Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62, No. 91

8 APPLICANTS

Alligator Editor
Elections Today
The Board of Student Publications (BSP) is scheduled to meet most
of the day today to select an Alligator editor from among eight
applicants and a managing editor from two candidates. Both
appointments are for the Spring quarter.
Originally scheduled to make the selection last Monday, BSP
members chose to postpone the selection when the election of
Seminole and Florida Quarterly editors took longer than they had
anticipated.
Prof. Hugh Cunningham, chairman of die student-faculty board,
said die BSP subsequently decided to solicit additional applications

Infirmary Bids
Night Service
Beginning tonight, all
out-patient service at the
Infirmary will be transferred to
the emergency room of the
Shands Teaching Hospital in the
J. Hdlis Miller Health Center
from 11:30 pm. to 7:30 am.
Student Health Services
Director Wilmer Coggins said
the change is being made
because of financial reasons.
We are caught in an
increasing cost spiral and cannot
afford to keep the Infirmary
staffed 24 hours aday, he said.
This service already exists on
campus, so there is no reason
for us to continue to duplicate
it.
Coggins said this change will
not affect the current fee
system. Shands emergency
room will provide the same
services normally provided by
the Infirmary seeing a
physician, basic laboratory
charges and simple
medications.
Any additional services will
be billed, which is regular
Infirmary policy, Coggins said.
The Infirmary will still
provide a staff during the dosed
hours to provide for in-patients.
Also, students will still be
admitted to the Infirmary, if the
staff at Shands emergency room
thinks it necessary.
JFC Prof Awards
Voting Begins
Voting for Interfratemity
Councils annual professor
awards will be today and
Tuesday with the awards
presented at Winter Frolics
Friday night, Service Chairman
Doh Ostergard said Sunday.
Polling places will be open
from the beginning of second
period to the end of seventh
period both days. Students must
show their indentification cards.
Students may vote at the
following places: Graduate
Library, Matherly, J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, Spessard Holland
Law Center, Stadium, Florida
Gym, between Little Hall and
Walker Auditorium, Engineering,
McCarty, Norman and Leigh.

The
/*... vr
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

for tiie posts since there were
only two applicants for each of
the offices.
He emphasized the move was
not indicative of board
dissatisfaction with the original
applicants and that no discussion
of their qualifications had taken
place last Monday.
The appointments had
originally been scheduled for a
two-quarter term, but the BSP
also voted to reduce this to the
Spring quarter only.
Cunningham explained the
board is currently considering
changing tenure terms from
Fall-Winter and Spring-Summer
to Summer-Fall and
Winter-Spring.
He said if the board chose to
leave the terms unchanged those
selected for the two top
editorships today may be asked
to remain in office through the
summer quarter.
Candidates for editor include
Alligator Executive Editor Carol
Sanger and journalism senior
Jimmey Bailey, a former
Alligator columnist and an
announced candidate for
election to the State House of
Representatives on the American
Independent Party ticket.
Both Miss Sanger and Bailey
were the original applicants for
the post.
Those applying since last
Monday include Helen Huntley,
former assistant news editor and
currently a staff writer; Neal
Sanders, a former assignments
editor; Larry Jordan, a former
staff writer and current Student
Government Secretary of
Minority Affaire.
Also, Robert A. Fraser and
Jerry Roberts, both seniors in
and Ed. C. Watkins,
a former paste-up assistant in the
Student Publications production
laboratory.
Vying few the managing editor
post are Assistant News Editor
Karen Eng and Sports Editor
Sam Pepper.
The BSP has scheduled
interviews with the editor
applicants at 45 minute intervals
beginning at 2:30 pm. today.
The interviews are expected to
run late into tonight.

The University of Florida, Gainesville

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The UF campus reverberated to the sounds of the
Rotary Connection and the Celebration this
weekend at the Rathskeller. A crowd of about 500
students crowded into the room Saturday night;

READS NEW SEATING ACT

Senate Passes Budget Bills

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Thursday
night passed a new Athletic
Seating Act, gave a second okay
to a new budget preparation law
and passed eight zero budgets
along with the Accent *7l
budget.
A zero budget is one
submitted by an organization
but not granted any Student
Government funds.
The new budget preparation
law was passed on the second
reading despite a veiled threat by
Student Body President Charles
Shepard to veto the bill.
The bill requires the president
and treasurer to sign the budget
into law as a unit instead of
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UF*S OMBUDSMAN service
has been taken over by
Gamma Beta Phi honorary
society 2
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 10
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 10
SmaU Society 6
Sports 13

signing a collection of individual
organization budgets. Shepherd
opposed the bill both because of
the limitations it places on the
executive and its potential to
create corruption.
I thought it stank when I
was a sophomore, he said,
referring to a similar system used
at UF before the present system
was adopted. I still think it
stinks.
Refering to the system used at
UF four years ago he said, *T
witnessed a tremendous amount
of wheeling and dealing outside
the senate chambers.
He contended the bill would
cause pressure groups to form
coalitions mid pass a whole
budget with inequitable
provisions.
A new Athletic Seating Act
was passed on the first reading.
It is meant to replace the present
act, described by one member of
the senate as a potpourri of
rules and ideas collected over the
last few years.
The new act, if it passes a
second reading and is signed into
law by Shepherd will:
t Form a Student Athletic
Seating Commission to take
charge of all matters of athletic
seating.
Form a Group Seating
Commission to administer all

Monday, March 2, 1970

singing along, swaying in their seats, jumping on the
stage and just generally grooving. The Rotary
Connection stayed on stage until 3 Sunday morning.

bloc seating in accordance
with provisions established
within this law and within
policies prescribed by the
Student Athletic Seating
Commission.**
Form a Spirit Committee
to control all activities related to
school spirit at all
inter-collegiate athletic events. It
will also be in charge of a spirit
section.
The bill provides that aO
agurizations or groups that
have participated in group
seating in the previous year must
be notified by the Group Seating
Commission of deadlines for
group seating at least four weeks
in advance.
According to the bill, the
spirit section will consist of not
more than 1,500 seats between
the 35- and 50-yard lines. It will
perform card tricks and assist
the band and cheerleaders in
cheers.
Membership in the section is
open to all full-time UF
students. Application must be
during the May preceeding the
football season.
A motion was defeated which
would have eliminated the spirit
section completely, both as an
economic measure and because
of student opposition to the
id£a.



Page 2

V^ytoHdiAHieo^< W 2/4970

Kirk Aides Shot
Governor's Club
fles To Press

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PHIL COPE
'COME TOGETHER
The Rotary Connection gave UF students a free concert Saturday
frimoon at the love-in on the Plaza of the Americas. Miss Minnie
Ripperton, the group's singer, joined in with the clay's fun.
PICTURES ON DISPLAY

Miss Seminole Vote Begins

jT
A photographic display of the
1970 Miss Seminole finalists will
open on the first floor of the
Reitz Union today at noon.
Students will be able to cast
nicker votes through Friday
and the winner will be
announced March 9.
Finalists are Carol Holcomb,
Pat Klonne, Marie-Louise Lodge,
Sharon Keller and Shiela Miller.
They were selected two weeks
ago from a field of 35 entrants.
Students will vote by
depositing five cents or more in
boxes marked for each girl. The
money ballot will count 60 per
cent of the competition. The
gWs will be ranked by the
money they collect, and
proceeds will go to the Gator
Loan Fund.
The final 40 per cent of the
competition points will be
determined by a panel of three
judges who will view the
photographs this week.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next

mi " 1

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov.
Claude Kirks two assistants, admittedly
trying to take the edge off a legislative
investigatory of the Governors Club,
uri&cked filftl cabinet full of club
recorder hewsfeen Sunday.
Among the thousands of documents
opened for inspection already
subpoenaed by the House Elections
Committee after a monthsdong court
battle some showed:
234 persons have contributed to
the secret-membership fund-raising
dace its founding in April
Wri end nine es theae had contribarii
sCrit er nan. Membership fee mm
TMi pii jiim
# Nineteen of the dub members de

Nine or ten pictures of each
gid are on display inside the first
floor doors.
We enlisted Bill Home who
has a local studio to shoot the
girls for us and he did a fantastic
job, Seminole Editor Ken
Driggs said.
He said the five finalists will
all be featured in a color spread
in the 1970 Seminole.
We decided to bring the Miss
Seminole contest onto campus
this year to give students more
exposure to the yearbook,
Driggs added.
I think the money angle will
provide a service to the general
student body as well.
Money donated to the Gator
Loan Fund is matched by
federal funds. The total is made
available to students on both
loan and scholarship bases.
Carol Holcomb was sponsored
by Kappa Delta sorority, Sharon
Keller by Tau Epsilon Phi

Gamma Beta Phi Mans
UF Ombudsman Service

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
AHipnor otaTT wnw
Gamma Beta Phi, the only
coeducational honorary service
organization on campus, has
taken over the manning of the
Ombudsman.
The service allows students to
dial 392-1650 or stop by room
232, Reitz Union, and register
complaints or ask questions,
Gamma Beta Phi President
Richard Spool said.
A machine which tapes
messages makes it possible for
students to call at any time. A
student just leaves his complaint,
name and address. The
Ombudsman then contacts
someone who can eliminate or
ease the problem.
Office hours are between 1:30
and 5, and 7 and 9 Monday;
2:30 and 5,7 and 9 Tuesday; 12
and 5,7 and 9 Wednesday; 1:30
and 5 Thursday, and 12 and 5
Friday.
He said Gamma Beta Phi is
doing this on a temporary basis
this quarter.
It is really up to the next
student body president whether

fraternity, Pat Klonne by Delta
Tau Delta fraternity, Sheila
Miller by Alpha Epsilon Phi
sorority and Marie-Louise Lodge
by Delta Delta Delta sorority.
MINI-FOSTER
I LEARNED a new
HOUSEHOLD WORD
today
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business with the state on a basis other
than competitive bidding.
Forty of the members have been
appointed to public offices by Kirk, not
including things at the local
level or cfepnty patronage comnuttccs./
The Governors Club which Kirk
said he was renaming the Peoples
Club when he disclosed limited
information about it two weeks ago
owes $16,000 to Jack Behringer of Fort
Lauderdale as the last remnant of two
loans totaling $90,000 made from a
Mari ftp*bank when the dub
was founded.
A total of 31 of the dub members
ponding to a recent questionnaire
fid they did not want then names

A NEW PROGRAM AAf*
OF INTEREST TO l)f[ fc

we continue the project next
quarter. The head of the project
is a Student
Government-appointed
position, Spool said.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd recently
appointed Heidi Earnhardt, a
member of Gamma Beta Phi, to
this position.
Since the members of Gamma
Beta Phi range from freshmen to
graduate students, they will be
Former Editor
May Face
'Contempt'
Former Alligator editor Dave
Reddick may face contempt of
court charges Tuesday for
reporting in the Gainesville Sun
the alleged contents of a suicide
note left by UF student Kenneth
West Anderson.
Copies of a summons from
Alachua County Judge John
Connell were sent Friday to
Reddick, City Editor Nick Tatro
and Executive Editor Ed
Johnson, all of the Gainesville
Sun.
Connell said in the summons
that the trio were
contemptuous of the orders and
directives of the court and show
utter and total disrespect for and
disregard of the dignity and
authority of said court.
The three Sun employes were
ordered to appear before
Connell to show cause why they
should not be held in contempt
of court for publishing the
alleged contents of the note.
According to the summons,
Reddick had been ordered not
to report the contents of the
note until the court could act on
a request by Andersons parents
to keep the material out of
public record.

