(A-100-st-p).
*69 Kawasaki street scrambler, Alss
250 cc. 3,200 miles, S6OO call Bill
after 5:30 p.m. 373-1142.
(A-100-st-p).
TV for sale; good condition; $45;
22" screen; wooden cabinet; Call
Bonnie at 373-2838 after 5:00 P.M.
(A-101-st-p).
Clearance sale portable cassette
taperecorder S3O Polaroid Model 210
camera $25 Gollclub full set and
bag S2O call after 4:00 378-6277.
(A-101-st-p).
Honda super 90, 1968 looks perfect
runs good, around SIIO.OO. Color
TV, Olympic $85.00 firm call Steve
378-8960. (A-102-3t-p)
HONDA CB 350, 1969, Candyaple
red. IT GOES. What a Deal to have
Wheals for such a Steal. Call Paul
378-7943. (A-102-st-p)
Motorbike 1968, Sears 5O cc.
Only 1,200 miles. SIOO. Washer
1969. Sears 3 cycle auto. $l2O. 22
Rifle Marlin lever action-39A. Like
new SSO. 378-1765. (A-102-3t-p)
Honda 160 2 yrs old must sell this
quarter first $360 takes It Perfect
shape call 392-8289 to see It and test
drive. (A-102-3t-p)
1969 19Vi ft travel Trailer, air cond.,
self contained, sleeps 6. Reese hitch
Included. Can be seen at 3860 Archer
Rd. lot no. D-l afternoon & eve.
(A-102-55t-p)
Hi-Fi; Voice of Music, great tone
quality, good condition: S3O. Also,
Silvertone amp. single 12" spkr., with
tremolo: $45. 373-1 575.
(A-104-2t-p).

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 9<
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
GAINESVILLE MALL

FOR SALE
£'.nsxx ; x*xvx-x*x-x-x*x-x-x-x-x-v.'.".". - .'
Luxury mobile home 12 x 54 1968
Malibu one large bedroom
completely furnished. Call 378-6505
after 5:00 (A-104-3t-p).
1948 Harley 74 Chopper, completely
rebuilt 8> customized, SBOO.
378-2229. (A-104-3t-p).
Parrot and cage for sale. SSO. CALL:
392-8266. (A-104-3t-p).
Stereo, Garrard turntable, Scott
Amp, Huge Walnut Speakers with
Marble Tops, S6OO, Worth $1,200.
CALL 378-0570. For a job well done feeling "dean
carpets with Blue Lustre, Rent
Electric Shampooer, SI.OO Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-53-p).
Used Smith Corona Portable Electric
Typewriter, needs cleaning. SIOO
indudes case. CALL: 378-2129.
(A-104-3t-p).
DIAMOND, 1 karat, with certified
jewels, appraisal $625, best offer,
373-1445 after 6 PM. (A-104-3t-p).
AR amp sl6O. Two desk-top AM
FM stereo radios, 25% off perfect
for dorm, turntable may be added.
Pair of speakers with 8" woofers, 5
yr. warranty. Two beautiful floor
speakers with dual 12 bass speakers
in each cabinet; 5 year warranty, 25%
off, $l5O each. Call Jay at 376-9583
after 5:00 PM. (A-104-3t-p).
I'"' FOR RENT I
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Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
induded completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 3 78-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c)
Sublet 1 br. furn. apt. In Camelot
AC, w/w carpet. Heated pool, saunas,
clubroom, laundry on premises.
392-2208 day, 378-1773 eve.
(B-101-6t-p).
Apt. for rent no. 49 Village Park
spring quarter 2 br furnished.
373-2116. (B-102-st-p)
PARTLY FURNISHED 4 Bedroom
Room in Lincoln Estates. Call
528-4891 Wllllston after 5 weekdays
for appointment. (B-102-3t-p)
- immediately available now or for
spring quarter 2 bedroom apt.
Village Park 10, can move in one day
notice. Call anytime 378-8278.
(B-101-st-p).
Sublease 1 br. apt. AC completely
furnished SHO/mo. cable TV, couple
preferred, 1404 SW 10 Terr. apt. 18,
PHONE: 378-0139 after 5 PM.
(B-101-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet a/c, $120.00 mo., Cable
TV., Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W.
2nd Ave., 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
One bedroom apt. 2 blocks from
campus. ALL utilities included. $95.
mo. 208 NW 14th St. (B-101-st-p).

