Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Fraser: Alligator Has Tremendous Possibilities

' '^BIHHBf
ROBERT FRASER
... 'no grudges'

mi

Vol 62, No. 102

30,000 PACK PERRY
Clouds Darken
Eclipse, Spirits
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
PERRY The March 7 solar eclipse was to Perry, Fla., what the
Johnson-Kosygin meeting was to Glassboro, N. J., but in the latter
case, mother nature didnt intervene.
The small north Florida town, known as the tree capital of the
South, changed its name for a day and suddenly became the eclipse
capital of the world.
Perry Police Chief John Young estimated a crowd of nearly 30,000
people flowed into Perry to view what some called a once-in-a-lifetime
event.
College students from throughout Florida flocked to Perry and set
up campsites in the towns state park to spend the night under the
stars waiting for the sun to appear and then disappear.
Scientists from Italy, Japan, Canada and the United States began
arriving in the small city earlier last week to begin construction of
observatories to enable them to view first-hand a total solar eclipse.
As the big moment approached Chamber of Commerce officials
began biting their fingernails as they eyed the grey sky blocking out
that much-wanted sunshine.
Rain was forecast and expected by the weathermen three days in
front of sunless Saturday but the optimists refused to believe the
prediction.
The Perry Chamber of Commerce with the cooperation of local
industries circulated over 25,0CX) eclipse viewers to residents of Perry
and its visitors but nobody got to use them.
A research team from a Mississippi high school camped in a school
bus on the Perry football field and began setting up equipment a few
hours before the scheduled time of totality, 1:17 pjn.
The Perry airport was closed to air and ground traffic as amateur
(SEE 'GREY' PAGE 6)

' Women Denied Equal Status, Equal Pay

HMHMHi
I
STUDENT SENATE overrode
Student Body President
Charles Shepherds budget bill
veto Thursday page 2
CtfopwCthr 10
fliaifluli 11
E4itaitato..i 8
Lettan i 9
Movies 11
Sports..-- IS
FSUNows..* 6

(EDITORS NOTE: Mary
Mcride is a junior journalism
major and formerly a staff writer
under Alligator editor-elect
Robert Fraser while at Broward
Junior College. In the interest of
fairness, the editors asked Miss
Mcride not a staff member
to write the following
interview with Fraser.)
By MARY McBRIDE
Special Writer
When the Board of Student
Publications (BSP) announced
their choice Wednesday of
Robert Fraser for spring quarter
Alligator editor, the newsroom
echoed the question, Whos
he?

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

By JANIE GOULD
Aiiigmor Awpivnvnn caixor
' and
JOHN SUGG
I have been asked by men, does a second citizen have anything to
talk about?** said Dr. Betty Cosby, assistant to UF*s vice president, at
Sunday's observance of International Women's Day.
The answer from the women there was a definite yes and,
moreover, they were not going to be content with inferior status any
longer.
The program, attended by 60 people in the Reitz Union, was the
that commemoration of the holiday, begun over 60 yean ago, in
GsinesvSes history.
Included in the program were speeches by Dr. Cosby, Mrs.
Savannah WiDiains of the National Welfare Rights Organization, Mrs.

EDITOR-ELECT FACES CHALLENGE

The University of Florida Gainesville

PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AGREE

BSP Meets Tonight
The Board of Student Publications meets tonight to consider
Alligator Editor Raul Ramirez charges of irregularities during
the boards selection of Robert A. Fraser as Alligator
Editor-In-Chief for the Spring quarter.
The meeting is slated for 7 p.m. in room 316 of the Reitz
Union but, according to BSP Executive Secretary Brent Myking,
Ramirez charges wont be heard until around 8 pan.
Fraser is also scheduled to appear, following Ramirez*
presentation.

He has not worked for the
Alligator in the two years hes
studied journalism at UF. And
this is precisely why the current
staff has challenged the .BSPs
decision.

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NOT ALL EXPERIMENTERS WERE BLACKED OUT
... Nikon's Japanese researchers didn't need dear skies

Fraser commented Sunday on
the staffs reaction.
I understand it. I can
imagine its quite an emotional
issue. I hope those who choose
to remain with the staff dont

Judi Rossi of the Young Socialist Alliance. The event was built by an
Ad Hoc Committee comprised of representatives of several campus
and community womens
Don Albury, a Vietnam veteran, also spoke on the role of the
Vietnamese women and a Vietnamese film was shown.
The moderator of the program was Diana Sugg, a local womens
libentlonist.
Mrs. Rossi reviewed the history of women. She said:
Women were instrumental in organizing the anti-slavery movement
but then found they couldnt speak at the abolitionist conferences
because they were women.
Mrs. Rossi stated three ways women are denied human lights:
They don't have control over their own bodies, she' said.
Thousands die and suffer from illegal abortions each year.
They are denied equal pay for equal work. Although 40 per
cent of the working force is women, we only earn 30 to 60 per cent of
(SEE SOMETHING* PAGE 5)

bear any grudges. I certainly
dont.
When you work for the
Alligator, you work for the
Alligator not Bob Fraser, not
Carol Sanger, not Raul Ramirez.
A newspaper is an institution.
While at UF Fraser has
maintained the 3.0 S average
necessary to hold
Scripps-Howard and Minneapolis
Tribune scholarships. Hes
worked at a local department
store for a year and a half, and
says he didnt have time to write
for the Alligator.
I had to work, thats what it
boiled down to. Im married so I
have a family responsibility, he
(SEE GATOR' PAGE 5)

Monday March 9, 1970

'Largest' Raid
Nets 23 Pounds
Os Marijuana
By United Preet I nternatiohal
Three persons arrested this
weekend in a raid in which
sheriffs deputies seized 23
pounds of marijuana were to be
arraigned today on charges of
possession of narcotics.
Officials said the raid early
Saturday was one of the largest
in Gainesvilles history. The
marijuana confiscated by the
deputies was valued on the black
market at over $2,000.
Jailed pending arraignment
Monday were Michael
Tomkinson, 20, and Charles
Shorter Jr., 19, both of
Gainesville, and Michael
Colombo, 22, of Port Jefferson,
N.Y.
Deputies also took a
16-year-old boy into custody
during the raid. He was turned
over to juvenile authorities.
Officers said the marijuana,
stored in one-pound bags, was
found in a car at a home
deputies raided on the outskirts
of town.



Page 2

, The Florida AMgetor, Monday, March , 1970

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UF Workers Meet In Unionizing Effort

By RAFAEL BETANCOURT
Alligator Writer
In an effort to unionize all paid
employes connected with UF, a meeting
of students and faculty was held at the
Catholic Student Center Friday
afternoon.
Hubert C. Cranford and Val Cox,
international representatives of the
AFL-CIO Service Employes
International Union, came from Atlanta
at the invitation of John McLaughlin,
organizer of the unionization effort, to
speak to a group of approximately 35
students and faculty members.
The purpose of the meeting was to
organize students and faculty to contact
all workers, explain the union to them
and urge them to attend a meeting of all
interested workers April 4 at Mount

Budget Preparation Law
Veto Overridden By Senate

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Overriding Student Body
President Charles Shepherds
veto by a 32-16 vote, the
,j £
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I MISS SEMINOIE I
** **
Miss Carol Holcomb was ;|:
: named the 1970 Miss ;|:
: Seminole Sunday following a :
| week-long Nickel Vote" in §
: the Reitz Union which ;:
:j generated over S3OO for :
:: Gator Loan Fund. Miss :
:: Holcomb, sponsored by %
:: Kappa Delta sorority, will be ¥
:: featured in a color spread in
>: the 1970 yearbook along J
>: with the other four finalists. :j:
: She is a 21-year-old senior in ::
: recreation.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
otyrctlonable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled tro run
several times. Notices tor correction must be given before -the next

Carmel Baptist Church in Gainesville.
Also, the contacted workers would be
urged to sign membership cards
authorizing the union to represent
them. After 51 per cent of all UF
employes have signed membership
cards, the group would file a petition to
the U. S. Labor Relations Board, which
would then conduct an election among
all employes to determine if the
majority wants the union to represent
them.
The group would then elect
temporary officers who would lead the
union and operate it at the direction of
the membership.
All non-student employes connected
with UF would be eligible for
membership in the proposed AFL-CIO
local. This would include all clerical,

Student Senate Thursday passed
an amendment to the Budget
Preparation Law.
The vote was exactly the
two-thirds required to override
the veto.
The law amends die budget
preparation act of Student
Government to require both the
senate and the president to pass
the student body budget into
law as one act. Previously it has
been passed as a series of
individual budget requests, each
request being passed individually
by the president and senate.
Under the new system if the
president wishes to veto one
budget he would have to veto
the entire budget act, including
those individual budgets he may
favor. Under the old law he
would merely veto the one in
question and pass the rest.
The Senate Judiciary
Committee recommended the
veto be overridden.
Senate President Jack Vaughn
spoke in favor of the bill and
discussed what he felt were the
two main concerns of the bill:
its financial feasability and the
possibility of political
manipulation.
On the first, he said, To me
the budget is one act, one
budget and balances within itself
- not 25 single budgets. You

SMALL TURNOUT FRIDAY

cannot go back and look over
the whole budget again
(referring to what happens under
the old system if the president
vetoes an individual budget.)
You can just look at the two or
three you have.
He said this makes the senate
inflexible in dealing with the
whole act. It would be difficult
to rebalance the budget because
the senate would have no source
in the budget to get the funds,
he said.
Vaughn said he doubted the
president would be able to gain
control or influence over a
sufficient number of senators to
hold up the budget in the senate.
Jim Roll, student body
treasurer, said, You can look at
any budget all you want and
change any part of it you want.
All it takes is two readings.
After the bill was passed, the
senate proceeded with the
second reading of the budget,
passing it after a quick reading.
The budget act as per the
new law will come up for a
final reading Tuesday at 7:30

medical and service employes.
There are approximately 5,500 state
employes at UF with over 100 private
employes of fraternities and sororities
and roughly 150 regular employes of
Servomation, Inc. Private employes,
instead of signing membership cards as
do the state employes, need to sign
payroll deduction authorization cards.
Again, after 51 per cent of the employes
sign, an election would be held among
the company employes.
The membership cards would not be
made public, although the payroll
deduction cards, which all union
members would eventually have to sign,
would.
At the April 4 meeting for the
workers, the international organizers
would again come down, this time to

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PHIL BANNISTER
JOHNNY RIVERS
Singing until 2 Saturday morning, Johnny Rivers captivated two
different audiences of UF students attending Interfraternity Council's
Winter Frolics this weekend. Joining him were Sweetwater and
Celebration.

m
v ' LiaLhifcy^l*
A NEW PROGRAM U-.,
OF INTEREST TO MEN

come together
"Electric" Andy Kramer's
fourth Come Together Saturday
on the Reitz Union lawn
brought together an estimated
2,500 students who threw
frisbees, painted bodies, smoked
pot or just drank beer until past
midnight.

explain the workings of the union fully
to the workers. This meeting would give
the workers an opportunity to unionize
by forming a local of the AFL-CIO
Service Employes Union. The next step
would then be to negotiate a contract
first with UF and then with the private
organizations connected with it.
Contracts have already been
negotiated by other locals with
University of Illinois, Southern Illinois
University, Memphis State University
and others. Hourly wage rates after the
new contract at Southern Illinois
University, for example, range from
$2.70 for distribution clerk to $3.60 for
building custodian. Minimum wage at
UF for full-time employes is $1.45 an
hour, with some part-time employes
earning less than $l3O an hour.

