Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
mi
AS. Aml'uUljl

Vol. 62, No. 99

- > -~*
M ,' *~ pP^Mr
PHIL COPE
ANCHORS AWEIGH

These two (three?) UF students, imbued with the
spirit of Spring and approaching finals, recently
took time out to launch their own version of the

State University Budget Cut

A $42 million budget cut for the state university
system initiated by Gov. Claude Kirk is being fought
by the Board of Regents which hopes to convince
the legislature to restore the funds.
The graduate school program around the state is
expected to be hit the hardest by the cut which
would mean a loss of $lO million for that program
alone. Dr. John T. Algeo, assistant dean of the UF
graduate school, said as far as he knows the UF
would be held to last years budget and so would
not be able to grow to meet expanding needs.
In its meeting Monday, the board also announced
the creation of a committee hoping to counteract
government reorganization moves that have taken
away the freedom and virtual autonomy of the
board.

NSA:'Conference Bad. Workshops Good

(EDITORS NOTE: Alligator staffer John
Sugg attended last weekends National Student
Association regional conference in Atlanta as an
observer. Following are his impressions of the
convention and NSA.)
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Editorial Awistant
Some people who attended the National
Student Association (NSA) Southeast Regional
Conference last weekend in Atlanta said it was
irrelevant.
However, this is probably not the case since
the 100 NSA delegates from more than 40
universities and colleges seemed legitimately v
concerned about vital social problems.
The problem, at least as it appears to this
writer, is that NSA is organizationally inept.
Moreover, while trying to present itself as a
progressive force, NSA has failed to keep pace
with the youth radicalization with its politics
failing to go beyond SDS, circa 1963-64.
Literature at the conference old articles by
SDSs Carl Davidson and other articles like
Student As Nigger on student power
reflected this orientation.
And, even as amorphous as SDS was during
that era, it still had more direction and
organization than NSA seems to now.
Henry Solares, SG secretary for academic
affairs, said the conference in general was a
failure primarily because of a lack of
ittfmdanci

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Gainesville

Armada in the Graham Area pond. Did you ever get
that old finals sink or swim" feeling?

UF President Stephen C. OConnell was named a
member of the committee which will attempt to
clear up the structure of authority and
decision-making which board members call
confusing and overlapping.
In other action, the board authorized the UF to
apply to the U. S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development for a $3 million loan to
construct replacement housing for Flavets.
If funds are acquired an architect can be hired to
design approximately 300 units of married housing
for an area in the west part of campus near 34th
Street. The units are expected to rent for S7O to
SBO per month. Construction will take 12 to 18
months during which time Flavet 111 will continue
in use.

AT ATLANTA CONFERENCE

||
NSA had expected as many as 400 delegates
but less than 100 actually attended. Because of
the low attendance, several resource persons
and speakers cancelled out of the conference at
* the last moment.
Solares said, However, the workshop I
attended was a great success.
The workshop was on techniques for
organizing educational reform, Solares said.
What is needed is enough people dissatisfied
with things and willing to work for change, he
said.
Solares favors the continuance of the informal
relationship UF has with NSA.
The workshop this reporter attended was on
relating educational reform to a larger political
perspective.
It was noted that gains made in educational
reform were often taken over by administrative
bodies who gave little credit or influence to the
people who had worked on reforms for years.
It was also observed in this workshop that
many reforms were turned to reactionary ends
by administrative bodies. For example, teacher
evaluation had been used to fire radical and
liberal professors at some schools.
Kathleen ONan, an NSA resource person and
a member of Young Socialist Alliance from
Berkeley said it was necessary for demands to

ALL INVITED

Wo mens Day
Set For Sunday

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writar
International Womens Day
will be recognized on the UF
campus by a program presented
Sunday by the Ad Hoc
Committee at 2:30 in room 361
of the Reitz Union.
The program will feature Dr.
Betty Cosby, dean of women
and regional representative of
the National Organization of
Women (NOW), Dr. Elizabeth
Philp, gynecologist at UF
infirmary, Don Albury, a
veteran speaking on the
G. I.s attitude toward
women, a film on
the of Vietnamese women
at Imme and in the war plus
speeches on Womens liberation
ind the history of women.
International Womens Day
is not a day for gripes,
explained Judy Rossi, a member
of the Ad Hoc Committee. Its
purpose is to recognize the fact
that women have been active
throughout the years and have
played a part in the countrys
development.
This will be a mass education
for women, said Diana Sugg,
another member of the
committee. We want to let
people know women have done
things and let them know
women should be recognized for
these accomplishments.
Two objectives of the
committee were emphasized.

v m
transcend the campus in their implication.
This is necessary, she said, to avoid the
isolation of simple student power and to turn
the university into an agent of social change
rather than an ivory tower.
One of the main sessions of the conference
was on Women's Liberation. There were two
workshops, one for women and the other for
men on 'male chauvinism.
Both groups seemed divided, in varying
degrees, between those who felt the problem was
in peoples heads and those who felt there
were social/economic causes for the oppression
of women.
A striking feature of the conference was that
there were no general meetings, other than a
speech by Cad Oglesby, a former SDS president.
Consequently, there were no plenary sessions,
resolutions or general political debate.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd's
entry into and, later, hurried retreat from NSA
was probably motivated by political
opportunism, i. e., when NSA made some radical
statements (which it has yet to follow up with
action), Shepherd backed out to avoid being
associated with a 'leftist group.
However, considering NSAs lack of organized
direction and inability to act politically, coupled
with its theoretical program of student power,
which proved inadequate for the campus
situation five years ago, Shepherd's move may
have been wise in the long run.
The reason NSA seems doomed to political
ineffectiveness and obscurity.

Wednesday, March 4, 1970

Primarily, equal rights for
women were discussed. Forty
per cent of our work force is
women, Mrs. Rossi said. We
want equal pay for equal work.
'There is discrimination
against women because they
have children. We need adequate
free day care centers for all
children in die country, not just
those who can afford it, Mrs.
Rossi said.
Another point was womens
control over their own bodies.
If a woman chooses to have an
abortion she should be able to,
Mrs. Sugg said.
All residents of the Gainesville
community and UF students are
invited. There will be a free
nursery for those who attend
who have small children. The
nursery will be in room 346 of
the Union and will be run by
men.
piaiiiaeilll
TfaeCteMsO* j|i
GENTLE WEDNESDAY
will be attempted again
this Wednesday by Student
Government page 4
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies 12
Small Society 6
Sports 18
What's Happening 5

\ > /



Page 2

!, Ttw Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, March 4.1970

N/XON SAYS

'Poor Have Been Failed

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon proposed
Tuesday creation of a National
Institute of Education to find
out why the nations schools
have failed the children of the
poor before the government
commits vast new sums in aid to
education.
He told Congress in a special
message that basic research in
teaching and learning by the
institute operating the way
the National Institutes of Health
does in biomedical research is
required to begin to climb the
up staircase toward genuine
reform.
hi addition, Nixon signed an
executive order establishing a
presidential commission headed
by former Defense Secretary
Nefl McElroy to make a
two-year study of school
financing, including possible
alternatives to the use of the
local property tax for revenues.
The President said that the
Johnson administrations
ambitious and costly programs,
such as head start, have not
measurably helped poor children
catch up with well-to-do
children entering the first grade.
He made this problem the
proposed institutes first
research priority.
Meanwhile, he indicated, his
administration would not move
to expand special programs until

Grades May Go At PKY

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
Student-paced teaching and
elimination of scholastic grades
are two of the changes in store
for P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School if the Board of Regents
approves the plan and allocates
$750,000 for an experimenta experimentation
tion experimentation in education.
Dr. Julius B. Hodges, director
of the school, said a study
conducted last summer and fall
by the Board of Regents staff on
the state laboratory schools
resulted in a recommendation
that they become primarily
MINI-POSTEIt
ui 1 7&mm
take it OFF...
iake itauoff!
tl _

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (l) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times, for correction must he given before the next
LiKT; ~ 7

the institute conies up with
other possible answers to
overcome poor backgrounds,
suoh as use of day care centers,
publicly supported projects in
educational television and new
reading programs.
Daniel P. Moynihan, the
presidents counselor for urban
and domestic affairs, told
newsmen that Nixons message
recognized that we have not

RR Strike Possible
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon prepared Tuesday to ask
Congress for emergency legislation to avert a nationwide railroad
strike which four shopcraft unions called for Thursday.
The White House announced Nixons intentions a few hours after
the unions declared they had no choice in the face of a court ruling
against selective strikes to walk out on the entire U. S. railway
system.
There was no immediate indication what Nixons proposals would
be. He was the third President in the past seven years to be forced to
turn to Congress for help in settling a labor dispute in the vital
railroad industry.
Only last week, Nixon asked Congress to grant him broader
executive powers in dealing with work stoppages in the transportation
industry.
The heart of his proposals was a provision for a final offer
settlement of contract disputes, which the AFL-CIO has already
rejected as amounting to compulsory arbitration.
Under this plan, labor and management would submit one or two
final offers to a neutral three-member panel, which would then
select the most fair and reasonable offer as a binding settlement.
The strike announcement by William W. Winpisinger, chief
shopcraft union spokesman in nearly 16 months of contract
negotiations that have ended in complete deadlock, made it clear that
only Congress could halt a general walkout.

research organizations instead of
concentrating on teacher
education.
Hodges said innovative
programs had not been started at
the laboratory school before
because of lack of funding, but
now the Board has asked the
school to design experimental
programs and to eventually
study their effectiveness.
It is planned that eventually
all academic grade levels will be
eliminated, each' student
working at his own pace and
moving from one subject to
another as he masters the
material. Currently the school
teachers 930 students from
nursery school to the 12th
grade.
Students will not take
courses but units of subject
matter such as on long division.
They will spend varying amounts
of time under the personal
direction of a teacher depending
on their need, and then may
practice the skill during
laboratory sessions.
The subject matter students
cover will depend on their future
Guns Guns Guns
+ Inventory over 450. Buy +
-it Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
.gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

succeeded in achieving equal
educational opportunities for
minority groups in this country,
and we do not know how to
achieve it.
Nixon cautioned against
letting his proposals get bogged
down in the present controversy
over school desegregation, in
which his civil rights critics have
accused him of condoning delays
in the South.

goals if they plan to go to
college, work in the community,
enter vocational training. The
students and their advisors will
decide when they are ready to
move on to other units and
when they are ready for a
diploma.
Hodges said the faculty would
be used in away most
appropriate to their abilities.
Teachers will take on
specialized roles such as giving
concentrated, individualized
instruction to students. Student
teachers and aides would staff
learning labs or do routine jobs
which require simpler
qualifications.
70 To 1 Odds
COLUMBUS, Ohio John B.
Mitchell, sociologist at Ohio
State University, reports that 30
per cent of Americas population
lives on 99 per cent of the land
area and the other 70 per cent
live on the remaining 1 per cent.
The lions share of air and
water pollutants come from the
large concentrations of
population, Mitchell says.

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY WWW* I )
I. .. F'd Awken |
K 3766472 \
S 114 S.W. 34th St.
W .yjya-rey.- / 372-3649 M
I EHJF! d| nner QQA [
I to! box wY 1
3 Pc. Chicken m
Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 m
I and Gravy M
|_m! s bring COUPON I

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KOREAN DOLL PE
Mi Hae Son looked like a little Korean doll when she attended a
reception with her parents Sunday in the Reitz Union. The reception,
held by Prof. Shannon McCune, was to celebrate Korean
Independence Day.
'Gator Editors 1 Selection
Scheduled For Today

The Board of Student
Publications is expected today
to select an Alligator editor and
managing editor for the
upcoming Spring quarter.
Board members met for 12
hours Monday to interview eight
candidates for the editorship and
postponed its deliberations and
final decision until today.
Two candidates for managing
editor are scheduled to be
interviewed today.
Mondays meeting ran five
hours over the anticipated time
when interviews of applicants
ran up to one and a half hours
each instead of the projected 45
minutes. The Board finally
adjourned at 3:05 a. m.
Candidates for editor include
Alligator Executive Editor Carol
Sanger and journalism senior
Jimmey Bailey, a former

Alligator columnist and an
announced candidate for
election to the State House of
Representatives on the American
Independent Party ticket.
Also applying are Helen
Huntley, former assistant news
editor and currently a staff
writer; Neal Sanders, a former
assignments editor; Larry
Jordan, a former staff writer and
current Student Government
Secretary of Minority Affairs.
Also, Robert A. Fraser and
Jerry Roberts, both seniors in
journalism, and Ed. C. Watkins,
a former paste-up assistant in the
Student Publications production
laboratory.
Vying for the managing editor
post are Assistant News Editor
Karen Eng and Sports Editor
Sam Pepper.