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 11,1970

.v:-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-v.-.-.-x-x-X-x.*;
FOR RENT
X v
V.X.;.x.;.;.X-X-X-X-X-X.X"SSSXX-X-X-X-X-X-Xh*.
Interim prof, needs Immediately, 3
br. house, furnished for 15 mo.
Prefer Unlv. vicinity. Call 392-0955,
378-6414, top rent, S2OO.
(B-100-st-p).
LARGE 3 bdr. brick house need 3rd
roommate for spring quarter. 33.33
month + utilities!! -good location
private parking lot. 378-7274, ask for
Steve. (B-101-4t-p).
Comfort. Sublease -apt. close to
campus, air. cond., cable TV, pool,
good neighbors. $l2O mo. Incl. util.
College Terr, office or apt. 419.
(B-101-st-p).
WANT TO LIVE WHERE THE
ACTION IS? Then I have the place
for you! IP the heart of Sin City,
Village Park Apts. I graduate and
need 1 or 2 girls to sub-let to. Please
come by anytime or call KATHY at
376-3905. SMILE!l!.(B-101-5t-p).
Swing Into luxurious La Mancha!
Have your own private bdrm., close
to campus, maid service, party
courtyard/pool, gas grills. Beer &
Food on party wkend. Townhouse or
flat, carpeted, Cen A/H. S7O ind. all
util, 1,2, 3, or 4 roommates needed.
Great place- to live! Call 378-7224
NOWI. (B-103-4t-p).
Ready for occupancy spring quarter,
one bedroom French Quarter Apt.,
Alr-conditloning; by pool; Call
376-5818 or come by apt. no. 43.
(B-100-st-p).
Groovy roomies and neat neighbors!
Come experience the French Quarter.
By the pool. Girl needed for spring
and summer. Talk to GINNY,
378-6502. (B-100-st-p).
2 bedroom apartment for rent
Furnished, air-conditioned, WW
carpet, $l3O. Call George, 378-5673.
(B-103-4t-p).
March rent Paid. Immediate
occupancy. 1 BR furn. TB AC heat
slls mo. Sublet to Aug. 31.
372-6991 or 378-8065 after 6 p.m.
Close to campus. (B-103-3t-p).
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FOR RENT |
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Sublet: 1 bedroom apt., furnished,
ww carpet A/C, Sin City, cable TV,
available AprU 1, Call 373-1987
Couple Preferred. (B-103-3t-p).
Come to Camelot! Large two
bedroom with fireplace $165 mo. To
sublet -call 378-8535 after 5 of
weekends. (B-103-4t-c).
Need 2 roomnTates (male) Landmark
apt. no. 26, call 378-1074, address
1111 S.W. 16th Ave. no. 26
Gainesville, Fla. 32601. (B-103-3t-p).
Sublease -Available Mar 21. 2 br.
Landmark apt. 32. AC, pool, cable
TV, barbecue grill, $lB5 mo. Call
ANYTIME. 372-8467. (B-104-3t-p).
Want 2 males to share or will sublet
to any sex: 2 br. apt. with AC at
1210 SW 3rd Ave. no 6, for Spg.
and/or Sum. qtrs. $45 mo + utilities
per person, or $135 mo + utilities If
sublet. See mornings or evenings.
(B-104-3t-p).
2-br. apt. Close to UF. 5-rooms In all.
SBS-mo. Starting In April. 376-0317
after 5 PM. (B-104-lt-p).
2 bdrm. trailer new air-conditioning,
$lO7 mo + utilities. Available Spring
Quarter thru June or August, Call
376-6160. (B-104-3t-p).
Sublet Apt: pod, TV, AH for sll
for Spring Quarter. Share with one
for same price as three. University
apts. Call 378-2127. (B-104-3t-p).
Sublet 1 br. landmark apt. for spring
and summer quarters. AC, furnished,
$145/tno., cable, pool facilities. Call
376-3873 after 5 p.m. (B-104-3t-p).
Sublease: 2 bedroom University
Gardens Apt. Furn sl7O. Unfum
sl4s. Carpets, AC, Disposal, two
pods. Gall 378-4339 after 10 p.m.
(B-104-3t-p).

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i WANTED |
Female roommate for spring qtr.
A/C,' pool, patio. $47.50+Vzut11.3
miles from campus. Call 372-5128,
ANYTIME. (C-103-4t-p). __
Male roommates for spring qtr., 2
brm. apt., 2 blocks from campus,
air-cond., cable TV. call anytime,
373-1085. (C-103-4t-p).
Female Roomate needed starting
Spring Quarter. Landmark 106. Call
373-2240. (C-103-2t-p).
Need male roommates for 4 bedroom
house. Share expenses, pay rent of
S4B monthly or less. Have a bedroom
of your own. Call 376-0802.
(C-104-3t-p).
1 female roommate wanted for
Spring Quarter. Poolside VILLAGE
PARK, apt. no 106. Call: 378-3129.
(C-104-3t-p).
IbI jF* p|p4
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

