Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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GRAHAM HONEYS
Graham's Bunnies Patti Haipern and Victoria Robas are amplifying
their invitation to the Annual Playboy Club to be held this Saturday
night. The evening will include a dinner, floor show, cokes and
dancing to the Nation Rocking Shadows. The price is $6 per couple.
Tickets are now on sale through Thursday at Graham, Union Box
Office and the Record Bar.

Full-Time Fiscal Adviser
Strongly Urged For SG

Student Government is on its way to getting a
full-time fiscal adviser to help keep student body
financial affairs in order.
The position was strongly recommended by
auditors, Student Body Treasurer Jim Roll said, and
a bill establishing the position passed the Student
Senate on first reading Tuesday night.
It will come up for second reading tonight and a
third reading next week if amended tonight, Senate
Majority Leader Sam Poole said.
The fiscal adviser will be a full-time SG employe,
directly responsible to the student body treasurer
and paid an annual salary of $ 11,000 out of SG
funds.
A bill allocating funds for his salary passed the
Senate on the first reading last week and will come
up for second reading next week.

Duel To The Death Unfolds In SG Executive

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
The fissure within Student
Governments executive branch
widened Wednesday, with the
release of a memorandum from
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd removing the vice
president as administrative head
of the cabinet.
This action followed in the
wake of Student Body Vice
President Walter Morgans threat
to veto any appropriations from
the Student Senate for the Camp
Wauburg development program.
Morgan called the proposal
ill-conceived and too
expensive at an address before

[^INTERPRETIVE

the senate Tuesday night. He
also accused Shepherd of selfish
interests and trying to build a
monument to himself.
Shepherd nullified a year-old
executive memorandum which
designated the vice president as
head of the cabinet and ordered
all cabinet officers to report
directly to him or to his
administrative assistant, Bruce
Boudreau.
-Some SG sources, who asked

The new advisers job will be to advise the
president and treasurer of the student body and the
president of the Student Senate on fiscal policy, to
recommend auditing controls, techniques and
procedures and to account for all SG property.
The adviser wont have any power in student
body transactions, but will be strictly a consultant,
the guidelines in the bill say. He will be hired by the
Personnel Policy Board.
Roll said a full-time adviser is needed to look
into all the things that may be going wrong that the
treasurer cant look into because hes tied up with
other administrative jobs.
He also said the adviser could help lend
continuity to programs started by one
administration and then dropped by another for no
good reason other than ignorance.

RUMORS, RESIGNATIONS, RANCOR

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 62, No. 95

CROPS VETO POWERS
Budget Preparation
Amendment Passes

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday
night in a drawn out meeting
passed an amendment to the
budget preparation law which
requires the Student Body
Budget to be submitted to the
president for signing into law as
one unit and not a collection of
budgets.
This law limits the ability of
the president of the student
body to veto specific budgets.
Under the old law he could veto
one specific budget say the
Mayors Council andStill sign
the rest of the budgets into law.
The new measure requires the
senate to consider the budget as
a single unit on the second
reading and submit it to the
president as such. He must either
sign the entire budget or veto it.
The bill allows the senate to
consider the budget as individual
budgets on the first readings.
A bill passed creating a
Student Government Personnel
Board. The board will establish

not to be identified, have viewed
Shepherds actions as retaliation
against Morgan and expect
Shepherd to act to keep his vice
president from ever taking office
as president.
Shepherd, who announced
Feb. 5 that he would resign
effective March 21, is now
reported to be considering
staying on as a special student to
fulfill his term.
I have said I was leaving and

University of Florida, Gainesville

positions of permanent
employment in Student
Government, which will include
secretaries to the executive
branch, Student Senate and
Honor Court, a clerk for Student
Traffic Court, a bookkeeper for
Student Government and a fiscal
counselor for Student
Government.
The board will be composed
of the president of the student
body, treasurer of the student
body, chancellor of the Honor
Court, chief justice of the Honor
Court and the president of the
Student Senate.
In budget action, budgets for
Billy Mitchell Drill Team, Gator
Guard, Celebration 71,
Symphony Orchestra and
Womens Commission were
passed on the first reading.
Gator Guard and Billy
Mitchell Drill Team were both
passed with an amendment that
the organizations were strongly
advised to seek other sources of
funds on their next budgets.
Both experienced large cuts in
travel and equipment expenses
by the budget and finance
committee on the budgets
passed Tuesday.
Celebration 7l budget was
passed with the stipulation that
it be held until the success or.
ilnsldel
The Gator
STUDENT BODY President
Charles Shepherd takes on
questions tonight on WRUFs
Dialogue page 2
Classifieds 12
Editorials 7
Entertainment 16
Letters . 8
Movies ; 12
Small Society 6
Sports 19

that statement still holds until I
indicate otherwise, Shepherd
said.
Should Shepherd resign,
Morgan would assume the
presidency for the remainder of
the term until late April.
In addition, Morgan has been
rumored as a possible
presidential candidate in the
Spring elections. If Shepherd
were to remain in office it would
deprive Morgan of a strong
political foothold for the
upcoming elections.
Meanwhile, at least three
cabinet officers are prepared to
block any move by the student

Thursday, February 26, 1970

failure of Celebration 7O could
be assessed.
The meeting was recessed
until 7:30 Thursday evening. A
quorum was called at 11:30 and
the necessary number of
senators (40) were not present.
Student Senate
Hears More
UAC Ideas
The Student Senate
Committee for Information and
Investigation concerning the
University Activities Center
(UAC) Wednesday heard Sam
Poole, Student Senate majority
leader, introduce a proposal for
planning of an activities center
which he hopes will lend itself to
more student trust and support.
Among the points of Pooles
proposals was the abolition of
the present UAC committee
appointed by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and
formation of a new one.
This point was debated by
Ralph Glatfelter, present UAC
Committee member, who said
members on the new committee
would probably include a
majority of those on the present
committee.
He suggested OConnell be
asked to open the present
committee for more members.
Another point of much
debate was that a second request
be made for $150,000
previously provided by the
Board of Regents for
preparation and preliminary
sketches.
However, Glatfelter said this
money would not be given to
UF again unless there is some
evidence of other financial
support

president to force Morgans
resignation from the vice
presidency.
Shepherd has called for a
required cabinet meeting
Thursday at 7 p.m. It will be a
closed meeting in room 355 of
the Reitz Union.
One of the cabinet officers
expected to oppose Morgans
removal is Ralph Glatfelter. He
said that he and others feared an
attempt to secure their
resignations in order to remove
Morgan by cabinet action with
less, if any, objection.
However, Shepherd said he
had no intention of asking for
(SEE 'SG' PAGE 2)



Page 2

I. Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 26; 1970

A&S Uraed To Drop Language Requirement

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Arts and Sciences Student
Council (ASSC) has urged the
abolishment of its colleges foreign
language proficiency requirement.
The resolution, accompanied by three
strongly-worded memorandums
outlining the harmful side effects of
the requirement will be presented to the
Curriculum Committee of the College of
Arts and Sciences Friday.
The proficiency requirement, long a
controversial issue with students, is
based on the idea that a degree
candidate of the College of Arts and
Sciences must have a minimum
proficiency in a foreign language for a
well-rounded education.
The catalogue states that a student