Drug Store: A Place Os Friendship

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A daik-haired girl wearing
blue jeans tucked into brown
knee-length boots hovers over
hot kettles of wax in the
kitchen.
Off to the side, matresses
substitute for furniture in bare
rooms, and laughter and guitar
music is heard.
Those who come hoe find a
home, a gathering place,
someone to whom they can talk.
The emphasis is on people.
Distinctions between
straights and hippies, an older
generation and a younger,
between members of the UF
community and those cut off
from UF life, melt away. Like

Jy ,V

i'Show Cause 1 Asked I
I |
| In Contempt Case |
| Over Suicide I
I i
fc In a surprise move Tuesday, Circuit Court Judge John J.
j Crews ordered County Court Judge John Connell to show :!;
Sj cause why three Gainesville Sun newsmen should be charged
S with contempt of court. :!;
The action came an hour and a half before a hearing when
Executive Editor Ed Johnson, City Editor Nick Tatro and Staff $
Writer Dave Reddick were scheduled to show cause why they :*
:$ should not be held in contempt. $j
That hearing was cancelled. i*j;
Instead, Connell will have to answer Crews order, a writ of &
;j|: prohibition, March 18 in Alachua County Circuit Court. $
;i|: If Connell fails to show sufficient grounds for charging the
;!: three with contempt, the circuit judge will issue a permanent
jx writ of prohibition and the case will be dropped. §
|ij: Connell initiated the contempt proceedings after an article
ij: written by Reddick appeared in the Gainesville Sun. jg
§ Reddick was reporting on a coroners inquest held to $
ijj: determine the cause of death of Kenneth West Anderson.
The inquest ruled the cause of death as suicide and Reddick Si
included in his story the contents of a suicide note that
| Anderson left. g
i*:- Connell said he ordered those present at the inquest not to $
reveal the contents of the note. j§
However, in a motion filed by attorney Benjamin M. Tench,
Reddick said he saw the note and heard it readout loud prior to
:£ the hearing, and that he wrote a preliminary story before the §
hearing. §
He also wrote a preliminary story before the hearing, and this a
:$ story also contained the contents of the note, the motion
stated. g
The motion also contended Connells order violated the First g:
s Amendment guarantee of freedom of the press. g:
g In addition, the order disregarded a Florida statute providing
| for open hearings in the coroners inquests, the motion stated. |
§ Anderson, who burned to death in his auto Feb. 19, left in jjjj:
his note a plea to young people not to experiment with drugs. |
| To those who might want to expand their minds with £:
| dmgs, dont, he said. $
| He asked his parents to forgive him for giving up after §
% youve raised me, and urged them not to blame themselves for &
5 his death. 3
?: I made a fatil (sic) mistake. $j
6 $
THE GREAT
CULTURAL REVOLUTION
IN CHINA
a critical Marxist
analysis
Young Socialist Forum
to be given by John Sugg, j
Reitz Union Auditorium, Tonight 8
Spomorl by StmUnt IW Union

Alices Chesire cat in
wonderland only the smiles and
eyes seem to remain.
You dont have to be an
ex-addict or an ex-anything to
come to the little green cottage
at 1823 N.W. 2nd Ave. known
as the Comer Drug Store.
When the Comer Drug Store
opened its doors Jan. 26 it
opened a center that was sorely
needed, according to a group of
people at the UF who had
planned the chug store for
months.
To my knowledge, the
concept of the drug store on a
campus is unique to the UF,
Drug Store Board Chairman
Dave Doucette said.
The drug store stood for a

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT

place open 24 hours a day to
anyone having problems with
drags, or bad trips.
Law enforcement officials
have said they will not bother
those who seek help or visit the
drugstore as long as drugs are
kept off the premises, Doucette
said.
But drug abuse is only a
small part of the concept of the
house, Steve Robitaille, the
student counselor who lives at
the Drug Store said.
It plays a larger role in the
prevention of drug abuse.
The students who come there
regularly have started an
informal speakers bureau.
Student volunteers who
frequently have been through
the whole drug experience speak
to PTA and civic groups, junior
and senior high schools and UF
classes;
A buddy system is really
needed, Robitaille said.
Students often will not
openly discuss their drug
problems with teachers or even
the professional counselors at
their school. The counselor with
his office hours still cant
substitute for a friend, Robitaille
pointed out.
He recalled one instance when
die junior high students he had
been addressing would not open
up with questions until he had
requested the teacher to leave
the room. Then students told of
their problems with drugs they
were currently using.
Building from the basis that
students will turn to drugs from
boredom and loneliness, the
drug store has become a place to
meet friends and find something
else to do besides drugs.
So it is that a student can
walk in at literally any hour and
find one of the pale yellow walls
in the front room covered with
notebook paper listing activities:
guitar lessons, photography,
candlemaking, a skin diving
excursion.
If the whole concept of the
Drag Store could be summed up
in a phrase It might be, I get by
with s little help from my
friends.

| jyi This WEDNESDAY tonight at the Uj
IH LvitftgfeeHn H
9 FILM FESTIVAL D
BHOB ?b ( TH IS WEEKEND pi

I was really impressed with
the way people act over here,
Robitaille, a former resident
advisor at a UF dormitory area
said.
There was none of this
everybody be a counselor bit.
There was just a group of
people, he said.
We hope to dispel the rumor
that were all do-gooders, or
ex-addicts, he added.
We just want to be fun, there
is nothing heavy like a big
sensitivity group here. I think
the whole college is
over-psychologized today, he
said.
Helping to bring people
# Guadalajara, Mexico
1 The Guadalajara Summer School, a* 1
pully accredited University of Arizona
Jprogram, will offer, June 29 to August'
18, art, folklore, geography, history, po-i 1
flitical science, language and literature
Aourses. Tuition, $160; board and room,
15155. Write Dr. Juan B. Rael, Office of 1
(Summer Session, University of Arizona,
PTucson, Arizona 85721.

A -A Teddy Bear Nursery
( V/cnW Divided into seven age groups. OPEN 7
a ra t 0 6 p.m., Sat. also Night
Babysitting 6 to 12 p.m. FREE pick up
and delivery to all schools.
1214 N.W. 4th Street
Ph. 376-0917 for further information
FRATERNITY ALUMNI RELATIONS FIRM
SEEKS MAN WHO NEEDS AT LEAST
$25,000 ADDITIONAL INCOME
National organization working exclusively with the frater fraternity
nity fraternity world seeks man to operate local office here. Must
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handled on a part-time basis evenings from your home until
full potential is reached. A minimum of $5,000 cash is re required
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Harry 0. Richards, President, Fraternity Alumni Service
DIVISION OF THE CARSON COMPANY
611 South Boulevard Evanston, 111. 60202 Tel. 312/869-8330

Wednesday, March 4,1870, Ttio Florida AWprtot,

together are the weekly meetings
of the Aquarius Club every
Friday at midnight.
Members may go into all night
rap sessions, or just play guitar
and sing.
Seeing as how the drug store
is more of a concept than a
specific place, it would be
possible to encourage other
students to open up their doors
and invite people in, just to
rap Robitadle suggested.
Ill bet the dorm residents
get tired of eating the same food
day in and day out. It would be
nice if some people would put
up a sign saying: *we need twelve
people over for supper, sign up,
and contribute a dish.
McGuire Trophy & Engratdiml
University headquarters
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Page 3



The

Page 4

Seide Dreams Os Student' Sounding Board 1

By MIKE FINN
Alligator Writer
An oiganization to be the voice or
sounding board for the college
students of Florida is the dream of
George Seide.
Seide, a senior from West Palm Beach
and former senate majority whip is
currently Student Government Director
of Inter-University Relations. He hopes
that dream will near completion, when
the first organizational congress of the
Florida Student Association (FSA)
meets Friday and Saturday at UF.

'Educational Reform Topic
At SG Gentle Wednesday

Student Government's
Gentle Wednesday, scheduled
for last week, will be today on
the Plaza of the Americas.
Gentle Wednesday* was
called off last week because of
unfavorable weather
conditions, Secretary of
Academic Affairs Henry Solares
said.
Speeches will center around
the topic Educational Reform
-At What Pace?
Solares said everyone is aware
of the need for educational
reform, but few people seem
willing actually to do anything
about it.

Biweekly Pay Switch
Probable This Year
UF's payroll system will probably be changed from monthly to
biweekly later this year, Vice President for Business Affairs William
Elmore said Sunday.
This has been kicked around for quite awhile, he said, but it has
not yet been approved in final form. Were programming for it, he
said. He anticipates the change to be approved and go into effect
probably July 1 or Sept. 1 of this year.
At the time of the change to every other Friday pay periods, there
will be a lapse of pay, probably two weeks, he said.
Elmore said the major problems encountered with the monthly
payroll system are in complying with the Federal Wage and Hour Law
by matching out 40-hour weeks to a monthly schedule and in delaying
payment for overtime.
With the more frequent payments, he said, it would be easier to
comply with the law and overtime would be paid more promptly.
Paul Anderson
" worlds strongest man"
JSPSPSIIiiI s
i P f Pi
1 i§
lli
M. fl I
Thursday March 5
1604 W. Univ. Avt. Admission SI.OO

Seide said Monday that he plans to
run for FSAs presidency in die
elections this weekend. 'To not run for
the job after all that I have been
involved in with FSA would be like
giving up a child of mine for adoption.
Seide is the organizer of FSA. He
feels it is the answer to the problem of
giving the students a unified voice.
We have a good cross section of the
schools in Florida with six private
schools, seven state universities and
several junior colleges all sending
delegates to the congress.

We hope to go from
discussion into action.
Several of the speakers
scheduled for last week will be
unable to come.
Assistant Speech Professor Dr.
Anthony Clark will begin the
program at 11:30 a. m. A panel
discussion will follow at noon.
Business Administration Dean
Robert Lanzillotti; Fred Breeze,
chairman of the Omicron Delta
Kappa (ODK) course, and
teacher evaluation and Chairman
of Mechanical Engineering
Robert Gaither will discuss
educational reform.
Associate Law Professor

SAYS FSA MAY SOLVE PROBLEM

Michael Gordon; Dr. James
Lister, chairman of personnel i
services; Associate Professor of
Comprehensive English Dr.
Corbin Camell; Vice President
for Academic Affairs Dr.
Frederick Conner; SCORE
Chairman of Communications
Emily Retherford, and
Psychology Prof. Dr. Sidney
Jourard will speak beginning at
and going until approximately
2:30 p. m., Solares said.
We hope to awaken students,
faculty and administrators to
changes which must come about.
Students dont want to wait and
they shouldnt have to.
Choking Statistic
8.5 billion cigars are sold
annually in the United States.

Make
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AND DO GOOD IN AN IETNA CAREER
Insurance is a service business. It serves people. What Whatever
ever Whatever your major, you can satisfy your pocketbook and
your conscience in one of these basic career areas:
ADMINISTRATIVE
ANALYTICAL
SALES MANAGEMENT
If y u 'd like to hear more about doing your thing at
Aitna, here s what to do:
Ask for a copy of Your Own Thine
at your Placement office. mhllKJ
Make an appointment to see
our representative. Hell be
on campus on: marchs, 1970
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and a JOBS-participating company.

