Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
$124,000 Wauburg Development Plan Released

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Assignments Editor
A $124,000 Phase One plan for Camp Wauburg calling for, among
other things, partial construction of a $105,000 open pavilion, was
released Friday by the Wauburg committee.
Included in the initial proposed costs are SIO,IOO for swimming
docks; $5,800 for boat docks; $7,550 for boat storage; and $2,000 for
a gate house,.
In addition, the plan calls for spending $14,800 for a maintenance
shed.
Not included in Phase One, but a distinct possibility, is an
olympic-sized pool for Camp Wauburg, at an estimated cost of
$200,000.
Sources indicate the pool would become necessary for swimming if
Wauburg gets too polluted. The lake would then be used only for
boating and skiing.
However, two olympic-sized pools are already funded and slated to
be built on campus soon; construction has been held up for some time
by jjrocedural delays.
Wauburgs nine-mile distance from campus is considered a
prohibitive factor in student use of the lake, though it is possible a bus
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

vAff vAmmioh

VoL 62, No. 98,

Senate Avoids
Budget Issue,
Wauburg Plan
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Writer
The Student Senate will
manage to avoid two of its most
controversial problems Lake
Wauburg and the budget law
for the immediate future
tonight.
The proposed Wauburg
renovations will be set aside
temporarily while she or seven
senators to be named by Senate
Chairman Jack Vaughn study
the problem with the Wauburg
Committee. The senators will
then submit their findings in
individual reports to the senate,
according to Ralph Nobo,
Chairman of the Judiciary
Committee.
Meanwhile, the new budget
preparation law, passed by the
senate Thursday, will lie
dormant depending on whether
its signed or vetoed by Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd.
Shepherd has indicated he will
veto the bill if it is passed.
(SEE 'WAUBURG' PAGE 3)
MMIBI
9i
CARLOS ALVAREZ has
been named to the
Academic All-America
football team page 14
Classifieds 10
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies .* 10
Orange and Rue .12
Sports 13


The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

L M WBk | lnfiii
~*'
W FOR
I
K Si4 t
JrrPF I 9 i\f\ if | \ j
V I i l{jM|
PHIL BANNISTER
BEST PROF
Today is the last day to cast your ballot in the IFC election for the
most outstanding professor awards. These students are making sure
that they have the opportunity to vote for the professor they consider
most worthy of this honor. You may vote today for the last time at
several places around campus.

MEETING FRIDAY

Workers Union Visualized

BySUECUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
An international organizer of the AFL-CIO will
meet Friday with concerned students, members of
the Black Student Union and non-academic workers
on campus to discuss the possibility of forming a
union for the workers.
The idea started when John McLaughlin, a senior
in philosophy, had a talk with the cook in his
fraternity house. The cook told him he was
depressed because of his small salary and because he
is getting old and has not retirement pension
forihoomiiig.
McLaughlin told the cook he wasted to hdp,

FOR LAKE'S SOUTHERN SHORE

The University of Florida, Gainesville

WILL THERE BE RECREATION ACROSS THE LAKE?
.. dosed Camp Wauburg awaits decisions on future construction

within a week the cook said he'd met with other
cooks with the same problem and theyd elected
McLaughlin as their representative in trying to form
a union.
Val Cox, an international organizer for the
AFL-CIO and Jack Harris, a local AFL-CIO
representative, have also met with McLaughlin and
the workers to plan further meetings and action.
Cox and Harris will be present at the 3:30 p. m.
meeting Friday at the Rath&eller.
McLaughlin said the meeting hopefully will
attract students interested in the workers cause. An
April 4 meeting at the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church in
Gainesville, is being planned where more concrete
plans concerning a union will be conodesed.

BY POSTMASTER

YSA Denied
Mail Delivery

See Editorial Page 8
By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Campus Postmaster S. E.
Golden has refused to deliver
letters deposited in a campus
mailbox for the Young Socialist
Alliance by the Student Peace
Union (SPU) and under SPUs
sponsorship.
SPU is a recognized student
organization. YSA has been
denied permission to apply for
recognition by UF Vice
President for Student Affairs
Lester L. Hale.
The letters were sent to
recognized campus organizations
asking them to write UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale and ask that
YSA be allowed to form a
campus organization.
Golden returned about 50
letters to John Sugg, YSA
member and SPU president, with
a letter stating the campus mail
service is authorized and
operated for the exclusive

Tuesday, March 3, 1970

processing and handling of ofofficial
official ofofficial campus mail. The
returned mail is not considered
to be official campus mail.*'
Golden said the letters were
first questioned because they
were not sorted by departments
or buildings, as is required for a
mailing of 50 pieces or more.
One of the letters was then
opened to determine the sender
and the letters were returned
because they were not sent by
an official campus organization,
he said.
Sugg said the letters were
sorted according to buildings
and said he had attached a note
explaining they were being sent
by the SPU, which is an official
campus organization.
The campus postmaster has
the right to open unsealed mail,
Golden said. Any sealed piece of
mail must be taken to the
business office to be opened if
there is doubt about its
contents, he said.
He said other organizations
and some of the deans on
campus had had their mail
returned before, but he could
not dte any specific instances.
Campus Services Coordinator
Steve Johnson said violations
were not caught frequently, but
there had been others before. He
said he did not remember any
other cases of a recognized
organization sending out letters
for an unrecognized group.
There was no directive from
anyone in the administration to
stop delivery of YSA mail,
Johnson said.
The whole object, Sugg
said, is that YSA wants to
function as a truly legitimate,
above>board campus



!, Thk'PtofMa Alligator, Tiiwday, March 3,1970

Page 2

IRS Investigating 'Governors Club

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
Miami investigator said Monday
that the Internal Revenue
Service is conducting an
investigation to determine if the
Govemnors Club paid for
personal things such as
maintenance of Gov. Claude
Kirk's Palm Beach residence.
Ed Bishop, investigator for
the House Elections Committee
until Feb. 1, when funds for his

COURT RULES
Nonregistrants
Free At Age 23

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court ruled 5 to 3
Monday that youths who refuse
Senate Avoids
Budget Action
PAGE OWE^I
If the bill comes back to the
senate 1 believe there is a better
than two-thirds chance that it
will override the veto, Nobo
said.
The new Athletic Seating Act,
passed on its first reading
Thursday, is expected to meet
strong opposition when it comes
up for its second reading.
According to Nobo, a strong
minority of senators are
dissatisfied with the part of the
act establishing a spirit
section.
The section would cost
approximately 53,000 to
operate.
A constitutional amendment
providing for the names of
convicted student offenders to
be published will come up for its
first reading. It was postponed
from last Thursday when an
Honor Court officer failed to
attend.

OConnell Appoints Chairman Replacements

hK|l JB
IRVING GOFFMAN _
... new economics head

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion. w _____
i . ill IIH HWI

SIOO-a-day salary ran out,
testified under oath that the IRS
was interested in whether any of
the fund-raising clubs money
went to foot the bill for Kirks
rented weekend residence,
Ducks Nest, or other personal
expenses of the governor.
Bishop also told the Elections
Committee it should follow up
on several investigations that he
was in the midst of when funds

to register for the draft are
exempt from prosecution when
they reach their 23rd birthdays.
The government had claimed the
statute of limitations ran until
age 31.
Chief Justice Warren E.
Burger, along with Justices
Byron R. White and John M.
Harlan, disented with White
declaring from the bench the
decision represents the kind of
free-wheeling judicial authority
that courts ought to avoid.
But the majority opinion by
Justice Hugo L. Black held that
Congress had specified a
five-year statute of limitation in
the Selective Service law. This
means, Black said, that the
government must bring
prosecution between a youths
18th birthday when he is
required to register and his 23rd.
The government had claimed
that each day a youth failed to
register was a new offense which
could extend the statute of
limitations until age 31.
The ruling reversed the 1967
conviction of Robert I. Toussie
of Brooklyn, N. Y., who had
refused to register for the draft
on grounds he was a
conscientious eight years after
Toussies 18th penalty for
failure to register is five years in
proson and a SIO,OOO fine.

UF President Stephen C. OConnell has named
two university professors to replace current
department chairmen who are returning to full-time
teaching and research posts.
Dr. Irving J. Coffman will become chairman of
the Department of Economics July 1 and Dr.
Robert C. Ziller of the University of Oregon will
become psychology department chairman on Sept.
16.
Goffman replaces Dr. Clement H. Donovan and
Ziller will replace Dr. Wilse B. Webb, who

Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
Sell Trade Repair.
+ Reloading supplies. Custom M
M reloading. Harry Beekwith,
"Tgun dealer,- Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

MIAMI INVESTIGATOR TESTIFIES

were depleted.
But Bishop said he wont be
able to continue them because
he has gone to work for
Attorney General Earl Fairdoth
in his investigation of alleged
infiltration of organized crime
into legitimate businesses in
South Florida.
Earlier, the Elections
Committee heard testimony that
a SSOO contribution to the

'' M M
jB&'S: w Jph & .
Wi,. %
NICKEL VOTE
Pictures of the five lovely finalists in the Miss Seminole contest are
now on display on the first floor of the Union. Votes are five cents
apiece for each girl. The winner, Miss Seminole 1970, will be
announced on March 9.

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
E Koitidoi Triad £kiikn I
214 N.W. 13th St. m
( 376 6472 114 s.W. 34th St. J
V SSF A '372-3649 V
I EL§l dinner GOA {
| boh box vuv |
M 3 Pc. Chicken m
B Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 B
and Gravy k U
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announced his resignation last year.
Goffman, a native of Canada, has been on the UF
faculty since 1959. He is serving on the board of
editors of the Southern Economic Association and
writes numerous articles for professional journals.
Ziller has been with the University of Oregon
since 1966 where he served as newsletter editor of
the Society for Experimental Psychology,
filler is listed in Whos Who in Science.
The Board of Regents, meeting in Miami, has
approved OConnells appointments.

governor from an industrial
claims judge was referred to as a
payoff by Tom Ferguson,
former executive aide to Kirk
and one of the architects of the
Governors Club.
Ron Cole, who testified that
he later was fired as an attorney
for the governor, told the
committee he delivered a sealed
envelope, designated as being
from Judge August Fontaine of

Tallahassee, to Ferguson early
last year.
Ferguson opened the
envelope, pulled out several
piles of currency, and
commented: Well, he paid off
quicker than I thought he
would, Cole testified.
Fontaine flatly denied any
intention of a payoff, although
he said he gave SSOO in cash to
Paul Marko, executive assistant
to the chairman of the Industrial
Commission in February, 1969,
to defray some of Kirks
: expenses.
Bishop told the House
committee that:
Ferguson paid in cash, after
he left the governors employ, a
$13,000 Key Biscayne Hotel
Villas bill for Fergusons parents
that had originally been billed to
Michael ONeil, Miami, Kirks
deposed secretary of
transportation.
The Governors Club paid a
$1,068 Key Biscayne hotel bill
covering expenses of some
members of the governors staff
also marked for billing to ONeil.
Dr. Lewis Lombard, Miami
optometrist, allegedly made a
contribution to the Governors
Club on the promise that hed be
appointed to the State Board of
Optometry and his son would be
named to the board of
dispensing opticians. Only the
son received an appointment,
according to Bishop and records
of the club released by Kirk do
not include either Lombard as a
paying member.
Gerald Mager, whom Bishop
said was the man who offered
the appointment of Lombard in
return for club memberships,
swore to the committee that this
was a lie, a categorical lie.
Lloyd Hagaman, Fergusons
successor, testified that
publisher Sam Foor offered to
get 20 members for the
Governors Club in return for
the Lombard appointment and
was ordered out of the office.
Editor Selection
Prolonged
Board of Student
Publications interviews of
applications for the Alligator
editorship for the Spring
quarter were still being
conducted near midnight
Monday.
BSP members told the
Alligator that the slowness of
the interviews might preclude
a board decision until later
this week. Applicants for the
position of Managing Editor
were told earlier in the
evening their interviews
would not be conducted
Monday night.