If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Take
Advanced Training
If you still have two years left at
the University, you may qualify for
this new 2-year Army ROTC
Program.
a Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
e Receive SSO per month while
enrolled in the program.
e Continue your education and
learn to be a leader.
e Fulfill your military obligation
of 2 years active duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information Contact
M*j. Lawrence, Rm. ill, Military
Building or call 392-1395 not later
than 11 March.



)
1
is
No Joy In Perry
As Celestial Body
Fails To Perforin
HELEN HUNTLEY
... covers biblical blackout

WITH DAILY SORTIES

U.S. Hitting Laos

VIENTIANE, Laos (UPI)
U. S. warplanes are averaging
400 bombing sorties daily in
Laos under President Nixons
guidelines for supporting
Laotian forces upon request,
qualified sources disclosed
Sunday.
They said about 150 sorties
are flown in northern Laos in
the strategic Plain of Jars area
where during the North
Vietnamese offensive last
month, the sorties reached a
peak of about 300 per day.
The northern Laos strikes are
in addition to the average of

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W Lunch and
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Wm. Tuesday |H
fj§ p pe r Steak or Chicken & Dumplings g
Fried Chicken or Chopped Sirloin
3 Above Entrees Served with choice of Potatoes, Rice or Veeetabfe, @
choice of special salads of the day, hot roll or muffin. Iced Tea or Coffeet
1 I I
313 W. Univ. Ave.
DOWNTOWN
Closed Saturdays

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writar
Saturdays doud-covered sky didnt
look very promising. Only seven people
showed up for the Alligator caravan to
Perry, Fla., the eclipse capital of the
world, but six of us decided to go
anyway.
After all, it was the celestial
* -v
happening of the century and I had
made myself a genuine eclipse-viewer
with two peices of cardboard (one with
a pin hole for the sun to shine through
and the other covered with white paper
for the sun to shine on).
And there is some special joy in
getting out of Gainesville the weekend
before the weekend before finals.
Traffic was heavy heading toward
Perry on bumpy U.S. 27, which wound
its way through Alachua, High Springs
and Mayo. The residents sat on porches
and stood on street comers watching
the students and assorted tourists drive
by. Little black children waved, holding
their fingers in the peace symbol.
Perry was prepared. Red and white
hand-lettered signs told telephone
numbers you could call for eclipse
information and pointed the way to
eclipse-viewing sites. Signs in a gas
station advertised an eclipse lecture and
a dance.
There was a carnival-like atmosphere
on the open field we chose for our
eclipse-viewing ate. Members of Perrys
senior class were selling hamburgers,
drinks, coffee, candy apples and other
goodies. A few high school kids
wandered through the crowd selling
drinks and wearing Ask me, I live
here signs.

about 250 sorties flown daily by
U. S. aircraft and 852 s against
targets along the Ho Chi Minh
Trail in southern Laos, the
sources said.
Main targets in northern Laos
in recent days have been supply
lines leading out of North
Vietnam along highway 7 in the
plain area. Photographs of
bombing along the road show it
virtually obliterated at points by
landslides.
The North Vietnamese,
however, have still been able to
move trucks at night, sources
said.

Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair jr
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Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered j/X
Trophies plaques
Florida crest jewelry r
9 Lavaliers lt=l
Class rings
Engraving
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub

@%ef/c Lindsey
Pewter Mug Favors
For your For Your 'Big Weekend
With a Free Interlocking or Old English Monogram r*
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A Great Favor or Gift
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Other styles
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In the Gift Department
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER 1302 N. MAIN ST.
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There were vans, trucks, cars, tents
and trailers all over the field. Some kids
stretched out on blankets looked like
theyd been there all night.
A big yellow station wagon painted
with Biblical slogans in Spanish and
English had a loud speaker too garbled
to understand. Guys in fraternity jerseys
stood around and took pictures.
The air was damp and cold. I looked
at my bare legs and sandaled feet and
knew Id been mistaken to think winter
was over. I bought a cup of coffee and
took it back to the car to eat lunch and
watch the crowd prepare for the
eclipse. The coffee made a little
steamed-up place on the windshield.
Do you have a piece of gum? a
junior high boy asked. He needed the
tinfoil for his eclipse-viewer. A few
minutes later he walked back by with a
sheet of aluninum foil.
One man had set up a
battery-operated television on his car's
trunk lid. A crowd gathered to see the
edipse in Mexico.
Across the field, telescopes, cameras
and odd-looking scientific equipment
had been set up, but as the time for the
eclipse neared, many were taken down.
The cameras were used primarily to
take pictures of the crowd for, by 1
pjn. no one could even tell where the
sun was. The entire sky was covered
with a heavy gray ceiling of clouds.
I held up my eclipse viewer and saw
nothing.
But the crowd wasnt totally
disappointed.
As file sky began to darken, about
1:18, there was a hushed ah. The
darkness spread rapidly over the sky and
there was a beautiful sunset,

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Monday, March 9,1970, Tha Florida AMgetor,
v.v.v.v.v.v. .v/.v.v.v.v/.v/.Vj%v/av.%:
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AJw
THE ECLIPSE
... that no one saw
which melted in seconds. Then a couple
minutes of night, punctuated by
automatic street lights, flashbulbs and
the flickering television.
For a moment 1 wondered What if
the sun doesnt come back? I
sympathized with the ancient people
who were terrified when the sun
blacked out unexpectedly.
And I thought those minutes of
darkness told more about God than a
thousand yellow station wagons.
People began packing up the minute
the light came back. It was
bumper-to-bumper traffic all the way
back to Gainesville.
We talked about the cloud cover, the
moment in history and what I should do
with my eclipse viewer.
Ill save it til Im 74 and the next
eclipse comes, I said.
But instead I threw it away.

Page 3



Page 4

[ Th rin,hi, **' hin,iri,i IMS IMA

v m

Before we started putting* together
The Place we asked a lot of students
a lot of questions about the kind of
living space they wanted. Your an answers
swers answers are now being pre-
served in stone and glass flgy
and wood just next door to
the University of Florida jHfe
campus.
We learned a lot in those surveys...
like the fact that you value your pri privacy.
vacy. privacy. So weve provided individual
entrances to each unit, and were
building enough soundproofing to
let your neighbor get into The Fugs,
and let you get through 78 pages of
Camus at the same time.
We also learned that its a hassle
when your roommates Che poster
clashes with your Jackson Pollock
prints... so youll each have a pri private
vate private bedroom at The Place. What
youll be sharing is no wasteland
either. What with double baths, wall
to wall carpeting, modern furnish furnishings
ings furnishings and a complete kitchen... your
two story townhouse unit is a fair
cut above the YMCA.

Now urtdor construction at 3rd and 13th


%k
Your life style doesnt keep you in
doors all the time... so were build building
ing building a groovy external environment
too. Therell be landscaping, a pri private
vate private courtyard, a pool, a recreational
pavilion, and a private patio for each
unit.
Sounds like what you had in mind?
Then dont make a move until you
have all the details on The Place,
soon to be completed just across the
street from campus.
.the
place)
Just like you
planned it



Substantial Pay Raises For UF Employes

Substantial pay increases are on tap
July 1 for 2,145 employes if the
recommendations of Gov. Claude Kirks
budget message are enacted by the
Florida Legislature.
The increase above the normal pay
adjustment would apply to employes in
custodial, service and medical-technical
positions whose salaries are less
competitive than those currently paid in
the Gainesville area.
They apply to workers now earning
$3,324 to $8,400 annually. The
governor recommended an expenditure

BY EDITOR-ELECT FRASER
Gator Seen As Challenge

pROM PAGE Pill
said. His wife, Judy, is a math
education major interning at
Buchholz Junior High School.
In applying for the editorship,
Fraser saw it as a challenge. He
cited as tremendous
possibilities the circulation of
the Alligator (bigger than the
local paper) and professional
staff.
There are creative,
imaginative, sometimes brilliant
people on the editorial staff, he
said. I simply want to try my
hand at guiding it.
Fraser said he plans to make
the Alligator a more professional
newspaper in terms of news and
editorial comment. To him,
professionalism means putting
out the type of news the readers
want.
I think theres a demand on
campus for more campus, state,
national and local news, he
said. He noted the high level of
education and diverse interests
of the college community. I
think you should be able to
meet as many of those interests
as possibles
I just want to put more news
in the newspaper. And, I want to
make it a campus-wide paper.
When asked if he thought the
Alligator does not cover the
whole campus, Fraser said, I
know its easy to criticize the
Alligator. Everybody does. I
would not amply like a chance
to criticize, but a chance to do
something about it.
He intends to do something
about what he calls the mixed,
confusing editorial page. He
said he believes news and
editorial comment should be
separated, and interpretive
articles should be labeled.
I dont think they make it
altogether clear. When a letter