NSA Conference Highlights
'Education And Society

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Education and Society:
Reform or Revolution? will be
the subject of the National
Student Association (NSA)
conference in Atlanta this
weekend.
Although UF is no longer a
member of NSA, two
representatives, Henry Solares,
Kathy Spellman, and Alligator
staffer John Sugg will be
attending the Southern area
conference.
Solares said educational
reform is necessary at UF. In
learning about the methods

Judge Hoffman Praised

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida's Cabinet adopted a resolution Tuesday
commending Chicago Seven Judge Julius Hoffman
and Gov. Claude Kirk said he will present it in
person when the judge comes to Florida.
Kirk said Hoffman is expected to vacation in the
state shortly, but did not say where. In Chicago,
Hoffman said he had no vacation plans and
wouldnt reveal them if he had.
Comptroller Fred Dickinson sponsored the
resolution commending Hoffman for his conduct
during the lengthy trial.
Judge Hoffman has been through more than any
other judge in history- the indignities, the
disrespect, the profanity, the vulgarities that were
heaped on him, Dickinson said.
And through it all he, as the young people say,
kept his cool.
This is a resolution commending him for what I
think was a new era in patience and strength in the
American jurisprudence system, Dickinson
continued.
He said the defendants told Hoffman the day of
revolution is coming and he would be here to see
the second American revolution. I dont see how
much plainer their intentions could be, said
Dickinson.
Kick said that after speaking to a student
: mtHence at the University of New Hampshire last
k he could understand how Hoffman felt.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times.weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
I advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several' times.- Notices for correction must be given before the next
-
-

others have employed to
institute changes on their
campuses, he said changes might
be facilitated here.
He said he thought students
should have more opportunity
to select their own courses.
Student Governments
Gentle Wednesday is part of
UFs effort to make education
more pertinent. The topic of
discussion will be Educational
Reform At What Pace?
The purpose of this
conference in Atlanta is twofold.
First, resource people will be
available to help students deal
with programs and problems of

BY FLORIDAS CABINET

may elect to show he has a proficiency
in a language by either taking an
examination upon entering, or
successfully completing the final quarter
of work in a foreign language offered at
the 200 level or higher.
The majority of students are unable
to pass the proficiency examination
upon arriving at the UF the council
statement said.
ASSC chairman John Maher, and
members David Chafin and Henry
Solares each wrote a statement
presenting burdens which the council
felt the language requirement put on the
student.
Mahers statement was compiled of
notes taken during discussions of the
ASSC which met once a week for at
least two hours since the beginning of
the quarter in formulating a position on

They called me a pig, Kirk said. But he said the
name-callers were a small minority of the entire
group.
Lou Tally, a first-year law student and chairman
of UFs chapter of the American Civil Liberties
Union, said he was not particularly surprised at
this kind of thing from Tallahassee as this is an
election year.
Its funny to see Kirk and Dickinson scramble
for the middle American votes, he said.
Tally said that regardless of the defendants
conduct, Hoffriian acted incompetently and
without regard to citizen rights. It was the poorest
judicial showing ever made public.
The Cabinets resolution is ridiculous. To just
back Hoffman would be expected, but to make him
out as a saint is really laughable, Tally said.
Charles Black, a first-year law student and
secretary of UFs Young Americans for Freedom,
said it would have been better if the Cabinet had
condemned the defendants and defense attorney
William Kunstler.
He said the court was used as a political arena by
the defense. They showed no respect for our
judicial system and American institution of
jurisprudence, Black said.
I cant say Hoffman reacted overly bad, but he
could have done better. He met the challenge to our
judicial system as well as could be expected under
tbe circumstances, Black said.

BY STUDENT COUNCIL

educational reform in their
university communities.
Second, there will be
workshops centered around the
meaning and relationship of
educational reform and the
larger movement for change in
America.
Topics for workshops include
womens liberation, off-campus
learning projects, new
curriculum designs, students and
labor, fundamentals of
education reform organizing,
free universities and
experimental colleges, the
Southern Legal Action
Movement and educational
change and ecology.

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the requirement.
Four major hardships were brought
out by Maher:
The amount of time needed to
develop a proficiency in a language cut
deeply into a student s study time.
Other courses are bound to suffer
from neglect when a student must spend
from ten to twenty hours a week on a
language course which has superficial
usefulness in the students academic
and vocational fields, he noted.
t The requirement has a profound
impact on the number of credit hours
a student may take while in college.
Since the knowledge explosion it
takes more and more credit hours to
train a physicist, chemist, political
scientist..., and by necessity a man
must be educated beyond his own
speciality, Maher said.

MINI-POSTER
l. V'
YOB THINK ITS EASY
TO BE PRESIDENT
until ym oour moo)
0 OIHAT Yoo'K POW 6?
Shepherd On
Dialogue
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd will be
answering students questions on
WRUFs Dialogue tonight.
Between 11 pan. and 1 a.m.
students can call the station and
address questions to the
president.
Major issues at this time in his
second administration include
Shepherds proposed resignation,
new plans for the University
Activities Center and proposals
for developing Camp Wauburg.

SG Executive

PAGE ON^j
anyones resignation, including
Morgans.
We just dont operate that
way, he said. If Morgan is
asked to resign it will be the
cabinets action.
Glatfelter, SG secretary for
consumer affairs, said
Wednesday he would not resign,
even if Shepherd asked him to,

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Noting that it took from 18 to 24
quarter hours to develop a language
proficiency Maher called the
requirement the straw that broke the
camels back.
The foreign language requirement
often brings down an entire grade
average.
Until the satisfactory/unsatisfactory
grade option, it was common for a
student with an academic average of
high C or better for example, to plod
through the foreign language
requirement with a perfect 2.0 average
he said.
Failure to achieve proficiency, or
to attempt it is a major selective factor
in determining a students decision to
enroll in the college of Arts and
Sciences.

PE Debate
Hits Senate
The controversial physical
education proposal will once
again be brought to the floor
when the University Senate
meets this afternoon in McCarty
auditorium.
Ernest H. St. Jacques, acting
chairman of the University
Curriculum Committee, has
asked members of the Senate
Steering Committee to withdraw
its former proposal and submit a
new plan giving students the
opportunity to take P. E.
courses on a pass-fail basis.
St. Jacques has also
recommended that lower
division curriculum include a
required three-quarter,
one-credit hour sequence of
P. E. and health.
The total hours needed for
graduation will not be increased
by the P. E. and health
requirement.
The report stipulated that
phys ed courses will still be
available for credit when taken as
an elective course.
The senate will also take up a
proposal to amend portions of
the UF constitution dealing with
the Committee on Academic
Tenure and Freedom and
officers of the UF Student
Government.

until after Thursdays meeting.
At the same time, SG officials
are critical of both Morgan and
Shepherd. They are privately
lambasting Shepherd for his
strong-arm tactics and Morgan
for possible political motives
behind his Wauburg statement
and personal attack on
Shepherd.
Morgan was unavailable for
comment by press time
Wednesday.