Wauburg Plan Includes Swim, Boat Docks

service will be inaugurated.
The plan released by
Gainesville architect ... John
Puckett calls for development of
a currently undeveloped area,
the southern sector of the camp.
This 60-acre tract is directly
across the lake from the 19-acre
swimming and picnicking area
that will be scrapped if this plan
is approved.
The 19-acre area already has
access roads and two facilities, a
bath house and recreation hall.
But Student Body President
Charles Shepherd wants to
dispense with these facilities
entirely and proceed with
development on the other side
of the lake.
The existing facilities are in
need of repair, there is a
shortage of parking places and
the water on that side is too
muddy Shepherd contends.
Not everyone sees it that way.
Groundskeeper E.J. Eagle
wondered why the money
couldn't be used to rebuild or
repair the existing buildings.
I dont see why they want to
spend half a million dollars on
the other side of the lake when
this side is already landscaped
and has a road, he said.
Another possible component
of Wauburg development is
construction of a home for the
caretaker, on the south side of
the lake.
He already has a house on the
north side.
I can see this point raising
questions among members of the
senate, said Student Senate
President Jack Vaughn.
The senate will have to decide
what to do about the Wauburg
plan; it has earmarked a
$127,000 for development, but
eventual costs could ultimately
soar to $500,000.
Student Body Vice President
Walter Morgan has spoken out
against the plan, calling it the
work of one man Shepherd.
He contended Shepherd was
MINI-POSTEft
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Mon-Fri. 9am4pm Sat 10am-spm

really building a monument to
himself' which would really
cost $500,000.
After listening to the
Wauburg committee report last
Friday, Morgan told the senate
last week, 1 have concluded the
only factor whichdetermined the
cost of Phase One of the project
is that $127,000 is all we
presently have.
He said the project would not
only absorb reserve monies for
the current year, but also will
eat up all student monies for
years to come.
The Wauburg committee will
request one dollar from each
students activity fee each
quarter to buy such items as
canoes, sailboats and other
equipment not budgeted in
capital expenditures.
This source of funds would
amount to more than $60,000 a
year.
Wauburg has been in a state of
general disrepair for some time.
It is normally closed from
December to February, but this
year the committee decided not
to reopen it.

Here's what your first year
or two at IBM could be like.
You'll become involved fast.
You'll find we delegate responsi responsibilityto
bilityto responsibilityto the limit of your ability.
At IBM, you'll work individu individually
ally individually or on a small team. And be
encouraged to contribute your
own ideas. You'll advance just as
fast and far as your talents can
take you.
Here's what three recent grad graduates
uates graduates are doing.
Taylor, B.S. Electronics
Engineering '67, is already a
senior associate engineer
working in large-scale circuit
technology. Aided by computer
design, Doug is one of a five fiveman
man fiveman team designing
integrated circuits that will go
into IBM computers in the
1970'5.
He
* 1 -V"i'
a programmer training, John
Klayman, B.S. Math '6B, began
writing programs used by a
computer system to schedule
every event in the Apollo
tracking stations. And when the
finished programs were turned
over to NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center, he was responsible
for making them work.
Fprmorq information
on what IBM is like,
visit vour placement office.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM

Igjgf i : ; rm \
Jmr js i j I lh| Iff ~* ghriNw*
1 1 II WL W tr-
STUDENTS SWAM AT CAMP WAUBURG
... pools may be constructed if pollution persists

TtmriayNUrch 3,1970, Tw Florida

Page



> Th.Ftorid, Aitfter.- Tmmk*;mnka; nro

Page 4

'SHRIMP KING' BIG GATOR FAN
... comes out in support of Camigras *7O
ATTACKS AGNEW TOO
Senator Accuses Nixon

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Walter F. Mondale, D-Minn.,
accused President Nixon Sunday
of sacrificing the cause of human
rights in the interest of political
expediency and attacked Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew for
doing great damage to this
country.
Weve seen the head of the
department enforcing civil rights
fired for only enforcing the
law, Mondale said, referring to
the ouster of Leon E. Panetta as
director of the Health,
Education and Welfare
Departments office for civil
rights.
Weve now had two
nominees to the Supreme Court
who are distinguished by their

THE DRAFT:
question A answer
Q. A letter to the Gainesville Sun last week stated that the highest
number picked by any particular draft board during the most recent
month is strictly confidential. Is this true? If so, why?
A. Yes, it is true. The selective service board receives a number
every month from the Selective Service Board in Washington. This is
the number in the lottery which the local board cannot pass in its
draft call. For instance, the national board will send out the number
90. The local board may then call all numbers in the lottery up to 90,
but they may not go beyond this.
If the board reaches its quota by number 75, it will not reach
number 90, but it cannot release the number 75 because it would be
the equivalent of releasing the names of those inducted, which is
illegal.
Q. I have 11-S student deferment. Can I drop this deferment and
enter the I-A-O pool and take my chances with the lottery?
A. Not unless you cease to be a full-time and satisfactory student,
graduate or reach age 24, whichever copies first.
EVERYONE WELCOME
(SfJwGI
TRUNK m SHOWING
PLACE: Boardroom-2 nd Floor
Flaglor Inn
DATE: Mar. 3rd. 11AM-4PM
CLOGS, SANDALS, MOON SHOES
FLATS, HEELS
ONE PAY PBJVERY
L *1 i i l

disinterest in human rights. The
President is trying to gut the
Voting Rights Act and in a series
of other efforts it is quite clear
that he wants t 0... retreat
from if not abandon our efforts
to achieve a society truly
committed to human rights.
I think its a tragedy,
Mondale declared. I think hes
tearing us apart and, to add to
that, Mr. Agnew seems to be
able to think of somebody new
every night to attack. I think
hes doing great damage to this
country.
The Presidents record in the
field of human rights, I think,
has been one of political
expediency which has sacrificed
the cause of human rights, the

Minnesota Democrat asserted.
Mondales denunciation of
the administration's civil rights
policies came during a television
interview, NBCs Meet the Press.
ORANGES
$2 bushel
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MODEL HOMES
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143

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Carnigras Backed
By 'Shrimp King
By PHILLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The Shrimp King, a Tampa businessman, announced Monday he
will stand behind the Gator Loan Fund (GLF) and Carnigras 70.
H.C. Booty Singleton, the worlds largest seafood packer,
producer and processor, said he is a big Gator fan.
Although Singleton did not attend UF, he says he seldom misses
any of its athletic functions.
I am for a well-balanced, well-rounded educational system, and to
support this type of system is to support the UF.
Chairman Eddie Floyd said GLF is designed to help students who
could not receive a college education without financial aid.
It is the motto of the GLF to help students help themselves. It is
men throughout the state, like Singleton, who are doing just that.
Floyd said local business owners have been behind the GLF in the
past, and are doing so again this year.
Businesses are donating small gifts to be given away at Carnigras
7O, helping to make it the biggest and best ever.
Floyd said the GLF is trying to raise three times as much money as
last year.
We are expecting students to prove to the people of Florida they
can help themselves if given the chance, he said.
Fraternities, sororities and other organizations on campus can
donate SSO for booth rights, which will enable them to open a booth
at Carnigras 7O, Floyd said.
So far the results have been good, but we are still going to send
letters to all organizations, informing them of the opportunity.
_
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ain't forget
A Mattel representative will be
on campus Thursday, March
sth to talk about careers in
sales and market marketing.
ing. marketing. Contact your mKKESjk
Placement Office for
an appointment.



Spc
u v H ;
JtT' Zo- t 1
r-ov /tv-- 1 suJ
B" Rrres l*
F|Rc_V'
A VAN, NO LESS

When a notice like this pops up on the Reitz
Union bulletin board, it really sticks out from the
multitude. Problems can be problems and when

Genesis Two
Union Movie
Genesis Two, a two-hour
program featuring portions of 16
different films from the
avant-garde school of cinema,
will be featured again tonight at
the Reitz Union Auditorium.
Shows will be at 7 and 9:30.
Admission is $1 for students and
51.50 for others.
Film festival prize winners,
such as Demonstration Movie
I, Project I, The Tempest
and (< Campus Christi are among
the films included in the
program.
Pick
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WEDDINO RINO 80
The center engagement
diamond is guaranteed
perfect by Keepsake (or
replacement assured). Re Remember,
member, Remember, in diamonds, per perfection
fection perfection means more
brilliance.
Keepsake*
DIAMOND RINGS
2 East University Ave.
Kimm ma

Support Group Meets
An organizational meeting of the University Support Committee
will be at 3:30 pm., Friday at the Rathskeller.
The group will strive for better wages and dignified working
conditions for non-academic workers on campus.
Anyone interested in working for these goals is invited.