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of approximately $8 million for pay
adjustments covering over 20,000 state
employes. The list of die classifications
affected showed 2,145 positions at die
UF.
Robert A. Button, UF personnel
director, noted that the governors
request is in answer to many appeals
nude by UF and other state agencies for
upgrading pay for employes filling
positions in classifications with lowest
pay scales.
Button is serving on a task forge of
state personnel directors who are

is run as a column, youre
giving partial sanction to it.
Fraser explained why he
thought the BSP wanted a
person with new ideas as editor.
When a staff writer joins the
Alligator, he said, he becomes
friendly with die people he
works with and this could have
an effect on his judgment as an
editor. If you bring in new
blood, his judgment is his own.
This isnt saying the editors
now are doing a poor job, he
said. Its just that the BSP
wanted new ideas.
Fraser decided on a writing
career while serving four years
and four months with the
Marines. Ive always read a

'Weve Got Something
To SayDr. Cosby
PAGE ONj^
what men do.
Finally, women are denied their rightful place in history.
Dr. Cosby, a former UF dean of women, spoke on women and
higher education.
In 1636 Harvard was founded, she said, but it was 200 years
later before there was higher education for women.
Dr. Cosby said professional women at UF feel discrimination
especially in terms of advancement and salary increases.
We dont need women to represent women but, as members of the
community, we should have full and equal access.
When we are free, Dr. Cosby concluded, men will also be free.
Albury described the condition of women in war-tom Vietnam.
The Vietnamese woman has been put on her own as a result of the
war, he said. Men between the age of 18 and 40 are either dead,
disabled, or in the army.
He said the women are flocking to the cities to find jobs to support
their families.
They have been driven off the farms by the war.
They may find work as barracks maids, where they will earn a
dollar for a 12-hour day, or they may end up working on garbage
trucks. While a man drives the truck, the women run around picking
up the garbage and throwing it into the truck, he said.
Alburys discussion was preceded by a film narrated in Vietnamese
which showed North Vietnamese women defending the countryside
from attack.

2,145 MAY GET INCREASE JULY 1

H fl


great deal, and I decided Id like
to be a writer.
He was discharged as a
sergeant in February 1966 and
enrolled in Broward Junior
College, Ft. Lauderdale, in
September. He was editor at the
Broward campus for 18 months.
Faced with a possible staff
walkout if the BSP does not
change its decision, Fraser is
determined to get the paper out.
If they walk out, the
Alligator will still be on the
stands the first Monday of next
quarter. Id rather they didnt
quit because its a waste of
talent, but Im prepared to put it
out.

compiling recommendations concerning
changes in the pay {dan of the state.
Examples of UF workers affected by
the proposed increases include:
374 janitors who would receive an
annual adjustment of S4OB a year, or
approximately 14 per cent above the
current rate of pay;
32 laundry workers for an annual
adjustment of $444, or approximately
14 per cent above the current salary;
51 food service aides for an annual
adjustment of $444, or a 13 per cent
increase;

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Monday, March 9,1970. Tlw Florida AHgaCor,

65 licensed practical nurses
elevated by $444 annually, or
approximately 10 per cent;
t Nine cooks increased by $672, or
19 per cent;
142 maids boosted by $l6B, or
five per cent;
121 laborers increased by $672, or
19 per cent, and
58 groundskeepers with a $672, or
19 per cent salary hike.
A complete listing of the pay rate
adjustments will be available through
college deans and department chairmen.

McGuire Trophy & EngrarinJ
University headquarters sor
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Page 5



Page 6

, Tho Florida Alligator, Monday, March 9,1970

EXCEPT ON FARMS

Pest Wildlife No Problem

Pest wildlife are not a serious
problem in Florida unless you
are the farmer who lost seven
acres of cabbage plants to
browsing deer, or the sugarcane
grower plagued by rats, or the
strawberry grower who has to
hire people to shoo robins away
from his berries.
The amount of damage from
pest wildlife is not very
substantial on a statewide basis,
said Dr. Stephen L. Beckwith, a
wildlife ecologist with the
University of Floridas Institute

UF Prof Elected

A UF education professor has
been named president-elect of
the national Society of
Professors of Education.
Dr. Glen Hass, professor in
the College of Educations
Division of Curriculum and
Instruction since 1958, was
elected over Fordham College of
Education Dean Harry N. Rivlin.
Founded in 1902, the Society
of Professors of Education has a
membership of over 1,000 from
every area of the United States.

news
from...-

STUDENT AFFAIRS
Acting vice president Robert
Kimmel confirmed Friday
speculation that any major
reorganization of the Division of
Student Affairs will be left up to
the permanent vice president for
student affairs.
Kimmel, in a presentation to
the division staff of plans for his
interim service as head of the
division, promised to major

Grey Skies Block
Solar Eclipse View
astronomers set up telescopes and watched and waited.
The dock struck noon and grey clouds in Perrys Taylor County
hid the sun as the moon began crossing across the face of that nearest
star, the sun.
All eyes turned skyward and all that could be seen was a thick
lower doud cover which had moved into the north Florida area late
Friday evening.
Throngs of people crowded around television sets to watch the
action In Mexico when the Florida sun failed to make its scheduled
appearance.
At the time of totality in Perry the sky quickly lost its hazy glow as
darkness fell with amazing speed.
Automobile headlights and street lights were switched on as the
moon covered the suns path of brilliance to the earth. Perrv
experienced totality.
The crowds that were gathered around telescopes were hushed,
birds had stopped singing and eyes were no longer trying to find the*
sun but were focused toward the dim horizon.
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of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS). But when the
damage comes out of one or two
peoples pockets it is a
significant amount, he said.
The single greatest pest
wildlife problem in Florida is
that of rats on sugarcane. Last
year South Florida sugarcane
growers lost close to $3 million
to rat damage and spent an
additional $400,000 for rat
control.
Wildlife experts are reluctant
to estimate amounts of damage

The purpose of the organization
is to bring together professors
from all disciplines within
colleges of education to discuss
problems of mutual concern.
Hass, who recently completed
a two-year term as president of
the national John Dewey
Society, is the co-author of three
books on curriculum. He is also
a former member of the
executive committee of the
Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

lUlMfsii

reorganization.
I plan to function within the
existing organizational
structure, he said in a prepared
statement.
He said he will give top
priority to gathering information
which the permanent vice
president will need in order to
make sound decisions affecting
our future.

from other pest wildlife since
such damage is often scattered
over a wide area or an entire
farm industry and may be
difficult to verify. Theres
really no entirely accurate way
to figure this kind of damage,
said Vernon D. Cunningham,
wildlife biologist with the
Division of Wildlife Services,
U. S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries
and Wildlife in Gainesville.
Wildlife damage to
agricultural crops in Florida
includes raccoon damage to
watermelons and sweet com,
deer damage to cabbage and
citrus trees, robins on
strawberries, starlings on grapes
and blackberries, blackbirds on
grain feed and to a limited
degree foxes, bobcats, and
even coyotes attacking cattle,
sheep and poultry.
Cunningham and Beckwith
are familiar with pest wildlife
problems because both of them
may receive calls for help when
outbreaks occur. Usually, they
are able to recommend remedies
that are at least partially
successful in protecting crops
from marauding wildlife.
We receive a lot of
complaints about raccoon
damage to watermelons,
Cunningham said. The raccoon
makes a hole in the rind big
enough to put his paw through,
then reaches inside the melon
until he has it hollowed out.
According to Cunningham,
Floridas raccoon population is
as high as that of any state in the
nation, and the damage they do
to watermelons is
correspondingly high.
Cunningham recommended an
electric fence eight inches from
the ground for keeping raccoons
out of a field. Attaching pieces
of shiny metal to the fence will
help attract them to it, he said.
Other, less satisfactory remedies
to the raccoon problem are
traps. However, live traps are
expensive to use and steel traps'
may kill other animals by
accident.
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V / l v.v.:v:*>:w >xwx>XvXvXi >x : :v>Xv>>:-v>v.v ...
| Consumer Faces |
1 Complex Role |
The present-day American consumer faces a complex business :?
§ and economic role, and he needs educational assistance to help :
§ him play the role effectively. $
§ The UF takes an active part in consumer education, reports
Dr. James W. Crews, associate professor of education here. \
§ Writing for the latest issue of Dimensions, monthly l
publication of the universitys Bureau of Economic and Business 5
| Research, Crews says, The rapid pace of the 20th-century j:j
£ living and the increasing complexity of economic activity form i
: the dual and interlocking bases of need for consumer i
|i; education.
The nation will approach the $1 trillion mark in total ft
j: economic activity in the 19705, the business educator points i
ft out. ft
Then, he asks, Is our ability to produce marked by an ft
ft ability to consume with maximum efficiency? And, does the :S
level of consumption match in a qualitative sense the level of ft;
:j: production? §
j: To provide the American citizen with economic knowledge *5
that he needs to play his important role in the financial drama,
x Crews says that consumer education basically should rest on
parents, schools and industry.
Because the allocation of personal economic resources is so |:'
v greatly influenced by the values one holds, it is important that i
consumer education be started early by parents, the economist 5
x points out.
'l'
To aid schools in helping to teach consumer education, the x
$ UF has maintained in-service workshops for teachers and ft
ij: administrators since 1955. A six-week summer workshop has
S been conducted for 15 consecutive years. ft
ft

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If you are, you can pick
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Monday, March 9,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 9,1970

The Florida Alligator
The Price f freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
TOHR/ Ramirez Dave Doucette
Eclitor-in-Chiof Managing Editor
looted
Ass Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
. Executive Editor News Editor
A mim
j THE LIBERTARIAN
Preference Question,
Not Restriction
Unfortunately, Miss Sally Bowers (Speaking Out, March 5)
and others with similar thoughts are missing the point.
To my knowledge no one is questioning the universitys right
to restrict its free mail service to official correspondence. The
question at issue is whether the university may preferentially
open certain services to some groups of students and not to
others.
A recent example will illustrate my point:
About one month ago, a slick advertising brochure promoting
a yes vote in the colosseum referendum was mailed to every
student on this campus through the campus mail. The mailing
organization was listed as the University Activities Center
(UAC) Student Committee.
That group was NOT an official campus organization, the
mailing was not an official university mailing (would it have
been, it would have violated state law), and there was no
sponsoring group listed.
Look carefully. An unsponsored non-organization was
permitted to send thousands of political brochures through the
campus mails but a sponsored non-oiganization was denied the
right to send some fifty or so letters to specific organizations
and officers.
One wonders whether YSA would have been recognized as an
official organization by now if they had agreed to publicly
endorse the Feb. 4 referendum proposal.
Incidently, in our forthcoming meeting (March 8, 5 pm.,
Union room 316) the Board of the student ACLU will consider
a resolution condemning all such preferential treatment and
denial of organizational recognition.
LOU TALLY
Arab World
Death Filled