Eventually plans call for all 56
institutions of higher learning in the
state to be members, he said.
Seide, however, does not take credit
for the idea of FSA. The idea originated
after Florida became disenchanted with
National Student Association (NSA).
This came about because of two
reasons.
First, NSA did not seem to represent
the students as a whole and second,
because of its preoccupation with
political matters.
FSA will be purely educationally

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Dialogue with a Theologue
Dr. A.G. Cranney, on
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Wednesday March 4 4:oopm
Union lounges 122, 123
Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

oriented Seide said.
It will focus on educational
problems of the students.
Despite a small proposed budget and
low key operation for the first y ear
Seide hopes the Association will act on
various educational problems such as
using of the Florida Regent twelfth
Grade Test for admissions, improving
guidance in junior colleges and
improving counseling for freshmen and
junior college transfers entering a four
year institution.



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BITING THE DUST?

It's hard to tell who's the good guy and who's the
bad guy when it doesn't look like anybody's
winning. These members of the Jujitsu Club

WHATS

BY THE TIME I GET TO
PHOENIX: Mark Schorer,
writer, critic and professor at
University of California at
Berkeley, will speak on A
Phoenix Legend: A View of D.
H. Lawrence.** The lecture is
Friday at 8 pjn. in the old Law
Building Auditorium.
RED SKIES AT NIGHT A
GATORS DELIGHT: The
Gator Sailing Club will have a
general meeting Wednesday at
7:30 pm. in room ISO D of the
Reitz Union.
VETERANS ARE AT IT
AGAIN: Veterans Against the
War in Vietnam, a new
organization for any vets who
oppose the war, meets Thursday,
9:30 pm. in Reitz Union room
150 C.
IS CHAIRMAN MAO A

8
Write Ithaca College for
Summer Session Pictora! Review
LOSE YOURSELF IN EDUCATION
AND RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES
Liberal Arts Program
Humanities
Natural Science
Social Science
Communications Arts
Physical Education Program
Health
Recreation
Athletics
Performing Arts Program
Fine Arts
Film
Music
Radio-TV
Theatre
PROGRAM FOR ALL

SACRED COW?: YSA is holding
a Young Socialist Forum on
Chinas Great Cultural
Revolution: A Critical Marxist
Analysis in Reitz Union
auditorium Wednesday at 8 pm.
Speaker is John Sugg. The
meeting is sponsored by the
Student Peace Union.
EVERYBODY LOVES
SOMEBODY: The Befrienders
will meet Wednesday at 5 pm.
in front of the Infirmary. Bring
your own dinner.
HOWS THE CHOIR THESE
DAYS?: Mormon Student, Dr.
A.G. Cranney, Jr., Center
Advisor, will speak on
Mormonism and Minority
Groups Wednesday in lounges
122-23 at 4 pm. The lecture is
part of the Dialogue with a
Theologue series.

demonstrated the fine art of self-defense for
onlookers on the Reitz Union Colonnade Tuesday.

EARN $200.00
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\ Saturday, March 21
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Wedding Dress .... SBO Flowers ST I J
Handmade Veil .... 830 Catered Reception 875 J Name
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Mfodnaaday, March 4,1*70, Tha Florida AiHgator,

If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Taka
Advancad Training
If you still have two yean left at
the University, you may qualify for
this new 2-year Army ROTC
Program.
§ Qualify for an officart
commiasion in 2 yn.
f Receive SSO per month whfle
enrolled in the program.
f Continue your education and
learn to be a leader.
§ Fulfill your military obligation
of 2 yean active duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information Contact
Ma|. Lawrence, Rm. ill, Military
Building or call 392-1395 not later
than 11 March.

Page 5



Page 6

. Tl Florida Alligator, Wadneeday, March 4.1970

IN HIGH COURT
Status Os Bingo
To Be Debated
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The novel argument that bingo can be
nm as a pari-mutuel pool and taxed by the state just like horse and
dog racing was put before the State Supreme Court Tuesday as a basis
for holding the 1967 bingo law constitutional.
Such a tax would be one of the greatest sources of revenue this
state ever had, former State Rep. George Stallings Jr., Jacksonville,
said m arguing that bingo is not outlawed by the constitutional
prohibition to lotteries.
But Jacksonville attorney William Maness, who contends bingo is an
unconstitutional lottery even though authorized by the legislature,
said, The people of this state will think the law and thk court have
gone crazy if it says bingo can be operated as a pari-mutuel pool.
The arguments were heard by a seven-member court on rehearing,
a ter a five-judge panel that heard it nine months ago wound up in a
3-2 split, less than the majority of four required for any court ruling.
It is on appeal from a ruling by Duval Circuit Court Judge Charles
A. Luckie holding the law unconstitutional.
The 1967 law permits benevolent and charitable organizations to
operate bingo games under rigid restrictions and attempts to exclude
if from the anti-lottery provisions of basic law.
Stallings and Maness could not agree on the basic issue thrown
out by Justice Vassar Carlton of what constitutes a lottery.
Maness claimed that a lottery is what the state attorney general has
defined as the award of a prize by chance for a consideration.
But Stallings said the only valid definition was written by the State
Supreme Court, in a 1935 decision involving slot machines, and which
held that a lottery is a gambling device that affects the whole
community, rather than just a segment of it.

Chicago 7
Speech Barred
From U of I
CHICAGO (UPI) A
spokesman for three University
of Illinois student associations
said Tuesday the federal court
may be asked to overrule the
schools decision to bar a speech
by Chicago Seven attorney
William M. Kunstler.
Violence broke out on the
universitys Champaign campus
Tuesday night following a
decision by the University of
Illinois Board of Trustees to
prohibit the use of school
facilities tonight for a speech by
Kunstler.
A spokesman for Concerned
Law Students, the organization
which invited Kunstler to
campus, said the group was
considering a suit which would
ask the U. S. District Court in
Chicago to permit the
appearances.
Concerned Law Students
would be joined in the suit by
the Associations of
Undergraduate Students and
Graduate Students, he said.
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OBrien Agrees To Return
As Democratic Chairman

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Lawrence F. OBrien agreed
Tuesday to return as Democratic
National Chairman.
OBrien agreed after the
partys executive committee
voted unanimously Monday to
urge him to accept a draft for
the job.
As titular leader of the party,
former Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey had led a search for a
chairman to succeed Sen. Fred
R. Harris of Oklahoma, whose
resignation becomes effective at

a Democratic National
Committee meeting Thursday.
Humphrey asked OBrien last
month to take the assignment.
But OBrien, the Johnson
administrations postmaster
general who served in the
chairmanship for Humphreys
1968 campaign, startled
Democratic leaders Thursday by
announcing that he would not
accept because he lacked the
broad support he felt he needed.
At further sessions Monday,
no widespread support was

I WANT'S SO/AE PieiVAcV He
TO GO To OLASe
- W\ cKmAtJ

by Brickman

reported in the committee for
any of those whose names were
discussed. The talk kept drifting
back to O'Brien, who now runs a
consulting firm in New York.
J. M. Arvey, Illinois national
committee member, who was
presiding, telephoned OBrien to
tell him that he was the
unanimous choice of a
committee that is seldom
unanimous about anything.
Arvey reported to newsmen
OBrien that he was willing to
reconsider.



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Vtoihmctay, March 4, WTO. 7h& PMdm AWfrtr, I

Page 7



, Th Florida AMgrtor, Wadmaday, March 4,1970

Page 8

Screaming Sunday Liberals

The question of regional hypocrisy on school
desegregation has surfaced in the crest of the debate over the
constitutionality of busing children to achieve integration.
The Stennis Amendment, authorized by Sen. John R.
Stennis (D-Miss.) was tacked onto a financial bill for the
Department of Health, Education and Welfare. It proposed
uniform school desegregation throughout the county.
The amendment was first shrugged off as just another
Southern diversionary attempt designed to delay
integrationist efforts throughout the South.
But, alas, when an honest-to-goodness, liberal, Sen.
Abraham Ribicoff (D-Conn.) said he agreed that Northern
schools were as hypocritically segregated as their Southern
counterparts, Stennis* amendment received serious
consideration and was eventually approved.
It would require HEW to put the same effort into
desegrating Northern and Southern schools, whatever the
cause of segregation.
Southerners have long argued that segregated schooling in
the North is at least as prevalent as in the South. They point

WE'LL FREE WE'LL FREE -AND
SOUTH VIETNAM j CAMBODIA |
'* 1,1 r
- a.
President Richard M. Nixon: A New Policy For Peace

RFK: 'The President Must Lead In A Crisis

WASHINGTON ln February of 1970, the racial
problem reached a crisis. As in the past, the
question was whether to have one society or two,
but the immediate issue was whether to abandon
the effort to send black and white children to the
same schools.
The President stood mute, but statements were
issued in his name, so confusing and so vague as to
permit both sides to claim his support.
*
On the night of July 27, 1967, Sen. Robert
Kennedy sat in his office talking with friends.
President Johnson had just addressed the nation in
the aftermath of the Detroit riots. Its over, said
Sen. Kennedy, hes not going to do anything.
What would you do, if you were President?
challenged a friend. Kennedy thought for a
moment.
If I were President, he began, Id take
advantage of the power of the office. Id call the
heads of the three television networks, and ask them
to be here tomorrow morning.
Id tell them its their duty to their country to
produce a two-hour documentary, to be run as soon
as possible in prime time which would show
what its like to live in a ghetto. Let them show the
sound, the feel, the hopelessness, and what its like
to think youll never get out.
Show a black teen-ager, told by some radio
jingle to stay in school, looking at his older brother
who stayed in school and whos out of a job.
Show the Mafia pushing narcotics; put a candid
camera team in a ghetto school and watch what a
rotten system of education it really is. Film a
mother staying up all night to keep the rats from
her baby. '

EDITORIAL

to the ghetto schools as their foremost example.
It is easier, of course, to change a law than a life-style.
Brown V. Board of Education outlawed the separate but
equal doctrine 15 years ago, but, school boards m the deep
South have done little to implement the change for the de
jure segregation and, in some cases, nothing at all.
It will be most interesting to observe what the North does
to achieve the same desegregation, its most outspoken
spokesmen have demanded of the South.
Stennis and other Southerners have cried out against
busing and mass shifting of faculty to achieve desegregation,
and their objections have been quickly dismissed by
Northern liberals as diversionary attempts.
We suspect that once the hypocritical double standards
are eliminated, we will hear the same cries of unfair, but
this time from the other side of the Mason-Dixon line.
And we wonder how many of Congress good Sunday
liberals will then be among the screamers, along with
Stennis, Thurmond, et. al.

The President is the only man who could get
them to produce that show. Then Id ask people to
watch it and experience what it means to live in
the most affluent society in history- without hope.
Government cant cure all the problems, but the
President isnt a prisoner of events he can act.
And hes the only man who can.
Frank Mankfewicz-
Tom Brodon
Then, Sen. Kennedy continued, Id collect
data on what this means in every major city. In New
York, ghetto children lose between 10 and 20
points on their IQ between the fourth and eighth
grades those statistics should be available for
every city.
Then Id call meetings one a day, if necessary
-of people from every major city. Maybe there are
50 such cities maybe more. Id find out who has
the real power, and Id ask them to the White
House. The mayors, ministers, bankets, real-estate
men, contractors, union officials everybody
knows who really has power in a city not just
elected politicians.
Id talk so these groups. Id show them the facts
- in their city, and Id say, Gentlemerf, this is your

Stolen Books
MR. EDITOR:
Warning to students who believe in the Honor Code:
To the Monday thief at the Rat:
Its a shame that I will associate a bad experience with the
Rathskeller, as I like to eat there. Having my texts stolen was not just
5 a shock; as the end of the quarter nears I have enough trouble with
my courses as it is.
Now I and several others have found that it is not safe to leave
books unattached in the main cafeteria, not even for 15 minutes.
One girl lost her French book. Another student had his calculus
text lifted. He has a test in that course Friday. Beyond losing his notes
he has to buy, at SIO.OO, another text.
You stole three books of mine which I desperately need. All three
have my name; address and phone number written inside in ink. It is
impossible to believe that these books were picked up mistakenly.
The Florida Book Store, Malones, and the campus bookstore have
been notified of these thefts. The campus police have also been
notified.
I hope that you get caught. Students: if your books havent been
stolen yet, keep your eyes on them; you could be the next victim.
GREG TRACY

problem, and only you can solve it. If you dont
solve it, your city will fall apart in a few years, and
it will be your fault and Ill say it was your fault!
They could figure out their own solution. If the
problem was schools, let them raise the money for
schools, or modernize, or bus the kids, or change
the zones. I wouldnt care just do it. If it was
unemployment, make new jobs. They could do it by
cutting profits, or by tax incentives, or by using
government programs. But Id make it clear that this
can only be solved in the community and that
they had no time to spare.
Sen. Kennedy sat back. Its no use my saying
these things when I do, its a political speech. The
President of the United States is the only man who
has the pulpit, he is the only leader we all have. If
he leads if he shows that he cares people will
give him time. In a crisis and this is the worst one
~ h* s leadership is all we have.
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng j an ie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
John Sugg
Editorial Assistant
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions; expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
aSEL 0 writer of the "tide and not those
of the University Os Florida.