Chicago Seven Bail Decision In Hands Os Court

CHICAGO (UPI) The government, charging
that the Chicago Seven and their two trial lawyers
are a danger and a threat to the community,
Wednesday asked a federal appeals court to reject
their requests Tor bail.
Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark and four
other attorneys of the American Civil Liberties
Union (ACLU), arguing there is no indication the
nine convicted men are dangerous, asked the court
to grant bail pending final outcome of the case.
The opposing briefs were filed with the 7th U. S.
Circuit Court of Appeals, which must decide
whether to overrule U. S. District Court Judge
Julius J. Hoffmans denial of bail.
*
Attorneys for the Chicago Seven and their trial

Group Offers European Tour
For $230 Round Trip Fee

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students, faculty, staff
and their immediate families will
be able to fly to Europe this
summer for only $230 round
trip.
The International Association
of Business and Economic
Students (AIESEC) is
co-sponsoring a charter flight
from Tampa to Amsterdam with

Money For Youth Hall
Denied By Court

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
State Supreme Court turned
down a $7.6 million proposal to
finance a youth hall and juvenile
court complex in Dade County
Wednesday in a landmark
decision that Chief Justice
Richard Ervin said could result
in fiscal crises and
governmental breakdowns.
The 5-2 decision has the
effect of requiring approval by
the freeholders of any ad
valorem tax millage in excess of
the constitutional 10 mills
allowed for county purposes.
It reverses a Dade County
Circuit Court ruling and upsets a
long line of cases in which many
counties have in the past
financed courthouse and jafl
facilities through certificates of
indebtedness backed by special
ad valorem millage levies not

Block Speaks Tonight
The Most Beautiful Person in All History is the title of a lecture
by Dr. Seymour Block that will open the Center of Mans spring
program tonight.
The talk by the founder of Zero Population Growth, Inc. and UF
chemical engineering professor is at 8 pjn. at the Presbyterian
University Center, 1402 West University Ave.
A program of guitar music and poetry will precede the lecture by
Block.
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a similar organization at Florida
State University.
The group is landing in
Amsterdam because it is
centrally located, according to
assistant director of the flight
Richard Hubble.
Reservations are being made
with a SSO deposit weekdays
from 3:30 5 pm. and Monday
nights from 7:30 8:30 pm.,
AIESEC President Jim Barks
said.

submitted to the taxpayers for a
vote.
The court majority, in an
opinion written by Justice Joe
Boyd, said the new state
constitution specifically requires
freeholder approval of
certificates of indebtedness or
any form of tax anticipation
certificates, payable from
property taxes, to finance
capital projects authorized by
law. The old constitution, the
court said, referred only to
bonds requiring freeholder
approval.
The new provision, the court
added, invalidates the old law
under which such financial
arrangements required only a
majority vote of the county
commission after public notice
in dealing with essential
governmental facilities.

DANGER. THREAT TO COMMUNITY

lawyers, William M. Kunstler and Leonard I.
Weinglass, asked the appeals court Saturday to grant
the nine men their freedom pending their appeals.
Five of the Chicago Seven were found guilty
by a jury of crossing state lines with intent to incite
a riot during the 1968 Democratic National
Convention. Hoffman found all seven defendants,
together with Kunstler and Weinglass, guilty Os
contempt of court for actions during the
tempestuous, 4 Vi month trial.
In a 39-page brief signed by U. S. Attorney
Thomas A. Foran, the government said evidence
overwhelmingly demonstrates the defendants ate a
danger and a threat to the community and the
record does not in any way establish that the appeal

Interested persons should
either come to room 301, Reitz
Union or call 392-1676, Barks
said.
The balance of the cost will
have to be paid by April 1,
Hubble said.
He also said at least one
meeting would be held sometime
next quarter, so people will be
able to meet others going on the
trip with them.
We are trying to get people
to Europe in the cheapest
possible way Hubble said.
He said people are going to
Europe for different reasons.
Some are going to be
working, others are just going to
tour.
Applications for the trip will
be accepted until March 13,
Barks said.

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of the conviction is meritorious.
The government submits that there is no policy
to grant bail to all self-styled political
militants .;. the brief said.
In this case denial is based on the danger in view
of the evidence.
Federal rules leave the question of bail after
conviction up the the sound discretion of the
court, the government said.
The ACLU petition and 17-page supporting brief
said, on the other hand, that at the very least, the
defendants are entitled to bail pending the outcome
of the case. It said denial of bail violated the first,
fifth, sixth and eighth amendments to the U. S.
Constitution.

ftX<*XX>XXXXX<*X*XXX*XXXXX<<<*l*X<<*XX*X*X*X*XX*X*X*XX*fc
j Gannon Speaks j
(On Campus Sex)
v V
:f: Interested in sexuality on campus? if;
ff How about the need for a separate black school system? f:j
Or maybe youre one of those who feels the blacks in fi;
if America can't go it alone and a black-white coalition is needed. £
sis If anyone of these subjects is of interest, there is a chance to sis
if hear qualified and sometimes controversial speakers discuss £
sis them on campus within the next few weeks. sis
sis Father Michael Canon Gannon, as a part of the Dialogue
fff with a Theologue series, will speak at 4 pjn. today on the if:
iff subject of Sexuality on Campus. if:
if: Father Gannon is pastor of the Catholic Student Center and if;
if; an associate professor of religion. His talk will be in rooms 122 if;
if: and 123 of the Reitz Union. if;
f: Friday at 2:30 pm. in the Union Auditorium Herman fff
if: Ferguson will discuss The Need for a Separate Black School ff;
| System. sis
| Ferguson is minister of education of the Republic of New :(
| Africa and a 1968 candidate for the U. S. Senate from the State f:f
£ of New York. sis
i* He has been suspended by the New York City Board of sis
if: Education after 20 years because he was indicted in 1968 for sis
:ff conspiracy to assassinate Uncle Toms. He is presently ff;
,f: appealing the conviction. iff

Thurftddy, February 26.1970. Thr Ftonc&AHigator.

Page 3



Page 4

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The Plaza has many
moods, especially on a sunny
afternoon.
Whether its watching the
wonders which surround the
area, basking in the beautiful
sun or just plain groovin' in
the green grass, this is the
"in" place for students to
relax and have a good time.
Photos
By
Tom
Crossfield

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Liberalism: Out Os Touch With Reality

By MICHAEL WEINSTEIN
Alligator Correspondent
Liberalism should and will die
because its ideology concerning foreign
and domestic affairs is out of touch
with reality, Dr. William Oliver Martin
said Tuesday night.
Martin, a philosophy professor at the
University of Rhode Island, spoke at the
Reitz Union before an audience of 70
people composed primarily of members
of YAF (Young Americans For
Freedom).
Under liberalism we assume that
differences between the free world and
the Communist world will be solved
only if we understand each others
position.
However, Martin said Communist
actions in the world prove that the
liberal ideology is out of contact with
reality because it fails to recognize the
Communist menace.