CI.X.yW'WX'XWXSVVKWWW C
WANTED I
Pi twocoe a aafr
i male ROOMMATE upperdass for
3 bedroom GEORGETOWN apt. 65
L month to live with two cool cats.
Call 378-7027. (C-103-4t-0).
Three friendly kind & mature coeds
need a comparable fourth Spring
Quarter. Summit House Apts. $46.50
plus utilities per month. 373-2521.
(C-101-6t-p).
Female roommate for house 3 miles
from campus, own room, central heat
end A/C, SSO a mo. share utilities,
373-1027. (C-100-St-p).
Female roomate to share apt. with 2
airis spring qtr. $122/qtr. quarterly
lease. A/C, very close to campus.
1123 NW 3rd Ave. Call 378-9078.
(C-102-st-p)
EMERGENCY Need 2 male
roommates for spring quarter. s4l
rent a month. House, 2 bath 5
bedrooms. Washer dryer, air and
heat. Call 376-3067 after 6:00. 14
NE 4 St. (C-102-3t-p)
1 or 2 girls for spring or spring &
summer qtrs. 2 bedroom Landmark
apt no. 61, poolside, TV, 46.25 a mo.
Call 376-6043, for Liz or Susan.
(C-102-st-p)
One male roommate wanted to share
2 BR apt., 2 baths, dishwasher, TV,
pool, $135. per quarter La Bonne Vie
S.W. 16th Ave, Call 378-5864.
(C-103-3t-p).
Roommate for Spring quarter, 2
blocks from campus, your own room,
nice, come by 314 NW 14th St, or
call 378-0163. (C-103-3t-p).
1 or 2 Female roommates needed
immediately. Landmark. $46.25 /
mo. Call anytime, 378-4941.
(C-103-4t-p).
Female Landmark poolside
apartment. Spring and/or summer.
March free. Move In immediately.
Call Donna anytime 376-8467, or
378-4481. (C-103-4t-p).
Female roommate for 2 bedroom
Gatortown apt. S9O for entire spring
quarter. NO deposits: 378-6162.
(C-103-4t-p).
Male roommate for spring term in La
Bonne Vie apartment. SSO/mo.
Deposits paid, nice roomamates.
Phone: 373-1448, after 5 p.m.
(C-100-st-p).
Female roommate for spring quarter.
Poolside village park apt. Call
378-3157 or come by no. 116.
(C-98-9t-p).
Co-ed roommate for 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Apt. SSO a month. No
damage deposit. Call 376-1015.
(C-100-3t-p).
2 female roommates needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. in University
Gardens; spring and summer quarters.
Call 376-0716 after 4:30, ask for
Diane. (C-100-st-p).
Co-ed roommate wanted for
Landmark apt. 173. Come spend the
spring with us. Air. cond., pools. Oall
5-7 p.m. 373-1475. March rent free.
(C-100-3t-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED: Village Pk.
apts. 85 private room on the pool,
spring qtr. Call 373-1863, anytime.
(C-101-st-p).
2 female roommates for poolside
French Quarter apt. for spring qtr.
A/C $45/mo. Call 378-7876 apt. 78.
(C-99-st-p).
Wanted, l fern, roommate Spring
Qtr., penthouse apt., Col. Manor, 1
blk. from campus, $63 month, no
dep., move April 1, Call 378-8123 or
392-0107. (C-104-3t-p).
join the fun!
The'SWINGS
TO WINGS
AII over America people are taking to the
sk y young and old...some just for the fun
o* it. others because their business bene-
Ms from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
nirod uctory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hymg ease. Come visit us today.
[378-28461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
KBO W a ldo Road
Wr*!* Cmntmr ____________________

WANTED 1
Desperately need CBS 262 notes to
Xerox, Will pay, Cali 378-0551.
(C-104-2t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
Spring Quarter $48./mo. Village Park
Apt. 6. Call 373-1530. (C-98-st-p).
Male roommate needed for 2 bdrm.
Summit House apt. For Spring
Quarter. $43.50/mo. Call 376-1006.
(C-104-3t-p).
Male roommate for Spring Quarter in
French Quarter 2 bdrm. apt, $45/mo.
+ V* util. Call: 373-1816.
(C-104-3t-p).
Male roommate wanted for spring
quarter. Only SIOO for the entire
quarter. University apts. Call
378-4346. (C-104-3t-p).
Male roommate for spring qtr. Private
bedroom in 3 bdrm. house. A/C, T.V.
$6 5/mo Includes utilities. 912 N.W. 8
PI. 373-1575. (C-104-3t-p).
HELP WANTED |
Male telephone solicitor. High
Commission for about 10 hours work
per week. Experience desired but not
mandatory. Phone 376-2043 for
Interview. (E-101-st-p).
Bartender partlme evenings. Light
work for rapid pleasant older or grad,
student. Call 376-9102 BENCH &
BAR Immediately. (E-100-4t-p).
§ AUTOS j
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S2OO 63 Corvalr, blan-blue, clean
engine, fair condition, should run a
few more years. 376-0623 after 6,
anytime weekend. 312 N.W. 10th St.
(G-104-3t-p).
63 Dart, 4-door, 6 cylinder,
automatic, radio, heater, carpets,
good interior-seats, new 7OO x 13
Goodyear Polyglass tires, regularly
serviced! 378-6277. (G-104-3t-p).
Corvalr Monza. *62. Radio & Heater.
Air-Conditioned. Clean. Engine
recently overhauled. Good tires.
$350. PH: 378-6317 or 378-2078.
(G-104-3t-p).
Flat 1967, $550, Great Buy!! Good
running and in excellent condition.
Perfect for town and campus as it
parks anywhere. 376-6166.
(G-104-3t-p).
For sale: 1966 Triumph Spltefire in
fine mechanical condition. Body and
upholstery in good shape, R&H, Call
John at 376-8159 any afternoon on.
(G-104-3t-p).
Sunbeam Alpine, 1965. Radio,
heater, air. 42,000 miles. Must sell
SBOO or best offer. 378-9162
evenings and weekends. (G-104-3t-p).
1965 TR 4 Spitfire, Must sell SI,OOO
or best offer. Call 378-0570.
(G-104-3t-p).
1959 Ford, automatic, radio, heater,
must sell' S2OO, Call after 5 PM,
378-0365. (G-103-4t-p).