MR. EDITOR:
RE: Reply to Mr. Aheg.
As life changes, culture
changes. It represents the life of
its people. No longer is the Arab
world filled with music and
debkas. It is filled with deaths
and fears. This is the loudest
sound in the hearts of the
peoples involved.
You are right in believing that
International Week was the time
to concentrate on International
harmony and understanding.
This also is the belief of the
playwright involved.
The play presented was a
symbolic one. The Arabs have
been chained mentally as well as
physically. It is not necessary
that It be done by metal. This
scene was meant only to begin
the build up to the climax. This
climax took place during the
breaking of the chains and the
final dance and song of peace
and harmony (The Age of
Aquarius).
I know for sure that the Arab
students are proud of their
cultural dances and songs.
Because they stop to think
about where they are and where
they will strive to be does not

mean they are ashamed in any
way. They are proud and want
to preserve their lands and
people. This idea is more
beautiful than any music or
dance in any culture.
SUE MASRI, 3AS

Change To 'Anti-Student Board

MR. EDITOR:
I was rather amazed to read the latest action of the Board of
Student Publications in regard to its plaything, The Florida Alligator.
The choice of Mr. Fraser (whoever he is) as editor apparently confirms
my belief that Mr. Cunningham and his BSP henchmen are interested
only in an insipid imitation of a newspaper run by robots who mouth
the right-wing inanities of Hugh and the Gang.
The BSP could have selected as editor a staff member with
considerable qualifications. Instead, the BSP chose a young man who
has never worked for the Alligator.
This reasoning is remarkable, to grossly understate the matter. It
appears that, in selecting a 25-year-old Marine Corps vet, the BSP has
pledged to defend the Alligator against the threat of take-over by
liberals such as Parker and Hittleman, plus the asserted Commies that
Cunningham and Co. see under the beds, in the closets, and between
the lines.
The liberal trend, started by Benny Cason and Steve Hull must
be stopped; a return to the Dark Ages is, of course, the only
alternative to the prospect of anarchy, which is always aided by liberal
newspapers.
I must commend the BSP for its excellent logic in selecting

EDITORIAL

An Unjustified Decision

Our concern over the Board of Student
Publications choice for next quarters
Alligator Editor goes beyond the
questionable procedural practices employed
by the Boards chairman during such a
selection.
The fact that Chairman Hugh
Cunningham cast a vote during such
procedures in direct violation of the Boards
own regulations is, indeed, a very relevant
point.
Cunninghams ruling that student board
member Leslie Perry could not vote during
such proceedings is also a factor not to be
taken lightly.
And we believe that the conflicting
versions of what transpired near the close of
the final election meeting during an
exchange between Cunningham and Miss
Carol Sanger, a candidate for the papers
editorship, definitely need to be aired and
clarified.
But the concepts that have stirred our
staff go past the above questions and into
little-explored grounds.
At the root of the conflict lies the Boards
decision to combine new talent with a
person with Alligator experience in the top
two editorial positions in order to bring in
new ideas.
Implied in this statement is an apparent
lack of faith in the Alligator staffs
willingness or ability to accept new
concepts, fresh ideas and broader horizons.
Such implications are ludicrous.
Any individual who will take enough time
to peek into our newsroom will find a very
heterogeneous group of students combining
their talents and efforts to offer this campus
the best product possible.
The Alligator staff does welcome the
influx of new, constructive ideas.
But we feel new blood should come into
the staff in the same manner as new blood is
pumped into any body: It is injected into
the veins and made to work its way to the
heart.
What our staff objects to is the Boards
decision to force upon it an editor or
managing editor who lacks the knowledge
and understanding gained in the process of
publishing a unique and complicated
product such as the Alligator.
Such a move on the part of the Board
could perhaps be justifiable in a situation
where no talented, experienced personnel
with such qualifications could be found
within this staff.
But the Alligator staff believes this not to
be the case.
Let us take a look at the qualifications of
those experienced staff members who had
applied for the top two editorial posts:

someone who has never worked for the Alligator before. Why choose
someone who is familiar with the operation of the paper? How can
you run a paper or any other business that way?
* tO course is to give a nice, clean-cut non-entity
^"c*??f > T r traillin or wa y he may eventually become a
rvr ed i, U D F now *^ ot hing, following in the footsteps of Steve
onnell, Burke Kibler, and their equally incompetent predecessors.
I wish, though, that the Board "of Student Publications would
change its name, since it obviously doesnt care at all about the
stu ents at this school (whose only purpose, after all, is to praise the
name of the BSP and honor no other gods).
Perhaps Anti-Student Board of Publication would be more
Idd Pliate r likC Nietzsctie > we might use the phrase The New
Nietzsche wrote that The New Idol tells lies in all the tongues of
gooa and evil; and whatever it says, it lies and whatever it has, it has
n ver ything about it is false; it bites with stolen teeth, and bites
Lets hear it for Ozymandias.
DAVID MILLER, 4AS

. new blood should come into the
staff in the same manner as new blood is
pumped into any body: It is injected into
the veins and made to work its way to the
heart.
Helen Huntley, a candidate for editor,
was a staff writer and school editor for the
Clearwater Sun for two and a half years.
Miss Huntley interned with the St.
Petersburg Times last summer and is
attending the UF on a $ 1,200-a-year Poynter
journalism scholarship. She was a staff writer
for the St. Petersburg Junior College student
magazine for a year and has worked for the
Alligator since the Fall of 1968.
Carol Sanger, also a candidate for
editor, interned with the Fort Lauderdale
News last summer and is the recipient of
Broward Countys chapter of Theta Sigma
Phis 1969-70 scholarship to the most
promising woman journalist in Broward
County. She has worked for the Alligator for
four years.
i Karen Eng, an applicant for managing
editor is this years recipient of the Gannett
Newspapers scholarship to the UFs
outstanding junior in journalism. She has
worked on the Alligator staff since January
of 1967 and was last years Student of the
Year in Student Publications.
Samuel Pepper, also a candidate for
managing editor, is the former editor of the
Palm Beach Junior College weekly student
newspaper and has won numerous awards in
state-wide junior college competition. He is a
former sports stringer for the Palm Beach
Post Times and the Associated Press and has
worked for the Alligator since last Fall.
Their records speak for themselves.
Why, then, has the Board seen fit to go
outside the staff to seek an editor or
managing editor?
Why has it ignored the staffs feelings in
making this crucial decision?
Is the Board concerned about the quality
of the paper or is it the contents of our
editorial pages that have prompted this
move?
These are the questions we are asking.
Questions to which we hope the Board will
address itself at its session tonight.



BSP Member Replies
To Alligator Staff

MR. EDITOR:
I am writing this letter as an
individual member of the Board
of Student Publications to make
public a personal account of the
Boards executive session of last
Wednesday.
At the outset I would like to
say that it is true that during the
course of the proceedings
Chairman Cunningham did break
a tie vote.
However, it is important to
keep in mind that the tie which
the chairman broke was in the
voting for editor designate, the
first position on which the
Board voted.
The Board had adopted a
procedure whereby an editor
designate and a managing editor
designate would initially be
chosen. No finality was attached
to these selections. They were
procedural devices, for the
purpose of ascertaining the
initial preferences of the Board,
without consideration of the
rapport or lack of it that might
exist between these individuals.
The Board made these
selections having agreed that
the actual selections could not
be made until a second vote, for
permanent editor and permanent
managing editor, had taken
place. It was understood that
when the Board came to vote for
permanent editor and managing
editor any name could be
offered in nomination, not just
those of the previously selected
designates.
Our minutes reflect this
procedure, which the Board felt
was imperative due to the large
number of candidates and the
necessity for discussion with the
editor designate and managing
editor designate on their
preferences for the other
position.
With that background in
mind, I relate the following
account of what happened. The
chairman broke a 3-3 tie in the
selection of editor designate in
favor of Mr. Fraser and
announced that his vote was
open to change upon hearing
from Miss Sanger, Mr. Fraser,
and upon hearing further
discussion from the Board.
Sentiment, and hard votes,
favored Miss Sanger at this time
for the position of permanent
editor (i.e. editor).
However, the Board was
unanimous in its feeling that at

Alligator Staff
Jmmo Gould Karen Eng
Assignment Editor j 0 Assistant News Editor
Editorial Assistant
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,87,
88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83, or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must: .
- typail. fionsil. uiarrl d 300 words
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Here addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer shows just cause. The editor
'"estves the right to edit all lowers for space.

least one of the two positions
should be filled by a person not
now on the Alligator staff, for
the purpose of bringing new
ideas and fresh perspective to
the paper.
The majoritys support for
Miss Sanger was dependent upon
her willingness to accept this
unanimous desire of the Board
for a person who is not now on
the Alligator staff to fill one of
the two top posts. To ascertain
whether Miss Sanger would be
willing to accept a position on
this basis, she was invited to
speak to the Board.
At this time the Board had
already selected Robert Fraser as
editor designate. But this
selection would in all probability
and in my personal judgment
not have stood up had Miss
Sanger expressed a willingness to
work with a non-member of the
current Alligator staff as a
managing editor.
What actually occurred was
this. Miss Sanger arrived and was
invited to answer the following
question:
Would you accept the editor
or managing editor position if
someone who is not now on the
Alligator staff were appointed to
the other position?
Miss Sanger replied that she
would not accept the position of
managing editor.
She was then asked if she
would accept a managing editor
who is not on the Alligator staff
if she were selected editor.
She said she would not.
The specific question put to
her was whether, if she were
editor, she would feel compelled
to withdraw her application if a
person who is not now on the
Alligator staff were appointed
managing editor.
She replied in the affirmative.
By doing so she put herself in
a position contrary to that of
the entire Board, namely,
contrary to our desire that one
of the positions go to someone
not now on the Alligator staff.
Her refusal to work with anyone
other than current Alligator staff
members in the position which
she was not in, to wit managing
editor if she were editor and
editor if she were managing
editor, cost her the majority that
would have voted for her had
she expressed a willingness to
work with a non-Alligator staff
member as managing editor.
I regret that she was unable to

express such a willingness.
Concerning my fellow Board
member, Miss Leslie Perry, I
have these comments. For
whatever reasons, Miss Perry did
not attend any of the 16 hours
of interviews conducted by the
Board as a part of its selection
process.
Without the benefit of having
heard this testimony, she was at
a disadvantage in relation to the
other Board members, all of
whom had heard all of this
testimony, which included the
asking of questions by each
individual Board member to
each of the applicants.
The chairmiui ruled that she
could not vote, for the reason
that her vote would not be equal
to those of the members who
had heard all of the testimony.
But the chairman invited her,
several times, to make a motion
to overrule the decision of the
chair, if she felt such a motion
were in order.
Miss Perry did not accept the
chairmans invitation and did
not make a motion to overrule
the decision of the chair.
Instead, she stated her
agreement with the chairman,
that in light of not having heard
the testimony she was not in a
position to be able to validly
exercise her vote.
In conclusion, let me say that
I regret the hard feelings
apparently present among many
on your staff. I hope that this
letter has served to clear the air
and answer any questions you
might have had about the
actions of the Board. At this
point I hope that we will all
come together and work for the
good of the Alligator, which is
what we all desire.
BARRY R. DIAMOND