THE DRAFT:
question & answer

(EDITORS NOTE: Address
all questions to Draft Answer
Man, 330 Reitz Union.)
Q. I am graduating in June.
At that time I will be reclassified
1-A. How does my period of
eligibility run? Will I be most
eligible between June, 1970 and
June, 1971?
A. The first priority group
consists of those men who are
19 and draft-eligible at the
beginning of the year, and those
men between the ages of 19 and
26 whose deferments expired
during the year upon completion
of school or for other reasons.
Your maximum vulnerability
will end in December, 1970,
although you will be eligible for
selective service until your 26th
birthday or until your
classification changes.
i
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

Liberals continue poverty
programs on the assumption
that man is only part of the
environment. They feel that if
the evil conditions of the
environment are improved, man
must improve.
-Dr. William Oliver Martin
University of Rhode Island
IWttNIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIHtIiIIHMIIIiIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMHMNIII
Another drawback in the liberals
beliefs, according to Martin, is his
failure to see the good and evil of
human nature.
Human nature is neutralized in the
liberals thinking, while the condition of
the environment represents the good
and evil.
Martin suggests that this principle of
liberalism has led to the weakness of

Q. I will turn 19 on March 1.
Do I enter the lottery pool on
that date?
A. No. You wont be
included in the random selection
sequence until 1971. The 1970
pool is limited to those bom on
or after January 1,1944, and on
or before December 31,1950.

jJm B I I 11
Botarp Connection Q
W and Celebration U
Thurs, Fri, Sat 9pm & 11pm Tickets 2.50 non-members 2.00 members
Tickets Sold At Union Box Office, Record Bar, Rat
Produced in Cooperation With S.G.P.

MARTIN TELLS YAF

Outstanding Police Awarded

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Writer
Outstanding law enforcement officers from the
University Police Department (UPD) as well as the
Alachua County Sheriffs Department and the
Gainesville Police Department, will be honored by
the Gainesville Lions Club at a banquet March 30.
Ray Gamble, chairman of the Lions Club
committee planning the banquet, Tuesday
announced the names of the two officers from each
department who will be honored. Sgt. Elby E.
Smith and Officer James King of the UPD have been
selected.

our poverty program.
Liberals continue poverty programs
on the assumption that man is only part
of the environment, he said. They
feel that if the evil conditions of the
environment are improved, man must
improve.
In Martins view, the continuing
poverty in our country shows that
liberal ideology in this area is not suited
for todays world.
The elderly, gray-haired professor
labeled contemporary liberalism
nihilistic in its approach to religion
and morals.
The relativistic liberal who says God
is dead is wrong, he said. Whats
dying is the liberal type person who says
God is dead.
In referring to the so-called new
morality of liberalism, Martin
criticized it by saying that nihilism was
implicit in liberalism.

TfeirxJay, F bauary 26,1970Tb* Florida AMigtar,

The liberal speaks of permissiveness,
but what it amounts to is moral
indifference.
One example of the influence of
liberalisms moral indifference which
he cites concerns the elimination of
prayers in school, with its replacement
by a program of sex education.
Martin compared liberalism to
Marxism by saying thht theyre both out
of touch with reality. However, he
explained at least Marxists are
consistently wrong, while liberals are
inconsistent.
Whereas Marxists would support
both abortion and capital punishment,
liberalism would support abortion and
oppose capital punishment.
He said only the fragmented mind
of the liberal would permit the killing
of a young embryo, but allow survival
of a hardened criminal.

At the banquet the officers will find out who was
voted the most outstanding officer and who was
voted runner-up. The voting was done by the
employes of the three departments themselves
because they would best know the background and
qualities of the officers, Gamble said.
This is the sixth year the Lions Club has honored
outstanding officers. In the past the public was
asked to write letters recommending officers from
which the winners would be picked by three judges.
This is the first year the winners will be selected
by their fellow-workers and the first year the UPD
has been included.

Page 5



Page 6

i Jilf t Fabruecy 26/^1970

INCREASED BIRTHS?
Pill Alarm Risky
WASHINGTON (UPI) The president of Planned Parenthood
warned today unwarranted and dangerous alarm about birth
control pills could sharply increase unwanted pregnancies and produce
a harvest of unloved, neglected and abandoned children.
In prepared testimony, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher told Sen. Gaylord
Nelson, D-Wis., that his subcommittee hearings on the alleged hazards
of oral contraceptives have needlessly created a sense of great
alarm.
Guttmacher quotes a magazine poll that reported 18 per cent of pill
users had stopped and 23 per cent were considering quitting.
Guttmacher said he was testifying not to whitewash the pill,
but... to place this matter in proper perspective in the hope of
stemming unwarranted and dangerous alarm.
The pill is the most effective means yet known to prevent a very
serious affliction, unwanted pregnancy, Guttmacher said. He cited
statistics on the need for contraception and said they would get worse
if women abandoned oral contraceptives.
At least one out of six U.S. brides is pregnant when married. Half
of the... teen-age brides are pregnant. The pill is... by far the best
contraceptive for sexually active adolescents.
... At least 750,000 children bom each year were unwanted at
the time of their conception. Undoubtedly a significant proportion
lead to unloved, neglected and abandoned children.
Florida Bar Association
Immune From Court Action

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Florida bar is a state agency and
immune from court action,
according to a ruling by the U.S.
Supreme Court.
The high court Tuesday let
stand an appeals court decision
in a libel action filed by Norman
F. Dacey, author of the book,
How to Avoid Probate.
Dacey had filed a suit against
the Florida Bar Journal and
Boyd H. Henderson, author of a
review of Daceys book which

the UF Board of Student Publications is now accepting applications for I
Editor, Managing Editor, Florida Alligator I
Term 111 only, 1970 Deadline Friday Noon. I
Applicants Who Have Applied For I
2 Terms Under The Previous I
Application Request And Who I
Are Interested Do Not I
Have To Reapply. I
- General Instructions
All applications are to be picked up and returned to Rm # 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union. I
e Each applicant must return an original plus two copies of his application. I
e For Further Information Call Mr. Norm Going, 392-1680. I
e Board Meeting will be held Monday, March 2 at 2:30 in Room 346, Reitz Union I
ll*ir ~*T~ T*
e A Schedule of Interviews will be Posted on Main Bulletin Board in Student PubEcatian.
(Rm33Q)iMonday,Martf^;,^;-v' I
*-.< - J

appeared in the Journal. The
review incorrectly said Dacey
had been convicted in
Connecticut of the unauthorized
practice of law.
A U.S. District Court ruling
that the Florida bar was an
official arm of the Supreme
Court of Florida and thus
immune from liability was
upheld by the sth UJS. Circuit
Court of Appeals.
State agencies cannot be sued
without permission of the state.

the small society

HAVE FIMALI-V A<&Fe&P To MMAObMbut
[Dp] i-i A &OLLAP OFF&&&P IT
da Too £Y the ray
0 UH ct VvA/ANP LABofc
a ,t
C --2-2 l^^l
Times Co. Charged With Monopoly