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glad there's a bulletin board to stick it on.

iSS;

' ~ = ' -
Now, How Do You
Spell It.. .Really?
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
AULmAm fi ff -
Alligator wmif wntar
Saturday, while leafing through my local Gainesville, Fla.
Telephone Directory, including Archer, Bronson, Hawthorne,
Keystone Heights, Micanopy, Newberry, also including Alachua,
Brooker, High Springs, Melrose, Starke and Waldo, I noticed a
strange thing.
Have you had occasion to call the telephone company lately?
If so, the first thing you probably had to do was check the
aforementioned book for the number, right?
If you are one of those people who just call Information, you
dont know what youre missing.
Anyhow, if you whipped out the half-inch (including yellow pages)
thick book, what did you look under?
Would you believe Fone Company?
I didnt think so. But, honestly, its in there. I wouldnt lie.
Now that everyone has double-checked his handy dandy copy of
the fone book, do you believe?
How about all the people within three hundred yards who you
told? I bet they didn't believe it either. Have they checked?
Oh, I know it's listed under Phone Company, Telephone
Company Southern Bell, t( Southem Bell Telephone and Telegraph
Company and in the front of the book at least twice.
But, Fone?
I non-stop I
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Trail ways Bus Station
527 W. University Ave.
I Tralnws I
easiest treyal on oortH
r From Gainesville
ST. PETERSBURG H
7 convenient trips daily
JACKSONVILLE H
4 convenient trips daily
PENSACOLA
11- Thru Express service H
B NEW ORLEANS I
I The only Thru service M

Tuaadtty, March 3,1970. Tha Florida AUiprtor,

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 3,1970

UPI President
Deplores Arrest

NEW YORK (UPI) Mims
Thomason, president of United
Press International, sent a
telegram to California Gov.
Ronald Reagan Monday,
protesting the arrest and 20-hour
detention of a UPI reporter who
was attempting to cover student
disturbances at Santa Barbara,
Calif.
This is to call your attention
to the utter disregard shown by
law enforcement authorities in
Santa Barbara during the
weekend to the professional and
personal rights of a United Press
International correspondent,
Thomason said.
I refer specifically to the
arrest of Stewart Slavin of our
Los Angeles office while he was
carrying out his professional
duties, and to his being held
incommunicado for a period of
20 hours.
Despite the fact that he was
carrying a valid press credential,
Mr. Slavin was arrested,
handcuffed in a painful manner,
and denied permission even to
make a single telephone call
during the entire period he was
in custody. Moreover, his
notebook was seized and has not
been returned as of today,
Monday.
It is deplorable enough that
law enforcement authorities
thwart the coverage of their

Doctors Demoralized
In Fever Struggle
ATLANTA (UPI) A Yale University medical scientist revealed
Monday that the deadly Lassa Fever virus has killed another American
missionary nurse in Nigeria and that doctors there were becoming
demoralized in their struggle against an outbreak of the illness.
Dr. Wilbur G. Downs, head of the Yale Arbovirus Research Center,
identified the latest victim of the mysterious virus as Dr. Jeanette
Troup, who died Feb. 18 in Jos, Nigeria.
Downs was in Atlanta to bring medical researchers at the National
Communicable Disease Center (NCDC) up to date on the virus
research that started last year at Yale.
The Yale research was discontinued after the disease killed a
laboratory technician and infected another researcher who recovered
only after a long illness.
The research will continue at a newly-constructed high security
laboratory at the NCDC.
Downs brought with him a batch of the virus material contained in
30 dead mice which were infected with the disease in the Yale
experiments. The material was transported in a sealed container and
kept frozen.
Downs said Dr. Troup helped care for two other American
missionary nurses who died last year of Lassa Fever, a
newly-discovered virus disease which was not identified until 1969.
Downs said Miss Troup died while nursing victims of a current
outbreak of Lassa Fever in Jos.
The fever is reported to have struck as least 20 persons in Jos and
to have killed half of them.
Os the six Americans known to have contracted the disease, four of
dim died.
Downs said the two American doctors in Jos at a missionary
hospital there were exhausted and becoming demoralized after a
long struggle with an outbreak of the fever which started in January.

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public activities by a bona fide
reporter. But it is doubly
disturbing when they violate his
right as a citizen by denying him
the opportunity to make contact
with the office, family or
counsel, Thomason said.
Slavin, 23, was arrested
Friday at 8:30 pjn. as he was
covering the arrest of 11 persons
outside a hamburger stand in
Santa Barbara. He was told he
was charged with curfew
violation and that his bail would
be $1,250.
Later on Saturday, he was
released and no charges were
preferred. Slavin said National
Guard commander Maj. Gen.
Charles Ott told him he was a
victim of an emergency
condition.
The reporter said an official
of the Santa Barbara County
Sheriffs Department had
apologized to him and said his
arrest was a result of a
communication breakdown
among the 12 different law
enforcement agencies and the
National Guard.

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Nixon Apologizes To Pompidou

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
White House said Monday
President Nixon personally
apologized to President Georges
Pompidou for U. S. anti-French
demonstrations and had decided
to attend a New York dinner
Monday night honoring the
visiting head of state.
Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler
said that Nixon telephoned
Pompidou in White Plains, N. Y.,
Sunday night and personally
and officially conveyed his
apologies and regrets and those
of the American people.
He added that Nixon had
decided to attend the New York
dinner to underline the
deepening and improving
relations between France and
the United States.
The dinner at the
Astronauts
Quarantined
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
space agency said Monday it will
quarantine the Apollo i l3
astronauts for three weeks after
they leave the moon next month
because of the possibility that
~ life may exist in the hilly terrain
they will explore.
The first two moon landing
crews also were quarantined, but
because no evidence of
extra-terrestial life was found
some scientists thought there
was no longer a need for such
precautions.
However, mission director
Chester Lee told at a news
conference that the decision has
been made to place Apollo 13
astronauts James E. Lovell,
Thomas K. Mattingly and Fred
W. Haise under similar
quarantine restrictions.
The astronauts are scheduled
to be launched from Cape
Kennedy April 11. Lovell and
Haise will land on the moons
hilly Fra Mauro formation April
16 while Mattingly remains in
lunar orbit.
Lee also said that if Apollo 13
is not launched April 11, the
mission will be delayed until the
next launch opportunity comes
on May 10. The Apollo 13
mission will be the first to land
on the rougher upland areas.

Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is
scheduled for 8 p.m. EST.
Nixon was expected to leave
Washington late in the afternoon
and return to the White House
immediately after the dinner.

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MANAGEMENT JOBS FOR ENGINEERS
If you will receive a degree in Building
Construction this June, or a BSME or
BSCE Degree, consider a career in
construction management.
Limbach Company, a principal national
mechanical contractor, has room for just a
few Engineers-in-Training in its program
starting in July. Training involves group
seminars and highly varied duties in a
wide range of project organization and
construction functions. This company,
with SSO million of annual construction
activity, is solidly founded, yet small
enough to assure that individual
performance is recognized and rewarded.
A representative of Limbach Company
will be on campus March 6. Consult the
lacement Office to make arrangements
for this management career opportunity.
LIMBACH COMPANY
an equal opportunity employer
r- " a tjS'

by Brickman

Pompidou talked with Nixon
in Washington when he began his
U. S. tour last week and no
further meetings between the
two presidents had been
planned.



REELECTION

Maddox Denied

ATLANTA (UPI) Gov.
Lester Maddox, reacting to a
UJS. Supreme Court decision
barring him from seeking
reelection this year, said Monday
he will announce his future
political plans March 16.
Maddox hinted that either he
or his wife, Virginia, will seek
some state political office.
He previously said he might
run his wife for governor if he is
unable to seek a second term.
Maddox said of the court
decision, It is not important
that Lester Maddox be in the
governors office ... as it is that
someone who speaks like Lester
Maddox ... about common
sense government be there.
The governor added, This
doesnt mean that I wont be
heard from. I will be heard from.
The voice of Lester Maddox will
be heard possibly even more
than it has been in the past.
Im going to wait and hear
the response from the people of
this state and the people of this
country and I will govern myself
accordingly.
He declined to discuss the
possibility of backing other
previously announced candidates

Generator Spreads
Jax Oil Pollution
JACKSONVILLE (UPI) A city electric generating plant coughed
up billows of oily black smoke following a fan malfunction Monday
and spread more pollution on the already greasy St. Johns River.
When the smoke cleared, a slick of damp soot a half-mile long and
almost 200 yards wide, had settled on the river where it winds
through the downtown area for commuters to gawk at from the
bridges above.
The smoke, which poured form the plants tall smokestack for
about 20 minutes, also spread a sooty film over buildings and
automobiles over an area of several blocks.
The pollution, which city officials said would be skimmed off the
river by nightfall, occurred less than four days after a small Danish
freighter slammed into a barge and spread 7,000 gallons of bunker
C crude oil on the river Thursday night.
The state of Florida sought sl.l million in holding bonds on the
freighter and the tug which was pushing the oil barge in last weeks
incident. But U. S. Dist. Judge Charles Scott indicated Monday it will
be possibly two or three days before he rules on the suit.
City Public Safety Director John Waters said the soot on the river
was no danger to bird or fish life although he said there was some oil
in it. He noted that it wasnt nearly as big or as bad as the
inch-thick layer of oil from the barge accident.
The Coast Guard reported Monday that skimmer barges were taking
up the last concentrated amounts of the Bunker C oil from the barge.
Jacksonville Electric Authority officials said that a fan at the
southside generating plant went out for about 20 minutes and caused
the smoke. Without the necessary oxygen for complete combustion,
the fuel oil burned dirty and spat the thick smoke form the stack.
Dialogue with a Theologue
Dr. A.G. Cranney, on
Mormonism & Social Problems
Wednesday March 4 4:oopm
Union lounges 122, 123
Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union
-for advertising salesmen.
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at this time, although he said
several had been to see him.
I dont know whether
Virginia wants to run or not, he
said. I will talk it over with her
again.
Maddox said he was not
surprised at the Supreme Courts
refusal to hear his case. He said
it was based upon what may be
political experience and what
the Socialists and others would
desire. It was against Lester
Maddox and conservatism more
than anything else.
The governor also compared
the decision to those of the
Supreme Court of Germany
which he said led to the rise of
Hitler. He said the court is afraid
of the wave of conservatism
and patriotism that is growing so
much in this nation. They dare
not allow the conservative voice
to be heard.
The high court refused to
consider Maddoxs appeal,
holding it had no jurisdiction to
decide whether a Georgia
constitutional provision barring
governors from succeeding
themselves violates the U. S.
Constitution.

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Tuesday, March 3,1970, The Florida Atlgctoc,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th Florida Alligator. Tuesday, March 3,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is The exercise of responsibility.

Panetta Dismissal A Step
Toward Two Americas

WASHINGTON The story behind President
Nixons decision to dismiss Leon Panetta, chief civil
rights officer of HEW, is a good example of the
manner in which the Southern congressional bloc
has succeeded in entrapping the nation into a classic
confusion of ends and means.
Panetta himself is a means. As chief enforcer of
HEW guidelines he simply carried out the law,
though he did so with a high-minded devotion to
civil rights that gave the Nixon Administration a
liberal coloration.
But Southerners chiefly GOP Sens. John Tower
(Tex.), Strom Thurmond (S.C.) and Ed Gurney
(Fla.) demanded his head. It all began last
summer.
Under the orders of his boss, Robert Finch,
Panetta had told some 300 Southern school districts
to comply with the law by the start of the school
year in September, 1969, or face a fund cutoff. He
had been working with officials of these districts on
compliance plans.
Suddenly he discovered that A tty. Gen. John
Mitchell was calling the signals and that the date for
general compliance had been postponed.
Panetta sought to make it clear that the new
policy did not effect existing orders and plans and
prepared a memorandum to that effect. When White
House pressure forced Finch to withhold the
memorandum, Panetta offered to resign but Finch
talked him out of it.
Since then, Panetta has pursued his job with
considerable success. He is now dealing with the last
10% of Southern school districts to comply with the
law.
But the work took him to Florida and South
Carolina, and he had lately begun to seek
enforcement in Texas, where there is legal
segregation against Mexican-Americans. Thus it was
that Thurmond, Gurney and Tower told the White
House that Panetta must go.
The resignation itself was handled brutally.
Stories that Panetta had resigned were planted in a
Columbia, S.C., newspaper, formerly represented by
White House aide Harry Dent. Predictions of his
resignation appeared in the conservative magazine,
Human Events, and on the last day a similar story
appeared in a Washington newspaper.
At that point Panetta went to Finch and asked
for advice. The secretary suggested that he wait and
see what the White House said. Late that same
afternoon presidential Press Secretary Ron Ziegler,
in answer to reporters questions, confirmed the

My Lai Morality Relative?