U.of F. School Os One Heart
Isshin-Ryu
(Karate Demonstration)
2**oo pm Today The Union South

Wednesday, March 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

f AUTOS i
'X:XrX-X*X-X*>X*X*X 66 Volkswagon Bus exc. cond. new
tires recently rebuilt engine call Lake
City 752-2482 after 3pm.
(G-102-st-p)
Enjoy my beautiful, blue;
air-conditioned PORSCHE, a lavishly
equipped 196 8 912/5. Call 378-7301
afternoons and eves, be persistant.
(G-101-st-p).
1965 Malibu wagon 283 V 8
automatic. Excellent condition.
SI6OO call Sokol 372-3173, after
6:30 PM. 1964 GMC Panel Van,
standard Trans. 6 cyl., cedar panel
Inside + cupboards. New paint, S9OO.
Beautiful camper. Call 372-3173 or
378-6236. (G-103-4t-p).
68 Firebird 350 Fully equipped,
genuine leather upholstering, must
sell; reasonable offer accepted. Call
Allan 373-1815 ANYTIME.
(G-103-2t-p).
VW 68, RED, 20,000 miles 51,400
Must sell. Call 373-1541
EVENINGS. 392-1495 DAYS.
(G-103-4t-p).
BUICKI9SI 4-door sedan runs great,
2 excellent tires, 2 fair 1970 tag,
asking 200, Call after 6 PM.
372-6949. (G-103-4t-p).
fffIOO6mBOQCQ6BOBOMSeewmnnPWOOOI,
I PERSONAL ][
8 ooossdSM b Mwwwwcowwi!:-
FREE love beads with todays first
purchase at THE BAUBLE BAG,
custom-made jewelry. 535 S.W. 4th
Ave. near Greyhound Bus Station.
Open 1 PM. (J-104-lt-p).
UNDERGROUND FILMMAKERS
Want to show your work? Every Sat.
night at the Thirsty Gator. Call
372-9408 between 1 & 3 for Info.
Also < watch for the festival.
(J-104-3t-c).
GREAT Party Idea!l Rent W. C.
FIELDS flicks. 372-9408.
(J-103-4t-C).
Come In and choose at bargain
prices: component units consoles
headphones home tape decks
clock radios TVs AM/FM
cartidge tuner cordless slicing knife
electric shavers electric hair
combs sewing machines wet suits
8 track car stereo electric
toothbrush 1228 N.E. sth Ave.
378-4186 Mon thru Sat 9-6 Frl
9-9. (J-97-2t-p)
Judy: You may use my charge card
for-your entire wedding If youll see
Sears bridal consultant. Be sure to
attend Brides World Fashion Show
In Jacksonville. Love Dad.
(J-99-Bt-c).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Willlston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p)
S6O a month, room & board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p)

Page 11

i
Bustline Beauty You are Invited to a
bra showing Virginia's Hairstyling &
Reducing Salon Tue & Thur
10am-2pm Symbra 'Ette custom
fitted-sizes. 28aa-46m Free fittings.
Gale Collins, consultant, 372-1575 &
378-3283. (J-102-st-p)
Composer desires getting into good
band. Acid rock to beethoven. Would
like' to work with single performers
too. Herb at 392-6299 after 7 PM.
(J-103-2t-p).
Art Lessons In Freehand Drawing:
Children & Adults. Group or private
Instruction. Call 373-1947 for
information. (J-100-7t-p).
Original handmade wedding rings;
custom jewelry gold or silver,
Contact Hope White 373-1947.
(J-100-7t-p).
GIRLS Do you realize that
CUSTOM MADE clothes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material & design, and
feature myner quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress,
WEDDING DRESS, Sportswear &
Bikinis by your English dressmaker,
KATHLEEN. Phone 378-0320.
(J-100-10t-p).
11 LOST A FOUND I
Lost: silver I.D. bracelet with name
MIKE. $5.00 reward. Call
376-0326. (L-103-4t-p).
Lost Perscrlptlon sunglasses In
flowered case. White frames grey
lenses. Call 392-9628 ask for Carol.
(L-101-3t-p)
. .WWWX'XvXvNXWW-rW'WVWKi'Wi
SERVICES |
' OQOOor '
XEROX COPIES: speclizating In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-l2t-57-p)

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$ OLE/ pKFor Sin City & Campus Onlyol
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£ Sun thru Fri £
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V Os Favorit* Mexican Foods J
a Tacos 29C Rancho Burgor 39< A
jvj Tost ad as 29< Chili Dogs 39< Aj
M FrijoUs 29< Mexican Slaw 29< N
W T/R. Mexican Specials
M Steak Taco 79< &
W Beef Burrito (Neat treat) 49<
W Jose Chili (Wow ) 39< M
M Tamales (Hot enough) 49< Jvl
M Fiesta Plate (Everything) 99< M
vj For Gringos (Amoricanizod) M
Fried Chicken basket 1.09 Ny
A Hamburger (Gringo Burger) 49< JVJ
[A\ 1624 S.W. 13th St. LXJ
yV (Across from sin city)

SERVICES |
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE
2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
Overland expedition to India Via
Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan,
Khatmnud. Lvs London late June.
$545 fully inclusive, Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Or.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
Photography Special on spring
outdoor color portraits: IB x 10,
Is x 7, 6 wallets, sl2. Application
photo's: 6 wallet size for $5. Call
Ron between 5-7 PM 376-6042.
(M-104-lt-p).
Housewives Will do Ironing in your
home and repair. One weeks ironing
for two persons 2.50 a week. Before
10 PM. 372-5269. (M-99-4t-p).
HORSES BOARDED l2 Xl2 stalls
with pasture or paddock. 8 miles
west of the Unlv. 372-3452 or
372-2182. (M-104-3t-p).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS, at
519 S.W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
M-ts-59-c).
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p)
French woman educated In France
would tutor students of any level In
any area of the French language
speaking grammar etc. Call 378-1127.
(M-103-3t-p).
RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1958
N.W. 4th Street, 376-8506, Mrs.
Ruby Mills (M-100-st-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop.- Call
376-0710. (M-57-ts-c)
XEROX COPIES 1 to 10 copies Os
each original 5 cents; over ten 4 cents
THE COPY CENTER 1718 West
Unlv. Now open next to Gold Coast.
Free Collating tel. 376-9334.
(M-102-st-p)