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.
(UPI) The Times Printing Co.,
faced with government charges
that it was trying to monopolize
this citys newspaper market, has
ceased publication of the
Chattanooga Evening Post.
The action Tuesday leaves this
Tennessee mountain city with
two competing newspapers, the
Evening and Sunday
Chattanooga News-Free Press
and the Chattanooga Times, a
morning and Sunday parent
publication of the defunct Post.
The government filed suit in
federal court here charging that
the printing company, owned by
the New York Times family,
created the Post in 1966 solely
to try to drive the News-Free
Press out of business, in
violation, of the Sherman
Antitrust Act.
Ruth Sulzberger Golden,
publisher of the Times and Post,
said the company agreed to a
consent decree precluding the
offer or combination advertising
rates for both papers. This in
turn made the continued

publication of the Post
economically impractical, she
said.
The majority of the stock of
Times Printing Co. is owned by
the trust established under the
will of Adolph S. Ochs, the late
publisher of the New York
Times, who bought the
Chattanooga Times in 1878.
Mrs. Golden is Ochs
granddaughter and sister of New
York Times publisher Arthur
Ochs Sulzberger. Each serves as a
director on the others
newspaper.

*****************************
: Extinguishers :
* Commercial FREE PKK-UP j
; : tSSL DCIIVERY
Automotive
Marine Co.
* 1010 South Main 378-2694
A*****-************* **********

by Brickman

The government accused the
company of intentional below
cost operations resulting in
losses of $7 million. The paper
charged unreasonably low
advertising and circulation rates,
engaged in discriminatory
pricing and forced combination
sales of classified advertising, the
suit said.
Mrs. Golden said her firm
disagreed with the government
contention, but we could only
prove the correctness of our
position in lengthy and extensive
litigation with the government.



BY FAIRCLOTH. 'LIFE

Kirk-Mafia Link Futile

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
newspaper said Wednesday that
Attorney General Earl
F aircloths office cooperated
with Life magazine in a futile
attempt to connect Republican
GoV. Claude Kirk with the
Mafia.
The Tampa Tribune, in a
story written by Tallahassee
bureau chief Skip Johnson, said
Faircloth assigned his chief
investigator, James McCall, to
work with the magazine for

'Axe* Repercussions
Felt By Maddox

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Speaker John W. McCormack
chided Gov. Lester Maddox of
Georgia Tuesday for passing out
pick and ax handles in the House
restaurant. Rep. Charles C.
Diggs, D-Mich., proposed to
declare Maddox unwelcome
hereafter.
McCormack, who issued an
order Tuesday that resulted in
clearing half a dozen of the
governors weighty trademarks
out of the restaurant, told
reporters today: It was
inappropriate for Maddox to do
what he said.
Governors have the privilege
Silent Majority
Speaks Up
BERKELEY, Calif. (UPI)
The silent majority in Berkeley
finally decided it was time to
speak up.
A crowd of 500 neatly
dressed, middle-aged men and
women held a rally on the City
Hall steps Tuesday and
presented a petition signed by
15,000 citizens.
They said they were at the
boiling point because of six
years of sporadic violence
erupting around the University
of California and a large
non-campus community of
street people.
A few young activists were at
the edges of the crowd as Mayor
Wallace Johnson was presented
the petition calling for a
crackdown on revolutionary
and subversive organizations.
Only last week, a riotous band
of 1,500 protesting the Chicago
Seven trial went on a rampage
through downtown Berkeley,
smashing hundreds of windows
and causing nearly $170,000 in
damage.
After they had swept up the
broken glass, an ad hoc group
called the Peoples Committee
began circulating the petitions
which they presented to the
mayor Tuesday.
&gj| 01

about a month before the
investigation was dropped.
Faircloth is a Democratic
candidate for governor.
The newspaper said Greg
Walter, an associate editor of the
magazine, met with Faircloths
state-paid press aide, Richard
Knight, and other Faircloth
aides Jan. 21 and reached an
agreement to share information
about the Kirk investigation if
Faircloths office would provide
help.

of the House floor, McCormack
said. But they are supposed to
comply with the rules and
regulations of the floor and of
the restaurant. It was
inappropriate for him to do
what he did.

test
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Faircloths name would have
been mentioned prominently in
the story, the Tribune said.
Knight was quoted as saying
he agreed to help the magazine
partially because the Florida
press has been unkind to
Faircloth.
My job is to make the
General look good, Knight was
quoted. If I can do that by
making the governor look bad,
Ill doit.
The newspaper said the
investigation involved the
possiblity of a connection
between Kirk and the Cosa
Nostra through Kirks father,
Claude Kirk Sr., and the
operators of the Queen
Elizabeth at Port Everglades.
The investigation failed to show
any of the connections sought
and was dropped, the Tribune
said.

(Richard Nixon Likes]
iParisian Midi'Skirts I
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon has revealed a new side of
himself: He likes high fashion and has put his stamp of approval on
the new Parisian mid calf skirts, at least as worn by the first lady of
France.
The French Couture and the new longuette look came to a White
House state dinner Tuesday night in honor of French President
Georges Pompidou and his tall, blonde, wife Claude.
Praising Madame Pompidous glittering turquoise and coral gown by
French Courturier Perre Cardin, Nixon said, I like the color and high
style. I like the split in her sheath skirt.
No one was more surprised than Nixons wife Pat to hear the
President holding forth on fashion.
Mrs. Nixon, who wore a pale green beaded gown, said the longer
skirt has always been a favorite of mine but you have to go with
the style.
Madame Pompidou admitted she was modeling the new longer
skirts for the first time herself. Well aware that she would be on
parade as the picture of Paris fashions, she brought along a wardrobe
of 22 costume changes.
She has won over Americans with her open, friendly manner. She
wears no makeup, has a windblown hairdo and appears at home in the
United States.

'* Thtfndtfy; F*bruy 26,197,Th^FIMMM

Page 7



t. Tlw Florida Alfator, Thursday, February 26,1970

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Curriculum Reform Near

MR. EDITOR:
The revolution of the seventies on campuses
across the country will take place in classrooms and
lecture halls. It will be aimed at meaningful changes
to transform and maintain education in a dynamic
state. The knowledge explosion which surrounds us
demands that we examine our priorities in an
educational system.
The concept of a general education was to
influence the personal and intellectual growth of the
individual through die content of a basic curricula.
In the current era there no longer exists a specific
body of knowledge to be acquired which is aimed at
those goals.
Universities must begin to offer experiences to its
students which afford more relevance to the realities
of today.
Education of die present and future should brace
itself for the drastic revisions which are imminent.
The increasing demands on special fields of interest
and interdisciplinaries pressure a student to acquire
a rapidly increasing and specialized body of
knowledge.
Such demands upon students are affecting the
entire undergraduate program. Truly general
education should become even more general to