released to the public, but mo f
members replied they had 1
objections. no
Governors Club
fail'fc jibe
the Wst&ony olf George H. r Zt
head of a Miami engineering
before a legislative committee that he
contributed SIB,OOO to the club 0 f
which $15,000 was to get former Kirk
assistant Tom Ferguson fired.
Club records show Kunde and two
Jeffries and Richard K
Johnson, Iwve contributed a total of
sl7*ooo, although $16,000 was
contributed shortly before Ferguson left
Kirics ottaalast year.

familiar with many of the
problems students encounter,
Spool said.
Spool said his organization
has the manpower necessary to
handle the project. There are
problems, but we think we can
iron them out, he said.
The Ombudsman is able to
cut through red tape for
students, Spool said.
We may not be able to solve
all problems, but we will try.
~ AUI % ..
DAVE REDDICK
... exposed note's content
Johnson said the Sun had the
information before the order not
to publish it was issued.
There is a public right, I
feel, Johnson said,
particularly within this
instance.
We felt then, and still do,
that the publication of the
details were well within the
publics right to know, Johnson
said.
Reddicks article, in the Feb.
27 Sun, said Anderson had had a
bid trip with mescaline, and
that Anderson thought his
mind was ruined by the drug.
Anderson could not
concentrate and he fell into
despair: Im too proud to
continue living as a burden to
those I love, the story quoted
Anderson as writing.

If You Didn't Have A
Chance To Take Basic
ROTC, You Can Still Take
Advanced Training /
, Jf V'' ._ ;
If you still have two years left at
the University, you may qualify tot
this new 2-year Army ROTC
Program.
t Qualify for an officers
commission in 2 yrs.
Receive SSO per month while
enrolled in the program.
§ Continue your education and
learn to be a leader.
t Fulfill your military obligation
of 2 years active duty, as an officer.
For Complete Information Contact
Maj. Lawrence, Rm. ill, Military
Building or call 392-1395 not later
than 11 March.



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ON DIALOGUE
Shepherd: Must
Create Opinion
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President Charles Shepherd touched on topics
ranging from lowering the voting age to the development of Camp
Wauburg Thursday on WRUF and Florida Blue Keys Dialogue
program-
Shepherd told callers that Student Government is going to take an
active part in the environmental problem in the future as it branches
out into areas of national student concern.
Right now, Shepherd said, students have more voice in the
university community than ever before. He said that out of 88
university committees, students are represented on 33. These 33
committees are those which affect students.
As a result of the Board of Regents decision on tenure, the
President (UF President Stephen C. OConnell) is considering placing
two students on the personnel committee, the student president said.
However, Shepherd said there is a definite problem with the type of
students on committees.
They dont really take an active part in the committees, he said.
He said there are several committees, such as the Wauburg
Committee, on which 50-50 representation among students and
faculty is a realistic goal.
When asked about the necessity of SG at the UF, Shepherd said:
Besides the fact that SG is the administrative agent of the student
body, it is the only organized representative of student thought to the
administration in matters affecting students. If we did not have SG,
we would have a sporadic, irratic representation.
He said SG has been too timid in creating student opinion.
We have merely tried to express student opinion, but now we
must take a leadership role, Shepherd said.
He said Wauburg was a provision for students to get off campus
for a day ... which can make a difference.
Present facilities now consist of a water pump and a bath house
which has walls being held up by a stack of gunny sacks, Shepherd
said.
He is now pushing the Student Senate for appropriations to
construct new facilities on the lakes south shore, moving from its
current north shore site.
What we have in mind is a state park-like facility; nothing fancy or
elaborate just something very rustic, he said.
Answering a question concerning lowering the voting age, Shepherd
said that the youth of this country have displayed more
conscientiousness and dedication to this nation than some of those
who by the grace of age are permitted to vote.
Its not that the youth of today are better than their predecessors,
but they believe that there is no problem which cannot be resolved
through the social commitment of die American people, he said.
He said the University Police Department members are not really
police, they are campus security agents.
It bothers me that anyone on this campus has a gun, whether in
the dorms or on the hip of a campus policeman, Shepherd said.
He said he has enjoyed his two terms as student body president,
the only two-term president in UFs history. He gave three
recommendations:
SG will not retain the extent of its autonomy and responsibility
unless it guards its prerogatives very jealously, especially in the area of
finances;
We are going to have to get students to take more interest in
academics;
Students should be very careful as to whom they select for their
next president as SG has reached a plateau and it will be up to the
next president to take SG from this plateau and do something with
it.
It is up to SG to get students involved, Shepherd said.
Dialogue Features Programs
On Politics, Law Enforcement

WRUFs Dialogue program
will entertain the conservative
and liberal political points of
view when the program is aired
Tuesday night at 11:05.
Jimmey Bailey, campus
conservative, will speak on
conservative thought, while Tom
Batchelder will represent the
liberal political point of view.
A program on law
enforcement is scheduled for the
Florida Blue Key sponsored
program Thursday evening.

Present facilities (at Lake Wauburg)
now consist pf a water pump and a bath >m
hous? whicfi has walls being held up by a
stack of gunny sacks.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd

University police chief Audie
Shuler, Gainesville Police Chief
William Joiner and an Alachua
County Sheriffs deputy will be
guests.
Gainesvilles first radio talk
show solicits questions from the
radio through telephone
conversation and has hosted a
wide variety of guests in the past
including Student Body
President Charles Shephard and
campus radical John Sugg.

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The Cl
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I Select-A-Meal Plan I
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I No Foolin I
I Your Choice of Meals I

I Meats (1)
I Chopped Sirloin Steak
I Fried Filet of Flounder
I Chicken & Dumplings
I Baked Beans & Franks
I Italian Spaghetti
I Pork Steak
I Salads (1)
I Slaw
I Carrot & Raisin
I Beet
I Bean
I Waldorf
I Macaroni
I Jello
I Breads (1)
I Butter-Flake Rolls
I Corn Bread

I Or If Youd Rather I
I Soup, Sandwich 7Qt I
I & Beverage I
I Burger Cheeseburger I
I Basket 60< Basket 70{ I
I with Fr. Fries with Fr. Fries I
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I 1728 W. University 376-2653 I

Monday

Vegetables (2) I
Turnip Greens I
Steamed Cabbage I
Mashed Potatoes I
Green Beans I
Steamed Rice I
Buttered Carrots I
Desserts (1) I
Apple Cobbler I
Banana Pudding I
Chocolate Cream Pie I
Apple Pie I
Cake I
Tapioca Pudding I
Beverages (1) I
Coffee or Tea I
Lemon, Grape, I
Fruit, or Cherry Ade I

Page 3



Page 4

1970

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16 ENGAGEMENTS SET
UF Days Project Begins

Ten UF representatives, including two students,
will go to Volusia and Brevard counties today
through March 11 for a series of 16 speaking
engagements to acquaint citizens in those areas with
the institutions varied educational programs and
future goals.
The University of Florida Days community
relations project is conducted four times each year
in cooperation with the Alumni Association.
Organizations in Collier, Lee, Manatee, Sarasota,
Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Hillsborough, Pinellas
and Polk counties will have similar programs later this
year.
Groups hosting speakers include Rotary, Kiwanis,
Lions, Exchange, Civitans and Junior Chamber of
Commerce.
Listed below is a chronological schedule of
University of Florida Days appearances (clubs,
locations, speakers, dates, and times).
TODAY
Noon Daytona Beach Rotary, Palmetto Club
Dr. George K. Davis, director of the Division of
Sponsored Research.
6:15 pm Melbourne Kiwanis, Host of America
Motel Dr. Charles Proctor, professor of industrial
and systems engineering.
TUESDAY, MARCH 3
12:15 pm. Daytona Beach Lions, Lions Club
House William J. Watson Jr., director of Division
of Alumni Services and executive secretary of the
UF Alumni Association.
12:15 pm. Cocoa Rotary, Rockledge Country
Club Dr. Charles Proctor, professor of industrial
and systems sngineering.
6:30 p.m. Daytona Beach Exchange,
Ridgewood Hotel William J. Watson Jr., director
of the Division of Alumni Services and executive
secretary of the UF Alumni Association.

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6:45 pm. Cocoa Beach Kiwanis, Oceanside
Steak House Dr. William Childers, associate
professor of English and coordinator of the summer
freshman orientation program.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4
Noon Daytona Beach Civitans, Club 92 Dr.
William Childers, associate professor of English and
coordinator of the summer freshman orientation
program.
12:15 pm. Coca Beach Rotary, Holiday Inn
William J. Watson Jr. director of the Division of
Alumni Services and executive secretary of the
University of Florida Alumni Association.
THURSDAY, MARCH 5
Noon Ormond Beach Kiwanis, Danish Table
Restaurant Col. Jere Hudson, professor of
aerospace studies and coordinator of Air Force
ROTC program.
Noon Merritt Island Rotary, Apollo Inn Dr.
Gustave Harrer, director of University libraries.
6:30 pm. Holly Hill Rotary, Holiday Inn
(1202 N. Ridgewood Ave.) Dr. Gustave Harrer,
director of university libraries.
6:30 pm. Ormond Beach Rotary, Billys Grill
(58 E. Granada Ave.) Dane Griffin, senior
student, College of Arts and Sciences, from Ocala.
6:45 pm. Rockledge Kiwanis, Brevard Hotel
Col Jere Hudson, professor of aerospace studies and
coordinator of Air Force ROTC program.
7:30 pm. Daytona Beach Jaycees, Riviera
Hotel Marvin Sylvest, senior student, College of
Education, from Jacksonville.
FRIDAY, MARCH 6
12:15 pm. Cocoa Kiwanis, Brevard Hotel
John A. Nattress, associate dean of the College of
Engineering.
WENDESDAY, MARCH 11
Noon Halifax Kiwanis, Daytona Plaza Hotel
Dr. Harold Hanson, dean of the Graduate School.