Page 12

!, Ttw Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 11,1970

o
mml m k M
'
BBRBRi
am
? -- ,- * '; '* ; -i* J *- ' _r / ' '"'7
We care.
Nothing happens in a vacuum. Every time you add another
building to a citys environment, that environment changes a little.
We think all businessmen have an obligation to make sure
that change is for the better.
Before we began designing The Place we asked a lot of
questions... of ourselves, of our neighbors, and of our prospective
tenants. We found out what kind of living space students really wanted;
and we found out what our neighbors didnt want next door. Only
when we had those answers did we go to the drawing board.
- v -\
The result is a totally new concept in apartment buildings,
planned to meet the needs of the people who will live in, and near,
The Place. We are casting those plans in glass and stone and wood
today... and were doing it with quality materials to ensure you
wont be looking at an eyesore ten years from now.
The Place will provide quiet, private and convenient living space
for University of Florida students. The complex will be managed by
a highly trained team of local residents who care as much about your
needs as our balance sheet. We think the combination is unbeatable.
After all, if we dont bother to care about our neighbors, how
can we expect our neighbors to care about us?
Now under construction .tile
3rd ond 13,h PKICCt)
Just like you
planned it
*
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New Book Deals
i
,
,
I With Guns, Politics

,
i
,
I
Picking Up the Gun
By EARL ANTHONY :
(Dial, $4.95) :
Any attempt to understand the origin of the Black Panther l
Party for Self-Defense, or the response it has elicited from \
police, must begin with guns. i
When Huey P. Newton founded the party in late 1966, he j:
saw guns as the only way black people in Oakland, Calif., could \
assert their independence. j
In time, he expanded his notion of the partys purposes to \
j include revolution and Mao Tse-tungs often-quoted, little :
understood dictum: Political power grows out of the barrel of ;
a gun. :
Revolution arid ideology are, however, basically incidental to :
the real appeal of the Panthers. Earl Anthony, expelled by the :
i party during a purge in 1969 but still loyal, makes it clear guns j
captured the imagination of young blacks accustomed to
\ backing down before police guns. :
Anthony talks about politics, but guns were what brought j
j him into the party, it was guns that aroused police hostility j:
! across the country. For Anthony and blacks generally, the guns j:
\ were an assertion of manhood, of independence, of a refusal to :
j bow and scrape. :
For the police, the guns are a threat, despite the fact the j:
Panthers so far have used guns only rarely, usually in geniune :
| self-defense. :
Thomas Powers (UPI) :
>
>
)
(
I
i
{
Accomplices to the Crime, the Arkansas Prison Scandal :
By Tom Murton & Joe Hyams :
(Grove, $7.50) j
The setting is Arkansas or is it? The corruption, lethargy j
and degration of penology in the book takes place in Arkansas,
but it isnt that far removed from almost anywhere in the j
United States. j
Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller pledged his support for prison j
modernization four years ago when he was chasing the Arkansas j
governorship. When he won, he named Tom Murton to |
accomplish the staggering chore. Then, according to Murton, the j
governor handcuffed him and finally would be sacking him }
despite the progress he had made in the states archaic penal j
system. j
Murton knows the problems of the Arkansas system and :
Hyams knows how to write. Together theyve come up with a :
horrifying look at one states alleged efforts in the name of :
penology. j
Since its a first person account, the book obviously leans
heavily toward Murton and away from the governor and other \
politicos. But even if a small fraction of Murtons claims are
true, the extent of graft and corruption in the state is |
overwhelming.
The refusal of state officials to come to grips with the ;
problem is almost unbelievable. j
This gripping work opens the door on a hole called the :
Arkansas prison system. :
Paul Robbins (UPI) \


rx Irl
** 2035 N.W. 13th St. / Gainesville. Florida / 378-2304

The
Florida
Alligator

Director Begins Work
For Next Production

By DWIGHT GODWIN
Alligator Corrwpondent
Auditions for a play even
on a non-professional level are
time-consuming, serious affairs
for the director and the people
trying out.
In two night sessions totalling
more than ten hours, James
Lauricella, an assistant to
professor in the Speech Dept.,
listened to more than 50 people
read lines, watched them walk,
and looked at them alongside
one another in various
combinations for height,
physical type, and suitability.
Lauricella will direct
'Thieves Carnival by French
playwright Jean Anouflh for its
performances here in May. His
work began at least two months
ago.
Lauricella talked to the entire
group of hopeful actors last
week before the final two nights
of readings. He pointed out that
the play, as he would stage it,
would require a high degree of
mimetic ability with an entire
fourth act that would be
choreographed.
To help lessen the strain and
nervous tension the people
might feel, he told them, Dont
look on this thing as a high level
competitive enterprise. Its our
job to explore you. You cannot
improve your abilities in the
short time of rehearsal, so dont
push for unnatural things.
Translate these lines into your
idiom.
Lauricella also outlined his
plans for pacing the entire
production to help the would-be
actors understand die approach
he will be taking. Act I will be
paced as you would tell a child a
fairy tale light and fluttering,