The
Florida
Alligator
77ie price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor



Courtesy F. 0. Alexander
1966, Philadelphia Bulletin
FORUM:^^
r jAdviu mi DcaawT j
hoop fnr fft,- rr ~plfiM n
Speaking Out
A-
Arabs Are Human
By Samir K. Itani
In the February 27th issue, the Alligator gave its readers one more
opportunity to discern its blind partiality on the subject of the Middle
East.
Its cartoon attempts all at once to put the blame for the recent
Swiss airplane crash on Palestinian commandos in general,
conveniently labels them Arab guerrillas so as to implicate all
Arabs, and depicts them as some form of tail-bearing animals. The
cartoonist, as well as the papers editors, are guilty of the most
grotesque distortion of the facts.
They can congratulate themselves for deluding the student body
and playing their part in the dissemination of the myth information.
This has been true in the papers past for as far back as we can
remember, but this time the attempt was particularly distasteful and
grossly lacking both grace and finesse.
First, the facts:
In Amman, an obscure Arab terrorist organization called Popular
Front for the Liberation of Palestine General Command promptly
bragged that it had blown up the Swiss plane because Israeli officials
were aboard!! (Time Magazine, March 2nd issue)
We have been unable to verify Times allegation or to find any
evidence of its veracity in broadcasts from the Middle East and
Western Europe. What we did find was a series of statements by every
major commando organization disclaiming any responsibility for the
incident.
We challenge the cartoonist to substantiate his charge and to
produce evidence for it. In the past, the PFLP has indeed been
responsible for attacks on Israeli planes in Athens and Zurich and has
vociferously endorsed its commandos actions.
The PLO, better known as Fatah, has not been responsible for any
operations outside Israeli-occupied territories and is by far the most
popular commando organization whose membership accounts for a
great majority of all Palestinian guerrillas. Its targets are military and
its daring in the face of overwhelming odds has captured the
imagination of the Arab masses.
Prompt to address itself to the Swiss incident, the Alligator failed
to make as case of the recent bombing of a scrap metal factory in
Egypt in which 70 civilians were killed and 150 more maimed and
burned with napalm. The bombing by Israeli pilots who demonstrated
their well-publicised pin-point accuracy during the 1967 war, and
since, was readily dismissed as accidental
Why this discrepancy? Perhaps because the Palestinian people
evicted from their land, subjected to the worst atrocities and
humiliations, condemned to subsist on UN chanty and on what help
the governments of Syria, Jordan and Egypt can provide are more m
the wrong when they take up arms than the affluent Israelis who now
occupy their homes.
Or is it because some human lives have more intrinsic worth than
others Ud whde depriving the Arabs of life, land and dignity the
Israelis have also divested them of their humanity? ~
***** '**""

Christ Is The Answer?

MR. EDITOR:
There is a very large sign in Gainesville saying
Christ is the Answer. So, I began trying to figure
out what the question is that Christ is the answer to.
Could the question be How can we end the war
in Vietnam? No, with few exceptions the church
has been very quiet on the subject of this slaughter
of more than half of a million persons. Lets see.
Who was it that said Thou shalt not kill. (no
exceptions)? No one Ive seen around.
Maybe the question is How do we end racial
discrimination? No, the church has, again with few
exceptions, not spoken very strongly to this issue.
Where is the church when freedom marches are
taking place? Where is the church when legislation is
being voted on? Nowhere to be seen.
How strong of a ghetto program is underway
because of the churches? The KKK are great
church-goers though, I understand.
Well, perhaps the question is How do we end
poverty in the U.S.? No, wrong again. The
churches own more than a fourth of all private
property in the U.S., yet hundreds of thousands of
U.S. citizens are going hungry. A number actually
starve to death.
Where is all of the churches money (which they
in a sense extort, by the use of guilt and fear, from
their members) going? Its going in the form of our
gold reserves to the Vatican. Its going to the
building of shining new churches used to spread
The Answer.
But what is the question? Is is How do we stop
the irreparable pollution of our environment?
Nope. See how many ecological programs the
church is sponsoring and how strongly they speak
out on this issue. See how much political pressure
they exert for this cause. Not much indeed. They
exert plenty for not paying their taxes, however.

Our Society Is In Danger

MR. EDITOR:
The United States was formed
from people of different
nationalities and cultures. These
people bonded together to form
a more perfect union, a union
that would offer them above all
freedom, freedom from the
tyrannies and persecutions of
their homeland; a union that
would free them and their
posterity to live the life that
until then was only a dream.
Our founding fathers fought
and died for this impossible
dream, One nation, under God,
indivisible, with liberty and
justice for all.
I ask you, what has happened
to our society in the past several
decades? Are these values which
our ancestors fought and died
for, archaic and uncalled for in
this modem space-age-society?
Why is it passe to love and
respect our country and to feel a
sense of obligation?
Could our lack of patriotism
and national unity stem from
too long a period of prosperity
in which we have forgotten the
meaning of anarchy and
tyranny?
I do not claim to know the
answers to these and numerous
other questions, but there is one
thing of which I am certain.
/I*. ,'W , * V/ / *i

America is and always has been a
great nation. True, it may have
its faults like any system, but it
has served us well and deserves
more respect than it has been
receiving.
Maybe Im strange, but I do
feel a sense of loyalty to my
country and because of this Im
scared, for at no time in the
history of our society has its
very existence been threatened
more than at the present. The
danger internal strife.

America is and always has been a great nation. True, it
may have its faults like any system, but it has served us well
and deserves more respect than it has been receiving. Maybe
Im strange, but I do feel a sense of loyalty to my country
and because of this Vm scared, for at no time in the history
of our society has its very existence been threatened more
than at the present.

Khrushchev said our
grandchildren would grow up
under communism, and its
beginning to take shape without
their ever firing a shot.
There are those of us who
claim that America is a society
of capitalistic pigs whose sole
ambition is the accumulation of
wealth, whose so-called
democracy is in reality nothing
more than an oligarchy
I ask them, have you got a
better system than our
democracy which gives the
commoner an equal vote with
the aristocrat? If not, then why
dont you cease your destruction
until you do.
Dont destroy our
bread-and-butter and leave us
with nothing but crumbs. Who
knows, you might get hungry
some day and good old Uncle
Sam might not be around to
feed you.
~. These individuals are not


Wednesday, March 4,1970, The Florida Allijrtor,

Is the question How do we lower the crime rate
in the U.S.? No again. The church has been
growing steadily stronger (perhaps up to 1960
anyhow) yet the crime rate has been soaring. Youd
think that if the church were doing something in
this area, the crime rate would decrease, and it
would. But the church isnt doing a thing here to
speak of.
Certainly the church (or, the body of Christ) is
not the answer to any of these questions. Is Christ
Himself the answer? No. Powerful as He is supposed
to be, all of these problems are present in critical
proportions. Either He is unwilling or unable to do
anything about them.
Neither He nor His body is the answer to any
of these questions. No, ladies and gentlemen, girls
and boys, I'm afraid the answer to these is yon and
me. Is is an adequate answer?
Will I sign my name to this? Heavens no! (If
youll pardon the expression.) Well, maybe that is a
question that Christ is the answer to. What
institution is it that makes people intolerant of
another persons ideas and is constantly trying to
make others believe what it believes by subtle and
not-so-subtle means?
What institution makes people feel guilty about
natural bodily functions (sex, to the point of
psychosis in many instances) and makes diem fear
what they dont know anything about (death and
hell an invention of the church) in order to
coerce them to believe what it advocates and to
make them give money. (Don't add to the collection
plate once and see how your conscience that the
church put there for this purpose feels.)
What institution is it that replaces open
discussion on pressing problems with a thousand
years-dead dogma? Maybe the church and Christ is
the answer to some questions.
NAME WITHHELD

seeking the freedom they profess
but rather anarchy and chaos
through the destruction of our
society. They are individuals
who are unable to compete in
our society or gain social
acceptance, and therefore turn
to movements which will give
them understanding and
acceptance.
I do not find fault with
persons of this type. My only
gripe is that they become the
prey of radical leaders bent on

destroying America. These
leaders are by no means stupid;
they are very intelligent and can
easily persuade their prey to
follow them in whatever manner
they wish. This can easily be
evidenced by the Man son case,
where a leader such as I
described led his following to do
horrible acts of violence.
I am not a right-winger, and
I dont aim this attack against
any specific organization or
persons. My only intent is to
speak out in defense of America.
When people publicly curse
George Washington and make
fun of everything else that has
been cherished by the American
people for generations, its
simple deduction to conclude
that our society is in danger.
That means its time some of the
silent majority woke up and
defended that impossible dream.
GLENN 3RYAN
r j <

Page 9



Page 10

I, Th> Florida AWpter, Hhdnwdiy, Mrch 4,1970

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COLONY SHOP
Pacemaker shows the way with navy and red. A simple
skimmer with only a gold clip and contrasting collar. Will
make any date a success. Shoes by Life Stride. Modeled by
Patty.


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Robin models the modem version of the traditional
Vone-piece." A new cut-out in black by "Sirena" with the
rings of brass on the sides and the "connector" for front
piecft... a greet new splash in swimwear.
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Covered up and yet not. This cotton crocheted dress is the
nude-look yet mysteriously enchanting. With a body
stocking it would be so right for lounging. A matching
swimsuit will give you the smartest beach look. If Susan
Scott doesn't have it... it isn't Modeled by Carole.
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FIGURE FAIP
Be the first spring flower when y<
white voile polka dot peignoir set
top of dacron-cotton batiste with <
white "peter pan" collar gives the
Price about $12.00. Sizes: petite,
Modeled bv Kathv.



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s 1 just the right touch.
s iPna M' and medium.

Shelly flips and flies into Spring in this gaily printed dacron
voile skirt set from Twig. The permanent pleats give the
outfit a soft, lovely look to really turn on to the season
with!
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Two versions of the jacket dress and linen look with
contrasting trim and self-covered buttons. Modeled by
Carole.
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MAAS BROTHERS
Combine a fire-engine jersey jumpsuit with a gypsy scarf
and some jangle jewelry... cause a little fire at Frolics.
Modeled by Kathy.
STAG AND DRAG
Catch glances left and right in this Arpeja dress from Stag n'
Drag. The dress features long sleeves, covered buttons down
the front, and a peek-a-boo neckline. Modeled by Pam.
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WarinMday, March 4, 070, Th> Florida ASiprtor,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 FOR SALE
: $
%x*ssv:x^w/wsv.-:
Parrot and cage for sale. 392-8266.
(A-96-4t-p).
1966 Honda so excellent condition.
Must sell- immediately. 685 or best
offer. Can be seen at 416 NE 7th St..
Lower rear apt. (A-95-st-p).
1969 HONDA C 8350. Excellent
condition, 6 months old,
color-turquoise, crash bars and helmet
included. $650 see at 423 S.E. Bth
St. Ph. 376-8470. (A-98-st-p).
10 x 47 Great Lakes mobile home. 2
bedroom, air, carpet, 6x utility
shed, shady lot. 62,195. 378-5880.
(A-98-st-p).
2 bedroom, 50x8, furnished with
central heating, air conditioning,
carpeting, 62250 or best offer.
378-8304 after 5. (A-97-st-p)
1968 Vandyke 12 x 57 central air,
two bedroom, 2 bath, like new,
graduating must sell 6700 equity &
take over payments. Call 378-6529.
(A-94-st-p).
ROTC seniors: army green and blue
uniforms for man sft+Bln tall also 2
used tires for VW (5.60x15) cheap!
call 378-5402 day or night to 9pm.
(A-97-lt-c)
Cycle, *6B. Sears 106 cc Low mileage,
excellent condition. Manual, helmet
6175 cash. Call 378-2980, after six.
(A-99-st-p).