MR. EDITOR:
In his letter of the 26th,
Societys Extremists are Our
Enemies, Mr. Bruce Alper
presents himself as a moderate

Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Karen Eng
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
John Sugg
Mary Toorrtey Editorial Assistant Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,87,
88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82, 83, or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
11 ||| i. in mi ** i i i >'" :
Opinions expreaed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

attacking extremism on either
sides, and proceeds to denounce
the left for its objection to the
Vietnam war.
He then presents the idea that
the enemy is inhuman, killing in

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Frank Mankiawicz Mankiawicz_
_ Mankiawicz_ Tom Bradan
resignation. Panetta then resigned.
Meanwhile, the White House has issued three
separate statements on school integration within the
past week, none of them clear, but all of them
designed to put the President squarely against
busing as though busing like Panetta were an
end and not a means.
The end the courts have made clear is a
unitary and biracial school system, and busing is one
of the means available to that end. In some districts
- Berkeley, Calif., for example busing has been
notably successful. In others, a redesigning of the
citys districts to provide for educational parks
has proved an answer. There are other answers,
limited only by the ingenuity, good will and courage
of school boards.
But after events of the past week in Washington,
courage among school obards is likely to be rare.
Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.), with the unfortunate
but well-intentioned support of Sen. Abraham
Ribicoff (D-Conn.) and the active acquiesence of
the President, has made it appear as though the
Supreme Court decision of 1954 had been handed
down yesterday and had called few pell-mell busing
of children all over the country, beginning
tomorrow.
This deliberate obfuscation of ends and means
may accomplish a great many political objectives.
The Southerners will have preserved segregation.
The President will have eliminated George Wallace
from serious contention in 1972. Some Northerners
will have appeased what they detect as a growing
racist tide in their own states.
But the Apocalyptic vision of the Kerne r
Commission -two Americas: one black, one white,
both armed will have moved a step closer to
reality.

an almost crazed frenzy. He
further states that it is the
enemy who turns children into
orphans, destroys the schools,
and inflicts suffering upon the
people.
May I then ask what does he
consider the children of the
thousands and thousands of
Vietcong and North Vietnamese
killed in the war? Are they not
to be considered, since they are
only the offspring of the beasts
we are killing? Are they not
children, all the same?
My Lai was nothing when
compared to the Auschwitz that
Hanoi inflicted on Hue. Is
morality relative? If we slaughter
one civilian for every ten or
hundred they kill, are we freed
of guilt? What is the ratio
necessary to justify My Lai?
* DAVID BURDETTE, 3AS

editorial
Stop The Games
The Young Socialist Alliance is a group of UF students
that are especially eager to express their ideas ideas
admittedly contrary to the beliefs of the powers that be.
YSA claims it can best win people to its beliefs by free
and open discussion by all political groups.
Whatever else its beliefs are, YSA calls for an egalitarian
democracy which seems surely more than exists on this
campus now.
By administrative edict and in complete violation of
the administrations own rules YSA is being denied by UF
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale the basic
democratic right to APPLY for campus recognition.
Now, a new link in a growing chain of harassments has
been added.
YSA is not being allowed to send appeals through the
campus mail for support from campus organizations, even
though the organization is doing so through the Student
Peace Union, a recognized campus organization which
supposedly has every right to use such service.
Administration representatives say non-campus groups
have been denied the use of campus mail on prior occasions,
although they can give no concrete examples. But thats all
right.
The point is that the mailing of YSAs appeal for support
was made by a recognized campus organization. And a note
attached to YSAs appeal made this quite clear.
The situation, of course, becomes much more ludicrous
when we consider Hales refusal to allow YSA to apply for
recognition.
In short, YSA has tried using UFs channels and found
them to be clogged up, unresponsive.
Lets cut out the games, administrators.
Let YSA begin the recognition process, and make this
campus a place where free expression truly exists.
Machines Lousy

MR. EDITOR:
*
I would like to make the
following suggestion to the
different owners of the vending
machines on campus. Instead of
offering SIOO for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of someone for
breaking into your machines,
you should take a positive
attitude and offer SIOO to the
first person who can get them to
work.
Seriously, it is very
aggravating in the dorms to lose
money in a machine on one
floor and then lose money again
when you try another floor.
It is also a little irritating
when the machine says it takes
nickels and dimes and then it
wont take either one and the

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* A * ******* ' * *. '* **> 4 '-**. * *

machine is not empty. And
getting the wrong kind of
canned drink without pushing
the button isnt exactly a source
of joy.
Probably much of the
vandalism in the dorms is from
people who got tired of the
machines not working. When the
candy machine on the first floor
of Hume Hall West was
vandalized, not only did they
remove that machine, but the
milk machine next to it. Oh
well, it didnt work either.
It would be nice if the
vendors would spend a little
time and money in fixing the
machines and putting in new
ones. Then maybe they would
get some cooperation.
MICHAEL T. HUTSON, lUC



Chicago Trial: Attempt To Eliminate Leftist Leaders

MR. EDITOR:
It has frequently been said that the
United States is on the path toward a
totalitarian form of government. Let us
examine some recent events to
determine if such a trend actually exists.
Trials for political crimes cannot take,
place under democratic governments
although such trials are inherent in any
totalitarian form of government. From
all aspects the trial of the Chicago
Seven appears to be a political trial.
The trial can be termed political for two
reasons.
First, it represents an attempt by
Attorney General Mitchell to stifle
dissent and elimination of leaders of the
Leftist movement. Secondly it is an
attempt by the Nixon administration to
gain support of reactionary middle class
Americans collectively called the silent
majority.
A classical element of the political
trial is the law (or laws) under which the
defendants were prosecuted. Usually
such laws are catchalls, as was the
conspiracy law, or were specifically
created for political prosecutions, as was
the anti-riot clause of the Anti-Crime
Act of 1968.
Even more important than the laws
themselves is the manner in which they
are enforced. Although they may be
legally prosecuted for conspiracy,
individuals cannot conspire to commit a
criminal act if they have never met. The
Chicago Seven allegedly went to
Chicago at the time of the 1968
Democratic Convention for the explicit
purpose of inciting a riot. Lets look at
the riot in Chicago to see who or what
actually caused it.
Various groups and organizations
requested permits to hold rallys and

Student Senate Should Present
Alternate Financing Plans To SG

MR. EDITOR:
As you may recall, I wrote a
letter several months ago
regarding what I felt was unfair
treatment of small clubs on UF
campus by the student
government.
The following is another letter
I recently wrote the Budget &
Finance Committee of the
Student Senate which further
substantiates my claim.
Dear Miss Madorsky:
Our organization, the Student
Occupational Therapy
Association, feels your
committee has erred in refusing
OUr request for financial aid.
Our organization is an
established, on-going dub
***** to a professional
curriculum. We *nggi in
student and general community
servic project*, in contrast to

parades at the time of the Convention.
Only one such request was granted
That to the National Mobilization
Committee to End the War in Vietnam
to hold an afternoon rally in Grant Park
on August 28.
Through the denial of such permits
the City of Chicago was abridging the
right to peacably assemble. In order to
exercise their right to assemble, the
demonstrators were forced to break the
law. Furthermore, Mayor Daley and the
City of Chicago by mobilizing the
National Guard and through a display of
force were, in effect, challenging the
demonstrators to a confrontation.
The riot occurred when the
demonstrators were forced out of
Lincoln Park into the streets. Although
there was provocation, there was no
excuse for the brutal attacks of the
Chicago Police. Senator Abraham
Ribicoff best described the situation
when he referred to the actions of the
Chicago Police as Gestapo tactics.
If charges for inciting a riot had to be
filed they should have been filed against
the City of Chicago and the Chicago
FORUM:-^^
C Aimla mi VlAAut y
hope forth,

short term, social and
recreational activities.
Whereas the function of the
university is to promote all
facets of the students
education, which would include
an awareness of his role in
sodety and his professions, we
feel that this should receive a
higher priority in student
financing than it is presently
given.
Recent decisions have
allocated funds to a vague
majority and although we are a
small group, we -feel that we
deserve a proportionate return
to our student activities fees.
Along these same lines, due to
the budget format, 1 was forced
to itemize a single request that
may appear disproportionately
large ($430). This does not mean
fh* we wish the student
government to furnish this entire
ftrni- any amount wcftjfdjerve to

reduce this expense.
In fact, the amount now
needed to send a student to the
national, professional conference
in question is only $176.40 as a
result of change in location.
It seems to me that an
important function of your
committee could be to present
alternate financing plans to the
student government to give aid
to worthwhile club activities.
For example, a suggestion to set
aside, SI,OOO would be feasible
to give aid to 50 to 20 small
clubs.
I recently wrote a letter to the
Alligator in protest of what I felt
was a bias in student government
and student services toward
large, well established
organizations. I would hope that
this is not yet another
illustration of that complaint.
MRS. MARTI SOUTHAM
President
... .j, v +# * \

Police Department, not the Chicago
Seven.
One of the basic rights guaranteed by
the Constitution is the right to trial by
an impartial jury. The jury in the trial of
the Chicago Seven was anything but
impartial.
Typical of the jurors was Mrs. Ruth
Peterson, 44, who favored conviction on
both counts for all and admitted there
was not one of the defendants she really
liked: Half a chicken is better than
none at all. We were all anxious to go
home. The jurors, like most middle
class Americans, are prejudiced against
individuals with long hair and unpopular
political views. Under conditions like
this a fair trial was impossible.
The most obvious example of bias
was Judge Julias Hoffman. Before the
jury, he praised Chief Prosecutor
Thomas For an and put down Defense
Attorney Leonard Weinglass by
consistently mds-pronouncing his name.
Hoffman barred testimony from former
immwwiwimwtiiniwwniHHwwHHimiiwnminmi>iinMniiwi
The contempt sentences handed
down by Judge Hoffman were an
obvious attempt to gain personal
revenge against the defendants and
their attorneys . The counts of
contempt against Kunstler
included such actions as
embracing Ralph Abernathy (6
months) and refusing to sit down
(7 counts 7 to 30 days each.)
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
\OV4 \
mON] DEFENSE
N OVERRULE j

Machine Food
MR. EDITOR:
The following is a copy of a letter which I just wrote to the
Wometco Vending Company.
Dear Sirs:
I wish to complain bitterly about the manner in which your
machines are serviced in the Architecture and Fine Arts
complex. It is not a matter of the machines having been
mutilated by the students they do work.
It is their contents I am complaining about as well as their
lack of contents. For instance, for the past two days I have tried
to purchase milk from the milk machine on the second floor of
the Fine Arts classroom building.
On Friday of last week the milk in the container that the
machine spewed forth was so spofled that it had horrible little
curds in it. Today, the milk was also spofled but did lack the
curds. In several of the other machines contents had not been
replenished.
According to other letters of complaint which I have read
from time to time in the Alligator as well as complaints 1 have
heard, irom my fellow students, this experience of mine is not
an isolated incident.
Indeed, I have lost a lot of money in your machines over the
past three years I have attended school here. I would have
complained before this but somehow I was always able to
rationalize my resultant anger.
In the future I will no longer buy items from your machines
and I will so inform students and faculty members I know to do
the same, until such time that your service of the machines
improves.
(MRS.) DONALD DEWSBURY

Tuesday, March 3,1970, The Florida Alligator.