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like butterflies. Act II will be
more highly stylized, and Act in
even move so, until by Act IV
everybody's a wind-up toy.
The whole play is a goof, a
huge, huge goof. At the end,
when the actors go out into the
yiNca/
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audience and hand out balloons,
they will say, Gee, it was nice of
you to come this evening; may I
escort you to the door?, and go
on out with them, and stand
talking, in full make-up and
costume for 20 minutes.
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Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

MBBB&IIiMBMraHBHMMPBH / V..'.
% %
-. .; '. ;
'- 1
££.':\ v£v
wmW M
>'
9 BF 9
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''£' >^-.7-'.-."J. '' J : -^A:v : '' '-i:'-- 'V .:
PHIL COPE
GATORS' RALPH HART
... won three of last four matches

UK First In UPI Final
Jacksonville Gets Fifth

NEW YORK (UPI) The University of Kentucky
is United Press Internationals national basketball
champion for a record fourth time.
Adolph Rupps Wildcats were named no. 1 on 19
of the 33 ballots cast by the 3 5-member UPI Board
of Coaches Monday. Two coaches did not
participate in the balloting.
Kentucky put together 304 points, 14 mote than
UCLA, the season-long leader which saw its chances
for repeating as national champion fade in an upset
loss to Southern California last week.
UCLA received 11 first place votes, Jacksonville
had two and Notre Dame one.
St. Bonaventure moved up to third in the final
ratings with New Mexico State fourth and
Jacksonville fifth. South Carolina finished sixth,
followed by lowa, Notre Dame, Drake and
Marquette to complete the top 10 for the season.
Houston was ranked 11th, followed by North
Carolina State and Pennsylvania.
Florida State took 14th with Villanova and Long
Beach State tied for 15th.

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Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133

Three teams Niagara, Utah State and Western
Kentucky tied for 17th while Cincinnati and
Texas-El Paso finished in a dead heat for 20th.

NEW YORK (UPI) The United Press
International top 20 teams for 1969-70 with first
place votes and regular season won-lost records in
parentheses.
TEAM POINTS
1. Kentucky (19) (25-1) 304
2. UCLA (11) (24-2) 290
3. St. Bonaventure (23-1) 243
4. New Mexico St. (24-2) 200
(>. Jacksonville (2) (24-1) 187
6. South Carolina (23-2) 142
7. lowa (19-5) 140
$. Notre Dame (1) (21-6) 46
% Drake (21-6) 43
10. Marquette (22-3) 41

AGAINST PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE
Netters See Action Today

By JAY GARTMAN
Alligator Sports Writer
Tennis coach Bill Potter
thought that 1970 would be a
rebuilding year for the Florida
squad, but he reserved specific
predictions until after UF met
Florida State.
Florida State has a pretty
good team and the result of that
match should be a good
indicator of our ability, said
Coach Potter at the seasons
opener two weeks ago.
Last Saturday the Gators
dropped their third match of the
season to the Seminoles, 6-3.
The contest was closer than
the score reveals, though,
according to assistant tennis
coach M. B. Chafin.
We should have won several
matches, said Chafin.
Today at 2:30 pan. UF takes
on Presbyterian College also a
tough team, according to the
tennis coaching staff.
Presbyterian and Southern
Illinois provide the Gators with
their only remaining stiff
competition for this quarter,
with Jacksonville, Columbia,
Kalamazoo and the U. S. Naval
Academy called breathers by
Coach Chafin.
Next quarter UF will get back
the services of junior Paul
Lunetta, who was academically
ineligible this quarter. Lunetta
played number four, five and six

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 11,1970

Page 14

singles and teamed up with
Jamie Pressly to win the SEC
number three doubles in 1969.
This year he was dated to carry
the number two singles.
Even with Lunetta, the Gators
face tough opposition including
Miami, Georgia, Georgia Tech,

i
:-xj: : i .... tBLc;;. r _'|^ > '^*{>y^^j4|{^ftj^jl-K, ff^
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PHIL COPE
BUDDY MILES
.. number two man

MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES An ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

r STfIK*~SH fiSTi
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(With The Coupon)
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1 SI.OB Value Only 90$ ulus tax |
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\t£lo S. Ifr. 13th St Gainesville
iFn
EAT-IN
Chicken Cold Cuts 3
FOOD
(free, that is)
Tonight 5:00 6:00
tunar

Ken McKinnon
Assistant Sports Editor

Tennessee and LSU in the
spring.
Miami, featuring
All-Americans Pat Cramer and
Luis Garcia and freshman
standouts Eddie Dibbs and Raz
Reid, beat Houston Saturday,
8-1. UF fell to the same Houston
team last Friday, 9-0.

Need Printing 7
48 Hour Service
Collating Composition
Folding C uttmg
Stapling Paste ups
Ewing Photoprint
305 N t Ist St Gainesville
378-2436