Guinier Ends
v y,
V
I Lecture Series I
i|: Ewart Guinier, associate director of Columbia Universitys ;i|:
:£ Urban Center and active anti-poverty crusader, will round out die ft
UFs Black America Series March 6 at 3 pm. in the Reitz $
Union Auditorium.
:j: Can the Blacks Go It Alone? is the topic chosen by jjjji
:5 Guinier, a sociologist-attorney whose formation of the Harlem §
5 Affairs Committee was instmmental in the election of the first $
Negro as Borough President of Manhattan.
:£ Admission to the lecture, last of a four-part series, is 50 cents. :|jj
:$ The Sixth Annual Industrial Editors Learning and jjj:
>: Development Day, sponsored by the College of Journalism and $
:£ Communications, will be held at the college March 7, with i;!;
:£ luncheon and dinner at the Flagler Inn. !:;
Speakers at the session, held in conjunction with the Florida
Magazine Associations weekend board meeting here, will §
include Miss Diane Rush, former editor of State Farm Insurance :|ij
Co.s house publication in Jacksonville, and Miss Julie McClure, ft
editor of Western Electric Co.s Atlanta publication, Service $
% South.
iji Tuesday- Tops Concert, University Concert Band,
jj: University Auditorium, 8:15 pjn. $
;j: Thursday Poetry Reading: Works of John Cage,
v Lawrence Hetrick 111, assistant professor of'English, 122 Reitz §
;v Union, 4 pjn. §
:|: Friday Black America Series: Can the Blacks Go It
>i Alone? Ewart Guinier, associate director of the Urban Center, ::
Columbia University, Reitz Union Auditorium, 3 p.m. §
:j:| Friday IFC Winter Frolics: Johnny Rivers, Sweetwater and
:j: the Celebration, Florida Gym, 7:30 and 10:30 pm. $
Sj: Friday-Sunday Conference: Industrial Editors Learning X;
and Development Days, Flagler Inn and College of Journalism ji'.;
and Communications.
:: Exhibits: Through April 2 The Maya, University Gallery; $
i|: through April 10 African Artifacts, Teaching Gallery. $
6 £

I I * *****

THE MAYA
3 SHOWING
*' Mayan chrmwo came to the
front of artistic emphasis last
week at the UF as the University
Gallery opened its major exhibit
of the year, /The Maya."
Hundreds of black and white
photographs and color slides and
38 artifacts on loan from
museums and private collections
across the nation comprise the
exhibit. Here, Roy C. Craven Jr.,
(left), gallery director, and
student assistant David Bryant
set up a Mayan stone sculpture
on loan from the Peabody
Museum at Harvard University.
The exhibit opened Thursday
and runs through April 2.



GIVING $l3O EVERY MONTH
IFC Help ing Support Palmer Day Care Center

By SUE COSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
The Interfraternity Council (IFC) has shown 21
children at the Palmer King Day Care Center that
they care.
The IFC decided in January to give the center
$l3O each month for the centers operational
expenses, which total about $450 a month.
Mrs. Marion Irey, a supervisor at the' center, said
the center is supported by one-time contributions
and receives no other outside support. She said
funds are available through the federal government
and other sources, but most of them will not

IN COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM
Educators Visit. Evaluate

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The College of Journalism and
Communications was examined
for renewal of accreditation
Thursday and Friday.
The college offers degrees in
journalism, including the
news-editorial, public relations
and technical sequences,
advertising, and broadcasting.
A team of five men visited
classrooms, talked to students
and faculty, examined records
and generally investigated the
college, Dean John Paul Jones
said.
I do not anticipate, any
problems in receiving
accreditation, he said.
He said review for
accreditation usually occurs

news 1
) v
from...!

UNION STRIKE : An unoffical working agreement between
administration and the State Riggers Union, Miich probably would be
acceptable to union members, has been proposed by university
officials.
Grayal Farr, union vice president and defacto spokesman, said
Sunday that Dr. Cecil Macke, FSU executive vice president, suggested
a written agreement which would be legal despite the Florida statute
which prohibits any state agency from negotiating with a
right-to-strike organization.
ACTING VEEP: Robert Kimmel begins interim service today as
Vice President for Students Affairs. Kimmel, formerly an assistant
dean of student affairs, replaces John Arnold, whose resignation was
effective Sunday.
Kimmel said Sunday he would give top priority to completing the
self-study of the student affairs division begun by Arnold.

mAi |ap Friday, March 6 I
U.U j|M
P6r COUpiC BeconlsvMe,ltecorJ Bar |

every live years. However, the
last time was in 1964, so it has
been six years.
They come at our request.
This is the third time we have
been reviewed.
Jones said he has had no
feedback from the committee,
although he has met with them.
We wont know the decision
for some time. The committee
has to report to a national
committee in April.
The Student Advisory
Committee to the Dean selected
60 students to meet with the
accrediting team. Questions such
as the standing of the college on
campus, how many elective
hours a student can take, the
amount of extra reading

llNii^lfsu

appropriate money to centers unless they are
well-established. Palmer King has been in operation
only since last November.
Children at the center, located in the 700 block
of NE First Street, come from families with
combined incomes of less than $3,000 per year.
Mrs. Irey said none of the parents pay more than $3
a week, with some paying as little as 50 cents and
others paying nothing.
Most other centers of this type charge S3O a
month or more.
Mrs. Irey said she feds the Palmer King center is
outstanding because were working very hard to
get a good educational program. These kids never

required and the effectiveness of
faculty were discussed.
The committee chairman,
Neale Copple, is from the
University of Nebraska. Milton
Gross of the University of
Missouri and Frank Schodey of
the University of Illinois were
also on the accrediting team.
These men all educators
were elected nationally by the
Association for Education in
Journalism (ABJ), Jones said.
Other members of the
committee were the editor of
the High Point, N. C.,
Enterprise, Holt McPherson and
the managing editor of the
Miami News, Sylvan Meyer.
Jones said the members of the
group from the industry itself
are selected by various news
organizations across the country.

Spring Frolics On
Spring Frolics is being planned but no entertainers have been
booked yet, Buzzy UnderiU, Interfratemity Council (IFC) program
chairman, said Thursday.
The only news is that Janis Joplin will not be coming.

McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
MUG SPECIALTIES j^j|^
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
0 ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS 0 RING SIZING
DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-8555

get exposed to any tiling.
She emphasized that centers like Palmer King are
important because childrens parents have a chance
to work or learn a trade without worrying about
their childrens care.
She said some 1,200 children in Alachua County
are left without care during the day, and only about
220 children are cared for in centers especially for
low income families.
Mrs. Irey said she hopes more people will become
aware of the needs of the Palmer King center and
others like it will become willing to assist them in
their work.

Fire Ant Remains
Subject Os Study

Extensive programs to
eradicate the imported fire ant
a tiny ant with a terrible sting
have been underway in the
South since the late 19505. But
as yet very little is known about
how the ant affects other insects
in its environment.
Awinash Bhatkar, a graduate
student in the UFs Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IF AS), is studying the
relationships between the
imported fire ant and other
species of ants, as well as other
insect predators.
I want to find out whether
the imported fire ant is
beneficial or harmful with
respect to its effects on the rest
of the insect population,
Bhatkar said.
Bhatkar, a native of Bombay,

: Extinguishers :
Commercial FREE PICK-UP ;
MfiSl DEIIVHY :
Automotive
: Marine HoWc. Tk Co.
* 1010 South Main 378-2694
*** ** * **********************

Monday. March 2,1970, Tha Florida AfNpft*,

explained that in India the
native fire ant (a near relative of
the imported fire ant) is
considered beneficial.
Because the fire ant is
beneficial in India, Bhatkar
said, I became interested in
finding out whether the
imported fire ant might be at all
beneficial in the United States.
Bhatkar has been monitoring
confrontations between fire ants
and other species of ants for
some time now and concludes
that the imported fire ant can
kill any other Florida ant.
Armed with a tape recorder so
that he can catch a play-by-play
of the battles between the ant
colonies, he has seen 42
different species of ants from
North Florida fall to the
imported fire ant.
Imported fire ants are
undesirable from the standpoint
of man because of their painful
sting. They also eat crops such as
okra, cabbage and com when no
other protective insecticides
have been applied.

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 2,1970

Page 6

Lawrence Elected
Fred P. Lawrence, citriculturist with the Cooperative Extension
Service, was elected 1970 president of Gamma Sigma Delta, national
honor society in agriculture recently.
Other UF faculty named were: Dr. Dale Thompson, vegetable
crops, president elect; Dr. Max R. Langham, agricultural economics,
secretary; Dr. Victor Nettles, vegetable crops, treasurer; and Dr. A. C.
Wamick, animal science, historian.
The organization set April 16 as the date to hold its annual honors
banquet.
At the banquet a junior and senior professor of the year will be
named, and two outstanding agriculture leaders in the state will be
honored.

CHILEAN PROF SAYS

'Welcome Aid, Not Control

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Corespondent
Latin American universities
welcome aid, but not control,
from U. S. foundations, Dr. Raul
Urzua, professor of social
sciences at the Catholic
University in Santiago, Chile,
told the 20th Latin American
Conference at UF Thursday.
Lectures in the conference
were in the native language of
the speaker. Urzuas talk was
entirely in Spanish.
Urzua said Latin universities
need help in the financing of
construction, teachers and aid
for their students. At the same
Allen Urges
USF Growth
University of South Florida
President John Allen told state
and university officials this week
a ten-year, 10,000-student
expansion of USF would cost
$55 million.
The costly expansion would
be for development of the
present 12-acre Bayboro Harbor
campus in St. Petersburg.
Allen said high-rise buildings
and multi-level parking garages
for 10,000 students, anticipated
by 1980, would cost about $35
million.
It was estimated that such
growth would necessitate buying
40 to 50 acres adjoining the
present site at a cost of S2O
million.
The $55 million proposal
costs more than is presently
invested in USFs
15,000-student Tampa campus.
Regent Elizabeth Kovachevich
asked whether a feasibility study
of the projects future had been
made.
This is expensive land we are
talking about, she said. Who is
going to pay for it?
Chancellor Robert Mautz said
there has not been a feasibility
study. He said the regents have
no commitment to the high-rise
expansion Allen proposed.

tune, with financial aid conies
control of the universities by
these foundations, which the
students resent.
Students and educators
consider this one more example
of the reliance of Latin countries
on the United States.
U rzua said this cultural
dependence is used by radical
groups who blame the
foundations and the United
States for the universities lack
of initiative.
This is not the only problem
facing the foundations. He said
they have been attacked as being
representatives of American
imperialism;
Urzua said the financial
control of the foundations on
the universities projects an image
of universities being controlled
by the United States and
promoting the idea of
imperialism;

AND IN THE BEGINNING: Genesis II will be shown in the Reitz
Union Auditorium March 2 and 3 at 7 pm. and 9:30 pjn. Admission
is $ 1 for students and $ 1.50 general admission.
MASS MEDIA FOR PEACE: The antiwar mixed media exhibit
sponsored by the SMC on March 14 needs artists to work and people
to help set it up. Call 378-0163.
DONALD DUCK IS A QUACK: Pre-screening interviews for the
Disneyland Summer Recruitment Program are being conducted in the
Career Planning and Placement Center, room G-22, Reitz Union
through Tuesday.
OH, THAT MELANCHOLY MUSIC!: The University Concert Band
will have a concert Tuesday at 8 pm. in the University Auditorium.
SINGLES, COME TOGETHER: The Gainesville Singles Club will
be holding a mixer and dance Tuesday at 8 pm. All bar drinks will be
only 55 cents, no cover charge.
An excellent training shoe with
f adidas features popularly priced.
V Wit* l oxhide uppers and special
H 1 ankle padding, White with blue
stripes.
We accept
Tv ill 1[ !B I Bank American!
'§|g yBJ Master Charge
'
1710 w. r s tab eimt) across from
University ts JX iUj* area

the small society

. i giJesg HE GHoULP
& ua\/e WiZiTreH it com i nevejz
jj ha vp wm w p(?eAMep
, H&'P FoftSeT
AftfSlSi Hl GECIZeT

The growth ot radical groups,
reformists has brought a new
dimension in Latin universities.
These reformists do not accept
the United States as a model.
These groups oppose the
foundations. This is a paradox,
according to Urzua, because
these groups are formed by
people who are a product of the
help given to the universities by
these foundations.
Now this group resents the
domination of the universities
by the North American
foundations.
The proposal made by Urzua
contended North American
foundations should not try to
control the universities. If they
want to help, they should give
grants to the Latin universities,
and let them determine how
thev are to be used.