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DmmKiw -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

.
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
Q for sale (con*cul*.> STUDENT # PHONE
Q torrent 1 dav
q wanted 2 days ADDRESS
help wanted G 3 days (*lO% discount)
Q autos 4 days (*lO% discount), Qjy STATE ZIE
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
WORDING
ll I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I'll I I I I I I I I I I I
al I I I I I I I I nr I 111 I I I I I I I I TTTTT
ai i 11 11 1 1 n 11 11 11 11 urn 1 11 1 11 itttti
4i i i i i i i i i n 11 1 11 11 11 11 11 11 1 1 n 11 ar

FOR SALE |
For sale, 1968 Yamaha 250 (yds 3)
new rear brakes, rear sprocket, rear
tire. Come by 111 N.W. 19th St. no.
11 to see. Any offer over 6325
considered. (A-95-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, 8700 6
assume balance. 863/tao. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
1967 HONDA, helmet tool kit good
shape 885 or Best offer. Raileys trt.
pk. 378-4169 after 4:30. graduating.
(A-99-4t-p).
Mobile home 10 x 51. Two bedrooms
wash AC 10 x 20 awning 82600 or
best offer. Raileys trl. pk. 378-4169.
graduating. (A-99-st-p).
Stan del amp 140 W, 2-15 JBL,
Fender Prec Bass, G retch Elec EV
Mike Jeasen spks. Will trade for cycle
or sell for cash. Call 372-8095
between 4 and 6. (A-99-st-p).
Garrard SL9S, best cartridge, base
dustcover 8125. Kenwood TK4OU,
or Doth plus records, 8275.
378-8322. (A-99-3t-p).
WINCHESTER 30-30 model 94
carbine. Great deer, wild boar, and
saddle gun. New condition shot 6
times sell for 875. Call 373-1684.
(A-99-3t-p).

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 4,1970

Page 12

VX-X-X-X-V.SVX-X-X-X-X-X-NV.N-XC^-I-X-X^V,.
FOR SALE
V
3 BR house, 2 baths, garage, 6% fha
loan, fenced yard, 3 yrs. old, 2252
N.W. 19th Lane. Maj. Bauer,
378-8007 or 392-1395. (A-99-st-p).
i FOR RENT Jj
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Sublet:* one bedroom apt. TWO
blocks from campus completely
furnished A/C 1605 N.W. 4th AVE.
Call 378-3425 after 4:00 (B-95-st-p).
Must sublet 2 rm. studio apt. 2
blocks from campus, air conditioned,
Call evenings, 373-2807. (B-98-3t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet a/c, $120.00 mo.. Cable
TV., Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W.
2nd Ave., 372-7111. (B-6t-41-C).
URGENT: Need 1 or 2 female
roomate Landmark 127: also 1 male
roommate no. 123; Call 378-5141,
3 7 8-3667 : 846.25/mo. Ask for
Barbara or Bob. (B-97-3t-p)

I Advertising I
I Majors I
The Florida Alligator,one of the leading
1 college newspapers in the nation,has 1
I been looking for you. 1
I But evidently youre hiding. 1
1 It seems you dont need the money the 1
1 job of Advertising Salesman offers. Good 1
I for you,youre one of the lucky ones. J
1 But how about the experience? Do you 1
1 already have that? 1
1 Probably not,but even if you do, 1
I experience is one commodity you can 1
1 never get enough of. And even if you 1
I dont believe that.be sure that the man
1 sitting opposite you at the interview 1
I table does. 1
1 So dont wait around for graduation.
1 Start your advertising career now,with I
The Florida Alligator.
I Where are you ? I
1 Room 330 J. Wayne Reitz Union 1

|^ tOO 0 j.
Needed 1 female roommate for V.P.
apts. $42.50/mo. Available anytime
372-9904 or 392-1107. (b-93-6t-p)
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C AH, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
furnished 3 blocks from campus.
Couple preferred, SIOO/mo., come
by before 10 PM, 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave, apt. 21. (B-95-st-p).
Two bdrm. unfurn. apt, AC
378-6190, sllO, availabe March 15.
(B-98-3t-p).
Sublease through June spacious,
partially panelled 2 bedroom apt.
central air, heat. Located near
Gainesville shpplng. center, 5 min. to
campus, $l6O mo, PHONE:
378-0795. (B-99-st-p).
For Rent, University Gardens apt.
occupancy of 4 people. Rent $45 a
month, plus utilities, call 373-1698
ask for Philip, move in mid March.
(B-99-2t-p).

| WANTED jj
COED ROOMMATE for spring
quarter. Very close to campus.
S4O/mo. Includes water. 2 bedroom
apt. Call 373-2730. (C-97-2t-p).
2 Female Roommates at starllte apts.
for spring quarter. Close to campus,
sum., & alr-cond. for only $37.50 a
month. Call 373-2925. (C-99-3t-p).
Programer wanted: Good
opportunity for ISE major to gain
business programing experience. ISE
major not required, PL/1 experience
preferred. Call Bill, 6-11 PM. Tel:
392-7512. (C-97-st-p).
Female graduate student roommate
to share two bedroom house SSO
monthly 411 NW 14th Street,
372-5409. (C-99-lt-p).
HELP! Our roommate got married.
Need a mature coed for poolside
Williamsburg Townhouse. Close to
campus. 52.50 + utilities. Call
372- (C-99-3t-p).
Must have 1 or 2 roommates before
THURSDAY or move. 2 bedroom,
42.50 per mo. Come by no. 228
Gatortown apts. before Thurs. NO
deposit. (C-99-2t-p).
2 female roommates for poolside
French Quarter apt. for spring qtr.
A/C $45/rnO. Call 378-7876 apt. 78.
(C-99-st-p).
German tutor help aged handicapped
student pass rudementary reading ex.
$4 hour, twice weekly, 8 weeks angel
Voc rehab, Wm. K. Skinner, 1533
N.W. 3rd Ave. (C-99-3t-p).
Need a ride to Miami on 18 March
after 3 or on 19 March before 12.
Also need a ride back on 29 March.
Please call Steve at 392-7127.
(C-99-2t-p).
Wanted 1 male roommate in La
Mancha, move in after 3-21, March
rent paid, damage deposit paid, Call
378-7558 or stop by office.
(C-98-st-p).
Female roommate for spring quarter.
Poolside village park apt. Call
378-3157 or come by no. 116.
(C-98-9t-p).
Male roommate for spring qtr.
University Gardens Apts. 1 bdrm.
$67.50/month. Poolside. Prefer grad,
student. 378-3767. (C-98-st-p).
1 or 2 MALE roommates needed for
2 bdrm. Summit House apt. for
spring quarter. 43.50/mo. Call
376-6361. (C-98-st-p).
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
Spring Quarter $48./mo. Village Park
Apt. 6. Call 373-1530. (C-98-st-p).
1 male roommate, apt. 1 Village
Park, V expenses, 3 78-8243.
(C-96-st-p).
3 girls need 4th in beautiful 2 bdrm.
Hawaiian Village Apt. Call 372-2949
ANYTIME. (C-96-st-p).
COED ROOMATE for spring quarter.
Very close to campus. $4Ol mo.,
includes water. 2 bedroom apt. Call
373- (C-97-2t-p)
One male roommate for 2 bdrm. apt.
3 blocks north of grad library, own
bedroom $45/mo plus utilities call
373-2795 6 to 7 PM. (C-97-st-p)
SINGLE MEN WANTED! Dating can
be fun. Tell us the type of women
you would like to meet. All matches
live in Gainesville. For Free
questionnaire and detail write:
Nationwide Dating Service, 177 10th
St., NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(C-94-7t-p).
Wanted part-time for maintenance
work inside and out. Can learn
outboard motor servicing in
mechanically Inclined. 2605 S.W.
34th St. 372-3344. (C-96-2t-p).
1 Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
apt. in sin city: air cond., pool, cable
tv; vacancy for spring qtr. call
373-1742 between 5 and 7 pm.
(C-97-st-p)
1 or 2 co-ed roommates immediately
for 2 bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Call 373-2766
(C-96-st-p).
Female roommate wanted for spring
quarter. Private bedroom in three
bedroom house, $lO9, 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. Call 373-2379. (C-96-st-p).
| HELP WANTED f
PR, MKG and ADV MAJORS Liberal
Commissions Paid for on-campus
marketing & sales promotion
program. Hours flexible. Call Fred
372-9705. (E-99-2t-p).
AUTOS ; 1
62 Ford 2dr hdt power and air good
mechanical shape go d
r*" 5 0 0 "*' 10 "- 350 <>* offer see
*g Ap) SW Av 376 8918
Porsche 912 1 966 red, tuned,
exhaust radio S3OOO Call 376-0936
evenings. 392-1360 days. (G-99-3t-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 79 $
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and
Candied 99$
Yams
GAINESVILLE MALL
Mightier Than The Sword... I
1 iS| I
I The backbone I
I of democracy I
I is an informed I
I public. I
I Contribute your I
I skills to The I
I Florida Alligator. I
I 330 Reitz Union I
-. h
BhBH 't j i*i* l **

Wednesday, March 4,1970. The Florida Alligator,

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Cawxx*x*xij.i..: bobob b oou usbwm
AUTOS I
qoobw
Austin Healy Sprite 68, excellent
condition, radio, heater, only 15,000
miles 51,300 Must sell. Call
376-0741 2032% N.W. 3rd Ave.
(G-99-st-p).
1963 Pontiac Tempest Convertible
R&H, 3-speed, new battery, tires,
smooth running, $425. Call
378-4633. (G-99-3t-p).
I PERSONAL
^w%swwwx i xww.:.w;wv
GIRLS Do you realize that
CUSTOM MADE clothes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material A design, and
feature higher quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress, Wedding
Dress, Sportswear & Bikinis by your
English dressmaker. KATHLEEN.
Phone: 378-0320. (J-95-st-p).
Come in and choose at bargain
prices: component units consoles
headphones home tape decks
clock radios TV's AM/FM
cartidge tuner cordless slicing knife
electric shavers electric heir
combs sewing machines wet suits
8 track car stereo electric
toothbrush 1228 N.E. sth Ave.
378-4186 Mon thru Sat 9-6 Frl
9-9. (J-97-2t-p)
460 a month, room 6i board*
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handcrafted
Brass and Leather Goods Pipes,
Clips, Belts, Sandals ready 4 days
from ordering lOB N.W. 7th St.
1,000 feet from The CIRCUS, open
dally except Sundays. PAX.
(J-98-st-p).
H. 21st 8., H.P. (Pam). We love yal
Boog; Terri; Trudy; Tuder; Mattl;
Munch; R.R.; Josey, Janet; Patsy, &
Jeanne. (J-99-lt-p).
Princess congratulations on being
best pledge. Im very proud of you.
Good luck as a sister. Love, Frog.
(J-99-lt-p).
Judy: You may use my charge card
for your entire wedding If you'll see
Sears bridal consultant. Be sure to
attend "Brides World Fashion Show
In Jacksonville. Love Dad.
(J-99-Bt-c).
Swettle May your SMILE always
be for me I love you and miss you as
only a flower can. Forever, love
PETUNIA. (j*99-2t-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, ana
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift ano
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wllllston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
ij LOST A FOUND |
LOST: Ladles gold Wltnaur watch
near Tlgert or Little Hall. Reward for
finder. Call 392-2814 or 372-7429.
Mrs. Teuton. (L-99-st-p).
LOST: a pair of off-green plaid slacks
and tie. Need very badly, only suit 1
have. Lost between Yullee and
library. Please call 378-8979.
(L-99-3t-p).
FOUND: 2 month old kitten around
French quarter. Owner please call
and identify. 373-1147. (L-99-3t-nc).
N.W. 13th St -Ph 372-9523 5
ITHE STERILE CUCKOO 3
PLUS CO-HIT
ROSEMARYS BABY
2 Barbara Hers hey 5
LAST SUMMER
Steve McQueen
in
THE REIVERS
mmmmmimimms
Buy a gator ad.
Well fit you in.
-IS "v. '.'i -V," -. 'v
i^ mtom -V. ; -** I v*"