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UF Needs Issues
In SG Election
MR. EDITOR:
While many of you bade in the sunlight out on the Plaza of
the Americas, listening to the sounds of the University and
talking to one another about how things should be, the petty
politicians of our Student Government are hard at work
conjuring up sneaky little deals and taking sides for upcoming
student body elections.
Soon two candidates will emerge, each opposing the other,
but each the same.
Who are you going to vote for young man, Humphry or
Nixon?
Well, I dont know. I dont think either one is really with
the issues.
This is how it has been on Southern campuses during the past
years. Before now, a radical (is that one of those guys who is
against the war, against pollution, etc., etc.) would never have
had a chance of being elected as a student body president.
But now, for the first time, I think conditions are right for a
radical to rise up out of the ghetto (just like in the American
dream) and become president of the students of the University
of Florida.
We need someone who will shock our puritanical parents, the
alumni, and most of all the administration. We need someone
who will stand up for what we really want, not the UAC, not
which group will get fifty yard line tickets, but a policy against
acceptance of Military research grants on this campus, and
against all Military recruiting, a more active stand on Vietnam,
and many, many more just causes.
Students of the University of Florida, can we afford to sit
back this time and make a decision by indecision?
MIKE PATRICK, 3AS
Condolences, Alligator
MR. EDITOR.
Please accept my sympathies and condolences during this time of
bereavement.
Perhaps the Florida Alligator does reflect its environment and is less
than perfect.
How unfortunate for its readers that some of those least capable of
objective judgment in regard to the paper are (is it coincidence?) in
positions to exercise the lack of that quality!
JAMES E. COUCH, INSTRUCTOR
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS

Monday, March 9,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 9



l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 9,1970

Page 10

Campus Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
FLORIDA PLAYERS BRING DRACULA TO CAMPUS
Strange things are about to happen on the University of Florida campus. The dead are
about to rise and walk the earth. People will change into bats and unearthly sounds will be
heard everywhere. What is going on? DRACULA, most famous of the horror movies, is
coming to the Constans Theatre. Come March 10, 11, and 12 to see the famous fanged
vampire and his victims. Dracula will rise from his grave at 8:00 p.m. each night to
"entertain" you.
i
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS
H.1.R.E., Student Government's summer placement service, is taking student applications
at the student activities desk, 3rd floor of the Reitz Union. H.I.R.E. has received job
openings of many types and in many locations. A partial list follows:
Upper division engineering majors
Special Project Assignments for B.A. masters degree candidates
Junior accountants
Nurses' aides
General Laborers
Construction workers
Drivers
Sales Personnel
ACCENT POSITIONS OPEN
Ed Boze and Ralph Nobo, recently elected chairman and vice-chairman respectively of
Accent for next year, have requested all students interested in filling committee chairman
positions and general staff positions to apply at the beginning of next quarter in the student
government office, 3rd floor of the Union. Something to think about over the break.
BABYSITTING CONTACTS MADE THROUGH SG
Married students needing babysitters and babysitters needing married students can call student
government to make their contacts. We have the file and it is up to you to make all final arrangements.
Applications can be filled out in our offices, third floor of the Union. Any questions, call us at 392-1665.
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20
copies of each sheet, to student government offices and you will get free publicity for your organization.
No personal material will be posted.
GOOD LUCK ON FINALS
" . y ... '* ' V
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE THEIR
INFORMATION IN THE STUDENTGOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT
TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



GATOR a. 4 A

FOR SALE
? >
1969 HONDA C 8350, Excellent
condition, 6 months old,
color-turquolse, crashbars and helmet
included. $650 see at 423 S.E. Bth
St. Ph. 376-8470. (A-98-st-p).
10 x 47 Great Lakes mobile home. 2
bedroom, air, carpet, 6x utility
shed, Shady lot. $2,195. 378-5880.
(A-98-st-p).
Cycle, 6B. Sears 106 cc Low mileage,
excellent condition. Manual, helmet
$175 cash. Call 378-2980, after six.
(A-99-st-p).
1967 HONDA, helmet tool kit good
shape SBS or Best offer. Ralleys trl.
pk. 378-4169 after 4:30. graduating.
(A-99-4t-p).
Mobile home 10 x 51. Two bedrooms
wash AC 10 x 20 awning $2600 or
best offer. Ralleys trl. pk. 378-4169.
graduating. (A-99-st-p).
Stan del amp 140 W, 2-15 JBL,
Fender Prec Bass, Gretch Elec EV
Mike Jeasen spks. Wilt trade for cycle
or sell for cash. Call 372-8095
between 4 and 6. (A-99-st-p).
3 BR house, 2 baths, garage, 6% FHA
loan, fenced yard, 3 yrs. old, 2252
N.W. 19th Lane. Maj. Bauer,
378-8007 or 392-1395. (A-99-st-p).
63 Chevy wagon air cond. Power
steering, Call 376-4244. (a-100-st-p).
2 tape players; Slave unit 8 track
Capitol; one Ranger 4+B track with
2 speakers Together SIOO, original,
SIBO. Also tapes $2-4. Ph: 378-4328.
(A-100-3t-p).
New U.S. Divers Single Stage, Double
Hose, Regulator, also like new
Remington 1100 Auto. 12 ga
w/improved 26 barrel!. 372-1817.
(A-100-3t-p).
1957 Yellowstone trailer, 8 x 20,
aluminum, air conditioned, heater,
fully equipped, $750, Browns trailer
park, cheap living, 378-2193.
(A-100-st-p).
VOLKSwagen, 1963, $550. HONDA
50, 1965, SIOO. Both vehicles in
good condition. Call 378-3135.
(A-100-3t-p).
69 Kawasaki street scrambler, Alss
250 cc. 3,200 miles, S6OO call Bill
after 5:30 p.m. 373-1142.
(A-100-st-p).
1968 Pontiac Firebird sprint,
overhead cam, six, fact, air, power
st., radio, auto trans., new tires
must sell now. Call 378-4126.
(A-101-3t-p).
TV for sale; good condition; $45;
22" screen; wooden cabinet; Call
Bonnie at 373-2838 after 5:00 P.M.
(A-101-st-p).
1957 VOLKS perfect for customizing
or around town use. Great mileage;
fair condition. Call after 5, 376-1940.
This is the car for you. (A-101-3t-p).
196 9 HONDA 350, Excellent
condition. Call 373-2226 between 8
~9 p.m. (A-101-3t-p).
Clearance sale portable cassette
taperecorder S3O Polaroid Model 210
camera $25 Goilclub full set and
bag- S2O call after 4:00 378-6277.
(A-101-st-p).
Honda super 90, 1968 looks perfect
runs good, around SIIO.OO. Color
TV, Olympic $85.00 firm call Steve
378-8960. (A-102-3t-p)
HONDA CB 350, 1969, Candyaple
red. it GOES. What a Deal to have
Wheals for such a Steal. Call Paul
378-7943. (A-102-st-p)
mSSm I last 2
DAY S!
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEES .
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTOR & ACTRESS
Bob Carol
Ted^Alice
IPsSkJI NOW!
LAST 4 DAYS
ISf Mu
I MmHau Beroman
I mm
I mm 0
I .:^: floU)iH *wi-~
ACADEMY award
nominee ... BEST
M SUPPORTING ACTRESS

*
-^*** HM I

Monday, March 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

X"-***-"*"X-x*x*x*x.v.v;vx*x-x-x.;-v-".*.:-;vx*".'
FOR SALE
s s
^-**** **************e*******i*i i # r # #*****t*i*r*r***************%% # ***
J^ 50 B,ack Excellent
condition, Good performance, Must
sell immediately, $95. Call 372-5687.
(A-101-3t-p)
BRACE yourself for a thrill the first
time you use Blue Lustre to clean
rugs. Rent electric shampooer SI.OO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-50-c)
1969 191/2 ft travel Trailer, air cond.,
self contained, sleeps 6. Reese hitch
included. Can be seen at 3860 Archer
Rd. lot no. D-l afternoon & eve.
(A-102-55t-p)
Honda C 8350, immaculate, only
1500 miles, dark green with 2
helmets, Army causes sale. Call
372-8129. (A-102-2t-p)
Honda 160 2 yrs old must sell this
quarter first $360 takes it Perfect
shape call 392-8289 to see it and test
drive. (A-102-3t-p)
Motorbike 1968, Sears 5O cc.
Only 1,200 miles. SIOO. Washer
1969. Sears 3 cycle auto. $l2O. 22
Rifle Marlin lever action-39A. Like
new SSO. 378-1765. (A-102-3t-p)
rX.V.SSS-X-XXX-XvX-X-XX-X-X-X-XV
FOR RENT I
"vooeo: nv. x-x*x-x*x*x.x.x.x.x.%n?.sv.snn'*!
Interim prof, needs immediately, 3
br. house, furnished for 15 mo.
Prefer Univ. vicinity. Call 392-0955,
378-6414, top rent, S2OO.
(B-100-st-p).
Ready for occupancy spring quarter,
one bedroom French Quarter Apt.,
Air-conditioning; by pool; Call
376-5818 or come by apt. no. 43.
(B-100-st-p).
Groovy roomies and neat neighbors!
Come experience the French Quarter.
By the pool. Girl needed for spring
and summer. Talk to GINNY,
378-6502. (B-100-st-p).
Room in Private Home for mature
male student, linen & maid service,
separate entrance, off street parking,
call 376-5360. (B-100-4t-p).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. w. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet a/c, $120.00 mo., Cable
TV., Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W.
2nd Ave., 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
Sublease through June spacious,
partially panelled 2 bedroom apt.
central air, heat. Located near
Gainesville shpping. center, 5 min. to
campus, $l6O mo, PHONE:
378-0795. (B-99-st-p).
Apt. for rent no. 49 Village Park
spring quarter 2 br furnished.
373-2116. (B-102-st-p)
PARTLY FURNISHED 4 Bedroom
Room In Lincoln Estates. Call
528-4891 Williston after 5 weekdays
for appointment. (B-102-3t-p)