EVERYONE WELCOME 8
(sfrjAj I
TRUNK m SHOWING I
PLACE: Boardroom-2nd Floor H
Flag lor Inn
DATE: Mar. 3rd. 11AM-4PM I
CLOGS, SANDALS MOON SHOES
- FLATS, HEELS
ONE PAY DELIVERY W
FACTS
SMC Industries will hire 3 students to work weekday
evenings and weekends in Gainesville, (flexible hours).
Work consists of presenting investments to single employed 11
girls. Referrals and telephone appointment plan. NO
CANVASSING! I
REQUIREMENTS I
18-28 personable male with car, good dresser. Business and 9
Psychology majors preferred but not a requisite. aj
BENEFITS I
Job leads to career employment opportunity with
international AAA-1 Dunn & Bradstreet Co. Part-time agents
also qualify for full time. Co. benefits such as FREE group S
insurance & annual Carribean vacations for two, etc. 1
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A GROUP INTERVIEW I
PLACE: REITZ UNION RM. 357
TIME: 11:00 AM and 3:00 AM
DATE: TUESDAY MARCH 3rd
PLEASE BE ON TIME
Jujitsu demonstration
2pm today on the
Union Colonnade l

by Brickman





Before we started putting* tog-ether
The Place we asked a lot of students
a lot of questions about the kind of
living* space they wanted. Your an answers
swers answers are now being* pre-
served in stone and g*lass Sty
and wood just next door to VHK
the University of Florida
campus.
We learned a lot in those surveys...
like the fact that you value your pri privacy.
vacy. privacy. So weve provided individual
entrances to each unit, and were
building* enoug*h soundproofing* to
let your neig-hbor g*et into The Fug*s,
and let you g*et throug*h 78 pag*es of
Camus at the same time.
We also learned that its a hassle
when your roommates Che poster
clashes with your Jackson Pollock
prints... so youll each have a pri private
vate private bedroom at The Place. What
youll be sharing* is no wasteland
either. What with double baths, wall
to wall carpeting*, modern furnish furnishing*s
ing*s furnishing*s and a complete kitchen... your
two story townhouse unit is a fair
cut above the YMCA.

Now under construction at 3rd and 13th

4i
Your life style doesnt keep you in
doors all the time... so were build building*
ing* building* a groovy external environment
too. Therell be landscaping*, a pri private
vate private courtyard, a pool, a recreational
pavilion, and a private patio for each
unit.
Sounds like what you had in mind?
Then dont make a move until you
have all the details on The Place,
soon to be completed just across the
street frofn campus.
.tliei
place)
Just like you
planned it

Monday, March 2.1970. Tho Florida AMpior,

Page 7



Page 8

t, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Match 2,1970

The
Florida
A UwfttPJv
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Cartoon Fosters Bias

MR. EDITOR:
The cartoon on page 8 of the Alligator of Friday,
Feb. 27th prompts me to a reply. I have seen similar
cartoons before and did not consider them worthy
of comment.
However, I think the persistent color of these
cartoons fosters an undesirable bias among
readers of the Alligator, especially since the
Alligator does not attempt to present the facts in a
situation which is very complicated on military,
political, and human levels.
With reference to the cartoon I have the
following comments:
§ There is no evidence that the explosions in the
Swissair and Australian planes were actually caused
by Arab terrorists.
Al-Fateh, the recognized Palestinian resistance
movement, disapproves of such actions, and has
made a statement condemning the sabotage.
Other Arab UF students I have talked to

Whatl You hired a Zionist waiter?

Nixons Southern Strategy*. No Help To G.O.P.

. WASHINGTON lt is now dear that Richard
Nixons Southern strategy so dangerous to the
nation is not even giving the short-term help to
Republicans for which it was designed. The latest
polls show George Wallace losing no ground despite
Spiro Agnews radical speeches, despite the guileful
retreat on school integration and voting rights,
despite Clement Haynsworth and Harrold Carswell.
If Mr/Nixon and Atty. Gen. John Mitchell had
read their history as carefully as they have played
their politics, they might have discovered why the
strategy would not work, and their countrymen
would thus have been spared much pain.
For if history is any guide, it is not racism alone
which is the strength of Wallace it is something
far more difficult to define and it may perhaps be
best explained by a significant electoral study
conducted at the University of Michigan after the
election of 1968.
These election analysts who know their
business set out to determine as best they could
what happened to the votes which went to Robert
Kennedy and Eugene McCarthy in the Democratic
primaries of 1968, but which, of course, were cast
for others if at all in November.
In significantly large numbers, both the Kennedy
and McCarthy votes but particularly the Kennedy
vote went to Wallace.
The explanation given the explicit campaigns
of the three men cannot lie in racism. Any voter
- and there were many who voted for Robert
Kennedy and who then supported George Wallace
can hardly have done so because he found their
views on racial problems compatible. Far more
likely is that he found those views of Kennedy
and Wallace irrelevant.
The explanation lies in the form of protest which
our history calk populism, taking its name from die
Populist Party, which battled Grover Cleveland and

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
3 Carol Sanger i
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
H/icki Vaa Eepoel
News Editor

shared my opinion in disapproving acts of violence
against neutral parties.
Small groups of embittered homeless
Palestinians, driven to die limit of physical and
mental agony by uncontrollable events that ruin
their life and future, may embark on any act of
retaliation.
I do not approve of their activities, and they
definitely do not reflect on the entire Palestinian
nation. However, it might be worthwhile to reflect
on the magnitude cf injustice leading them to such
actions.
The Palestinian resistance, like any other popular
resistance movement, has a basic right to fight
occupation on its own land, resembling the
Norwegian and French resistance against Nazi
Germany, or the Algerian resistance against the
French. As such it is not a terrorist organization.
RAIF HIJAB, 6EG
ARAB PALESTINIAN STUDENT

Benjamin Harrison in 1892 and succumbed to the
oratory of William Jennings Bryan in 1896.
For both Kennedy and McCarthy appeared as
symbols of popular protest McCarthy against the
Frank Mankiawicz Mankiawicz_
_ Mankiawicz_ Tom BracUn
v
way in which a President can manipulate the rest of
government and the individual no chance to
control the basic demons which affected his life,,;,
By November 1968, only Wallace appeared as the
enemy of the established order, only he seemed
willing and able to achieve real change if elected.
And it was that image -of real change which had
earlier caught the vision of the Kennedy and
McCarthy voter.
The specifics of the protest, of course, differed.
But even where they seemed to differ most on
Vietnam Wallace, McCarthy and Kennedy all
articulated a great surge of desire to get out of the
war and in any event to stop being lied to
about it.
Another aspect of American populism is that the
leader must give voice to the anger of the country
he must, in fact, protest, and this Kennedy,
McCarthy and Wallace all achieved.
The trouble with the .Nixon Southern strategy is

EDITORIAL
Abortion Bill
Open-Minded
The abortion bill, approved by the House Public Health
Committee and passed by the Senate, is now left in the
hands of the voter.
Referendum Bill 68, if approved in November, will allow
women not wanting a child, to legally have an abortion by a
licensed physician, in a hospital or other accredited facility,
within the first 16 weeks of pregnancy.
There have been an estimated one million abortions in
this country in recent years; 8,000 of which have been
performed by physicians in hospitals. The remaining cases
have been illegal. The total number of illegal abortions will
without a doubt continue to rise if this legislation is not
passed.
The present bill, labeled by many as being liberal
legislation, is still far more conservative than previous bills
presented to sessions of the State Legislature.
Abortions, which have been illegal in the United States,
except where one is necessary to save the mothers life, has
been classified as a criminal offense for too long.
Primarily affecting the younger voting populace, the final
approval of this referendum must be supported strongly by
these voters.
It is hopeful that enough voters will be as open-minded as
the State Legislature has been in allowing the referendum to
be placed on the ballot.
- Daily Evergreen
University of Washington
Dont Condemn J.P.
MR. EDITOR:
I propose that in this new decade we consider it imperative to
eliminate present discrimination which persists against individuals
with the initials J.P. It is obvious to all intellectuals that the
possession of such initials occurs only by chance and therefore does
not reflect upon ones intellect or capacity to learn.
Just because a few individuals such as Joe Pyne, John Parker, etc.,
are at times obnoxious and asinine, we can no longer tolerate
discrimination against the honorable J. P.s in our society.
v
HAL TAYLOR, 4BA

that it ignores the chief characteristics of populism.
It ignores the spirit of protest, the desire for reform
to turn the country around and the yearning
for individual participation. It ignores the need for
an angry leader.
It borrows from the Wallace movement only the
single issue of race, offering as a spokesman Agnew
who is not angry at the Establishment but angry
in its behalf not die rebel but the warden. And
as the polk show that is not enough,
The history of third party movements in the
United States is that they sting once like a bee
and then die. The reason is that their ideas are
always merged into a major party.
But Mr. Nixon had not adopted any of the
Populist ideas that matter. And by Adopting
Wallace s racism he had bartered the moral
leadership of the nation without apparently gaining
Alligator Staff
a En 9 L Janie Gould
,s ant ews Editor Assignment Editor
John Sugg
Am Fr-anJ," Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
lorida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor. Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
in ,lM F,orid> AlU **'or *o* of
. of the University rfWU. f h d "<>' ,ho



;syrf ?* ** £. & > "''<.-:r
> ,-. -j [ hate been ashed to atmoitnee^^^^^^tiUty' rites
will be omitted from this years festival
Drawing by Ed Fisher
1962, The New Yorker Magazine, Inc.
Arab Culture Is
Charming Too
MR. EDITOR:
Dear Fellow Arabs:
Because I genuinely care about you and because it gives me great
pleasure to see you going places, I feel I have to caution you to watch
where youre going!
Im referring to your recent display of energy at the International
Talent Festival. I was rather disappointed in your portrayal of the
Middle East crisis as representative of Arab culture.
To be sure, every nation has its crises; and we are well aware of the
fear and anxiety that lives with refugees. But youve just got to be
proud that you are still resisting. Youre not in chains now, and you
never have been.
Arabs (Gainesville Arabs), youre a bit mixed up. We spend our
whole lives exposed to the problems of civilization; for this one week
we were supposed to concentrate on International harmony and
understanding**
Dont be ashamed to show off your Oriental charm that has
survived the impact of Western sophistication. Give me the music of
Rahbini and Abdul Wahab, Ive heard Dr. Zhivago. Let me hear the
sound of your lute andyour drums, not the sounds of jets and bombs
dropping.
Show me your flag* and tell me that the red symbolizes revolution,
but dont ignore that green stands for fertility and white for clean
hearts. Dance for me, but show me your folk dances and debkas.
You ask me, where do I go? Go to the festivals in the Cedars and
at Baalbeck; go to the Damascus fairs; take a look at the majestic
pyramids along the Nile. Then come back next year and show me the
Bible Land in the crossfire of history.
REFAZ AHEG
Money For UAC?