General Education For UFs
Graduates Imperative

MR. EDITOR:
Thursday's Alligator carried an article describing
SCORES recommendation for the abolition of the
University College. I am not sure that the freshman
and sophomore students realize that this would
work very much to their disadvantage.
The graduate program on this campus has been
steadily enlarging in recent years. Every department
outside UC with which I am familiar is working hard
to improve or obtain its PhD. program. Every
professor is highly motivated to improve his
reputation, not in undergraduate teaching, but in
PhD. research.
He is in competition with other professors in his
discipline here and at other schools, and the relative
position of these professors is determined by each
man's ability to publish papers, organize research
programs, and bring in money from the outside to
support his projects.
The result of this competition is that the
professors within each department with the most
influence and prestige and those dedicated to the
PhD. program. Money and energy are drained from
freshman-sophomore courses to feed the PhD.
research effort. The best men are not found
teaching the lower courses. They are, of necessity,
thrown into the push to improve the reputation of
the PhD. program.
PhD. research requires cheap labor and is, by
definition, a means of training advanced students. In
order to supply this labor and these students,
graduate students are paid for teaching
freshman-sophomore courses.
The more such courses that a given department
has, die more graduate students it can pay and the
larger the PhD. program it can have. This motivates
every PhD. department to try to grab these courses.
Now there is a tremendous wealth of such courses
in die University College. For this reason, as the
graduate efforts of this University have become
stronger, the attacks on UC have become more
intense. -
In my opinion, the best hope for a good
freshman-sophomore program at this university is to
isolate it from the PhD. program. It should be in a
separate college with a dean assigned the job of
taking good care of freshmen and sophomores and
of protecting his faculty as much as possible from
the pressures of the PhD. program.
This dean should be given the money to allow
him to hire a faculty composed of first class
teachers men who have a broad view of our
society, its philosophical foundations and historical
origins, and of die, current state of man's
knowledge. A man Who is outstanding in rttduch in
some field may not fit these requirements it iD.
We now have this college structure, and I believe
it should be

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

afford students the opportunity to select courses
and thereby mold a curriculum unique to his desires
within the realm of general education.
The academic communities of this country
should takft notice of the reforms in curricula and
requirements spearheaded by Stanford and Brown.
It was observed that the colection of odes
referred to as file curriculum folows a cyclic
pattern; from a relatively simple beginning it
proceeds through a period of patchwork growth and
increasing complexity to eventual colapse. We seem
to be wdl into die second state and nearing die
third on this campus.
Universities should no longer be institutions
designed to fdl students with knowledge, but should
direct themselves to guide students toward acquiring
the knowledge which they seek.
Students should be given a greater voice and
responsibility in formulating their curricula. The
greater die possibility of selection given the student;
the more apt he is to utilize the opportunity to
delve into intellectual pursuits which hold his
interest.
HENRY SOLARES
SG SECRETARY OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

the men now operating it are doing so properly, but
this debate should not include the destruction of
the College itself.
It is true that some UC teaching is now done by
graduate students. This is, I believe, a consequence
of the eroding of the independence of the College
by external pressures and an effort by the College to
compensate for its lack of salary money.
In addition, there has been a shortage of good
faculty in almost all fields since World War H. This
shortage has now disappeared and good men are
expected to become increasingly available in the
coming years.
The abolition of the
University College
would work to the
students disadvantage
I would hope graduate student teachers, for the
most part, would be eliminated from
freshman-sophomore courses in the near future.
There are many other advantages to a
freshman-sophomore college that would take more
space than is available here to discuss in detail. One
comes from the special nature of the problems of
such students. A large fraction of them do not know
which major field they prefer. Another large group
states a preference but is so uncertain that ibev
change one or more times before graduating.
These students need the first year or two of
general education to insure the best choice of a
specialty field.
UC also can provide an integrated and relatively
complete program of studies of all fields of
knowledge. Turning general education over to the
department of Arts and Sciences will result in a
piece-meal and incomplete presentation.
It seems to me that the political issues presented
to the citizens of our democracy for their decision
come from such a variety of fields of knowledge
that a complete general education for our university
graduates is imperative.
It was my priviledge to attend UC as a student
many years ago.
I hope that the advantage that I enjoyed by
attending UC in those days can be passed on to
future classes of students.
; \\\ ARTHUR A. BROYLES
v..,. PROFESSOR of physics
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

editorial
Sad State

It is a sad state of affairs indeed when men who are
supposed to be leading our nation do not, in 1970,
understand the meaning of institutional racism.
And it becomes a worsening state of affairs when one
realizes that their ignorance could greatly affect the policies
and course of our public bodies, even this institution.
But such is the case, as one well knows if he has been
reading or hearing the reports of Vice President Spiro T.
Agnews recent speeches.
Agnew, one of the most visible signs of the spirit of
repression and fascism that is growing in our country, and
the right-wing side of President Nixons forked tongue,
came out against colleges that make allowances or set
quotas for disadvantaged applicants.
Knowingly or not, these men are ignorant racists and if
they do not know it, then it raises questions as to then thenability
ability thenability to analyze the society they are supposed to govern.
If Agnew does not realize how racism and poverty affect
opportunity in this society, then he is not fit for office.
Programs of the kind Agnew was attacking, such as the
Special Educational Opportunity Program, are not, by
themselves, meaningful anti-racism programs. But they are a
start, and to see public officials who unfortunately hold
much influence criticize them ignorantly is, to say the
least, disheartening.
The disadvantaged in this society not just the blacks,
but the Puerto Rican, chicano, Oriental and, to a lesser
degree, poor whites deserve an equal opportunity.
And an equal opportunity does not come by measuring
them up against a middle class, white American yardstick.
Press Muss Remain
Free From Police
MR. EDITOR:
The editorial board ot the Stanford University student newspaper,
The Stanford Daily, has arrived at the only honorable solution any
self-respecting member of the news media must to maintain freedom
of the press and continue the fight against the foiboding shadows of a
police state.
The staff has elected to bum all unused photographic negatives
within 24 hours to prevent their use by the police for political
persecution.
If the pressure is continued to force the constitutionally guaranteed
free press to provide an illegal source of information to the police
structure, capitulation by the media would further corrode our right
to privacy and security from the government. Not to mention
freedom of the press!
I believe that all members of the news media must follow the
patriotic example set by the staff of The Stanford Daily if this
country is to continue long to be the free democratic republic as
planned by the founding fathers.
WILLIS J. OZIER
ALUMNUS69
"That should get us more Southern votes'^



THEY FAN THE FIRES OF HATRED
Societys Extremists Are Our Enemies

MR. EDITOR:
It is common these days to hear
America denounced and ridiculed by
the radicals among us. In the wake of
the alleged massacre at My Lai we have
heard even more vituperative remarks
about our nation.
We must not accept the views of a
discontented few who see America as
cruel and brutal.
In South Vietnam it is the United
States which aids orphans, builds
schools, and renders vital medical
services. It is the enemy who turns
children into orphans, destroys the
schools, and inflicts suffering upon the
people.
We are not the murderers. In 1968 in
the city of Hue the North Vietnamese
slaughtered thousands of innocent
civilians. Let us not forget the
Americans who were captured,
executed, and then decapitated,
illustrating the almost crazed frenzy of
the enemy.
My Lai was nothing when compared