Page 13


SERVICES
vxc^.;.
HOUSEWIVES: Will do Ironing In
your home and repair. One weeks
Ironing for two persons 2.50 a week.
Call before 10 o'clock p.m.
372-5269. (M-99-4t-p).
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afganlstan,
Khatnmud. Lvs London late June.
$545 fully Inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
Afternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-C)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main. St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-S9-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
COEDS: Excess Fecial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-59-c).
Pfj!lifP£J OVER
3rd WEEK
iff NOMINEES BEST
W SUPPORTING ROLES
\JJ ELLIOTT GOULD
DYAN CANNON
Â¥
Cad
y
Alice
f ACTRESS
! NOMINEE
H GOLDIE
mm in6fiD
\ian iiau Beraman
eacTug rD
Fiower GP

CA(WO c*x*:*x*:ww*NV?;Ni!ivsaw^
SERVICES j
* ,^H>ftfrfrf:^*: ; -*%*T* %%v ****-** v *-*-***** iwww; B^^
Volkswagen Parts and Services. |
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376*0701. (M-ts-57-c)
XEROX COPIES: spedizatlng in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83*14t-p).
TOPAZ
I W *7 W. IMb
ONE OF
THE YEARS
10 BEST I
DOWNTOWN TC|j||l|
wJUmammmJUm*BKn r?
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ tot4i*ri cotunai* ncruats J
ENJOY OUR NEW
ORANGE & BLUE
"GATOR" SEATS-
Spaced For Comfort
QulilliCl
L jn w. 4~ |
From the country
that gave you,
M i a woman, m |p
"INGA and Via
"i am curious
I
I Still
f > ~ ?,.L



. tno FtestUi > Water. Uhie iwhy, Ijwefc 4.1870

Page 14

School Buses Attacked By Angry White Mob

LAMAR, S.C. (UPT) A
white mob attacked three school
buses loaded with Mack children
at newly-desegregated Lamar
High School Tuesday. Patrolmen
used tear gas to rescue students
moments before the whites
overturned two of die buses.
Blue-hehneted State Highway
Patrolmen shepherded the 39
children from the buses to safety
inside die school. Several of the

Doctors Watch Heartbeat
Os Lyndon Johnson

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (UPI)
Former President Lyndon B.
Johnson suffered transient
pain** in his chest and left arm
Tuesday. Doctors watching his
every heartbeat gave him
medicine to relieve the
discomfort.
The President had a
generally good night but
continues to experience

Railway Unions Plan
Total Strike Thursday
WASHINGTON (UPI) Four shopcraft unions announced plans
Tuesday to strike die entire U. S. railway system starting Thursday,
and nothing but emergency action by Congress stood in their way.
There was no immediate White House reaction to the
announcement by William W. Winpsinger, the unions* chief spokesman
in IS months of contract negotiations with rail management that have
ended in complete deadlock.
The strike call was issued one day after U. S. District Judge Howard
F. Corcoran ruled that die unions could not strike individual railroads
as they did Jan. 31 against Union Pacific. That walkout provoked
management plans to shut down all railroads with a retaliatory
lockout of employes.
The threat of a rail shutdown was averted by court restraining
orders against selective strikes or lockouts twice extended that
finally expired with Corcorans injunction Monday against what
management terms a whipsaw strike.**
That left the unions die alternatives of appealing Corcorans ruling,
issuing no strike call or striking all the 128 major railroads which are
members of the National Labor Railway Conference.
They decided on a general strike to begin at 12:01 am. EST
Thursday, even though Winpsinger said that from the beginning we
have made it dear... that we want to avoid a nationwide strike.**
Congress was considered almost certain to vote some form of
compulsory arbitration to settle the contract dispute and end a rail
walkout, which lawmakers consider intolerable to the nations
economy.
President Nixon has no further legal recourse in the dispute.
Only the Congress can provide the remedy now,** Winpsinger told
newsmen. __
I TONIGHT I
lat the .MfcMjj. CIA I
I FREE BEER I
I The Keg will be tapped at I
7:30
I Everyone is invited to the Party. I
I Bring a date; our dance floor is I
I probably the biggest in town. I
H m ft* ft* |j|
I Pool and games for your I
I entertainment I
I Thats Tonight at the I
I CM I
|4l3^J^6tj^t^76-945^|

BLACK CHILDREN INJURED BY BROKEN GLASS

youngsters suffered eye injuries
from glass flying from breaking
bus windows.
Gw. Robert E. McNair
termed the attacks
unspeakable and said they
resulted from segregation forces
urging defiance of the law. The
school was dosed. McNair
alerted the National Guard.
The violence was the worst
reported in the South since the

discomfort in his aim and
chest, Tom Johnson, the
former Presidents executive
assistant, told a medical briefing.
The President experienced
some discomfort in his arm at 2
a. m., the aide said.
Lt. Col. Robert L. North,
chief heart specialist at Brooke
General Hospital, diagnosed the
discomfort as transient pains

region began complying in
January with federal court
orders for total desegregation.
Darlington County, which
indudes Lamar, was the second
South Carolina county placed
under such an order.
A mob of 150 white men and
women gathered in front of
Lamar High, a formerly all-white
school that recently received
300 blades. They were led by

not connected with the chest
pains that sent the 36th U. S.
President to the army hospital
Monday.
Our main concern in our
current treatment is to try and
prevent a heart attack, North
said. This is the thrust of our
treatment.
These current pains do no
permanent damage to the heart
We dont have a bleak outlook.
In fact, we are very optimistic.
Os course, no one has tile power
of clairvoyance.
North said Johnson was given
quinine sulphate and warfarin to
relieve his discomfort. The first
drug used to reduce chest pains
and the second is an
anticoagulant.
The 61-year-old former
President was given x-rays and
constant electrocardiograms
today. All were within normal
limits, said his aide.
North said Johnsons weight
of 217 was within the normal
limits for his age and height.
Johnsons wife, Lady Bird, his
companion for 35 years, was at
his bedside in their seventh floor
hospital suite.
Brig. Gen. William H.
Moncrief, commander of Brooke
General, said the discrepancies
in Johnsons heartbeat that
forced his hospitalization still
were evident.
psi
RSNCHO |
C Mexican a
§ Rods
j OEE/J
I 7ree|
8 BEER! s
W,TH, F. K
3-spm §
With Any y
!>d Food Purchase a
$
£ Froo Delivery
S/ 5-9 pm X
\ Sun. Fri. £
J 376-8416 y

restaurant owner Jeryl Best,
head of the Darlington County
*Freedom-of-Choice
Committee,** which has urged all
whites to boycott the countys
schools.
The first bus to arrive,
carrying four blade children, was
pelted by Macks but officers
were able to get the students out
unharmed.
A second bus, carrying 20
black students, arrived minutes
later. Members of the mob
jumped on its hood and
snatched off its distributor cap,
forcing it to a halt. The mob
surged forward and smashed the
windows with ax handles and
brides.
w
Excellence in Food

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
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1 STARKE 0 1 FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
Hk iMk
r ; : .3£-8K: :
FROLICS '^'
DONIGAN'S
1123 W. Univ. 372-0472
N r WVIIBWWh~Ti *r IMWHW 'WHOWE* 'MWiiiWSBBIBgMMM

,A third bus, carrying io
blades, then pulled up, and the
mob attacked it, fighting
simultaneously with highway
patrolmen trying to protect the
buses.
The mob pulled away from
the buses only after patrolmen
opened up with tear gas. The gas
swirled a few minutes around
the buses as the black children
remained inside.
Patrolmen then escorted the
students inside the school while
the mob shouted epithets.
Moments later the crowd surged
again upon the buses and
succeeded in turning two of
them over.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211 r
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins



- ;' f .v si y* [** £ r 3j **** 4*. *+ *' *v t
1 .....
dip
<-
We care.
Nothing* happens in a vacuum. Every time you add another
building to a citys environment, that environment changes a little.
We think all businessmen have an obligation to make sure
that change is for the better.
Before we began designing The Place we asked a lot of
questions... of ourselves, of our neighbors, and of our prospective
tenants. We found out what kind of living space students really wanted;
and we found out what our neighbors didnt want next door. Only
when we had those answers did we go to the drawing board.
The result is a totally new concept in apartment buildings,
planned to meet the needs of the people who will live in, and near,
The Place. We are casting those plans in glass and stone and wood
today... and were doing it with quality materials to ensure you
wont be looking at an eyesore ten years from now.
The Place will provide quiet, private and convenient living space
for University of Florida students. The complex will be managed by
a highly trained team of local residents who care as much about your
needs as our balance sheet. We think the combination is unbeatable.
After all, if we dont bother to care about our neighbors, how
can we expect our neighbors to care about us?
Now under construction mU 4.
,3rdandl3,h H PlflCCj
Just like you
planned it
r- | j

Wednesday, March 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



The
Florida I
Alligator j
i

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entartainment Editor
College students in many
parts of the country have been
making their own films since the
mid-Fifties but people in places
like this haven't seen much of
their work.
Some places now underway
by the Films Classics Committee
could change all that. They're
working to get student films aired
one night a week in some
auditorium on campus.

: BESTSELLER :
*
* (Compitad by Publishers' Weakly) +
* Fiction £
THE GODFATHER. Mario
Puzo
THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS
WOMAN John Fowles
FIRE FROM HEAVEN Mary
Renault
THE INHERITORS Harold
Robbins
THE HOUSE ON THE STRAND
Daphne du Maurier
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT
Jimmy Breslin
THE SEVEN MINUTES Irving
Wallace
IN THIS HOUSE OF BREDE
Rumer Godden
PUPPET ON A CHAIN
Alistair Mac Lean
TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT
Graham Greene
Nonfiction
THE SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinnis
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
PRESENT AT THE CREATION
Dean Acheson
THE PETER PRINCIPLE
Laurence J. Peter and
Raymond Hull
AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGUSH LANGUAGE
William Morris, editor-in-chief
THE GRAHAM KERR
COOKBOOK Galloping
Gourmet
AMBASSADOR'S JOURNAL
John K. Galbraith
THE COLLAPSE OF THE
THIRD REPUBLIC
William L. Shirer
PRIME TIME Alexander
Kendrick
IN SOMEONES SHADOW
Rod McKuen

Prose and Poetry
jHr. iatorence Jpetricfe
on fofjn Cage
J " > ; *
Poetry and Recordings
Thursday March 5 4:00 PM
Lounge 122 & 123, Union
Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union
J.. - - - - -

B ; : V
L flu m IL* MM m mm IhIHEs afl is

HP flflfli fll flp BK H m&mlm mm
fir BIK HR aSe as 1 MKWB- ag
r XI H -T 'a 9K M. UK -t KK- '! MB'.
K KK. W mbMBI .S; - M.gBftiSK:IMHBMK S':<:v'w:vS:vK-:v:B:Vv:B'vn:B:B:W:V:B-Bv:v:B:-Kv:a;

A Light In The Wilderness

It's hard for a student to work
in films if he doesn't have the
opportunity to view the
experiments in craft that other
students elsewhere are doing so
maybe if we get these young
filmmakers' work on the screen
here, well have some of our own
to show soon too.
One of die members of the
Film Classics Committee whos
working the hardest to get
student films here is John
Haviland, a young student who
is a filmmaker himself as well as
being an official of the Classics
Committee. He says there are a
lot of problems cropping up.'
'The main hitch is in getting
the films from the campuses,"
Haviland said the other night.
We can easily get the
anthology-type of student films
(like Genesis I and II), but we
also would like to get some work
of the others whose work never
ends up in the collections."
The anthology-type
collections he referred to accepts
films made by students in the
main film centers and then
groups them together on one
reel with titles. The main
problem with anthologies is that
they are forced, by concerns for
commercial success, to include
some films that don't have the
impact of some others because
the others might not sell as well.
So, often (as with Genesis
series), there are some fine films
in the collection but there also is
some real crap.
We would like to direct this
thing toward films that would be
entertaining as well as
instructional and helpful few the
young filmmakers or aspiring
filmmakers here," Haviland said.
We like the humorous films as
weO as anyone, but we'd like to
put as much stress as we can on
finding films that can be studied
for their technique. By watching
the way other young filmmakers
have solved their problems, we
can learn a lot about how to
solve ours," he said.
The main problem that faces
young filmmakers, regardless of
where they live, is a lack of
money and equipment. Most of
the young experimenters can't
affoid to make movies much
longer than five or ten minutes.
A film even that long can cost
SIOO if a final print is pulled
with an optical sound track on
it. That's for black and white,
too.