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Meat Sauce
and Macaroni 791
All you can eat
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER,
Golden Fried Chicken
you can eat^^

Page 11

FOR RENT |
x-:-x*xC'X->x-x-:-x-:<.x.:.x.sx:xx-:-xc-:-:-x->:'K
WANT TO LIVE WHERE THE
ACTION IS? Then I have the place
for you! IP the heart of Sin City,
Village Park Apts. I graduate and
need 1 or 2 girls to sub-let to. Please
come by anytime or call KATHY at
376-3905. SMILE!!!. (B-101-st-p).
Immediately available now or for
spring quarter 2 bedroom apt.
Village Park 10, can move In one day
notice. Call anytime 378-8278.
(B-101-st-p).
Sublease -1 br. apt. AC completely
furnished sllO/mo. cable TV, couple
preferred, 1404 SW 10 Terr. apt. 18,
PHONE: 378-0139 after 5 PM.
(B-101-st-p).
1 or 2 roommates needed for spring
quarter in 2 bedroom S.H. apt. Close
to campus. Available immediately,
46.m0 + utilities. Call 378-8893.
(B-101-3t-p).
Sublet 1 br. furn. apt. in Camelot
AC, w/w carpet. Heated pool, saunas,
clubroom, laundry on premises.
392-2208 day, 378-1773 eve.
(B-101-6t-p).
One bedroom apt. 2 blocks from
campus. ALL utilities included. $95.
mo. 208 NW 14th St. (B-101-st-p).
LARGE 3 bdr. brick house need 3rd
roommate for spring quarter. 33.33
month + utilities!! good location
private parking lot. 378-7274, ask for
Steve. (B-101-4t-p).
Comfort. Sublease apt. close to
campus, air. cond., cable TV, pool,
good neighbors. $l2O mo. incl. util.
College Terr, office or apt. 419.
(B-101-st-p).
>:-x-x-x.x.ssr;sw*:-x-x-:-x-x-x.!.vx:wx*c^
WANTED I
v >:
-vX-X-X-I-X-X'XX-X'X-X-X-X-X-t-NXXS-X-W'v
Co-ed roommate for 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Apt. SSO a month. No
damage deposit. Call 376-1015.
(C-100-3t-p).
Male roommate for spring term in La
Bonne Vie apartment. SSO/mo.
Deposits paid, nice roomamates.
Phone: 373-1448, after 5 p.m.
(C-100-st-p).
2 female roommates needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. in University
Gardens; spring and summer quarters.
Call 376-0716 after 4:30, ask for
Diane. (C-100-st-p).
Co-ed roommate wanted for
Landmark apL 173. Come spend the
spring with us. Air. cond., pools. Call
5-7 p.m. 373-1475. March rent free.
(C-100-3t-p).
Wanted 1 male roommate in La
Mancha, move in after 3-21, March
rent paid, damage deposit paid, Call
378-7558 or stop by office.
(C-98-st-p).
Female roommate for spring quarter.
Poolside village park apt. Call
378-3157 or come by no. 116.
(C-98-9t-p).
1 or 2 MALE roommates needed for
2 bdrm. Summit House apt. for
spring quarter. 43.50/mo. Call
376-6361. (C-98-st-p).

jfrnpnnn n n n it- 1 inn nnirnnn n n nofioooqott
WANTED I
2 female roommates for poolside
French Quarter apt. for spring qtr.
A/C $45/tno. Call 378-7876 apt. 78.
(C-99-st-p).
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
Spring Quarter $48./mo. Village Park
Apt. 6. Call 373-1530. (C-98-st-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED: Village Pk.
apts. 85 private room on the pool,
spring qtr. Call 373-1863, anytime.
(C-101-st-p).
Three friendly kind & mature coeds
need a comparable fourth Spring
Quarter, Summit House Apts. $46.50
plus utilities per month. 373-2521.
(C-101-6t-p).
Female roommate for house 3 miles
from campus, own room, central heat
and A/C, SSO a mo. share utilities,
373-1027. (C-100-st-p).
JUST WHAT YOU NEEDI Nice
grandmother needs boarder for
efficiency, prlv. bath, kit. S6O/mo.
for one or two. 1618 NW 4 Ave.
372-8627. (C-102-2t-p)
Female roomate to share apt. with 2
girls spring qtr. $122/qtr. quarterly
lease. A/C, very close to campus.
1123 NW 3rd Ave. Call 378-9078.
(C-102-st-p)
EMERGENCY Need 2 male
roommates for spring quarter. s4l
rent a month. House, 2 bath 5
bedrooms. Washer dryer, air and
heat. Call 376-3067 after 6:00. 14
NE 4 St. (C-102-3t-p)
1 or 2 girls for spring or spring &
summer qtrs. 2 bedroom Landmark
apt no. 61, poolside, TV, 46.25 a mo.
Call 376-6043, for Liz or Susan.
(C-102-st-p)
HELP WANTED J
Bartender partlme evenings. Light
work for rapid pleasant older or grad,
student. Call 376-9102 BENCH &
BAR Immediately. (E-100-4t-p).
Teachers wanted 1970-71:
Elementary and secondary teachers,
also for special areas, Monroe Co.,
Key west, Florida. Interviewing on
carripus, March 11, 1970 9:00 to
5:00. (E-101-3t-p).
Male telephone solicitor. High
Commission for about 10 hours work
per week. Experience desired but not
mandatory. Phone 376-2043 for
Interview. (E-101-st-p).
JOB OPPORTUNITY On-campus
franchise to sell and promote
"Love Mates the all-new
photo-pillow, (see our ad this Issue)
Must be able to organize sales team.
SIOO investment provides complete
sales kit, license and samples. Earn up
to SSOO per week in your spare time!
Send resume listing qualifications and
snap shot to LOVEMATES, P. O.
Box 18382, Tampa, Fla. 33609.
(E-102-2t-c)
HERES A FAR-OUT WAY TO
GROOVE WITH YOUR MATE...
lj||
LoveMaio
A whole hew experience in "3 D You. You'll
be where you want to be without any hang-ups
when you give a LOVE-MATE photo pillow*
And if you really want to groove in stereo,
exchange LOVE-MATES with your "throb" and
see how the beat goes on!
The male of the species' is graced by wild
mod-cloth, while the "female" slinks into the den
clad in Tiger-skin material. Both are foam-filled
and quality finished 11" x 14" pillow portraits.
You've got to move quick, because orders are
pouring in . just send good quality snap
shots (head size 1 inch or larger) together with
a check or money order (sorry, no C O D.) and
well send you the hottest thing since
24 hour visitation!
PATENT PENDING
MAIL YOUR ORDER TOOAYTO^
LOVE MATES P O Box 15382 Ttmp*. FlorMaaMOt
--~
PLEASE SEND THE FOLLOWING ORDER TO
MAM
ADOREss
CITY ITATt HR
MY CHECK OR MONEY ORDER IS ENCLOSED FOR
Me* LOVE MAT! **4-cMf) 12 95 pint t*
Female LOVE MATE fT%er shm) 14 M ptoe tea
Matched Ra*r (abeve m Mere*) a 24.99 ptoe Im
POSTACC HANOtING 390 'Rtov
(FLORIDA RESIDENTS AOO 4% SALES TAX)
Trim
(igscMl SMRB|f Rumirll Is f iss)| Hvrlrel)

1
JWrWWvXWV.VWWMK 99ll)IAlRRIIR
Enjoy my boautlful, blue*
air-conditioned PORSCHE, a lavishly
equipped 1968 912/5. Call 376-7301
afternoons and eves, be persistant.
(G-101-St-p).
60 VW camper, good mech. trade for
Sturdy pick-up or best offer.
378-1933. (G-101-3t-p).
Austin Healy Sprite 68, excellent
condition, radio, heater, only 15,000
miles 51,300 Must sell. Call
376-0741 2032* N.W. 3rd Ave.-
(G-99-st-p).
66 Volkswagon Bus exc. cond. new
tires recently rebuilt engine call Lake
City 752-2482 after 3pm.
(G-102-st-p)
CHQHHBHlSSisssTWwonninnflQoaiC
PERSONAL 1
IMWIIH 6886 1
Can you dig this? 1966 Lincoln
Continental going for $2,000. All
powered plus AC for non-polluted
air. Blue-grey. Dig It. 372-6474.
(G-100-3t-p).
Judy: You may use my charge card
for-your entire wedding If youll see
Sears bridal consultant. Be sure to
attend Brides World Fashion Show
In Jacksonville. Love Oad.
(J-99-Bt-c).
I Sw! 13th sWA37-9523 A
I 2 ADULT HITS W
INGA PLUS 0
ROOM FURNISHED £
julie a
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RATED X ADM. 150 %
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FORECAST TO **
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TURNS INTO MH*



Page 12

t. The Florida Alii>or, MniKray, Match , 1970

'Dialogue Describes It-- A Casual Discussion

By ROBIN ADAMS
Miiigaior nfiDr
With laughter, shuffling of notes and hurried last
minute instructions, the student-directed radio
program, Dialogue, is pulled together to put on
the air.
The WRUF program, sponsored by Florida Blue
Key (FBK) and presented as a public service, is a
casual discussion on topics relevant to the campus
community.
I think the title 'Dialogue describes it, said
Bob Moore, the shows commentator. It is a
discussion between the university and the student.
The show, broadcasted every Tuesday and
Thursday night from 11 pjn. to 1 a jn. started Jan.