ALL-AMERICA VOTING

Maravich, Lanier Top UPI

NEW YORK (UPI) Pete
Maravich, greatest scorer in
jnajor college basketball history,
and Bob Lanier, rated the best
big man in the collegiate ranks
this season, were the top
vote-getters in the 1969-70
United Press International
All -America squad balloting
announced Tuesday.
Maravich, the Louisiana State
University standout who led the
Tigers to their best season in 16
years while becoming the most
prolific scorer in major college
history with a three-year career
total of 3,590 points and a 46.6
average this season, was named
on 549 of the record 556 ballots
received from UPI subscribers.
With scoring two points for a
first place vote and one for a
second place, Maravich tallied
1,083 points.
Lanier, the 6 feet, 11 inch
giant for St. Bonaventure,
received 1,003 points. The
Buffalo, N.Y., senior led the
Bonnies into the NCAA playoffs
with a 30 point average.
Other spots on the first team
went to Dan Issel of
tournament-bound Kentucky,
Rick Mount, the nations no. 3
scorer from Purdue and little
Calvin Murphy of Niagara.
Issel, a 6-8 senior from
Batavia, 111., received 921 points;
Mount, a 64 senior from
Lebanon, Ind., and the Big 10
conferences top scorer, had 733
points in the balloting.
Murphy, smallest man on the
All-America squad at 5-10, got
658 points. The senior from
Norwalk, Conn., averaged 30
points a game in leading the
Purple Eagles into the NCAA
playoffs.
The second team consisted of
Notre Dames Austin Can, the
no. 2 scorer this season; Charlie
Scott of North Carolina; 7-2
Artis Gilmore of Jacksonville;
John Roche of South Carolina
and Rudy Tomjanovich of
Michigan.
On the third team were UCLA
teammates Sidney Wicks and
John Vallely, Mike Maloy of
Davidson, John Johnson of lowa
and Rich Yunkus of Geogia
Tech.
Heading the players on the
honorable mention list were Jim
McMillian of Columbia and
Howard Porter of Villanova.
Maravich pumped in 1304
points this season in surpassing
Oscar Robertson's 2,973 total in
becoming the most prolific
scorer the game has ever known.
But the ability to shoot isnt
the only talent of the young
man whose father, Press
Maravich, is the LSU coach.
The
Florida
Alligator
is seeking an editorial staff
lor the spring quarter.
Anyone interested in
working for the newspaper
J houkl meet in room 357 of
sh J. Wayne Reitz Union at
ithr 10 a.m. on Thursday,
March 12
or
2 p.m. on Friday, March 13

'mem |H :
Wmw JH
"PISTOL PETE" MARAVICH
... third All-American award
INTRAMURALS
PIKES Close Gap
STEVE ROHAN
PI KAPPA Alpha moved to within 53 points of league leading Beta
and into a tie for fourth place in the Orange League as they stopped
the Phi Delts, 3-2 in the handball finals.
Phil Petrozella had little trouble topping Rick Saba 21-2,21-0, and
Jake Vam stomped Ed McDougald 21-1,21-2, for the Pikes.
But the Phi Delts loaded up their doubles teams as John Warren and
Skip Albury beat Gerry Snedaker and Dave Wilder, 21-14, 21-6, and
H. Block and Jim Lee stopped Jim Nilon and John Myrick 21-8,21-11
for the Phi Delts.
In the big match of the day, Allan Repp and Guy Dennis edged
Tom Christian and Rick Birch 21-9, 21-16 to capture the
championship for the Pikes.
Beta Theta Pi now leads the league with 553 points, followed
closely by Sigma Chi with 530 and TEP with 520. SAE and Pikes
come next with 500 points each.
ORANGE LEAGUE all-campus basketball stars include Kelian
Byrne, LX A; Luis Lamela, AEPi; Steve Sykes, ATO; Kevin Rinehart,
SX and Paul Register, PKT.
Blue I .league all-stars include, Dan Murray, KS, Gary Knight, KA,
Steve Kaufman, XP; Pete Marovich, AGR; and John Bryan, DU.
MORE SOFTBALL officials are needed for the coming quarter and
are asked to sign up in the intramural office. There will be an
important meeting of all softball officials Thursday night at 7:30 m
room 216 of the Florida Gym.
Independents may sign up for softball now and dorms may bepn
signing up for handball. All sign ups are made in room 229 Florida
Gym or by calling 392-0581.
I
SO NE HOURS I
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM j
SATURDAY BAM IPM I

t j£
Jets Get Trapp
! **
NEW YORK (UPI) The New York Jets traded cornerback Randy
Beverly to the San Diego Chargers Monday for reserve wide receiver
Richard Trapp.
Beverly, a hero of the 1969 Super Bowl when he intercepted two
passes, was injured most of the 1969 season and lost his starting
position at right cornerback.
Trapp, a graduate of UF, was the second leading receiver for the
Buffalo Bills in 1968 before being traded to San Diego.
Trapp will join Steve Tannen, who was selected by the Jets in the
first round of this years college football player draft.

GOUPAR M
sjL DRIVING RANGE
GOLF CLUBS RENTED
ISEL, CLUB HOUSE
ELECTRIC CARTS
LESSONS AVAILABLE
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721
AUTO GUSS
MAULDIN'S
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST*'
c=s general repair on all cars
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771
All 13", 14", & 15" thru Size 775 $8.95 1
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Or Always A Choice of: n
Fried Chicken or Chopped Sirloin §
Above antraas served with cholca of Potatoes,
Rice or Vegetable, choice of special Salads of
f§ the Day, Hot Roll or Muffin, lead Tea or
Coffee. ;a
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I 117/CAFETERIA | Downtown I
Closed Saturdays I

Wednesday, March 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

CENTRAL AUTO
SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RINGS & VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS
FRONT END WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
BRAKE JOBS
Mon.-Sat. 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
-Free pick up & Delivery in City
1027 S. MAIN.
378-4943

Page 15



Page 16

>. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 11,1970

Old Man Rupp Still Rolls On

NEW YORK (UPI) Adolph
Rupp proved this season that
basketball hasnt passed him by
at age 68.
Rupp, wholl celebrate his
69th birthday on Sept. 2, was
installed in the Naismith
Memorial Hall of Fame last
April, but he wasnt ready to
rest on his laurels that included a
winning percentage of 82.2
percent in 39 years as head
basketball coach at Kentucky.
He overcame numerous
difficulties including injury,
illness and a tragic auto accident
to guide Kentucky to the United
Press International National
Championship for a record
fourth time.