STUDENT FILMS MAY BE COMING

One problem that we forsee
in getting the films is finding
people who have more than one
print of their films so they dont
feel afraid of letting it out of
their hands, Haviland said. In
most of the real centers like
Berkeley and UCLA and New
York University, though, they
are so advanced that it ought to
be a lot easier to get films for
them, he said.
Unlike the University of
Florida, many schools in
California and New York and
some places in between have
their own creative film
departments, places where you
can learn to be a filmmaker rite
same way the Dept, of
Chemistry can teach you to be a
chemist here. And there arent
any real equipment problems at
many of the places either.
Berkeley, for instance, has more
than a few topflight cameras, a
supply of film processing
equipment, editing equipment,
etc., and the work the kids out
there turn out shows the
importance of giving the student
filmmakers tools and
guidance.
Os course we don't
hope to work any miracles, we
can't hope to get the school to
get behind a filmmaking
program with money and
cameras and everything, but we
do hope that by showing some
of these new films here that
people will get more and more
interested in doing the same
kind of thing themselves,"
Haviland said. And if theres a
real demand for a film program,
there maybe could be one here
in a few years," he said.
The young filmmaker said he
MustangJ^.
MOBILE HOMESmcK
1970
ALTAI R
43X12
FRONT KITCHEN
DELUXE APPLIANCES
3695.00
4820 N.W. 13th St. 378-1346
ACROSS FROM GAINESVILLE
LIVESTOCK MARKET

Page 16

and the others on the Film
Classics Committee hope that
the weekly night of student
films will attract about 50
people who are really interested.

GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
Were the students friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 So. Mali Pliok 376-7771
A Deal ... I
I Its A MEAL! I
I Its Now Serving I
I Only QJL £££ I
I
I (Sorry, no toko our services or discounts I
I at this low, low price) 1
I WEDNESDAY THURSDAY I
1 Baked Mackerel Loaf Fricassee Chicken I
I Veal Parmagiana and Noodles
I Fried Chicken Beef Roll & Onion Gravy B
I Chopped Sirloin Fried Chicken I
Chopped Sirloin
I FRIDAY Large Selection of I
| Roast Turkey I
I Fried Cod Fish Homemade Pastries 1
8 Fried Chicken 11
8 Chopped Sirloin lOy endup 8
fl Entrees Served With fl
I Choice of Potatoes, Rice or Vegetable fl
1 Choice of Special Salads of The Day 8
8 (Free Dressing) fl
1 Hot Roll or Muffin 8
8 Iced Tea or Coffee (Free Seconds) 8
A' la Carte Special All This Week
8 Lunch and DinnerMon. thru Fri.
U. S. Choice a
I Roast Beef 07 I
I SELF SERVICE h Q TIPPING I
I I
I downtown I
Clov-'d
I PLENTY OF PRtt REAR |

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday. March 4,1970

Working with Heib Ellis,
another Film Classics Committee
member, Haviland recently
completed shooting for a short
film on the Mardi Gras.
AUTO GUSS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
ciaimS for cars, trucks and
buses.



Frolics Entertainment
Varied And Impressive

Johnny Rivers is top billed
on the program for the
Interfratemity Councils Winter
Frolics this Friday night and the
long list of popular hits hes had
makes his position there
unquestionable.
TELEVISION
NOTES
NEW YORK (UPI) The
Blythe Danner you will see in
To Confuse the Angel,
original video drama by Loring
Mandel, starring Lee J. Cobb, on
NBC March 15, is the doll who
has captivated critics and
audiences this season in
Broadways Butterflies Are
Free, Dont miss her.
* *
Ed Sullivans March 29
program on CBS will be a filmed
record of visits he and several
performers will make to
entertain wounded Vietnam
veterans in Army hospitals in
Denver and San Antonio.
Involved are Flip Wilson, Bobbie
Gentry, Buck Owens, David
Frye, Nancy Ames, and Gladys
Knight and the Pips.
* *
Dean Martins summer
replacement on NBC again will
be a Dean Martin Presents the
Golddiggers series, but this
time the shows will be produced
in London, utilizing European
guest stars. Os course, there is
nothing new about this; for
several seasons, various summer
replacement shows for U.S.
television have been done in this
manner. Americas Charles
Nelson Reilly will be a regular
on the series.
a John Roberts
class ring from.
8 So. Main St.
L Qainesville, Florida

But the second-billed group,
Sweetwater, is bound to produce
some topflight entertainment
and they shouldnt be
overlooked. Neither should the
third-billed group, Celebration.
Theyre dynamite too.
Sweetwater is a hard rock
group that gets incredibly soft at
times and does a good variety of
material that should please
nearly everyone. The sound
Sweetwater produces is fresh
and dean and very musical.
The group has several lead
singers and features instrumental
work that includes the use of a
flute and an electrically
amplified cello and and violin.
The group also has a electric lead
guitar and an electric bass.
As the list of instruments
would indicate, Sweetwater has
been influenced greatly by the
traditions of classical music and
several members of the group
have backgrounds involved with
classical music.
But the sound is hard rode all
the way. A song the group

THE NEW BUSH JACKET
COMES IN BONE, GOLD AND NAVY. FABRIC IS
65% DACRON 45% COTTON. SWASHINBUCKLING
gook looks, a trim BELTED FIT, voluminous pockets,
easy washability. SIZES, S, M, L. 1A
)SHOP\
208 W. Univ. Ave.
ACROSS THE STREET FROM SILVERMAN'S

recorded on an album for
Reprise and one that has become
the groups best known tune is
Motherless Child, a traditional
folk-type tune adapted to rock.
The group has real power and
that power is evident in
Motherless Child.
Celebration is a rock group
with some members who live in
town and attend the university.
The group originally was formed
in Miami and played in the
Miami area extensively one
summer before coming to
Gainesville.
The group has a truly
professional lead guitarist with
many strengths and a terrific
stage presence. Vocally, the
group features a chick lead
singer who is tops, too. The
group is together and they work
well. Most of what they now do
is original material, too, and its
good original material.
Tickets are priced at $5.50 a
couple and on sale at several
locations. There will be two
shows, at 7:30 and 10:30 pjn.

£ SELLING OUT ENTIRE
STOCK OF TRADITIONAL
SUITS, SPORTCOATS.
SUITS
VALUES TO 65.00
SOME WITH VESTS.
25 00
SPORTCOATS
VALUES TO 45.00
20 00
ODD AND END GROUP
SWEATERS
s
Pullover, Cardigan and
Turtleneck. S,M,L
Largest Selection in size small.
SLACKS
2 pr 10
EA. 5.99
DRESS SHIRTS ODD AND END GROUP
Traditional button SPORTCOATS
down collars JACKETS 00
REDUCEDI LEISURE £>
1/ COATS 60
jfrpicE -
ODD AND END SELECTION
Values to 35.00
SPORTCOATS 10 00
YOUNG AMERICAN SHOP
208 W. UNIV. AVE.
ALL SALES FINAL No Exdwnfos, No Refunds
hi ii.mi TiTm i

WMdnwdey, March 4,1870, Ttw FKwfcto Alllg^or,

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator j

UF WRESTLERS PARTICIPATE IN SEC MEET
'A Bottom

By DOUG OLANDER
Alligator Correspondent
The UF will send a team to
the Southeastern Conference
Wrestling Championships for the
first time this coming weekend,
but it will be a fight to stay off
the bottom, said coach Keith
Tennant.
MS
M .Jm
- j^pp
Hft f
m f
:.-;i s W*mm M
.Jr
Jj ,'.
KEITH TENNANT
... 'lack of depth"
F # ft |
j|j| S
*r\>& i
jfl
it *&.-,> jMrapy '.
TOM DERROUGH
won ibsc Wwvi\

Baseball Team Plays
South Florida Today
By NICK CAIN
Alligator Sports Writer
The Gators will meet a much improved South Florida team this
afternoon at 3 on Perry Field, with UF Coach Dave Fuller again
planning to use three pitchers.
UF won their opener against Stetson on Friday but were beaten by
the Hatters on Saturday in Deland.
South Florida comes into the game from a victory over Florida
Southern last Friday.
South Florida had a potentially good pitching staff and defensive
team last year, said Fuller. And they have almost the entire team
from last year returning.
Fuller plans to pitch Wayne Rogers, Walter Gardner, and Glen
Pickren. Rogers pitched three no-hit innings in Fridays game.
The Gators will then travel to Miami on Friday to meet the
Hurricanes.

HIGH-DRY
1 PLACE TO BE
-Z*''
HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
APTS 378-5905
ONLY
5 APTS. LEFT ;
2 BR OR 1 BB 829 SQ. FT
150.00 UNF
| 175 00 FUR AS IBR
185 00 FUR-AS-? BR
PEC-HAUL. POOL 1
L AUNDRY, KIDDIE POOL
MAID SERVICE
H OTPQ! NT APPLIANCE
- - -

f- * I. * %

After placing third in the
All-Florida Wrestling
Tournament Saturday, the
Gators will be making what
Tennant calls a good trip for
experience, when they travel to
Auburn, Ala. to participate in
the SEC tournament.
WeVe been hurt most by not
having a lot of depth, especially
wem- a.*"
mmem ; c
I^l,lfJP
s', /# S
" . yM&mUF saMiM
: W9k
JEFF SHAFFNER
.158-pound class
w' *W Wm
9 l|
K jSj
SILL READ
... "not enough individuals"

Good Food at
Roasonable Prices...
Breakfast Anytime!
OPEN 24 HOURS
Carry Out Closed:
Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133

after having suffered a number
of key injuries, said Tennant.
Despite this lack of depth
which cost us the (All-Florida)
meet this weekend Tennant
was quick to mention four Gator
wrestlers as best bets this
weekend. He named Bill Read,
who wrestles in the 134-pound
division, John Barres (142) Tom
Derrough (150) and Jeff
Shaffner(ls).
Read agreed with Tennant
that the Gators still havent got
the depth to win the
conference crown this year.
Weve got individuals who
can take first this year, but not
enough to place very high in the
meet, Read indicated.
Barres puts UFs chances at
winning this weekend as not
much.
But this is the first year UF
has had a varsity wrestling team
and most of its SEC competitors
- Auburn, Alabama, LSU,
Georgia and Tennessee have
a pretty good jump on us, said
Tennant. He cited Auburn with
a wrestling team for 24 years as
an example.
For a first-year varsity were
doing at least average, maybe a
little better, Tennant
explained.
Weve done real well, said
Read. Weve got individuals
who rank among tfye best.
Tennant, in his 12th year in
wrestling, has never wrestled on
a college varsity team, (having
graduated from UF before it had
a team) though he was taught by
an Olympic wrestler for two
years.
He has done some recruiting
and is going after a couple of
blue-chippers, who he hopes to
sign next month.
Under SEC rules, the UF can
offer only four wrestling
scholarships next year, so depth
may stiD be a problem. There
should be more money for die
teams travel expenses, at least, a
problem which Read says has
been a prohibitive factor in
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I'BECK" RECHTHI n 373 1 o') c