MR. EDITOR:
In the interest of good
management and equal
opportunity, the Department of
Administration j# Tallahassee,
has denied approval for the
continuation of certain fringe
benefits currently enjoyed by
the faculty and staff of the State
University System.
Included among these is the
privilege of buying tickets for
athletic events at a reduced
price.
W*th die addition of an
eleventh football game, I
presume that the Athletic
Association wifi be able to
continue to operate in the Mack
a gain for several years. What
does the Athletic Association
intend to do with these monies?

As I. understand it, with the
increase to $7 per ticket per
game, I will be paying $17.50
more for my season ticket this
fall than I would otherwise.
Multiply this times the number
~ of season tickets sold, add the' :
additional revenues from
basketball, track, swimming,
baseball, etc., and you have a
substantial sum.
Might it not be enough to
lower the previously proposed
tuition increase of $6 per
quarter to something more
reasonable? And to reduce the
years this would have to run?
Though not a concrete proposal,
I hope this might be an avenue
for you to explore.
R. A. KENDZIOR
CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE

Speaking Outssssssssssssssss
ii.jiLO iJiTijJo! lfcr'/l JI -103 IDJ
Peftfi orr To D rop 3 D e ftie d
s^ss : By Mark Plossss

Last week I attempted to drop a course in
marketing in the College of Business
Administration. Before I could receive the petition
form I was told that I must see Assistant Dean Sims.
I did so and he asked me to explain what
circumstances had led me to feel that I should be
able to drop the course without a failing grade.
I explained the circumstances which 1 felt to be
valid grounds for permission to drop the course,
otherwise I would not have been there. Dean Sims
reaction, or perhaps 1 should say lack of, shocked
me totally.
He said that as far as he was concerned I didnt
have a valid basis upon which to expect the petition
to be approved.
I then asked Dean Sims what he would consider
to be valid grounds for approval. His reply was: If
your mother and father died and your little sister
was alone in Miami and your nearest relative such as
an aunt lived in Maine and you had to go to Miami
to take care of your sister, then I would say you
have a valid basis for approval. But you had better
have the death certificate stapled to your petition or
even then it wouldnt be approved.
Thats nice, Dean Sims, you strike me as being
truly concerned about and responsive to the needs
of the students in the College of Business
Administration.
I then asked Dean Sims if he had anything to do
with the committee which passed judgment on
student petitions. His reply was in the negative and
told me to go ahead and prepare the petition. I did
so and returned it to his office.
That evening while sitting on my front porch who
do you think I saw driving by? Lo and behold, its
Dean Sims; wonder what hes doing driving by my
house? I received the decision of the committee
Monday: Petition request denied.
I looked down at the bottom of the form and
saw: Chairman, Committee on Student Petitions.
Above it was the signature George R. Sims.
Yessiree, Dean Sims, I guess you dont have
anything to do with the Committee, why after all
youre just the Chairman.
Well, I bet the petition never went before any
committee except a Committee of One and it went
before that committee the day I spoke with Dean
Sims.

UF INEBRIATION
New Kind Os Pollution

MR. EDITOR:
Weekend pollution among UF
students is as expected a
happening as the hourly chiming
of Century Tower.
It is a unique sight to skip
down fraternity row on a
Saturday night and encounter
sobriety, as the trash cans in
back of each fraternity house
attest.
Thus a coed, unlike her
mother, no longer blushes or
slams down the receiver when
her date calls to inquire what
brand she prefers. Instead she
replies with the nonchalance of a
connoisseur, J. W. Dant 100
proof please.
Furthermore, a UF man's
heart no longer skips a beat,
when after informing his date of
the time to be ready, he is in
turn informed of the brand to
bring.
Yes, the sexes have finally
found an area of indulgence in
which no double standard is
raised.
However, as ego-crushing as it
may be, UF did not inaugurate

the social drink. Brewed beers
and fermented wines have been a
part of western culture for over
2,000 years.
The pie-exam drink dates
back to die Romans, who gave
their victims wine before
executing them, as away of
dulling the agony and
anticipation of death.
Along with the Saturday night
social drink, conies the lonesome
Sunday morning hangover,
which has been institutionalized
into the academic environment.
The blank stare at a physics
book and three empty cans of
tomato juice jesting on the desk,
are primary synqitoms.
It is estimated one-half pint of
whiskey takes ten hours to pass
out of the body of an average
weight individual. A poll of 40
UF men revealed Saturday night
consumption to range from one
pint to one-fifth of a quart of
alcohoL Consequently, Saturday
night's indulgence spills into
Monday's blahs and Tuesdays
failures.
Thus, UF has finally made
"the impossible dream a
reality, the number one

Monday, March 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

FORUM:
C AAiiu ml VMt J
no hnpt> L-****^
I dont really know why I am writing this letter,
except because I am still in total shock. I find it
hard to believe that an Assistant Dean must lie to
the very students whom he is there to serve.
1 find it hard to believe that my petition was
turned down, as were the ten petitions which
proceeded mine the week before. I think it is time
to ask the question: Just exactly how many
petitions of a like nature have been approved in the
last year, or should it be decade?
I have many friends in other colleges (at UF) who
have successfully dropped courses during the sixth
week without having to lost their parents to do so.
Why cant this happen in the College of Business
Administration?
One would think that the students were trying to
pull something over on the college, such as dropping
a course in which we are doing poorly (perhaps even
failing).
For some this may be true, and I think their
petitions should be approved if they can show
reasonable cause why they have been unable to
concentrate on then course work.
But for me, such is not the case. I wanted to drop
the course that I was doing the best in! But I
couldnt fake them out, theyre smart turkeys.
Seriously, I hope that in the ftiture the College of
Business Administration will become more
responsive to the needs of its students.
Before I sign out I would like to invite the faculty
and staff to view the flick 1f...

inebriated school in the
Southeast.
. CONNIENIJTIUfO.^UC
LETTERS POLCIY
Letters must:
9Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
9 Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
|§ Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers^
Names will be withheld
only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for
space.
i

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
.e*s-x-x-x->&toVdW>wcc*x*>x.svX
For Sale: Prtv. est. Superb antiques,
o* paintings, fine silver (sterilngt
coins), books (ell subjects), -guns,
swords (civil & rev. Items), glass,
lamps, china, desks, mirrors, oriental
rugs (large & small), fine gold.
Platinum Jewelry,- (No sales tax),
533*2381 Hl-wy 16A, Kingsley
Lake), Starke, Fla. (A*92*2t*p).
firewood, delivered by the cord.
CALL 3 78*2784 or 376*5624.
(A-61-3t-c).

Free 8 Cheese Pizza
With Pitcher of Beer
Good Th, Bllp.m.
Pira&iiua
Clip the
Pizza Inn ylq
Buck Vj9
below fora special t reat! yjp; /
pizza inn doUg~h note
with th JJ ~j/L.
flft. \ pvrcHoz# of ony Z' //T* 1
v\ CMTWrWA\ larf tit* pizza /
\\ 79\ lor 2 medium pizzas.
\\ limit 1 fine Init o
\ I) Dollar par family I Tho Pizza Inn
Offer good \ I / 31* S.W. 16th Avo. /yiVT'ETN
(ONE/ M.r. 29 \ M. 7*41 (ONE;
INN BUCO^InI

A REMARKABLY GOOD COLLECTION I
OF NEW CINEMA!" .0,,. I
d^uJuJJ
I EXTREMELY A BRILLIANT COLLECTION
i I
it,ROUGH THI WHOLE WORTHWHILE .EN I S
RANGE Os CINEMA OF NEW CINEMA
I CINEMATIC EXPLORATIONS
I NOT SUGGESTED FOR IMMATURE AUDIENCES

| FOR SALE
>scwooo&&sccv*sss!sr>K K*ww >:*:*x<'>>i*.*
Spring Is Here! Solve your
Transportation problems with a 2
year old Suzuki 50cc ($110) Must
sell now. Call Bill 392*7511.
(A*94*st*p).
1968. Vandyke 12 x 57 central air
two bedroom 2 bath like new,
graduating must sell- $950 equity +
take over payments. Call 378*6529.
(A-94-st*p).
Parrot and cage for sale. 392*8266.
(A-96-4t-p).

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 2,1970

|oo^
Beat the rent racket, own your home.
8 x 47 mobile home with 10 x 20
paneled cabanna; 10 x 10 covered
patio AC, Central Heat, ect. Call
372- (A-94-st-p).
AKAI 1710 W Reel to Reel
stereo-mono tape recorder. 3 speed,
excellent sound reproduction. 6
months old. S2OO. or best offer. Call
378-5120. (A-94-st-p).
1966 Honda so excellent- condition.
Must sell immediately. SBS or best
offer. Can be seen at 416 NE 7th St.,
Lower rear apt. (A-95-st-p).
If you dig Beads unique & antique
that no one else has : European AM.
& Hong Kong strung and unstrung.
PO Box 16/331 or call 392-8986.
(A-95-3t-p).
For sale, 1968 Yamaha 250 (yds 3)
new rear brakes, rear sprocket, rear
tire. Come by 111 N.W. 19th St. no.
11 to see, Any offer over $325
considered. (A-95-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
LEAR JET STEREO. Eight-track
tape player, with amplifier and
speakers. Excellent condition. SIOO.
378-7943 Ask for Marc. (A-93-st-p).
SPECIAL BASENJI PUPS, AKC
Pedigree, red and white, 3 males and
1 female, shots and womed. Call
468-1121, $75. (A-96-3t-p).
Honda 300 Dream Push button
start and winshleld. Excellent-shape.
$350 or best offer. Call Gary,
373- 1616 N.W. 3rd Ave.
(A-96-2t-p).
2 bedroom, 50x8, furnished with
central heating, air conditioning,
carpeting, $2250 or best offer.
378-8304 after 5. (A-97-st-p)
ROTC seniors: army green and blue
uniforms for man sft+Bin tall also 2
used tires for VW (5.60x15) cheap!
call 378-5402 day or night to 9pm.
(A-97-lt-c)