Orange Blossom
Time Coming
The time to experience the
fragrant beauty of Floridas
orange blossoms is fast
approaching.
Larry Jackson, an assistant in
horticulture with the UFs
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS),
says that orange blossoms will
probably be open in citrus areas
up and down the state by the
middle of March. It could come
a little sooner, Jackson said, if
the weather remains mild.
Jackson recommends several
different drives to people
wanting to see the orange
blossoms and inhale their heady
fragrance, The best road to
take for orange blossoms,
Jackson said, is US. Highway
27, from Leesburg south to
Sebring. The road, which is
called Citrus Boulevard, has
more citrus along it than any
other road in the world, Jackson
said.
Other roads he recommends
for orange blossom drives are:
UJS. 441, from Apopka to
Leesburg; Alternate 27, between
Frostproof and Haines City;
State Road 41 in and around the
Dade City area; many of the
secondary roads around the Fort
Pierce-Vero Beach area;
secondary roads in the area
around Mount Dora, Eustis, and
Tavares; and the Florida
Turnpike just north of Orlando.
Orange blossoms are small,
white, and somewhat waxy,
and give off an overpoweringly
sweet fragrance that attracts the
bees which pollinate them and
contribute the ingredients to
orange blossom honey. One
orange tree might have 100,000
or more blossoms, Jackson
said.
join the fun!
THE SWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky young and old...some Just for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 1 hat's all it costs for our Special I
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road

a H A
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Ri B I
SUE WHO?
The UF's Collage of Engineering doesn't have a boy named Sue/'
but it'll soon have a girl named Jimmie if Jimmie McNeeiey of Key
West has anything to say about it.
Jimmie is shown here listening to Robert Cusumano, a graduate
student in metallurgical and materials engineering, explain the use of a
new electronic instrument used to study corrosive behavior of metal
alloys in a see water environment. Jimmie, a sophomore from Key
West, plans to begin a metallurgical engineering program next fall.
In this case, engineering students would rather have a Jimmie than a
Sue. But, actually, they're getting both. Would you believe Jimmie's
middle name is Sue?
Free 8 Cheese Pizza
With Pitcher of Beer
Good M,T, W, Th, Bllp.m.
Strain inn v?
Clip the
: Pizza Inn nSHi
Buck SS
below for a special treat! wBKj
jcjw PIZZA INN DOUGH NOTE
NS. I kiy* th* pina /
J) IMJirpwfwny C 3/ Th.Kn.lnn
/fXKTTTVJ \ \// *I*S.W. I*thAv./WxrnN
vOIMxJP Mar. S-12 \ jjj/ 37A4521 itJIM K)
f* r y

LISTENERS URGED TO CALL IN

27. It has had a vesy good response, Moor said.
Each night a different topic chosen by FBK is
presented by guests who have information about it
and work with it. Moore keeps the show moving at a
lively pace by impromptu questions, prompting, and
filling in during slow moments.
Im a devils advocate, Moore said. I take both
sides of the issues Whether I believe them or not. It
sparks controversy.
Any interested listener is urged to call to voice his
views. Moore, in keeping with his role of devils
advocate, probes a listeners opinions.
I think people like their views challenged, he
said.
When no one calls, as has happened only once, on

the combined topics of Accent and Rathskeller,
Moore and his guests continue their discussion.
Previous programs have included topics
concerning the Alligator and the Environmental
Action Group.
Plans for the future include programs on the birth
control pill, mercy killing, womens liberation and
Students for a Democratic Society.
Moore, who has never taken a broadcasting
course, says he loves the show and considers it a
hobby I get paid for.
Moore says plans are for the show to be a
permanent program.
Ive tried not to inject my personality into the
show. It is not just a one quarter shot; it will
continue after I leave.

w w m w m .m w w w w w m w m w w w m w mm m m m m mm rn mm mmmmmmm,m mm.mwmmmmmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmrnmmm m
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

| PERSONAL I
Come In and choose at bargain
prices: component units consoles
headphones home tape decks
clock radios TV's AM/FM
cartidge tuner cordless slicing knife
electric shavers electric hair
combs sewing machines wet suits
8 track car stereo electric
toothbrush 1228 N.E. sth Ave.
378-4186 Mon thru Sat 9-6 Frl
9-9. (J-97-2t-p)
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and*
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy*
of our 200 page wholesale gift ana
Jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wllllston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J.75-3t-p).
Art Lessons in Freehand Drawing:
Children & Adults. Group or private
instruction. Call 373-1947 for
information. (J-100-7t-p).
Original handmade wedding rings;
custom jewelry gold or sliver,
Contact Hope White 373-1947.
(J-100-7t-p).
GIRLS Do you realize that
CUSTOM MADE clothes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material & design, and
feature mgner quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress,
WEDDING DRESS, Sportswear &
Bikinis by your English dressmaker,
KATHLEEN. Phone 378-0320.
(J-100-10t-p).
Mobile contest s2s Ist Prize,
Call Now 392-1655 or come by Rm.
310 Reitz Union for Information.
(J-100-3t-p).
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handcrafted
Brass and Leather Goods Pipes,
Clips, Belts, Sandals ready 4 days
from ordering lOB N.w. 7th St.
1,000 feet from The CIRCUS, open
dally except Sundays. PAX.
(J-98-st-p).
Bustline Beauty You are Invited to a
bra showing Virginia's Hairstyling &
Reducing Salon Tue & Thur
10am-2pm Symbra 'Ette custom
fitted-sizes. 28aa-46m Free fittings,
Gale Collins, consultant, 372-1575 &
378-3283. (J-102-st-p)
Princess ATB: Happy Birthday to a
sweet 19 yr old. Hope we're together
for 20, 21, 22, ... It's been a
wonderful 3 months. Love Senator
D. (J-102-lt-p)
a month, room A board*
Collegiate Living OrgantzatfeeTllT
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-942% **
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-o).
| LOST A FOUND |
RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1958
N.W. 4th Street, 376-8506, Mrs.
Ruby Mills (M-100-st-p).

JHL t iI'BAK HOUBBI
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
_ 3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

IJIOST a found |
LOST: One pair of prescription
glasses with black frames, in black
carrying case. They were lost on
Tues., Feb. 24. REWARD!. ¥>h.
392-7940. (L-101-3t-p).
LOST: Ladies gold Wltnaur watch
near Tigert or Little Hall. Reward for
finder. Call 392-2814 or 372-7429.
Mrs. Teuton. (L-99-st-p).
FOUND one Tan Cocker puppy in
vacinity of 14th St. If yours call Mr.
Swanson at 378-9469. (L-101-nc)
Lost Perscrlption sunglasses in
flowered case. White frames grey
lenses. Call 392-9628 ask for Carol.
(L-101-3t-p)
Found: Key connected to fluffy ball
(red.) Found S.W. sth Ave between
9th and 10th st. in street. Call
372-5943. (L-100-lt-p).
SERVICES I
' WJW.SWWXvWW.SSSSSviWW'ivfJs L
Need tutoring In Spanish? help for
the Spanish finals? Please call
376-9558 after spm reasonable rates.
(M-102-lt-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-57-ts-c)
Alternators -Generators-
Starters-Etectrlcal Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
fcEROX COPIES: spedizatlng in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologlst. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
NCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia* Afganlstan,
Khatnmud. Lvs London late June.
$545 fully Inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
OPTICIANS atsl9
SW 4th Ave, #cross from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480, (M4f-59-c).
XEROX COPIES 1 to 10 copies of
each original 5 cents; over ten 4 cents
THE COPY CENTER 1718 West
Unlv. Now open next to Gold Coast.
Collating tel. 376-9334.
(M-102-st-p)



The
Florida
Alligator

BEAT TENNESSEE, 549-519
Swimmers Capture SEC Championship

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
A super-charged UF swim
team regained the coveted
Southeastern Conference
swimming championship by
defeating Tennessee, 549-519,
this weekend in Athens.
Jimmy Perkins and Pete
Orscheidt shared most of the
glory setting records at every
turn of the pool, while leading
the Gators back to the
championship which they have
dominated for the last 15 years.
Perkins, a junior from
Gainesville, recorded two
seconds and a first in file meet
while breaking Gator varsity
records in the 100- and 200-yard
breaststroke and 200-yard
individual medley events.
I sure surprised everybody
up there, exclaimed the elated
Perkins. I quit working with
the weights three weeks ago
got rested and finally came
through.
Assistant coach Eddie Reese
said that Perkins performance
was truly unbelievable. Jimmy
was our fourth best
breaststroker going into the
meet and he just showed
everybody up.
Orscheidt scored firsts in the
mile and 500 free events and a
second in the 200 free beating
out teammate Bruce Williams.
The freshman distance swimmer
took 38 seconds off his own
mile record time and established
a new 500 free record by five
seconds.
He also managed to set a new
varsity record in the 200 free
topping Williams' old mark by
three-tenths of a second. After
doing so well in the 5001 was all
excited. Then 1 found out 1 was
in the same heat as Tennessee's
Lunn Wins
Citrus Open
ORLANDO (UPI) Arnold
Palmer shot his second 64 in
three days Sunday but missed a
four-foot putt at the end of a
36-hole grind and burly Bob
Lunn, 16 years Palmer's junior,
won the $150,000 Florida Citrus
Invitational Golf Tournament.
The 24-year-old Lunn and the
obviously tired Palmer, coming
to the final hole of the golf
tournament all even at 17 under,
both had extremely long putts
for their third shot.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
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WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
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PETE ORSCHIEDT
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great Dave Edgar and I knew I
could do well. He only beat me
by two-tenths second in the
qualifying times.
Steve McDonnell, another
freshman All-American who had
been having only a better than
average year, captured Gator
freshman records in the 100- and
200-yard butterfly events while
finishing first in the 100 and
second in the 200 fly.
McDonnell clipped six seconds
off his best time of the year in
the 200 fly.
Freshman Kevin Kierstead
broke Gator freshman standards
in the 50- and 100-yard
freestyles topping the times set
by All-American Andy
McPherson in 1966.
Coach Harlan had a
preplanned surprise for his
swimmers. Before the final relay
of the meet when the victory
had been assured, the coaches
came out with tee-shirts that
read, FLORIDA SEC
SWIMMING CHAMPIONS
AGAIN.
Everybody up there was all
for us, said Perkins. Kentucky
came out there with sheets
reading,Kentucky number one
in basketball Florida number
(me in swimming.'
We wanted it worse than
they did, said McDonnell.
We went berserk, said
Orscheidt.
GOLF PAR 60
e DRIVING RANGE
GOLF clubs rented
CLUB HOUSE
Mw&e ELECTRIC CARTS
LESSONS AVAILABLE
>PfgLeOPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3MI. WIST Os 1-75 ON
NEWStm HP. 373-2721

JIMMY PERKINS
... sat thraa vanity rocords
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy 9
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

BEAT THE HELL OUT OF INFLATION
Monday Only
LOAO OF SPAGHETTI
Meat Sauce, Soup, Slaw, 2 Rolls & Butter
69*
SPECIAL TO BEAT ALL SPECIALS
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Soup, Salad, French Fries, 2 Rolls & Butter
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Soup, Slaw, F.F., 2 Vegetables, 2 Rolls & Butter
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OPEN FROM 6:30 AM I
jf 9 TIL 3:00 AM
1225 W. UNIV. AVE.
** r 372-6666
ct ;:'vV v'

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

Monday, March 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

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Ken McKinnon
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 13



Page 14

~ The Florida Alligitor, Monday, March 9,1970

Rifle Team Wins State

The UF small bore rifle
team Saturday successfully
defended their championship
status for the second year in a
row.