American "T
Violence.. C\
Two Views f

CREATORS OF GENOCIDAL WAR POLICY
The Whole Establishment Stands Condemned

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is one of the
last papers ever written by Bertrand Russell.)
Violence is not new to America. White men of
European stock seized the > lands of indigenous
Indians with a ferocity which endured until our own
times.
The institution of slavery shaped the character of
the nation and leaves its mark everywhere today.
Countless local wars were mounted throughout
the Twentieth Century to protect commercial
interests abroad.
Finally, the United States emerged at Hiroshima
as the arbiter of world affairs and self-appointed
policeman of the globe.
What is new in 1969 is that for the first time
many affluent Americans are learning a very little of
this disconcerting picture.
The revelations of atrocities by U. S. servicemen
in Vietnam illustrate not isolated acts inadvertently
committed by disciplined troops, but the general
pattern of the war, for its character is genocidal.
It has been fougfrt from the air with napalm and
fragmentation bombs, helicopter gunships and pellet
bombs, the spraying of poisons on thousands of
acres of crops and the use of enormous high
explosive weapons.
Civilian areas have been declared free fire zones
and the policy has been one of mechanical
daughter. On the ground, search and destroy
missions have used gas in lethal quantities, the
kflmg of prisoners, and systematic interrogation
under electrical and other tortures.
Senator Kennedy has released figures given to
him as chairman of the Senate Refugees
Subcommittee. He says that there have been one
million civilian casualties in South Vietnam alone
since 1965, of which 300JDOO have been kfl|ed v> M
Vj'O4 > ' '!> ' ' *

to the Auschwitz that Hanoi inflicted
on Hue.
When faced with the events at My Lai
at least we have been able to detest such
aberrations of conduct. When was the
last time Hanoi courtmartialed its
troops for the countless massacres they
have inflicted on South Vietnam?
It is those who scream peace now!
and scorn our nation that have
contributed to the desolation. They
have aided the enemy and comforted
him but they will not prevail.
At home we see the disgusting sight
of riots in the streets and the all too
frequent slander of our President and
leaders. Violence practiced in the streets
and propagated by men either in
Chicago, New York, or California seems
to be the order of the day.
But America is not on the verge of
revolution as these men would have us
believe. The only thing that we shall
wipe out is the use of violence, verbal
assassination, and the fanning of fires of
hatred, by men too desperate, too
despondent to think for themselves.

In the London Times of Dec. 3, Washington
correspondent Louis Heren compares such slaughter
to the Nazi record in Eastern Europe:
What begins as a Tirefight in a hamlet continues
compulsively long after opposing fire has been
a HflumilHH I II
The relevations of atrocities by U. S.
servicemen in Vietnam illustrate not isolated
acts inadvertently committed by disciplined
troops, but the general pattern of the war,
for its character is genocidal... The
prosecution of isolated junior officers is
quite inadequate... the more wicked war
criminals are the highest ranking military
and civilian leaders.
tHiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiNnniitiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
suppressed. With such appalling fire discipline
among all units in Vietnam, it is only exhaustion of
ammunition that brings engagements to an end.
This is precisely the picture which emerged from
the sessions of the International War Crimes
Tribunal in Scandinavia in 1967. The Tribunal heard
from former U. S. servicemen of the dropping of
Vietnamese prisoners from helicopters, the killing of
prisoners under torture and the shooting on orders
of those trying to be accepted as prisoners.
All this and much more was known years ago to
anyone concerned to learn the truth. It was
certainly known to tens of thousands of troops in
Vietnam. The London Times Saigon correspondent,
describing the reactions to the recent revelations of
Americans in Vietnam, commented:
.. There is a strong undercurrent pf knowledge
md fear that there, but for the grace d God, go
~ ,* *v..>'/;\vO.v
4< n

We do not need the Abbe Hoffmans,
the Jerry Rubins, nor the Tom Haydens
40 show us the way to unity. For their
unity is one that aims at a collective
violence of malcontents, anarchists and
misguided souls who aim at America's
destruction.
The real unity we all want will come
by working within the system through
the rule of law, not by the road of
chaos, violence, and verbid combat.
The American Dream is not dead.
Only a few amongst us would destroy it.
It remains for those of good will and
moderate inclinations to prevent the
extremists -of left or right or
center from engulfing us all in the
fires of hatred, fueled by irresponsible
individuals and ignited by those who
follow blindly the clenched fist, the
hammer and sickle, the burning cross, or

FORUM:
C Ainiti ml Viauit J
*?P hone fnr the 11 illll

Thursday, February 26,1970, The Florida Alligator,

This is why the prosecution of isolated junior
officers is quite inadequate. They are to be made
scapegoats. The more wicked war criminals are the
highest ranking military and civilian leaders, the
architects of the whole genocidal policy.
Have we so soon forgotten the regular White
House breakfast at which Johnson boasted openly
he and McNamara and their closest colleagues
selected the targets for the coming week?
This in turn is why it is ludicrous to suggest that
an enquiry should be mounted by anyone associated
with the government or armed forces. The whole
establishment stands condemned, including those
more moderate politicians whose every utterance is
still dictated by caution and petty ambition.
Goldbergs call for a commission of concerned
patriotic Americans would be a sublime irrelevance
were it not the very means whereby the full horror
would be hidden.
Only a Pentagon enquiry could do worse. Because
I doubt whether any enquiry in the United States
would be free from the most severe harassment, I
have invited some 15 heads of state around the
world to press the U. N. Secretary General to
establish an enquiry into war crimes in Vietnam.
Several American newspapers have observed that
reaction to the massacre relevaiiMM has bean asdl
more rapid and sharp in WesteA4feMj|MMfl}Nl*
United States. This is
American people are now
If there is not a massive at what it
being done in their names to Vietnam,
there may be little hope for of America.
Having lost the will to cooHtf &4y|M|gfcter is
not enough; the people new
repudiate their civiland militant bjKlers. v

the hippie firebrand.
The malicious actions of radicals in
America no less than those of the
soldiers at My Lai will be condemned
and punished. This nation does not
move forward with the whirlwind of
violence and destruction. It moves
forward when men of reason and
moderation are willing to listen, to
compromise, and to build.
The extremists in society today have
no program for the future. Instead, they
preach their imprecations and scream
their vacuous slogans. Make no mistake,
they are not fools. But they are our
enemies.
And like the enemies of freedom
everywhere and justice through the rule
of law, they too shall be defeated.
BRUCE DAVID ALPER, 3 AS