UNDER THE BLEACHERS

Spring is almost here and as we all know, the season of spring is
time for jogging.
You see them everywhere, the joggers: running down Thirteenth
Street, Radio Road, around the Law Center and on that Joggers
Path near Lake Alice. Jogging has arrived.
Along with jogging, not by accident, come the joggers; those
citizens who wish to add a few years to their lives in hopes of seeing if
the world can get any worse.
Men joggers want to look like Burt Lancaster with his shirt off.
Lady joggers want to look like Debbie Drake (with her shirt off,
hopefully).
Men who used to brag about their high alcoholic consumption and
bed partners now boast of distances covered every night jogging.
They're amazing, these joggers. Professors, students, athletes, and
politicos. I live in a rather unfortunate section of town and for me, it's
difficult to tell who is jogging and who just finished mugging.
Around here, most people jog at night. Frankly, my first impulse
on seeing someone dash by my window is to let the dog out after him.
A friend of mine was jogging the other night and ran into a bit of
difficulty. As he was rounding a comer, he almost bumped into an
elderly woman walking her dog.
My friend was all red and he was panting. Jogging is strenuous
exercise.
But the lady thought he had romance on his mind. My friend
ignored her screams and continued his jogging.
But just as jogging has taken the American public's fancy the past
few years, so it will disappear like the Hula Hoop and the twist. The
old fatty tissue will be clogging up the valves again before you know
it.
One reason jogging can't last is because theres no ball in it, and
thus, is not a sport. A sport is not a sport in America unless it has
some kind of ball involved. Baseball, football, soccer, basketball are
good examples. Wrestling and boxing aren't included; they're only
playful forms of homicide.
Fishing isn't a sport, because an 80-year-old woman can put a worm
on a hook and catch a first. But putting a worm on a hook and
catching a fish, admittedly, makes more sense than being able to
throw a basketball through a hoop.
I hope jogging survives. Maybe it could make it if the jogger
bounced a ball while he ran.

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Rupp was hospitalized for five
weeks and his leading scorer,
Dan Issel was hurt much of the
season. Rupp also had to rebuild
the team after star guard Mike
Casey was injured in an auto
accident and was lost for the
entire season.
But Kentucky, displaying the
characteristic well-disciplined
attack that is the hallmark of all
Rupp teams, wound up the
regular season at 25-1 with only
a loss to Vanderbilt marring the
record and won the National
Crown when UCLA lost to
Southern California last week.
This team performed well
under the most adverse
conditions and I couldnt be

Jogging

JEFF KLINKENBERG

You probably didnt know it,
but you can order your Florida
Quarterly by mail.
Just send $1.25 to Room 330,
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
And well mail you a Quarterly.

more grateful for the no. 1
selection, Rupp said.
'fa 40 seasons, Rupp has now
coached his clubs to 835
victories against 176 losses. The
Wildcats have won the
Southeastern Conference crown
25 times.
A native of Halstead, Ka.,
Rupp played at Kansas under
another legendary coach, Pho
Allen. He coached prep ball in
Marshallton, lowa for a year
after his graduation from Kansas
in 1923 and then four years at
Freeport, 111. before he came to
Kentucky in 1930.
He's been there ever since,
although the Wildcats and Rupp
missed one season when
Kentucky was suspended in
No Comment
Says Player
SARASOTA (UPI) Golf pro
Gary Player says he has made his
first and last comment about the
apartheid racial policies of his
native South Africa.
One of my greatest regrets in
life is that politics has become so
involved in sports, Player said
during an exhibition round at
Longboat Key near here
Monday. I wish there were
some way in which people all
over the world could persuade
politicians and protesters that
sports should be above politics.
Commenting that he fears
there will be some
demonstrations at tournaments
he enters in this country because
of South Africas policies, Player
said, I deplore unfortunate
incidents like the refusal of a
visa to Mr. Arthur Ashe and the
refusal to allow Mr. Papwa
Sewgolun to play in the South
Africa Open.
The South African
Government recently refused to
issue a visa to Ashe, an American
Negro tennis player, and
Sewgolun was barred from the
Open. He is a black New Zealand
golfer.
One thing 1 do want to make
clear, he added, is that I am a
loyal and proud South African.
grateful to be back in the United
States to follow my profession,
Player said. I can offer no
further political comment.
Player planned to go to
Pensacola today to get ready for
the Monsanto Open.

florida I
quarterly I

1953 as a result of the
point-shaving scandals. But the
Wildcats bounced back to post a
25-0 mark in 1954.
Rupp's last previous national
title team in the UPI ratings
came in 1966 although the
Wildcats were upset by Texas El
Paso in the NCAA finals and
wound up 32-2. The victory
total included five on a tour to
Israel. The following year,
Kentucky slipped to 13-13 the
worst record in Rupp's career
but Rupp quickly proved he
hadnt lost his touch.
Kentucky posted 22-5 and
23-5 marks the last two seasons
and were ranked fourth and
seventh.
Rathskeller Now Taking
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for Spring Quarter
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Interesting Work
Long Hours
openings also for
Daytime Bartender
Information and Applications
Available at Rathskeller

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