I FOR SALE i
WPMWO.PC 0
H.B. Contreras 12 string guitar
Excellent Condition S4O Engr.
Drafting Kit $lO 373-1467.
(A-97-lt-c)
Carpets and life too can be beautiful
if you use Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-41-c)
j WWUBPO l)
FOR RENT |
< Uima :.www:-x HELP Im Getting Married! Need a
man to take my place In a modern 2
brm. apt. with everything only 43.50.
Great roommates 376-5542, Danny.
(B-94-4t-p).
Fun in the sun-. 1 female roommate
needed for 2 br. Village Park poolside
apt. for spring quarter. Call Kathy
after 5:30, 378-7061. (B-94-st-p).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
furnished 3 blocks from campus.
Couple preferred, SIOO/mO., come
by before 10 PM, 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave, apt. 21. (B-95-st-p).
Point West 2 bdrm, 2bth, Lux. apt.
to sublet. $l9O. mo. 376-9966 after
6 PM. (B-95-sf-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C B.H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
3-78-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
One bedroom furnished apt. SIOO a
month. Close to campus, 1604 NW
4th Avenue. Kitchen, bathroom,
living and dining rooms. (B-94-st-p).
Sublet: one bedroom apt. TWO
blocks from campus completely
furnished A/C 1605 N.W. 4th AVE.
Call 378-3425 after 4:00 (B-95-st-p).
Across street from campus. Stuaio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. w. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt,
A/C, & H pool, quiet nbhd, parking,
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph. 378-8734.
(B-93-st-p).
Sublease 1 bdr. apt., furnished, pool,
free B-B-Q grill, AC ww carpet, Good
location, Frederick Gardens apts. Call
376-0094 available now. (B-96-3t-p).
One bedroom apartment with living
room, dining room, private bath.
Available March 20. Call 372-9855 or
inquire at 102 N.W. 15th St.
(B-96-3t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet a/c, $120.00 mo., Cable
TV., Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W.
2nd Ave., 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
Needed 1 female roommate for V.P.
apts. $42,50/mo. Available anytime
372- or 392-1107. (b-93-6t-p)
URGENT: Need 1 or 2 female
roomate Landmark 1?7: also 1 male
roommate no. 123; Call 378-5141,
3 7 8-3667: $46.25/mo. Ask for
Barbara or Bob. (B-97-3t-p)
: ; X*x*x*S!
| WANTED
X-X-X-X-X-X-X-V-rX-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-NSTX'X-X*-}'
Male roommate for Spring quarter
Townhouse apt. PHONE
373- 307 S. W. 16th Ave,
Apartment 354. (C-94-st-p).
1 or 2 male roommate wanted for
two bedroom La Bonne Vie apt.
Spring Quarter Call 378-8525.
(C-95-4t-p).
Male roommate, 3 bedroom apt. Ige
private bedroom S4O. mo. 406V2 NE
Ist Ave. 376-0317 after 5.
(C-94-st-p).
Wanted part-time for maintenance
work inside and out. Can learn
outboard motor servicing in
mechanically Inclined. 2605 S.W.
34th St. 372-3344. Help! Honda 305 transmission
busted. Cant afford shop prices.
Need qualified help. Call 376-0882
anytime soon. Will pay reasonably.
(C-96-3t-p). \. v
1 male roommate, apt. 1 Village
Park, */ expenses, 378-8243.
(C-96-st-p).
1 Verhale roommate WANTED to
sublet La Mancha apt. Own room
with utilities furnished. Immediate
occupancy, no. 31 or phone
378-2132. (C-96-3t-p).
3 girls need 4th in beautiful 2 bdrm.
Hawaiian Village Apt. Call 372-2949
ANYTIME. (C-96-st-p).
SINGLE MEN WANTED! Dating can
be fun. Tell us the type of women
you would like to meet. All matches
live in; Gainesville. For Free
questionnaire and detail write:
Nationwide Dating Service, 177 10th
St., NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(C-94-7t-p).

| WANTED 1
1 or 2 bU4d roommates Immediately
for 2 bedroom apartment three
blocks from campus. Gall 373-2766.
(C-96-St-p).
Female roommate wanted for spring
quarter. Private bedroom In three
bedroom house, $lO9, 502 N.W. 2nd
Ave. Call 373-2379. (C-96-st-p).
J 111 v
TOPAZ
ONE OF
THE YEARS
10 BEST 1
- 1 r
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ i h. COLUMBIA PICTURES /
ENJOY OUR NEW
ORANGE & BLUE
"GATOR" SEATS-
Spaced For Comfort
PuULlmdl
rii-.~~v.r3 mi
From the country QM jy
that gave you,
I A WOMAN, mjjj/m
INGA and
i am curious mLm
(YELLOW) M



gator classifirds

fVpm m t
wanted ];
ffI.:.VWX<*?WWWMWMi!WIWW^
one male roommate for 2 bdrm. apt.
3 blocks nofrth of grad library, own
bedroom $45/mo plus utilities call
373-2795 6 to 7 PM. (C-97-st-p)
COED ROOMATE for spring quarter.
Very close to campus. $4Ol mo.,
includes water. 2 bedroom apt. Call
373-2730. (C?97-2t-p)
Programer wanted: good opertunity
for ise major to gain business
programing experience, ise major not
reauired. pl/1 experience prefered.
call Bill 6-llpm, tel. 392-7512.
(C-97-st-p)
1 Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
apt. in sin city: air cond., pool, cable
tv; vacancy for spring qtr. call
373-1742 between 5 and 7 pm.
(C-97-st-p)
|" HELP WANTED f
Student with Electronics experience
needed for part time work as
proto-type Technician and general
Testing work 378-1581. (E-94-st-p).
Graduating Accounting Majors: Why
not remain in Gainesville In a state
career service position with the
University of Florida? Challenging
positions with excellent promotion
potential. Starting salary $615 a
month plus liberal fringe benefits.
Please contact Mr. Eagan
Employment Manager, Hub
392-1222. Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-92-st-p).
Mature, competent males wanted,
over 21, to learn lie detector methods
and work ten hours per week for
salary until end of spring qtr. Call Dr.
Silverman at 392-0698 or come to
116 Bldg. E. (E-97-st-c)
>;.;.:.;.v.y.y;v;\vX\*X-X-XXvX*X-X-X-X-X.'X-v
AUTOS I
V
Jw*x*xx!Xtx*w*x*x*XiX>xxss*x*x*X"X*x£
67 MGB Roadster heater, oil cooler,
excellent shape, not off showroom
floor until *6B, NEED CASH. $1,500
make offer, 376-9540 PEACE.
(G-93-st-p).
Volkswagen bought in Germany fully
equiped light blue excellent
condition, low mileage must sell;
Going overseas call 378-1121 after 5
PM. (G-94-st-p).
1964 Corvair, black, radio, excellent
condition, rebuilt engine, SSOO, Call
Judy at 378-0082 4 thru 7 dally.
(G-94-st-p).
Porsche 912/5, blue 1968. Air cond.,
am-fm, chrome wheels, radials,
Konis, driving lites, headrest.
Unusually nice. Call 378-7301 eves.
(G-94-st-p).
69 VETTE, 427 convertible, like
new, PHONE 378-7921. (G-96-3t-p).
Economical Dependable 1960 V.W.
NEW tires clutch, brakes, Engine;
great shape + 31 m.p.g. $350.00
Flavet 3 Apt. 253-S After 6 PM.
(G-95-st-p).
62 Ford 2dr hdt power and air good
mechanical shape good
transportation, $350 or best offer see
at 1120 SW Ist Av 376-8918.
(G-97-4t-p)
PERSONAL
**
Come in and choose at bargain
prices: component units consoles
headphones home tape decks
clock radios TV's AM/FM
cartidge tuner cordless slicing knife
electric shavers electric hair
combs sewing machines wet suits
8 track car stereo electric
toothbrush 1228 N.E. sth Ave.
378-4186 Mon thru Sat 9-6 Fri
~9-9. (J-97-2t-p)
Gainesville Coin Club will meet Tues,
March 3, 8 p.m., In the Guaranty
Federal Building, 220 N. Main. Free
movie about mint. (J-97-2t-p)
Spend March 21-28 in Nassau slO7
Jamaica sl47 or Puerto Rico
$155 includes jet, hotel & extras. Call
378-9614 anytime by Friday
morning. (J-97-lt-p)
* 6 O a month, room & board,
collegiate Living Organization, 117
W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
_ c
FRESHMEN Old man have a job
waiting for you? Plan to join the
foreign legion. If so, congratulations,
not, the UF Career Planning and
lacement Center can help you plan
your future, suite G 22. J Wayne
R eitz Union. (J-94-st-p).
Charter Flight. $230
oundtrip Tampa to Amsterdam.
June-Sept. March 13 deadline. SSO
Posits being taken in Room 301
3 q on 3=30 5:00 weekdays or call
~' 1676 during the above hhours.
(J-96-3t-p).
Thet 9 / a^ l ati ns! New Ka PP a Alpha
to nc 3 T Sters Vou are an inspiration
r i, c s Theta Love. The Winter Pledge
class. (J-96-2t-p).

- Monday, March The Plnrirf* aiijj^

| PERSONAL j
yu realize that
de cl tHes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material & design, and
J^. a tV re hlgher Quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress, Wedding
Dress, Sportswear & Bikinis by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN
Phone: 378-0320. (J-95-st-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
Idrg6 selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
Jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
LESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Willlston cutoff at S. W. 13th St
(J-75-3t-p).
ijswftsooeeeewr.v.vtwww-x-x.x.x.r.v.vxv
| LOST A FOUND |
^ ,^WWWWftWy^V\Nv.v...v;vX.x\.Xs''l
Found: Terry Parker High School
ring in Norman Field. Call 392-7630
(L-96-3t-nc).
LOST: Mens gold Movado watch In
Leigh Hall. Reward for finder. Call
373-2939. (L-96-2t-p).
LOST: Casette tapes at Milhopper
Friday nlte. Please call 373-1537.
(L-95-4t-p).
, SERVICES
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afganistan,
Khatmnud. Lvs London Late June.
$545 fully inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 3 5 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. fM-38-59-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will clean,
adjust, lubricate, and install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than $10! 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
XEROX COPIES: speclizating in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
FRESHMEN The UF Career Planning
and Placement Center has everything
it needs to assist you in your career
planning problems. EXCEPT YOU.
suite 22, JWRU. (M-94-st-p).
Quoth our store never more! /Our
famous door is no more / Hacked and
chisled, bashed and beat / It has been
replaced with one thats neat / It
happened on one dark night / The
morning after was a fright / The walls
left bare without a care / For those
of you whod like a pair / But dont
dispair for we do care / And have
replaced with many a new pair.
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS
378-4480 Oh yes, drive your own
waiting room. (M-92-3t-c).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-59-c).
N.W. 13th St Ph 372-9523 m
ACROSS FROM THj^ALL
ITHE STERTLE CUCKOO 5
PLUS CO-HIT 3
ROSEMARYS BABY
2 Barbara Hers hey HZ
LAST SUMMER ~
aJHiiI.IIkHJX |
! Steve McQueen 2
in 3
THE REIVERS 3
iimiiiimiimimimii