Attorney General Ramsey Clark and
Civil Rights Leader Ralph Abernathy,
two potentially important defense
witnesses.
The contempt sentences handed
down by Judge Hoffman were an
obvious attempt to gain personal
revenge against the defendants and their
attorneys. The actions of the Chicago
Seven in court in no way set a
precedent. In the trial of twelve of the
Milwaukee Fourteen there were
numerous outbursts by die defendants
yet the maximum contempt sentence
handed down by Judge Charles L.
Larsen was ten days or SSO.
Quite a contrast to Judge Hoffmans
four year sentence given to Defense
Attorney William M. Kunstler. The
counts of contempt against Kunstler
included such actions as embracing
Ralph Abernathy 6 months and refusing
to sit down (7 counts -7 to 30 days
each.)
Another factor in the trial was
evidence obtained by wiretapping. The
following statement by Tom Wicker,
noted columnist of the New York
Times, best describes Hoffmans
attitude towards the evidence and any
future trends concerning the use of such
evidence in court:
Os great consequence was Judge
Hoffmans offhand acceptance, on the
last day of the trial, of Atty. Gen.
Mitchells novel and pernicious doctrine
that in the guise of national security the
government may eavesdrop (by
wiretapping and bugging) upon
domestic organizations and inviduals, on
its own decision, without court
permission and without having to
disclose the transcripts to
defendants ... It would be unwarrented
and extraordinary grant of unrestricted
police power to the executive branch if
the Mitchell doctrine, already accepted
by Judge Hoffman were allowed to
stand.
Just as Spiro Agnew has done an
excellent job in his capacity as voice of
the administration, so too has John
Mitchell done an excellent job in his
capacity, which is the elimination of
enemies of the state.
It is ironical that the silent
majority, through their support of the
Nixon administration, are contributing
to the destruction of their own
freedom. But then we should remember
that every fascist state has its own
silent majority.
LARRY TROPP

Page 9



FOR SALE |
For Sale: Prtv. est. Superb antiques,
oil paintings, fine silver (sterling*
coins), books (all subjects), -guns,
swords (civil & rev. Items), glass,
lamps* china, desks, mirrors, oriental
rugs (large small), fine gold,
platinum Jewelry.' (No sales tax),
533-2381 Hl-wy 16A. Kingsley
Lake), Starke, Fla. (A-92-2t-p).
Spring Is Here! Solve youi
Transportation problems with a 2
year old Suzuki 50cc ($110) Musi
sell now. Call Bill 392-7511.
(A-94-st-p).
Parrot and cage for sale. 392-8266.
(A-96-4t-p).
Beat the rent racket, own your home.
8 x 47 mobile home with 10 x 20
paneled cabanna; 10 x 10 covered
patio AC, Central Heat, act. Call
372-8722. (A-94-st-p).
AKAI 1710 W Reel to Reel
stereo-mono tape recorder. 3 speed,
excellent sound reproduction. 6
months old. S2OO. or best offer. Cali
378-5120. (A-94-st-p).
1966 Honda so excellent condition.
Must sell- immediately. SBS or best
offer. Can be seen at 416 NE 7th St.,
Lower rear apt. (A-95-st-p).
SPECIAL BASENJI PUPS, AKC
Pedigree, red and white, 3 males and
1 female, shots and wormed-. Call
468-1121, $75. (A-96-3t-p).

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DmclKm -300 (mil 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

' i i i *? |
I Wfc
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATt f
n for sale (con.~u.iw) STUDENT # PHONE i
for rent 1 day
wanted 2 days ADDRESS \
help wanted G 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos O 4 days (*lO% discount) f|TY STATE ZIR
personal n 5 days and over
D lost-found <* 2o% discount) |i 5 1 1
"** WORDING
111 1111111111111 I I l I I I I I I I I I ITT
l I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I 111 I I I I I I I
al I I II I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
4i 11 1 11 1 11 11 11 11 1 11 I I 11 1II r ili I 111 rr

" p,

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

yioDeeesiCMWowwcwwiww^^
1 FOR SALE 1
1969 HONOA C 8350, Excellent
condition, 6 months old,
color-turquoise, crash bars and helmet
included. $650 see at 423 S.E. Bth
St. Ph. 376-8470. (A-98-st-p).
10 x 47 Great Lakes mobile home. 2
bedroom, air, carpet, 6x utility
shed, shady lot. $2,195. 378-5880.
(A-98-st-p).
2 bedroom, 50x8, furnished with
central heating, air conditioning,
carpeting, $2250 or best offer.
378-8304 after 5. (A-97-st-p)
1968 Vandyke 12 x 57 central air.
two bedroom, 2 bath, like new,
must sell S7OO equity &
take over payments. Call 378-6529.
(A-94-st-p).
ROTC seniors: army green and blue
uniforms for man sft+Bln tall also 2
used tires for VW (5.60x15) cheap!
call 378-5402 day or night to 9pm.
(A-97-lt-c)
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO I*
Assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
For sale, 1968 Yamaha 250 (yds 3)
new rear brakes, rear sprocket, rear
tire. Come by 111 N.W. 19th St. no.
11 to see. Any offer over $325
considered. (A-95-st-p).

Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 3,1970

I FOR RENT jl
Two bdrm. unfum. apt, AC
378-6190, sllO, avallabe March 15.
(B-98-3t-p).
HELP! Outaslght room for rent.
Good place to live behind Spanish
main. If you like privacy! Call
378-6981 only $40.00 a month, dig
it! (B-98-lt-p).
Must sublet 2 rm. studio apt. 2
blocks from campus, air conditioned,
Call evenings, 373-2807. (B-98-3t-p).
Fun in the sun-. 1 female roommate
needed for 2 br. Village Park poolside
apt. for spring quarter. Call Kathy
after 5:30, 378-7061. (B-94-st-p).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
furnished 3 blocks from campus.
Couple preferred, sloo/fti6., come
by before 10 PM, 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave, apt. 21. (B-95-st-p).
Point West 2 bdrm, 2bth, Lux. apt.
to sublet. 6 PM. (B-95-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. AH
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
One bedroom furnished apt. SIOO a
month. Close to campus, 1604 NW
4th Avenue. Kitchen, bathroom,
living and dining rooms. (B-94-st-p).
Sublet:* one bedroom apt. TWO
blocks from campus completely
furnished A/C 1605 N.W. 4th AVE.
Call 378-3425 after 4:00 (B-95-st-p).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Sublease 1 bdr. apL, furnished, pool,
free B-B-Q grill, AC ww carpet, Good
location, Frederick Gardens apts. Call
376-0094 available now. (B-96-3t-p).
One bedroom apartment with living
room, dining room, private bath.
Available March 20. Call 372-9855 or
Inquire at 102 N.W. 15th St.
(B-96-3t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet a/c, $120.00 mo.. Cable
TV., Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W.
2nd Ave., 372-7111. (B-6t-41-C).
URGENT: Need 1 or 2 female
roomate Landmark 127: also 1 male
roommate no. 123; Call 378-5141,
378-3667: $46.25/mo. Ask for
Barbara or Bob. (B-97-3t-p)
Needed 1 female roommate for V.P.
apts. $42.50/mo. Available anytime
372-9904 or 392-1107. (b-93-6t-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Golden Fried Chicken
All you can eat 99 WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Jumbo Baked" Chopped

'X*X*X*X'X-X'X i X^X^X:X#£>X&¥: :
WANTED I
2 female roommates needed to share
2 bedroom apt. In University
Gardens; spring and summer quarters.
Call 376-0716 after 4:30, ask for
Diane. (C-98-lt-p).
Wanted 1 male roommate In La
Mancha, move in after 3-21, March
rent paid, damage deposit paid, Call
378-7558 or stop by office.
(C-98-st-p).
Female roommate for spring quarter.
Poolside village park apt. Call
378-3157 or come by no. 116.
(C-98-9t-p).
Male roommate for spring qtr.
University Gardens Apts. 1 bdrm.
$67.50/month. Poolside. Prefer grad,
student. 378-3767. (C-98-st-p).
1 or 2 MALE roommates needed for
2 bdrm. Summit House apt. for
spring quarter. 43.50/mo. Call
376-6361. (C-98-st-p).
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
Spring Quarter $48./mo. Village Park
Apt. 6. Call 373-1530. (C-98-st-p).
Male roommate for Spring quarter
Townhouse apt. PHONE
373-1448, 307 S. W. 16th Ave,
Apartment 354. (C-94-st-p).
Male roommate, 3 bedroom apt. Ige
private bedroom S4O. mo. 406V* NE
Ist Ave. 376-0317 after 5.
(C-94-st-p).
Wanted part-time for maintenance
work inside and out. Can learn
outboard motor servicing in
mechanically 'lnclined. 2605 S.W.
34th St. 372-3344. (C-96-2t-p).
Help!* Honda 305 transmission
busted. Cant afford shop prices.
Need qualified help. Call 376-0882
anytime soon. Will pay reasonably.
(C-96-3t-p).
1 male roommate, apt. 1 Village
Park, Vi expenses, 378-8243.
(C-96-st-p).
1 female roommate WANTED to
sublet La Mancha apt. Own room
with utilities furnished. Immediate
occupancy, no. 31 or phone
378-2132. (C-96-3t-p).
3 girls need 4th in beautiful 2 bdrm.
Hawaiian Village' Apt. Call 372-2949
ANYTIME. (C-96-st-p).
SINGLE MEN WANTEDI Dating can
be fun. Tell us the type of women
you would like to meet. All matches
live in Gainesville. For Free
questionnaire and detail write:
Nationwide Dating Service, 177 10th
St., NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(C-94-7t-p).
COED ROOMATE for spring quarter.
Very close to campus. $4Ol mo.,
includes water. 2 bedroom apt. Call
373-2730. (C-97-2t-p)
1 or 2 co-ed roommates Immediately
for 2 bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Call 373-2766.
(C-96-st-p).
Female roommate wanted for spring
quarter. Private bedroom In three
bedroom house, $lO9, 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. Call 373-2379. (C-96-st-p).