Page 18

wrestling opportunities this year.
If our program continues to
grow as it has this year we ought
to produce a (SEC) winner in
three or four years, according
to Tennant.
We could win a conference
championship in three years
sure, Read added.
ITIAipPHS §
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M lf 01 SUMMERls^^nSPb
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wlj AT SOUTHAMPTON!
S Students at Southampton College are i§S
encouraged to actively support and participate |
in any positive new effort which seeks to improve M
things in this wobbly world. ff
Of course, Southampton, with its delightful summer Ik
JPp climate, offers countless opportunities for |||
lighter types of involvement, too ... like
beaches... boating... g01f... theatres... Jr
If art colonies... and other activities which make II
ft Southampton a synonym for what summer m
1L should be all about.
This summer... be where it is.
Southampton College.
June 22-July 24 IN SCULPTURE, CERAMICS, 1
# July 27 AIIOUSt 28 PAINTING AND FILMS I
lit Concerts and lectures will If
% ACCREDITED UNDERGRADUATE be given by resident musi- I
1 COURSES IN HUMANITIES*SCIENCE cians and visitino exnrK &
,JF SOCIAL SCIENCE MARINE SCI- accommodatTon.;
% ENCE EDUCATION plus limited grad- 4
fl uate offerings. Courses are open to are available for students in $|
It visiting students who are In good academic courses and work- ||
standing at their own college. shops.
Director of the Summer Program,
SOUTHAMPTON'
COLLEGE i
LONO ISLAND UNIVERSITY j
Southampton, N.Y. 11968 (516) AT 3-4000
Please send me Summer Program bulletin. j
lam interested in Ist session 2nd session
I attend I
College Year Major j
Name j
Address |
_Crty_ State Zip j

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 4,1970

The enthusiasm of Banes,
while optimistic, is a bit more
guarded.
We have a good chance to
win an SEC championship in the
near future, he said, but it all
depends on how much support
we can get from the school
and the students.
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gjhflpo LESSONS AVAILABLE
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3V, Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721



SWIM TOURNEY THURSDAY

Freshmen Hold Key To SEC

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
When the UF tankers open
their assault on the Southeastern
Conference swimming
championship Tuesday, two of
the Gators most counted upon
will be freshmen who have made
a name for themselves on the
Florida squad.
Gary Chelosky, from
Claymont, Del., and Pete
Orscheidt from Baltimore, Md.,
will lead a fired-up Gator team
against the University of
Tennessee, the defending
champions.
For Chelosky this year has
meant one thing consistent
and dramatic improvement. The
high school All-American came
to the UF as a top breaststroker
and medleyist.
His times have consistently
dropped all year and he has now
broken the varsity and freshman
records in both breaststroke
events. He is on the verge of
taking the 200-yard medley
record, as he has qualified for
the NCAA championships in all
three of these events.
The year has not been quite as
bright for Orscheidt. After a
slow start this year the Gator
distance specialist left school
following tih loss to Tennessee
in Knoxville.
1 guess I was a little
homesick, Orscheidt explained.
Tm not sure that I intended to
leave school for good but 1 did
get all uptight at the time.
Orscheidt was away from school
for a week.
Since those precarious days in
January, Orscheidt has come on
to break the Gator records in the
mile and says I wouldnt leave
for anything now.
His time in the mile is 17:38
which is 11 seconds better than
Bmce Williams* old record.
Orscheidt swam a 17:10 in high
school and feels he can reach the

Cepecfa, Castiglione
Sign 1970 Contracts
WEST PALM BEACH (UPI) First baseman Orlando Cepeda and
rookie pitcher Bob Castiglione agreed to sign their 1970 contracts
with the Atlanta Braves Tuesday.
Cepeda, who reportedly was holding out for $90,000, signed for
about the same salary he earned last year 583,000. He batted .257
with 22 homers and 88 RBls while helping the Braves win the
National Leagues Western Division crown last season.
The Braves have now signed all their players for this season.
We talked for about 10 minutes on the phone, said Braves
Vice-President Paul Richards, who called the missing first baseman at
Cepedas home in Puerto Rico. Were happy about it and I hope
Cepeda is. Cepeda is due to arrive in camp Wednesday or Thursday.
Meanwhile, Felix Millan knocked in three runs to highlight a Braves
intrasquad game. Millan signaled with the bases loaded and delivered
another with a sacrifice fly as the Braves regulars beat a team of
reserves and rookies, 5-1.

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
( |siitii;kii fried Aicken )
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PETE ORSCHEIDT
... came on strong
17:05 time needed to qualify for
the NCAAs.
I was tired the entire swim
when I broke the record gn*
FSU, claims Orscheidt. Weve
been working hard all year and
have yet to be tapered off.
A swimmer will not swim his
best time while still tired from
heavy workouts. Tapering is a
process of slowly resting a
swimmer before a big meet.
Most of the Gators have been
tapered off for the SEC meet
while the ones who will go to
the NCAAs will not be tapered
until that week.
Both Cheslosky and Orscheidt
give most of the credit for their
success to Coach Bill Harland
and Coach Eddie Reese. The
workouts here are great, said
Orscheidt. We swim a lot more
yards here than we did in high
school and we have a different
workout every day. The Gators
swim two to three miles a day.
Chelosky feels the Gators
have a more complete workout
program than most schools. We
swim five or six times a week as
opposed to the four times a
week I used to swim in high
school. We also work with
weights and pullies. These are
the reasons my times have
dropped so consistently.

jfl Ipi
I m:- ''
GARY CHELOSKY
... dramatic improvamant
Cheslosky is not far from the
big time. He believes he can
bring his 200-yard breaststroke
time down from 2:12 to 2:10 by
the NCAAs. A 2:08.5 won the
event last year in the NCAAs.
Although a 2:06 has already
been recorded this year,
Chelosky ranks sixth in the
country in the event.
The top 12 swimmers in each
event in the NCAAs are
considered All-Americans.
Both swimmers are on sound
footing in school. Chelosky has a
3.0 average in pre-dental and
Orscheidt is back on his feet
after a shaky first quarter.
Orscheidt has not yet
determined his major.
The two out-of-state
swimmers say that UFs
recruiting advantages are the
good weather and the fine
coaches. Florida now has a
number of northern swimmers
and the number should increase
in the future.
There is one topic on
everyones mind at Florida Pool
and that is dethroning Tennessee
in the SEC championships.
Florida has a great chance of
winning the championship, said
Orscheidt.
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r INTRAMURALS
DUs Win
STEVE ROHAN I
DELTA UPSILON defeated Chi Phi in the handball semifinals and
now face Kappa Alpha in what appears to be a last ditch effort to stop
the Chi Phis from winning the Blue League Presidents Cup.
KA stopped Theta Chi to move into the semis and just about ruined
any hopes the Theta Chis ever had of catching the Chi Phis.
The Chi Phis now have a league leading total of 690 points.
GOLF NEXT quarter will be played on a different format. Instead
of single elimination as in the past, there will be a big tournament
with entry points going to those who attend and victory points to the
top finishers in each league.
IN THE ORANGE LEAGUE, league leading Beta Theta Pi still
hanging on to its thin advantage, was beaten as expected by the Pikes
in the second round of the handball tournament.
Last (dace Phi Delt puHed the upset of the year when they defeated
the ATOs in the quarter finals Monday. The ATOs were expected to
go to the finals against the Pikes.
THERE IS A softball officials meeting Thursday March 12 at 7
p. m. in room 216 Fla Gym. All prospective officials are expected to
attend.
ALL UF STUDENTS are reminded that to enter Florida Pool they
must present a picture ID and a valid current fee card. The weather is
warming up and it is expected there will be a large turnout at the pool
daily and on Sundays.
ms All l3", 14", & 15" thru Size 775
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-- "-* : r U

VMnaday, March 4,1970, The Florida Algator,

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 4,1970

ATLANTA (UPI)
Record-scoring Pete Maravich of
Louisiana State, in what should
certainly come as a surprise to

m ' .vJPm
WTMJgm *.
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pR .... .wvtw
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Rr" .>
PHIL BANNISTER
PETE MARAVICH IN CLASH WITH GATORS
... also named to UPI All-SEC basketball team
Shula Names Taseff
As Assistant Coach
MIAMI (UPI) Carl Taseff, a teammate of new Miami coach Don
Shula in college and professional ball, has been named by Shula an
assistant Dolphin coach.
Shula said Monday that Taseff, a native of Cleveland, will scout the
opponents.
Taseff played with Shula at John Carroll University. After
graduation in 1951*, they were both drafted by the Cleveland Browns.
After playing for the Browns in 1951, Taseff entered the service in
1952. He came out of the service and he and Shula were traded to the
Baltimore Colts prior to the 1953 season.
From 1953 to 1956, Shula was the right comerback and Taseff the
left comer for the Colts.
Taseff played one year for the Buffalo Bills after leaving the Colts.
He was an assistant coach for the Boston Patriots in 1964 and for the
Detroit Lions in 1965-66.
For the past three years he has been a pro scout working for a
combine representing the New York Giants, Baltimore Colts,
Washington Redskins, Cleveland Browns, St. Louis Cardinals, Green
Bay Packers and Atlanta Falcons.
PmsH
LJ fry 41
2035 N.W. 13th St. / Gainesville. Florida / 378-2304

Pistol Pete SECs Best-Surprise

nobody, Tuesday was named the
outstanding basketball player in
the Southeastern Conference for
the third straight year.

ISSEL A TOKEN CHALLENGER

Pistol Pete received only
token opposition from
Kentuckys Dan Issel for that
honor in balloting by
sportswriters and sportscasters
from throughout the Southeast.
No one else was even nominated.
Maravich and Issel were both
unanimous picks for the 1970
United Press International
All-Southeastern Conference
basketball team named Tuesday.
Selected with them were Bob
Lienhard of Georgia, John
Mengelt of Auburn and Mike
Pratt of Kentucky.
Maravich, a leading candidate
for the Neismith Trophy which
goes to the national player of
the year, has been in a class by
himself when it comes to
scoring.
Climbing from a then-NCAA
record 43.8 PPG as a sophomore
in 1967-68 to 44.2 PPG last year
and to 46.5 PPG so far this
season, Maravich has established
himself as the most prolific
scorer in the history of the
game.
The 6-foot-5, floppy-socked

pra
Ift MR. ANTHONYS ORIGINALS II

senior from Baton Rouge, La., is
as phenomenal a ball-handler as
he is a shooter, leading the SEC
in assists. It was his personal
drawing power that persuaded
the National Invitation
Tournament to extend an early
bidtoLSU.
Issel, a 6-foot-8, 237-pound
senior from Batavia, 111., has
averaged 34.3 points per game
higher than everyone in the SEC
but Maravich while leading the
high-ranking Wildcats to their
25th league title and another
NCAA playoff berth.
This was the third straight
time that Maravich had been
named to the UPI All-SEC team.
It was the second time for Issel
and Lienhard, a 6-foot-11 senior
from the Bronx, who were both
second-team selections as
sophomores.
Mengelt, a 6-2 junior from
Elwood, Ind., averaging 27.2
PPG, and Pratt, a 64 senior
from Dayton, Ohio, were on last
years second team.
This years All-SEC starting
five, four seniors and one junior,

average 6-foot-6, are mainly
Yankees and, as a unit, are
averaging 149 PPG.
Floridas Andy Owens, a
6-foot-S senior from Tampa,
Fla., who has been averaging
26.7 PPG for a losing club, is the
only other SEC performer who
challenged the All-Conference
five for a spot on die UPI team.
Pratt edged Owens by only
four points, 108-104, for the
fifth spot. No one else was even
close.
With Owens on the- second
team are seniors Perry Wallace of
Vanderbilt, Bobby Croft of
Tennessee and Ron Coleman of
Ole Miss and junior Jimmy
England of Tennessee.
The third team: sophomore
Jimmy Hollon of Alabama,
'senior Jerry Epling of Georgia
and juniors Larry Steele of
Kentucky, Thorpe Weber of
Vanderbilt and Lanny Taylor of
Georgia.
Mississippi State, last-place
team in the SEC, is the only
team without a player on the
15-man All-Star squad.
\