Page 11

PUd NOW
L-| W!NNER
Bob r
£ ACADEMY
AWARD
V-dfOl NOMINATIONS
£ INCLUDING
best
KM SUPPORTING
& ACTOR
Alice ACTRESS j
PSllMttflT NOW!
| academy
AWARD NOMINEE
GOLDIE HAWN!
Mm inurii)
Mill 11 Kin mikiii
cacnis
FLOWJr
nuoducmq flOlDfe HBWI- ~
GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
pHhj
£x*xt
j*i i; j; :
!Cjwll j 111 JI 1 il'feXidl vl
j jo SIySS

MORBISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
IUNCH AND DINNER
i a a c and Macaroni
Baked Meat Sauce
All you can eat //(
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Golden Fried Chicken
All you can eat
GAINESVILLE MALL
V SHOPPING CENTER
M
Advertising I
Where are you? I
The Florida Alligator,one of the leading I
college newspapers in the nation,has
been looking for you.
But evidently youre hiding.
It seems you dont need the money the I
job of Advertising Salesman offers. Good
for you,youre one of the lucky ones.
But how about the experience? Do you 1
already have that?
Probably not,but even if you do, 1
experience is one commodity you can 1
never get enough of. And even if you I
dont believe that.be sure that the man (
sitting opposite you at the interview
table does.
So dont wait around for graduation. I
Start your advertising career now,with 1
The Florida Alligator. 1
Room 330 J. Wayne Reitz Union



Page 12

!, The Florida AWtor, Monday, March 2,1970

I Campus! Crter
I : SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
WINTER FROLICS

v v^Hlr^ v 34. V.
I 9 '.\-'". v
E M Mmi Ir^B
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AnEND EITHER SHOW
"NETHER WILL BE WATERED DOWN
Fri. March 6, Florida Gym, 7:30 & 10:30 PM $5.50 per Couple
Tickets sold at Union Box Office, Record Bar and Recordsville
If you are going to the late show, come see the Celebration first at the Rathskeller. Your
admission is your FROLICS ticket.
If you are going to the early show, come see the Celebration second at the Rathskeller.
Your admission is your FROLICS ticket stub.
FLORIDA PLAYERS TRYOUTS OPEN
Tryouts for the Florida Players spring production of "Theives' Carnival" by Jean Anouilh
will be held on March 2 and 3,1970, in Room 109 of Little Hall. Tryouts will begin at 7:00
p.m. and are open to all university students. Anouilh's play contains nine male roles, four
female roles, one child and a number of extras. Directed by James Lauricella of 'The
Imaginary Invalid" and "After the Rain" fame, 'Theives' Carnival" is a "comedy played
with all the zest of youth, successful because it is played by youth without consciousness of
their youth."
UNION PROGRAM OFFICE SPECIALS
YOU'LL FLIP OVER THIS. Today at 2:00 on the Union colonnade, the U. of F. Jujitsu
Club will give a demonstration.
Poetry readings and recordings of John Cage given by Mr. Lawrence Hetrick. 4:00 in
the Union Lounges 122,123, Thursday.
Will make your eyes bleed!! Genesis II will, that is. Showings of this group of
experimental films will be at 7:00 and 9:30, tonight and tomorrow night in the Union
Auditorium. Tickets are SI.OO for students and $1.50 for general admission.
ACCENT 71 SEEKING CHAIRMAN
Interested in applying for chairman of Accent 71? Applications must be in the Student
Government office by 3:30, Thursday, March 5.
ACCENT 71 SEEKING CHAIRMAN
Anyone interested in applying for chairman, vice chairman, or other positions on the Accent *7l
executive staff may do so in the Student Government office.
CICERONES TO MEET TUESDAY NIGHT
All members are urged to attend this most important meeting in Rooms 122,123 of the
Reitz Union, Tues., March 3, 7:30 p.m.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE THEIR
INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT
TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT

W "k ' \ N
JOHNNY RIVERS



I The
I Florida
I Alligator^

[ 1 m In tic indoor meet
Trackmen Take Second Place

I By SAM PEPPER
I Alligator Sports Editor
I Tennesse continued to
(demonstrate its dominance in
(Southeastern Conference track
I this weekend as the Volunteers
I captured SEC Indoor title at
I Birmingaham, Ala.
Hi
BnHL x I
RON COLEMAN
.. .voted most valuable
i jKKB

JOHN PARKER BILL BALLINGER
.. .won the mile .fastest sprint
UF Wrestlers Take
Third In Tournament
By LOLLI HILLIMAN
Alligator Corrwpondent
Jonathan Barres and Ron Derrough led the UF wrestling team to a
third-place finish in the All-Florida Collegiate Wrestling Tournament
here Saturday.
Miami-Dade Junior College captured top honors with 72 points,
followed by Florida A&M with 66 points. The Gators finished only
two points behind Florida A&M with 64.
Five Gator wrestlers qualified for the finals in their divisions with
only Barres and Derrough going on to capture top division honors.
Barres pinned Miami-Dades Tom Silimon to take the 142-pound
class with teammate Derrough pinning another Dade competitor, Elio
Junco, to capture the 150-pound class.
The second-place finishers for UF were: Bill Read, decisioned by
Harrold Roberts of Florida A&M in the 134-pound class, Jeff
Shaffner, decisioned in the 158-pound class by Dade s Don Jackson,
and Dean Tibbetts who was pinned by Tampas Fletcher Carr in the
190-pound class.
The Gators will compete in the SEC tournament on March 6 and 7
in AiiKiivi

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The Gators, scoring 52 points
to the Vols 92, finished second
in the meet, while Kentucky
took third place.
Ron Coleman led the
Florida attack with victories in
both the long jump and the
triple jump. His 24-foot-8 1 /2
mark in the long jump set a new
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school record as well as make it
the second year in a row that
Coleman has won the event. The
previous record was 24-6.
In the triple jump his 49-11
leap set still another school
record, topping his old mark of
49-3. Last year, Coleman
finished second in this event.
Coleman was also selected as
the most valuable player in the
SEC section of the meet. A
similar award was presented in
the independent section.
In other events, John Parker
won the mile with a 4:09.2
clocking, he also finished fourth
in the 1000-yard run and was
part of the two-mile relay team
which placed second.
Eamonn OKeefe posted a win
in the 880-yard run and was a
member of both the second
place one- and two-mile relay
teams.
Ron Jourdan won the high
jump with a 6-10 mark, while
Bob Lang placed second in the
1000-yard run and was member
of the two-mile relay team.
Bill Ballinger recorded the
fastest sprint during the one-mile
relay event (48.2 for 440 yards)
and placed second in the
660-yard run.
Jerry Fannin placed fourth in
the 440, Mark Bir took fifth in
the two mile, Chuck Duff was
fourth in the high jump, and
Scott Hurley jumped 15-6 in the
pole vault.
The mile relay, despite
finishing second qualified for the
NCAA finals with a 3:17.2 time.
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The team was made up of
Ballinger, OKeefe, Fannin and
Ron Kindry.
Members of the two-mile
relay, which also placed second
included Parker, OKeefe, Lang
and Jack Stewart.

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Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Mdi 2.1970

M c Lain Life

(EDITORS NOTE: UP! Baseball Editor Fred Down reveals the
three faces of Denny McLain in a series on baseballs no. 1 bad boy. In
the last of three parts, he examines McLain the fool.)
By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK (UPI) Denny McLains sentence will be for life -no
matter what Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn decides.
The suspended Detroit Tiger pitcher may be reinstated in the near
future and told that he can resume his baseball career free of taint.
Not so. Denny will carry the scars of the current scandal as long as he
lives. Nor will time lessen the wounds he has inflicted on himself.
At 25, Denny could pitch another 10 to 15 years. He could even
win 30 games again and wind up his career with 200,300 or even 400
victories.
But life in baseball will never be the same again for Denny because
he committed the one sin which his peers will never forgive. He
dragged baseballs good name into the gutter from which it was lifted
50 years ago. He linked baseball to a gambling scandal.
Every sport has its own thing. Pro football thrives on its
organized violence. Hockey players have their love affair with pain.
Boxings code is that a real champion loses his title face down.
Baseballs thing is that no hint of gambling scandal touch it.
Relatively disinterested observers may scoff at it, but Denny will
learn over the years that baseball men will not forget. They will
remember just as they have remembered Joe Jackson, Chuck Gandil,
Ed Ckotte, Claude Williams, Buck Weaver, Swede Risberg, Happy
Frisch and Fred McMullin for a half century.
These were the members of the Chicago White Sox who were
charged with a conspiracy to fix the, 1919 World Series with the
Cincinnati Reds. They were tried by a federal grand jury in Chicago
and acquitted, but that made no difference to Judge Kenesaw
Mountain Landis, baseballs first commissioner. On the very night of
their acquital, Judge Landis banned them from baseball.
But that was only the beginning of the lifetime sentence. Long past
an age when their playing careers would have ended, the eight were
still paying the price for their alleged involvement with gamblers.
Their names were stricken from many of baseballs official record
books. They were never invited to Old Timers Day celebrations. None
can ever be elected to the Hall of Fame, although two or three may
have been good enough to be elected.
They had offended the first rule of the club and they were
never forgiven.
Years later when both were old men, Ty Cobb walked into a liquor
store operated by Jackson. Cobb walked around the shop for 15
minutes without any recognition from Jackson. Then he asked his old
rival if he hadnt recognized him.
Sure, I did, said Jackson, who batted .375 in the 1919 World

A* A A
Smith Denies Privileges Charge

LAKELAND (UPI) Mayo
Smith, the manager of the
Detroit Tigers, denied again that
he gave suspended pitcher
Denny McLain any special
privileges last season.
Smith first made the denial
last week when McLain was
suspended for bookmaking
activities.
He repeated it after catcher
Bill Freehan, in a book entitled
Behind The Mask that was
excerpted this week in Sports
Illustrated, claimed that McLain
hurt the morale of the club
because he got so many special
privileges.
Freehan claimed that McLain
often didnt show up for a game
until just before game time and
he didnt show up at all
sometimes when he wasnt
schleduled to pitch. He said the
rest of the players had to be at

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the park 2Vz hours before
gametime. The Detroit catcher
also claimed that McLain doesnt
bear down on the weak hitters in
the opposing teams lineup,
citing as an example a game in
which Baltimores Mark Belanger
beat the Tigers.
The Tiger catcher also claimed
that McLain once told Joe Foy
he was going to throw him a
side armed pitch and told Foy he
couldnt hit it and Foy hit it
for a homer.
Freehan also said the Tiger
starters in the field had discussed
that they should fail to show up
for a game that McLain pitched
in late September after the race
was over but they never did it.
But Smith claimed, There
are a lot of exaggerations in that
story and a lot of things that are
not altogether true.
He added, Some of the