aaaifiai^
| r WAWED "~|
Programer wanted: good openunity
for Isa major to gain business
programing experience. Ise major not
required, pl/1 experience pretered.
call Bill 6-1 lpm. tel. 392-7512.
(C-97-st-p)
1 Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
apt. In sin city: aircond.. pool, cable
tv; vacancy for spring Qtr. call
373-1742 between 5 and 7 pm.
(C-97-st-p)
One male roommate for 2 bdrm. apt.
3 blocks north of grad library, own
bedroom $45/mo plus utilities call
373-2795 6 to 7 PM. (C-97-st-p)
| HEIP WANTH> j
Student with Electronics experience
needed for part-time work as
Proto-Type Technician and general
Testing work. 378-1581. (E-94-st-p).
AUTOS |
Volkswagen bought In Germany fully
equlped light blue excellent
condition, low mileage must sell;
Going overseas call 378-1121 after 5
PM. (G-94-St-p).
1964 Corvalr, black, radio, excellent
condition, rebuilt engine, SSOO, Call
Judy at 378-0082 4 thru 7 dally.
(G-94-st-p).
Porsche 912/5, t>lue 1968. Air cond.,
am-fm, chrome wheels, -radials,
Konls, driving lltes, headrest.'
Unusually nice. Call 378-7301 eves.
(G-94-st-p).
62 Ford 2dr hdt power and air good
mechanical shape good
transportation, $350 or best offer see
at 1120 SW Ist Av 376-8918.
(G-97-4t-p)
*69 VETTE, 427 convertible, like
new, PHONE 378-7921. (G-96-3t-p).
§ PERSONAL
X S
Come in ana choose at bargain
prices: component units consoles
headphones home tape decks
clock radios TVs AM/FM
cartidge tuner cordless slicing knife
electric shavers electric hair
combs sewing machines wet suits
8 track car stereo electric
toothbrush 1228 N.E. sth Ave.
378-4186 Mon thru Sat 9-6 Fri
9-9. (J-97-2t-p)
HEY, CAMEL, HAPPY
BIRTHDAY!! (J-98-lt-p).
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handcrafted
Brass and Leather Goods Pipes,
Clips, Belts, Sandals ready 4 days
from ordering lOB N.w. 7th St.
1,000 feet from The Cl RCUS, open
dally except Sundays. PAX.
(J-98-st-p).
Gainesville Coin Club will meet Tues,
March 3, 8 p.m., In the Guaranty
Federal Building, 220 N. Main. Free
movie about mint. (J-97-2t-p)
S6O a month, room & board.
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th SL Call 376-9428 for
Acretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
FRESHMEN Old man have a Job
waiting for you? Ran to join the
foreign legion. If so, congratulations.
If not, the UF Career Rannlng and
Racement Center can help you plan
your future, suite G 22. j Wayne
Reitz Union. (J-94-st-p).
GIRLS Do you realize that
CUSTOM MADE clothes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material &' design, and
feature higher quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress, Wedding
Dress, Sportsweer & Bikinis by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Phone: 378-0320. (J-95-st-p).
Inlldl
N.W. 13th St Ph 372-8523 3
ACROSS FROM THE MAI i
I THE STERILE CUCKOO 5
PLUS CO-HIT 3
ROSEMARYS BABY "j
2 Barbara Hershey J
LAST SUMMER E
a |
THE REIVERS I
muni imniinmi|nc



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

[PERSONAL §
AIESEC Charter Flight. $230
Roundtrlp Tampa to Amsterdam.
june-Sept. March 13 deadline; SSO
deposits being taken in Room 301
Union, 3:30 5:00 weekdays or call
392-1676 during the above hhours.
(J-96-3t-p).
guy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, arid
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, fee our
large selection and get your free cop/
of our 200 page wholesale gift abdr
rewitry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wifston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
i>7s-3t-p).
IjLOST A FOUND J
Found: Terry Parker High School
ring In Norman Field. Gall 392-7630.
(L-96-3t-nc).
LOST: Casette tapes at Milhopper
Friday nlte. Please call 373-1537.
(L-95-4t-p).
pc n nr- n T ftf *** l,,v,w,v """ "
| SERVICES I
a a mniffwp bdiii i i a s twiwgii; I Mfl
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afganlstan,
Khatmnud. Lvs London Late June.
$545 fully Inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
| wtNNER
Bob f
f ACADEMY
| AWARD
LafOl NOMINATIONS
X INCLUDING
Tj BEST
leq SUPPORTING
& ACTOR
Alee ACTRESS
jHWwJI NOW!
I ACADEMY
AWARD NOMINEE
GOLDIE HAWN!
wauef inciriu
vidTTHdu Beroman
caems i
Rower
introducing GOUfeHawi TONI I
golden globe winner
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

haD* j
I irs GOOD BUSINESS j
I
l I
I 1
mmt h immmmKmm hb bb bb iiiiifli^Bi^l

1 SERVICES I
"POOe 8 Nv.v;-K':vx.ffi.:.ssww;vwv;.^^
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-3VSS-e).
* r H ators Gnerators-
Starters-Eiectrical Systems tested and
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)

"A REMARKABLY GOOD COLLECTION
OF NEW CINEMA! .o S !SS
IB JJ
EXTR[MfLY A BRILLIANT COLLECTION
.in
CINEMATIC EXPLORATIONS
NOT SUGGESTED FOR IMMATURE AUDIENCES
______

Tuesday, March 3, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rabat
Discount. 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-63-2 Qt-p).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Eiectrologlst. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)

Page 11

SERVICES
XEROX COPIES: spedizating in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
r 1 i ....

.OX-IW-V-Sv. JvWW/JWXWWWJWWij
I SERVICES
JSewsoswww^ft^WMCCoeMaiawowowooor
FRESHMEN The UF Career Planning
and Placement Center has everything
it needs to assist you in your career
planning problems. EXCEPT YOU.
suite 22, JWRU. (M-94-st-p).
'topaz^
ONE OF
THE YEARS
10 BEST!
DOWNTOWN
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ i> cotunaw ncnwcs J
ENJOY OUR NEW
ORANGE & BLUE
"GATOR" SEATS-
Spaced For Comfort
W'
ISDHK
q
aaSr
From the country
that gave you,
M A WOMAN," |HB
INGA and l|A
i am curious mjm
r jfj
It nil



Page 12

!. Th* Florid* Alligator, Tuesday, March 3,1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative N otices

GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduating, grant of
credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the exit interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program for the
spring quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you receive your fee
cards come to the Student
Accounts Office.
NOTICE OF DEPOSITORY
HOURS: Student Accounts in
the Hub will be open from 9
a.m. until 3 p.m., March 27,30,
31, and April 1,2, and 3. If lines
are as long as they have been in
the past, the lines will be
regulated on these days so that
there will be enough time to
wait on everyone inside by 3
p.m. For after hours there is an
envelope drop on the east wall
of the Depository for your
convenience.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMINATIONS: Friday,
March 6, is the deadline to apply
in the office of the appropriate
Foreign Language Department
to take the foreign language
functional knowledge
examinations to be given on
March 14.

I Lost youp Contact? I
j &****** \
AOs mAke Contacts!^^!

NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION C\ A
v .. ft# 11 II M
' V| i .-. . # *

SUMMER SWIM PROGRAM:
The University of Florida Golf
Club pool will open May 1
Sept 13. The pool will be open
from 9 a.m. 7 p.m. daily
except Sunday, when it will be
open from I7 p.m. There is
no recreational swimming before
12 noon, Monday through
Thursday, due to class
instruction. The swimming
lesson program will be divided
into three sessions for
instructional purposes. The first
session will be from May 1
June 18. Those eligible to swim
must be bona fide University of
Florida full-time students,
faculty, staff, their wives,
husbands, and their children.
Membership applications are
being accepted on a first
come-first serve basis. Fees will
include swimming lessons but
not golf privileges, and may be
mailed to "U of F Golf Club, P.
O. Box 14106, University
Station, Gainesville" or brought
to the Pro Shop at the golf
course.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
FRESHMEN: Don't wait until
your senior year to start
thinking about your future. The
Florida Career Planning and
Placement Center, Suite G-22,
Reitz Union, can help you
identify your career goals with
your academic interest and show
the opportunities available in
your chosen field.
WORK IN DISNEYLAND
THIS SUMMER! Male or female,
freshmen, sophomores and
juniors, age 18 and above who
reside in the greater Orlando
area need to apply in person at
the Placement Center, G-22,
Reitz Union.

BLUE BULLETIN

Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22, Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June and August grads,
unless indicated otherwise.
March 3: Dow Chemical Co.
March 3: Lever Brothers Co.,
The Hartford Insurance Group;
Combustion Engineering Inc.;
Southern Railway System; Sun
Life Assurance Co. of Canada;
Allstate Insurance Co.; St. Joe
Paper Co.; Army & Air Force
Exchange Service; Kurt Salmon
Associates Inc.; Chevron Oil Co.;
United Telephone Co. of Florida
March 4: W.T. Grant Co.;
Prince George's County Board of
Education, Md.; Baltimore City
Public Schools, Md.; Warner
Robins Air Material Area;
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.;
S.S. Kresge Co.; North Carolina
Memorial Hospital; CPA/Gold
Krist; Thomas J. Lipton Inc.
March 5: Gulf Power Co.;
Ferro Corp.; The Continental
Insurance Companies; E.l.
DuPont De Nemours 3t Co.; U.S.
Dept, of Commerce Office of
Audits; Park-Ohio Inudstries
Inc.; Mattel Inc.; Pratt &
Whitney Aircraft Fla. Res. &
Dev. Center; Aetna Life and
Casualty Co.
March 6: Systems Engineering
Laboratories; Metropolitan
Public Schools, Tenn.; United
Methodist Board of Education;
U.S. Dept, of Transportation;
Oscar Meyer & Co.; U.S. Dept,
of Agriculture Consumer &
Mkg.; H.W. Sheppard & Co.;
Exchange National Bank of
Tampa; Granada Valve & Fitting
Co.; The Hannan Co.; Union
Carbide Corp. Carbon
Products Div.
CANCELLATIONS
March 4: Greece Central
School District
March 10: Fraser Public
Schools, Mich.
GENERAL NOTICES
ATTENTION ALL
STUDENTS: The Gamma Beta
Phi Society will be taking over
the duties of Ombudsman
Monday, Feb. 23. If you are
having trouble solving your
school problems, let the
Ombudsman help you.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday, March 3
A.I.E.S.E.C. Office Hours, 301
Union, 3:30 5:30 p.m.
Cicerones Meeting, 355 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Genesis II",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Deppt: University Concert
Band, University Aud., 8:15
p.m.
Wednesday, March 4
A.I.E.S.E.C. Office Hours, 301
Union, 3:30 5:30 p.m.
Dialogue With a Theologue, Dr.
A.G. Cranney (Mormon), 122
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Befrienders, Bring Your Own
Dinner Meeting, Front of
Infirmary, 5:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Sigma Nu Chapter Meeting, 362
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Baha'i Association Lecture,
Speaker: Mr. Winson C.
Evans, 150 G & F Union,
8:00 p.m.
Mensa Business Meeting, 356
Union, 8:30 p.m.

FRATERNITY ALUMNI RELATIONS FIRM
SEEKS MAN WHO NEEDS AT LEAST
$25,000 ADDITIONAL INCOME
National organization working exclusively with the frater fraternity
nity fraternity world seeks man to operate local office here. Must
enjoy working with people and be willing to accept com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive training. This is a franchise program and can be
handled on a part-time basis evenings from your home until
full potential is reached. A minimum of $5,000 cash is re required
quired required with financing available. If you want a secure in income,
come, income, call or write me for complete details.
Harry 0. Richards, President, Fraternity Alumni Service
DIVISION OF THE CARSON COMPANY
611 South Boulevard Evanston, 111. 60202 Tel. 312/869-8330

Campus
Calendar

Thursday, March 5
Depts. of Physical Sciences and
Medical School Lecture,
Speaker: Dr. Daniel P. Jones,
Chemical Warfare Research
in World War I A Pattern
for the National Institutes of
Health," M-112,4:00 p.m.
Union Poetry Series Lawrence
Hetrick, John Cage's Music
& Literature," 122 Union,
4:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 150 F &
G Union, 8:00 p.m.
Brazilian-Portuguese Club Film,
Union Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Friday, March 6
Muslim Student Assoc. Prayer,
123 Union, 12:30 p.m.
Union Lecture, Ewart Guinier,
Can the Blacks Go It
Alone?" Union Ballroom,
3:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Bom Free,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
IFC Winter Frolics, Johnny
Rivers," Sweet Water,"
Celebration," Florida Gym,
7:30 & 10:30 p.m.
Rathskeller: Celebration," 8:00
2:00 Continuous, Frolics
Ticket holder admitted free.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Genesis
11, SI.OO Students, $1.50
General Public, Winter
Frolics, $5.50 a couple.