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DOUG CASE
UF WOMAN RIFLER LINDA LEE DUKE
... was the highest female scorer

SC Gamecocks
Lose The War
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI)
For South Carolinas high
strutting Gamecocks it was a
case of winning the season-long
battle but losing the war.
The third ranked Gamecocks,
undefeated in regular Atlantic
Coast Conference play and the
heavy favorite to represent the
conference in the NCAA
basketball championships, will
have to sit on the sidelines and
watch N.C. State vie for the
higher honors.
State stormed back from a
seven point halftime deficit
Saturday night and used a
double-overtime to edge South
Carolina, 42-39.
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In competition with
Florida State University,
Florida Southern and Stetson
University the UF retained
the Clement L. Theed, Jr.

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KM 1824 S.W. 13th St. V\A

Memorial Trophy for another
year. It marked the first time
in seven years that the UF has
won two years running.
The Red team composed
of Joel Dobson, Linda Lee
Duke, Wayne Pretschold and
Dave Waller won a narrow
victory with a 1033 point
score out of a possible 1200
points.
Second place in the match
went to Florida Southern
With a 1031 score. The
Florida Southern team was
composed of Lester Austin,
John Phillips, Wynn Sigman
and Lee Keller.
Third place went to
Florida State, with 1012
points.
In tense competition that
concluded in the darkness of
the partial eclipse that
blanketed Gainesville
Saturday, the highest
individual score went to John
Phillips of Florida Southern
College (269/300).
Second highest individual
scorer was Rocky McAllister
of Florida State University
(265/300).
The highest female scorer
was Linda Lee Duke of the
UF (259/300). The second
highest female scorer went to
Jan Dunphy of Florida State
University (244/300).
The match Saturday makes
Florida number one in
collegiate small bore state
competition. Florida will now
take part in nationwide
competition.

SEC Final Standings

CONFERENCE
W L PF
Kentucky 17 1 1623
LSU 13 5 1697
Auburn 11 7 1423
Georgia 11 7 1416
Tennessee 10 8 1227
VndrbTt 8 10 1519
Miss. 6 12 1353
Florida 6 12 1243
Alabama 5 13 1465
Miss. State 3 i 5 1298
l 1
i mtQAS* 13th Street I
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Wheel Alignment
Full Service (oil
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brand Mufflers and
Batteries
Present this ad and get a 5%
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and personnel. Good thru
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I l

10, the quarterly cometh
(Q VOLKSWAGEN Or AMERICA, INC.
gag | aBB
Sometimes we get the feeling
were beirsg followed.
Everybodys getting into the act.
Everybodys making a small car.
And since we've made more of them than any anyone
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we've learned about the business over the years:
First off, theres no doubt about it, the only way
to make an economy car is expensively.
So Rule No. 1, dont scrimp.
Get yourself the best engineers in the business
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them on their toes.
Next, try to develop an engine that's not a gas gasguzzler.
guzzler. gasguzzler. If you can get it to run on pints of oil
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air instead of water, fantastic.
Work on things to make your car last longer.
Like giving it 45 pounds of paint to protect its top __
and a steel bottom to protect its bottom.
Important: Make sure you can service any year
car you make. There's nothing worse than having
someone find out that a part they need to make
their car go is no longer available.
Finally, spend less time worrying about what
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Perfecting a good economy car is a very time timeconsuming
consuming timeconsuming business. So far it has consumed 25
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Miller-Brown Motors, Inc. XK
4222 N.W. 13th St.
Gainesville AUT p£T O
_________________

ALL
PA W L PF PA
1404 25 1 2500 2050
1572 20 8 2658 2528
1329 15 11 2015 1935
1386 13 12 1857 1934
1204 16 9 1696 1608
1496 12 14 2231 2150
1501 10 15 1924 2045
1445 9 17 1913 2049
1618 8 18 2082 2280
1476 6 18 1769 1923
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LIVESTOCK MARKET



Rugby Team Shines, Others Not Quite

BASKETBALL: Gator
captain Andy Owens, selected as
a member of the All-Conference
first team last week, ended an
illustrious career as a Gator
Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
scoring 36 points.
Those 36 points by the
6-foot-7 high post man from
Tampa, could not offset the
balanced performance of
Alabamas Crimson Tide which
had five players scoring in
double figures. The final score
was 89-79.
With the big effort, Owens
broke the single season mark of
663 points set by Neal Walk in
1967-68.
Only one other Gator scored
in the double figures besides
I
M """
JBf-
ANDY OWENS
... breaks Walk's mark

W
wildlife L es Raw Seeing t(
flSf# From Reading? Double-Double? Jlffi vllj
TAKE A BREAK! I
tj Come to t]
f?? Arty's
[] Jns Milk Shakes Only 15< u
II JL h Any Other Drink Free l]
|| After 10:00 P.M. With The Purchase ||
|| Os Just One Arby's M||
v A H'ljjS 11
IjJP "It Beats Booking! |j
Ij Offer Good Thru Thurs., Mar. 12.

WEEKEND ROUNDUP

Owens. Jerry Hoover tallied 15.
In losing the season finale, the
Gators dropped to 6-12 in SEC
play and 9-17 in overall
competition. They conclude the
season in seventh place.
BASEBALL: The Gators
dropped two games in Miami
this weekend, as the Miami
Hurricanes blanked Florida, 5-0,
on Friday and came back in the
bottom of the ninth inning on
Saturday to edge the Gators 54.
UF scored first in the second
inning on Saturday when Dobies
reached base on an error, Larry
Kiezek singled and Ron Macon
singled Dobies home.
In the sixth inning the Gators
scored two more runs
establishing a short-lived 3-2
lead, as the Hurricanes came
back in the bottom of the sixth
to tie the score.
Will Harmon singled home
Frank Bretz to give the Gators a
one run lead, but the Hurricanes
again came back in the bottom
of the inning to knot the score,
44.
Hurricane Doug Holka
slammed a two-out single to
score Joe Margiotta with the
winning run in the last of the
ninth.
The Gators will bring a 2-3
record to Tampa tomorrow
when the Gators meet South
Florida.
TENNIS: The UF tennis team

dropped a pair of decisions over
the seekend, losing to Houston,
9-0 on Friday and then FSU on
Saturday, 6-3.
In the Houston meet, despite
the teams inability to win a
match, Coach Bill Potter was
pleased by the Gators showing
against the powerful Houston
team.
Captain Greg Hilley developed
muscle cramps aunng his singles
match and was unable to
compete in the doubles
cpmpetition.
Against Florida State, Will
Sherwood defeated Hamid
Faquir, 6-1 and 6-0, while
teammate Ralph Hart stopped
Dale Baker, 6-2 and 64 for the
Gators only two wins in the
singles division.
Florida also won a doubles
match as Hilley and Buddy Miles
combined to beat the team of
Herb Rapp and Scott Bristol, 64
and 7-5.
The Gators are now 1-3 in
season play.
WRESTLING: UFs Jeff
Shaffner was the only Gator to
reach the finals of the SEC
Wrestling Championships in
Auburn, Ala. Saturday as LSU
won four of the eight finals
matches to take the team title.
Shaffner, wrestling in the
158-pound class, was pinned by
LSUs Steve Metro in 3:34,
placing second in his class.

The only other point-maker
for Florida was John Barres in
the 142-pound category. He
placed third, winning Saturdays
consolation finals.
LSU dominated both days of
the tournaments action,
outpointing Auburn 88-60.
Alabama placed third with 54
points. Georgia finished fourth
with 43 points, followed by
Tennessee with 28 and Florida
with 23.
TRACK: Tampas Jesuit
Invitational Track Meet,
regarded as the state
intercollegiate championships,
ended on a note of protest
Saturday as Florida State won
the college title, ending UFs
three-year reign as champions.
A torrential downpour made
the pole vault runway too
slippery for continuation,
according to the officials, and
Gator coach Jimmy Carnes
entered a protest. The event was
one-third of the way through
before it was halted. Carnes
contended that UF jumpers
would have captured all four
positions and won the meet had
the competition been run.
Gator John Parker and the
Seminoles Ken Mizer shared the
most valuable honors for their
record-setting performances in
the mile and two-mile runs.
Parker set a record in the
mile with a 4:10 clocking while

Monday, March 9,1970, The Florida Alligator,

fSKSsliinfipr ffiKlfia
- W *-
WM
JOHN PARKER
... sets mile record
Mizer captured the two-mile
event in the record time of
8:65.5. Parker placed second
behind Mizer in the two-mile
and Mizer came in behind Parker
in the mile.
FSU tallied 102 points to
Floridas 88, with the Gators
capturing four first place events
and FSU three. Florida A&M
finished third with 37 points,
Edward Waters of Jacksonville
came in fourth with 18 and the
University of South Florida
failed to score.
RUGBY: The Gator Rugby
team trounced New Zealand Air
Force Base, 43-5, here Saturday,
behind the scoring of John
Geiger, Dick Meatyard, Steve
Smith, Fritz Miller and Tom
Hester.

Page 15



Page 16

, Tfw Florida AtHptor, Monday, March 9,1970

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Miller-Brown offers the finest service facilities (27 stalls. 18 hoists) as well as
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