I DENMY MdAIN: %J |
THE FIREBALL |jj?
THE FLAKE f V s **
I AND j
I THE FOOL 1 It
Series and insisted he was innocent of any wrongdoing. But I didnt
think you would want to talk to me.
How big an offense has Denny committed against the baseball
establishment?
Well, in 1965 when Ford Frick retired after 15 years as
commissioner, he was asked the event or thing of which he was most
proud. Frick had been a good executive from the baseball
establishments point of view, and could have given any number of
answers.
The thing that makes me most proud, said Frick, is that there
never was a hint of scandal during my term of office.
McLains sentence that of his peers will become more severe as
time goes by. Now Denny wants to clear up his debts and resume his
career as a super star. He may be reinstated by Kuhn. But he will be
hounded for the rest of his life. Newsmen, TV men and radio
broadcasters will mark the fifth, the 10th, the 20th, the 30th, etc.,
anniversaries of Dennys suspension and tell the story all over again
for new generations of baseball fans.
Poor Denny, you had so much. No one resents a young
businessman ballplayer making all he can on the side. No one resents
that you played the organ in Las Vegas night spots or that you ran a
paint company. No one resents that you fly your own airplane or
were forming an advertising agency. No one even cares much about
the unpaid bills.
But, along the way, how could you forget that primary
responsibility to the game? How could you let yourself and baseball
become involved in that shadowland which it had avoided for so long?
How could a smart guy like you play such a fool?
You have shown baseball three faces that of the fireball, that of
the flake and that of the fool. You have thrilled us with your fireball
career on the field and amused us with your flakey remarks and
attitudes.
But its that third face, the face of the man who involved baseball
in its first gambling scandal in a half century, which will never be
forgotten.

players are trying to use Denny
McLain as an excuse for their
own inadequacies. 1 dont think
McLain got any special
privileges. I know he didnt.
Denny McLain never hurt our
morale. He wasnt bad for
morale. Baltimore hurt our
morale.
McLain also denied the
charges. Im tired of being used
as a scapegoat. Ive got enough
problems right now without
worrying what one individual is
writing in his book. I believe a
lot of the things he (Freehan)
presents in the article are
unsubstantiated and inaccurate.
And a lot of the true stories
involved are not in their true
context. But theres no way
anybody is going to hurt me any
more than Ive already been
hurt.

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General Manager Jim
Campbell refused to comment
on Freehans charges until he
read the whole book.
Freehan, who made it clear
that he was disappointed that
the magazine excerpted only
comments about McLain in the
article instead of giving an
overall picture of the book, also
refused comment but said he
will have a statement concerning
the article in the near future.
In the article, Freehan said
the Tiger players called a team
meeting with Manager Smith at
the end of the 1969 season and
asked the manager to enforce
the same rules for all the players
in 1970.
Freehan said McLain didnt
attend that meeting.

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Mike Hill Wins Doral Eastern Open

MIAMI (UPI) Mike Hill, a
31-year-old golfer with only two
years on the tour, battled back
from a shaky start to a 71
Sunday to win his first
tournament and pocket the
$30,000 first prize in the windy
Doral Eastern Open Golf
Tournament.
The Jackson, Mich., golfer
younger brother of the more
well-known Dave Hill beat Jim
Colbert by three strokes with a
nine-under-par 274. Colbert was
second with 277 and tied for
third were Larry Hinson,
Britisher Brian Barnes and
Australian Bruce Devlin.
Jack McGowan finished eight
strokes back at 282 after tying
Hill momentarily on the front
nine. But both he and Hinson hit
die water on die par three ninth.
McGowan came up with a triple
bogey six and Hinson had a five.
McGowan shot a four over par
76 for the day.
Arnold Palmer shot a 75
Sunday to finish at four over par
292, 12 strokes back. Defending
U. S. Open Champion Orville
Moody scored a 74 for a four
round total of 293.
Hill had to scramble to salvage
a par 36 on the front nine and
added a birdie on the 10th. He
had started the day eight under
par, and gained one more stroke
on the standard on his round.
The slight, charcoal haired
golfer who didnt join the tour
until he was 29, birdied the first
hole, but became shaky and
scored bogeys on the third,
fourth and sixth before
loosening up and scoring birds
on the next 10 holes.
Hill then settled down to his
game, which is shoot for the
par and let the birdies come
where they will.
The elation wont be felt
until tomorrow, Hill said,
explaining he finished still so
pumped up from playing.
This golf course especially
when the wind blows has got
to be one of the toughest
around, he said. As far as a
fair golf course, Id say Doral is
one of the toughest.
The former beer truck driver
and construction worker said he
would lay around here for a
Braves Cepeda
Holding Out
WEST PALM BEACH (UPI)
Orlando Cepeda of the Atlanta
Braves became an official
holdout Sunday and rumors
began circulating that the big
first baseman was on the trading
block.
Cepeda, who helped the
Braves to the National Leagues
Western Division title last season
with 22 homers and 88 runs
batted in, has rejected two
contracts the Braves have sent
him.
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THREE STROKE WINNER OVER COLBERT

couple days before playing the
Citrus Open at Lakeland.
Hills only challenger on the
back nine was the jaunty
Colbert, who stayed within three
strokes of the winner until the
17th where he three putted and
took a bogey five, wrapping it
up for his playing partner.

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The 18th hole, rated the
toughest finishing hole on the
tour, took its share of casualties
again Sunday, but Hill added a
pleasing finish on his most
successful day.
He hit his second shot into
the crowd, bat then dumped a
nine iron to within 15 feet of

the cup and sank the putt for his
tough par.
Hill did not join the tour until
two years ago, after spending six
years at home taking care of his
parents, letting Dave {Jill, 16
months older* take to jgbptour.
Dave Mil shot a 77

Monday, March 2,1970, The Florida Alliaatar,

I think Dave is as happy for
my win as I am myself, Hill
said. Hes a very goodhearted
guy.
Although it was Hills first
win on the tout* he won
$16,239 last year-Mp finished
second in two
.years ago.

Page 15



Page 16

. The Florida AMgetor, Monday, March 2,1970

Baseball Team Splits Two With Stetson

The Gators will host South
Florida here on Tuesday after
splitting two games with Stetson
this weekend.
Coach Dave Fuller will again
use three pitchers, trying to see
who his pressure pitchers are
before UF enters the tough
conference schedule. Wayne
Rogers, Walter Gardner and Glen
Pickren are scheduled to pitch.
We played two errorless
games this weekend, said
Fuller. The pitchers got
themselves in trouble with
walks
The Gators began the scoring
on Friday in UFs 3-0 triumph
over Stetson in the first inning as
left-fielder Will Harman doubled
and center-fielder Guy McTheny
singled. Third baseman Rod
Wright then grounded to third
scoring Harman on a fielders
choice.
Stetsons only scoring threat
came in the fourth inning when
Lorenzo Moll and Ashby Frayser

LIENHARD, HIGH SCORER
Bulldogs Romp Over Gators

By KEN MCKINNON
Awifwt Sports Editor
Bob Lienhard and the Georgia
Bulldogs kept themselves in the
running for second place in the
SEC and for an NIT bid by
downing the Gators, 85-69,
Saturday night in Athens, Ga.
Lienhard, a 6-foot-ll
All-American senior center, hit
12 of his 13 shots from the floor
and four from the line to lead all
scorers with 28 points.
He added 10 rebounds to help
the Bulldogs dominate the
boards, 52-36.
The big center put much
pressure on All-SEC Gator
captain Andy Owens, who
needed only 39 paints going into
Saturdays game to break former
UF All-American Neal Walks
year-old single-season scoring
marie of 637.
Owens, who hit on only seven
of 23 from die floor, managed
only 15 points and has one game
left this Saturday against
Alabama to crack the record.
Cliff Cox, a reserve
sophomore, was die only shining
light for the Gators. Replacing
starter Earl Findley, he came off
the bench to score 20 points and
pull down 10 rebounds.
With Owens and low-post man
Dan Boe on the bench most of
the first half, the Bulldogs went

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both drew walks. The Gators
escaped the inning as both Tony
Latour and Mike Fulford
grounded forcing runners at
third. Pitcher Larry Sheffield
ended the inning by striking out
Dave Davidson.
The Gators scored their final
two runs in the fifth inning
when third-baseman Wright
doubled to center scoring
Harman and right-fielder Tony
Dobies.
The winning pitcher was
Wayne Rogers who pitched three
no-hit innings before being
relieved by Larry Sheffield who
gave up two hits. Sheffield was
then relieved in the seventh
inning by Glen Pickren who also
gave up two hits.
The loosing pitcher was Bill
Rhoden, who was relieved by
Pat Arnett in the eighth inning.
The duo allowed only five hits as
the UF trio allowed four.
Stetson came back on Sturday

to the locker room at the half
with a wide, 45-31, lead.
. Suffering from poor shooting,
38.8 from the floor, the Gators
could not crack Georgias tough
man-to-man defense and trailed
by 20 points in the second half.
Besides Lienhard, the
Bulldogs had three other men in
double figures. Lanny Taylor
and Jerry EpKng had 19 and 18
points, respectively. Herb White
added 13.
Georgia now stands 11-5 in
the conference and 13-11
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with a 74 win over the Gators in
Deland.
The Hatters began the scoring
in the second inning when UF
pitcher Rod Macon walked Pete
Dunn with the bases loaded,
forcing in one run. Pitcher
Wayne Perry hit a sacrifice fly to
right field which brought in
another run.
Stetson scored again in the
fourth when Dunn slammed a
homerun over the 365-foot left
field fence.
The big Stetson blast came in
the fifth inning when Moll
singled, Frayser doubled, and
Latour hit a sacrifice fly to score
Moll. Mike Fulford and
Davidson then slammed
consecutive doubles to score two
more runs.
UFs first score came in the
sixth inning when Jim Gruber
walked with the bases loaded to
force in one run. Two more runs
were then scored on Leon
Bloodworths grounder and a

overall. LSU, which recently
secured an NIT bid, is a
half-game behind at 10-5, but
should equal the Bulldogs record
before meeting them in the
showdown for second place in
Athens this Saturday. LSU must
face Mississippi State tonight.
Kentucky, 15-1 in SEC play,
has already wrapped up the
conference crown and now aims
its hopes at the NCAA Mideast
Regional championship.
Florida is now 9-16 in overall
play and 6-11 in SEC play.

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GOWNS & PEIGNOIR SETS were $9.00-$20.00 NOW $3.99-$13.97
Across From Campus In University Plaza

sacrifice fly by Larry Kiezek.
Stetson and UF scored their
final runs in the eighth and ninth
innings, respectively.
The winning pitcher for
Stetson was Wayne Perry who
was relieved by John Fischetti.
The duo allowed rite Gators only
GOIF PAR (0
DRIVING RANGE
GOLF CLUBS RENTED
CLUBHOUSE
mfm* ELECTRIC CARTS
ttw* LESSONS AVAILABLE
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3 V/ Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

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402 N.W 13th St. 209 N 1.16th Avt,
i

four hits.
The loosing pitcher for UF
was Rod Macon. The Gators
used four pitchers, who allowed
Stetson nine hits.
The game tomorrow with
South Florida will begin at 3:00
pjn. on Perry Field.
I '"1
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Any car or color!
fwsggsi l
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665