The
Florida
Alligator

'I Still Dont Understand-Findley

By ken mckinnon
Aistant Sports Editor
Earl Findley is the second
highest scorer on UFs basketball
team. He also ranks third in
rebounding.
Against Ole Miss and West
Virginia earlier in the season
Findley scored 34 and 26 points,
respectively. Those were just
two of the four games that
Gator captain Andy Owens was
not the teams game-high scorer.
Owens is one of the
Southeastern Conferences top
four point-makers with a 27.2
average.
Findley's 18 rebounds against
VPI in the Gator Bowl
Tournament is more than any
other player on the team has
pulled down in one game all
season.
So, then, why has Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett had him sitting
the bench for the last five
games?
Findley thinks there is a

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conflict somewhere, but just
cant put his finger on it.
Bartlett, on the other hand,
doesnt believe there is that
much to the situation and says it
is merely a matter of Earls
performance of late.
I know there is a conflict
somewhere, but I just dont
know where, Findley, who has
scored in double figures in 11 of
this years 24 games, said. Ive
done nothing or said anything to
Coach Bartlett to offend him.
It all started when the Gators
faced the University of
Kentucky in the first of a
two-game road trip in Lexington
onFeh. 15.
Findley started that game, but
could only manage two points
and one rebound in the first
half. He sat out most of the
second half.
In the second game of the
road trip on Feb. 17 against the
University of Tennessee in
Knoxville, Findley again found

CLIFF COX
... replaced Findley

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SAYS OF BARTLETT'S DECISION

it difficult to find the range
coming up with only two points
and three rebounds in the first
half of play.
An oddity occurred! at the
beginning of the second half of
the Tennessee game. Findley did
not come out for the jump ball,
something he has done at the
start of every half in every game
this season.
In the last two home games,
against Ole Miss and Mississippi
State in Florida Gym, Bartlett
used Findley only for the jump
ball to start each half of play.
Sophomore forward Cliff Cox
has replaced Findley, almost
immediately, after each jump
ball. Findley did not get any
points or rebounds in either of
the two games.
Cox replaced Findley in the
Georgia game last Saturday and
led the team in scoring with 20
points and in rebounding with
10. Findley tallied only six
points and did not get one
rebound*
So, in the last five games,
Findley has managed only 10
points and four rebounds.
Findley said he was
dumbfounded over what Bartlett
had said about his performance
and he added that since the
Tennessee game, the Gators have
gone back to their old defense
and he just couldnt understand
why he hasnt played since.
Every player on the team
will tell you he is the best man
on the team if hes not playing,
Bartlett said. I thought by
putting Earl on the bench he
would learn a lot more.
Earl can jump out of the
gym and has a good shooting
touch, but he has a lot to learn.
Findley was not a very good
player in high school and was

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TuMday, March 3,1970, The Florida Aligator,

the best player on a bad team
at Palm Beach Junior College
before transferring to Florida
this year, Bartlett said.
This is his first year in major
college competition. Earl is what
we call a late comer. Now it is
just a matter of him continuing
to work and improve with time,
but it will be up to Earl to bring
himself out of this recent
slump.
Bartlett confirmed that
Findley had come in to aee him.
Yes, we talked it over and 1
think that Ear! was pleased when
he left my office. I really dont
think that there is all that much
to it.
My job is to come up with
the best possible combination to
try and win basketball games
and Cox has looked good in
practice. That is why Cox has
been playing and Earl is not.

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EARL FINDLEY
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Page 13



Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 3,1970

Gators Alvarez Gets
All Academic Honors

Florida sophomore receiver
Carlos Alvqrez has been named
Academic All-America in
football, another first for the
Cuban refugee.
Alvarez became the first
sophomore to earn consensus
All-America honors since SMUs
Doak Walker in 1947 as he
wound uo second in the nation
if|
I ii||
CARLOS ALVAREZ
... more honors

Andy Owens Named
SECs Best Student

Gator captain Andy Owens,
the fourth leading scorer in the
SEC, has been selected for the
1970 Academic All-SEC
basketball team, with the highest
academic average of the five first
team selections.
Owens is an A student in
finance and law, with a 27.2
scoring average.
Others selected to the team
were, center Dan Issel of
Kentucky, with a B average in
business and a 34 pdint scoring
average; guard John Mengelt of
Auburn, a B-plus physical
education major who averages
27.5 points on the court;
forward Mike Pratt of Kentucky,
a history major with a B average
No Game Today
Contrary to what appeared in
the Alligator on Monday, the UF
baseball game with South
Florida will be played tomorrow
at 4 pjn. instead of today on
Perry Field.
Soup Money
After his New York Jets won
the professional football title in
January, Coach Weeb Ewbank
received SI,OOO or more for
banquet speeches.
Mustang*)^.
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and helped lead Florida to a
9-1-1 season and the Gator Bowl
title in 1969.
He was the only sophomore
first team All-America and he
repeated this feat on the
academic all-star team.
Alvarez, an honor student in
Pre-Law, is the first Florida
football player to make the
academic star squad.
Joining Alvarez on the
offensive team were Michigans
Jim Mandich at end, Notre
Dames Jim Reilly and Colorado
States Tom French at tackles,
Michigan States Ron Saul and
Southern Californias Harry
Khasigian at guards, Armys Ted
Shadid at center, Purdues Mike
Phipps at quarterback, Penn
States Charlie Pittman,
Arkansas Bill Burnett and
Navys Dan Pike at running
backs.
This is a wonderful honor,
said Alvarez. My father was a
lawyer in Cuba and I have the
same interest in this field that he
has always had.

and a 20.4 scoring average, and
guard Ron Coleman of Ole Miss,
who has maintained a B average
as a physical education major
and has hit for 20 points per
game this season.
This is the strongest academic
SEC team that has been selected
since recognition of these special
student-athletes as an all-star
unit began in 1962.
To be selected for the team, a
player must maintain a B or
better classroom average. The
five selections from this year
being nominated for the
Academic All-America team,
which is selected annually by the
Organization of College Sports
Information Directors.

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GOLD MEDAL WINNER PAUL ANDERSON DURING RECENT EXHIBITION
... holds weightlifting record in the back lift at 6,270-pounds
Worlds Strongest Man,
Paul Anderson To Speak

Paul Anderson, billed as the strongest man in
the world, will speak and give a weight-lifting
demonstration at the Baptist Student Center, 1604
W. University Ave., at 8 p. m. Thursday.
Anderson, who has won gold medals in Olympic
competition, holds the world record of lifting at
6,270-pounds on a back lift. He has also lifted
elephants and trucks before.
A stumpy, round man, Anderson is a member of
the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and operates a
home for teenagers who are apparently unwanted
by their families.
Among Andersons favorite feats are driving a
20-penny nail through a couple of one-inch boards
bare-handed and lifting part of his audience on a
platform.
He stands about 5-feet-10 and weighs 375-pounds
with 36-inch thighs, about the size of the average
mans waist.
Anderson attended Furman University on a
football scholarship as a blocking back.
The Vidalia, Ga. weight-lifter has spoken to
thousands of college students across the Nation and

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around the world. He has also spoken to students
over Easter breaks at Daytona Beach.
Anderson makes about 500 appearances each
year with all proceeds going to his home for
underprivileged youth in Vidalia. He is only 36
years-old and estimates that he will not reach his
peak until the age of 40.
On a recent visit to Marion College in Indiana
Anderson said, Three billion people or moreon the
face of the earth call me the Strongest Man in the
World. I say these things not to impress you but to
make a point. The point is this: my athletic career is
thrilling its a thrill to be an Olympic champion
but the greatest thing in my life is being a Christian,
having the opportunity to stand up and witness for
Jesus Christ.
Anderson frequently reads his own poetry at his
appearances, also.
Tickets for Andersons appearance can be
purchased for $1 at the Record Bar, Belks in the
Gainesville Shopping Center, the Gold Coast
restuarant, the Reitz Union box office or at the
Baptist Student Center.



Eight Swimmers Make NCAA Finals

Floridas swimming coach Bill Harian will tell you the best areas in
the country for recruiting promising talent are the
Philadelphia-Wilmington area and the Sunshine State of Florida.
His reasons are simple. The Gators have qualified eight swimmers in
jg events for the nationals, three of them come from the
Philadelphia-Wilmington area and three from Florida.
Mark McKee and Bill Domey of Newtown Square, Pa., and Gary
Chelosky of Claymont, Del., head the list of Gators that have
qualified for the nationals set for Salt Lake City, Utah, in late March.
Bruce Williams of Eustis, Fla., and Jimmy Perkins of Gainesville,
Fla., Steve McDonnell of Columbia, Mo., along with divers Bob Link
of Roswell, N. Mex., and Ray Smith of Miami, Fla., round out the list
of Gators who have qualified for the nationals. Harlan expects several
others to qualify at the Southeastern Conference meet at the
University of Georgia on March 5-7.
This is the best group of swimmers Ive ever taken to the
nationals, stated Harlan. We hope to qualify more swimmers this
year than ever before and expect several to qualify at the SEC meet.
In 1969 the Gators finished higher than any other Southern team at
the nationals when they placed ninth. This year the Florida swimmers
have compiled a 7-1 dual meet record and placed second to national
power Southern Illinois in the Southern Intercollegiate
Championships.
McKee, a junior, has qualified for the nationals in the 200-IM
(2:00.2), 400-IM (4-15.1), 200-breast (2:14.9) and the 200-free
(1:45.4). Domey made the grade in the 100-back (55.1), 200-back
(2:00.5) and a member of the 400-medley relay that has a 3:34.5
clocking.
One of the biggest surprises has been Chelosky, a freshman. He has
qualified in four events, 100-breast (1:00.4), 200-breast (2:12.6),
200-IM (2:00.7) and the medley relay. He has been ranked in the top
five in the nation in the 200-breast.
Junior Bruce Williams has qualified in the 100-free (47.8), 200-free
(1:45.4) and is also a member of the medley relay. Perkins is set for
the national in the 200-breast with a 2:16.0 clocking. McDonnell, a
freshman, is a member of the medley relay team.
McKee, Williams and Perkins were All-Americans in 1969.
Famed Sportscaster
Dies Os Heart Attack

CHICAGO (UPI) Paul
Christman, 51, a former
All-America football player and
commentator on college football
Ball Players
End Hold Out
VERO BEACH (UPI)
Pitcher Don Sutton and
outfielder Len Gabrielson ended
one-day holdouts Monday by
agreeing to terms for the 1970
season with the Los Angeles
Dodgers.
Sutton, a 17-game winner,
signed a contract for an
estimated $32,500 late Monday,
after Gabrielson, who led
National League pinch-hitters
with a .333 average, agreed to a
contract estimated at $28,000
earlier in the day.

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Alligator is now
Q 'cepting applications for
ADVERTISING
[salesmen

on television for almost a score
of years, died Monday of a heart
attack.
Christman, who was
quarterback at the University of
Missouri, later played
quarterback for the Chicago
Cardinals, now the St. Louis
Cardinals, in the National
Football League and directed
them to their only NFL
Championship, in 1947.
After he retired from pro
football he went into radio and
television work and had been the
color man on college football
telecasts almost since they
began.
Christman was admitted to
Suburban Lake Forest Hospital
about midnight Saturday and
placed in the cardiac care unit.
The hospital said that at about
11:45 CST Monday, He had a
severe heart attack and expired.

-fr 1 1 nimnrnr inrrnmnniiMnnnnniin iTiiiinMHinnnmtimnrT
jfk >* 'll
H ... ' < v
Lm.
MARK McKEE
... made four events

SAYS JAMES SMITH

Tennis Opened New World

BOSTON (UPI) It was 30
years ago when a pretty good
athlete named James Smith
swaggered up to a tennis court
and challenged the players.
Smith, now 54, still recalls
that the other kids were playing
for nickles, I lost my money in
nothing flat.
Instead of being humiliated
by the loss, Smith decided to
learn to play tennis. And, some
years ago, he decided to teach
tennis to others because it
opened a new world to me, a
world I didnt know existed.
Accordingly, James A. Smith,
a Negro, married and the father
of a son, a resident of Bostons
Roxbury district, set out to
teach others tennis.
He taught the youngsters in
the Roxbury ghetto
neighborhood. He taught others,
both black and white, who
showed up for the lessons on a
nearby playground.
Over the years Smith has
helped teach tennis to maybe
600 youngsters.
But throughout that time, it
bothered Smith, an employe in
the education division of action
for a better community
development, that the tennis
lessons were limited to perhaps
50 youngsters a year when the
weather was right.
Smith saw that just one
player, Arthur Ashe, had
cracked the racial barrier in
tennis. He contacted Ashe and

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scheduled a banquet in the
Bradford Hotel Ballroom.
Ashe, intrigued by the mans
fight to do something he
believed in, attended the
banquet and helped the tiny
organization realize a few
thousand dollars.
The funds were immediately
earmarked for the start of
construction of eight lighted
outdoor courts.
Graduate students at famed
Masschusetts Institute of
Technology drew up plans for
Smiths dream house, a building
to house four indoor courts.
But everything costs money,
much more than the nickels Jim
Smith lost in his first tennis
game.
Quite a few people, including
Arthur Ashe, believe in Jim
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Tuesday, March 3,1970, The Florida AlNfator,

JIMMY PERKINS
... 1969 All-American

Smith and what he's trying to
do.
Accordingly, Ashe will pass
up a chance to win $17,000 in
prizes and expenses in a Swedish
tour next week to serve as the
key attraction in Smiths indoor
tennis center benefit
tournament.
The sportsmen's tennis club
has borrowed Harvard
Universitys Palmer Dixon
indoor courts for a March 9-11
tournament to be played along
Davis Cup lines.
Ashe, Stan Smith, Bob Lutz
and Clark Graebner will
represent the U.S. John
Newcombe, Tony Roche and
Fred Stolle will represent
Australia.
And Jim Smith will represent
the future.
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Page 15



Page 16

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, March 3,1970

UF Readies For 2 7th Florida Relays

Plans are being finalized for the 27th annual Florida Relays,
Director of Athletics Ray Graves Mid Meet Director Jimmy Carnes
jointly announced Monday.
The famed relay carnival is scheduled for Friday and Saturday,
March 27 and 28. Freshman, junior college and open events will be
held on Friday and the high school and university teams will see
action on Saturday.
Johnny Oelkers, former United States assistant Olympic track
coach and trade mentor at Tulane University will serve as meet
referee. Oelkers is considered one of the top track authorities in the
nation.
The Florida Relays, founded by former Gator track coach Percy
Beard in 1939 has developed into one of the largest and most
competitive meets in the nation.
Entries have been received from over 30 universities, 20 freshman
and junior college teams Mid over 100 high schools are expected to
enter the top competition.

Aaron, Kaline Move To First Base

By United Prat International
What was good enough for
Stan Musial and Mickey Mantle
may prove just right for Hank
Aaron and A1 Kaline.
Musial and Mantle, who
played the outfield during most
of their illustrious careen,
finished up their playing days at
fust base and Aaron and Kaline,
with a total of 33 yean of major
league experience between them,
may follow suit.
Aaron, the perennial all-star
outfklder for the Atlanta
Braves, worked out at first base
again Sunday in the absence of
holdout Orlando Cepeda. The
slugging Cepeda is seeking a raise
to $90,000 but the Braves have
offered him even less than the
$83,000 he earned last season
when he helped lead the Braves
to the National Leagues Western
Division crown with 22 homers
and 88 runs batted in.
Cepeda let it be known from
his home in Puerto Rico that he
plans to remain at home until he

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;/J| . .'
i jbobsf
I WITHOUT REALLY TRYING

agrees to terms, lending
substance to reports that the
Braves might seek to trade him
before the start of the season.
Cepeda was traded to the Braves
only a year ago from the St.
Louis Cardinals who had
acquired him in a trade with the
San Francisco Giants.
Kaline has been splitting his
time this spring between right
field and first base, but the
17-year veteran of the Detroit
Tigers missed Sundays workout
at Lakeland after complaining of
not feeling well. Another
absentee from the Tigers drills
was utility infielder Dalton
Jones who was suffering from an
upset stomach.
While most clubs are seeking
changes that will help them
improve on 1969 performances,
the Baltimore Orioles have let it
be known they may go with the
same lineup that carried them to
the American League pennant.
Theres always room for
improvement, said Oriole
Manager Earl Weaver as his club

TO BE HELD MARCH 27-28

We are looking forward to having the finest field of athletes ever
assembled for a track meet in the South, said Gator track coach
Jimmy Carnes. We are expecting the largest entry list ever and every
relay record will be in jeopardy.
University teams expected to enter the meet include Illinois, North
Carolina, Baptist College, Georgia, Memphis State, Georgia Tech,
South Florida, Florida A&M, Florida State, Eastern Kentucky,
Clemson, Pittsburgh, Ohio U., Richmond, East Tennessee State,
Columbia U., Southern Illinois, U. S. Naval Academy, Yale, Texas,
Ohio Wesleyan, Western Kentucky, Penn State.
The university list also includes Auburn, Alabama, Tennessee Tech,
Miami of Ohio, Delaware, Duke, Tulane, Cornell, Brown, Michigan,
Rochester, Mayland, Kentucky, South Carolina, Furman and many
others.
Heading the list of entrants is Southern Illinois sprinter Ivory
Crockett. Last summer he defeated John Carlos for the AAU 100-yard
dash championship.

went through its fifth day of
workouts. But when a club
wins its division by 19 games,
its pretty hard to find fault with
the performance of anyone.
The Orioles will hold their
first intrasquad game today
minus the services of first
baseman Boog Powell, second
baseman Dave Johnson and lefty
pitcher Dave McNally, all of
whom became official holdouts
Sunday.
Also facing holdout problems
are the Cincinnati Reds who are
still unable to satisfy second
baseman Tommy Helms, pitcher
Jim Maloney and third baseman
Tony Perez. Helms, seeking a
raise from the $40,000 he got
last year, complained they
wont give me a nickel more,
while Maloney refused to take a
cut and a club spokesman
admitted the team and Perez
are pretty far apart.
The Los Angeles Dodgers
signed 20-game winner Bill
Singer for an estimated $45,000
while A1 Campanis, the clubs

director of player personnel, said
he and 17-game winner Don
Sutton are very close to
agreement. Other Dodger
holdouts include catchers Tom
Haller and Jeff Torborg.
A1 Oliver drove in both runs
with a single and an infield out
as die Willie Stargells beat the
Bill Mazeroski, 2-1, in the
Pittsburgh Pirates intrasquad
game; Pat Kellys two run triple
and a run scoring double by
Amos Otis highlighted a
three-run third inning which
carried the Schultz to a 4-2
victory over the Dunlops in a
Kansas City Royals intrasquad
game; and Dave Nelson was the
star of the Washington Senators
intrasquad game with a homer,
double and single.
Lefthander pitcher Gary
Peters of the Boston Red Sox

I DONT GET I
JAMMED
into a teaching position thats unsatisfactory and a
place you cant stand. Your prospective students
need your full attention and only if youre happy can
you give them what they need. Its your career, be
selfish enough to make it a good one.
Theres no question about it-students in elemen elementary
tary elementary and high schools creed young teachers, with
fresh progressive ideas/to answer and satisfy their
thousands upon thousands of questions. Answers
that, when handled creatively and interestingly, not
only give information but cause young minds to
mold into strange-wonderful patterns. A good
teacher is a catalyst. They need you. Chicago needs
you.
But over and beyond their need, a starting salary
of $8,400 annually and one of the highest teacher
salary schedules in the nation indicate that Chicago
wants to satisfy the needs of its community.
Your endeavor may be needy students and an ade adequate
quate adequate salary-but then again it may be a healthy
non-stop social environment and night life, a 10
mile lake front beach, open air concerts, the ballet
or fine colleges and universities to continue your
education. The community of Chicago, on the shore
of Lake Michigan.
Get off to a good start in your career. If youre
a graduating senior with a degree in education, in investigate
vestigate investigate teaching in the Chicago Public Schools. ;.
For further information write:
DIRECTOR OF TEACHER RECRUITMENT
Chicago Public Schools, 228 N. La Salle Street,
{ Chicago, Illinois 60601
I lam interested in teaching: Grades K-3 4-6 7-8
* High school Special Education
i subject area {
Miss
| Mr.. :
i Address
j City State Zip
i I
II College Graduation I
srr. tno. J

JgH
:
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*rM
I -. <*m& r
: : ; ;:^S
IV
rn £1 .K
-
JIMMY CARNES
... expects large entry

resumed working out after
missing five days with a pulled
muscle in his back; the Montreal
Expos announced that outfielder
Jim Fairey will undergo surgery
Tuesday for damaged cartilage in
his left knee; rookie shortstop
Tim Foli continued to impress
the New York Mets camp at St.
Petersburg; and the San Diego
Padres whipped the Mexico City
Tigers, 9-1, as rookie outfielder
Julio Morales hit a homer for the
winners.
The Ozzie Virgil-coached
team downed the Wes
Westrums, 3-2, as the San
Francisco Giants held their first
intrasquad game; and Seattle
Pilots manager Dave Bristol was
pleased with the pitching of
John ODonoghue and Johnny
Morris as he conducted a full
workout in intermittent rain and
persisting wind.