Page 9



I. The Florida Alftor, Thuraday, Fabmary 20.1070

Page 10

Sakerif £peciali all
a. smve dinner
MKDARUNOBROWNIiSaVESEEOED
MRMWMUMY j^ (
Cocktail 5 S I OO Detergent 3 ** 1
fCu7T7.:5 39 Dog Food .10 89*
gfl ll ||i 'ft IK Jv# Sausage .. 4&s 89 c Cleanser . .- 10 e
hellmanns
2 fH |p_ .Mayonnaise
STOKELY GOLD $V
CORN% 1 jK^aL
CREAM STYLE I JM| tt| HH|
._ mb w w
COOKIES COLDWATER I
Mm OAc HI 2
I
TMjFTYMAID ** 3 89* box
AMOW ASSORTED UMYSCUT . ...
Tissue.. A-M** Beets 1 m|||§§|M :
ARROW. WHITE A ASSORTED PAPER THRIFTY MAID CUT OREEN Vs
Towels.. 4- $ I Beans... 6^ $ I -- ilis *^
5 !00 Peas.... 6- $ I ~TJj S s ~L
rr o c|m tinn Razor Blades B3
Juice.... 3-^l 00 Beans...s^l 00
THRIFTY MAK> TOMATO VAN CAMF PORK A C B||A MINI TRASH BIN . *l
Sauce... 5 s l Beans... 4- $ l strawberry preserves .. -a. 39*
fSTAFLO I*^i.4c...Moi. 7y.* [ KeeEies 49* Spray Starch 59 c Mac-A-Roni .... 2/43*
I £HBUi FREE | Fig Newtons .... 45* Twist Macaroni 2/31* Flavor Rice 39*
I 1 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 180 M.W. fitH ST.
I WlSl 'XZESZ j WAY 441. HtOH SPRjNO* r 1401 N. MAIN ST.
saswr \ jiiniiSSft jKsU?^^i^i
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' V
SUNNYUND TENDER SMOKED
' 11 £ZEOUIEN. SAUISTBJkK.HI.TVKKIYAOK.O.
P M. m. M£D SCcedHom . w*|" VaoTPam. . *P*
M§M Mil V Bologna .69* Turkey Roast.. ?£*2"
fe4Efe .fI^KakPSP P Ra PPA Sausage.... 69' Freaks 79'
SHANK Cheese Food .. 75* Send. Spread.. 49*
/ HALF 1 Pimento Cheese Beef Liver ... 69 c
lEOR iff ~. LB CheeseTT.... -.89* Fish Sticks ...**£ 99*
DUll naiT 07 Stick Owes* *;s9' Bisceih.... 6 iS59'
. *., __
mi TASTE O'SEA
AM M FLOUNDER
SUNNYUND PURE PORK BREAKFAST LINK Ell I BTC
Sausage $ 1" Roast.. *1 39
Roast rr S P 9 Steak.. 98' jKw\ jTmflL
Steaks *1 39 Patties $ 1" W KUADI %
PRICES GOOD WED. NOON THRU WED. NOON FEB. 25-MARCH 4 I
CHOICE NEW YORK CHOICE
Margarine ^ 9 OCOMA MEAT
41-ACRES ORANGE PnP M
CHICKEN, IEEE ar
.'I.ERBRAND HOWARD JOHNSONS
P| P PPipr H Ice Cream "*.' 59 c Corn Toastees ... 3 89'
mk 6_oz MP Potatoes 2 *S 99 c Cheese Cake > 69 c
vmjcANs FREEZER QUEEN MRS PAUI
'A Cook-In-Bag Meats 4- s l Onion Rings .... 3 o. M
Mi iiMy Coffee Rich .... 4 pnts s l Fish Cakes 2 S I OO
Radishes CotteeCake RsdiFillets -79'
VINE RIPE 2 bags 29* MM
I ABBAJamAA#
i omatoes A pppp,
mRjP U. s. No. 1 REGULARS (10 Lbs.RUSSETS79') 'lll pippi
29 PQTAIOES 20 SI Sr
- l slJj|ll eS 3 * 1 I
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVL open on - ... _ Peas 5 1 I
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ?.f.9!.N:..y^!M.ST : Grapes 4 JAS 99' I
'VMk i '. ;RriTitE>C.Ta/ls ;ir|MEXTR>% : SfS" M n us. ...
ihimTSaaKga immzzz E[ | Margarine ... 2 -s. 89 I
as, Imms -"7", ;KiM :p|ff jssJSs: .~ I
# .-.ssraiss. :Hr ;ER : iPP.*rrr Maroarine ... 3 M
N WiillEaaieeJ'7;ei:.Tyr.....' J jDlgg^VrTrrrTeTreeeKEiiiii-LW------:----.-, m aamml'j

Thursday, February 26,1670, Tha Florida Alipdor,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.;.;.>>x*:*x-x*xwcx*vv.v.%v. , x*x-x*x*x*xg
FOR SALE I
' :
%xxwx*x*x-x-x*x*w-Nw-*x>x->>x-xxwx*.-r
Spring is Here! Solve your
Transportation problems with a 2
year old Suzuki 50cc ($110) Must
sell now. Call Bill 392-7511.
(A-94-St-p).
Giant sale 1963 chevy conv.
w/stereo tape sale/trade $785 15w
amp. sls Zenith amfm $35 Sony
200 c tape rec. $l2O carcover $7,
great savings, ph. 378-8771
(A-94-3t-p).
1968 Vandyke 12 x 57 central air
two bedroom 2 bath like new,
graduating must sell $950 equity +
take over payments. Call 378-6529.
(A-94-st-p).
HONDA, 1969 C 8350 2,900 ml,
extras, crash bars, backrest, luggage
rack, $675, excellent condition, 423
S.E. Bth St., Phone 376-8470.
(A-94-2t-p).
Beat the rent racket, own your home.
8 x 47 mobile home with 10 x 20
paneled cabanna; 10 x 10 covered
patio AC, Central Heat, ect. Call
372-8722. (A-94-st-p).
AKAI 1710 w Reel to Reel
stereo-mono tape recorder. 3 speed,
excellent sound reproduction. 6
months old. S2OO. or best offer. Call
378-5120. (A-94-st-p).
Healthways scuba tank backpack
boot Sortsways single hose regulator
SIOO Swift spotting scope Is to 60
power eyepieces tripod SSO VW top.
Luggage rack S2O 372-2155 after 5
pm. (A-92-4tp)
Yamaha Twin 100. Good condition,
electric start, 4,000 miles. $225. or
best offer. After 6:00 PM 378-7724.
(A-93-4t-p).
FIREWOOD, delivered by the cord.
CALL 378-2784 or 376-5624.
(A-61-3t-C).
1966 Honda so excellent condition.
Must sell- immediately. SBS or best
offer. Can be seen at 416 NE 7th St.,
Lower rear apt. (A-95-st-p).
If you dig Beads unique & antique
that no one else has : European AM.
& Hong Kong strung and unstrung.
PO Box 16/331 or call 392-8986.
(A-95-3t-p).
Selling' all I own: books, records,
silverware, lots of etc., Grant
373-1014. (A-95-lt-p).
CARPETS and life too can be
beautiful If you use Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. fA-95-lt-c).
For sale, 1968 Yamaha 250 (yds 3)
new rear brakes, rear sprocket, rear
tire. Come by 111 N.W. 19th St. no.
11. to see. Any offer over $325
considered. (A-95-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
LEAR JET STEREO. Eight-track
tape player, with amplifier and
speakers. Excellent condition. SIOO.
378-7943 Ask for Marc. (A-93-st-p).
Hand painted turned on step van all
aluminum body very good condition.
Great for bands, trips or delivering
bread. 373-2681 378-5425. BILL.
(A-93-3t-p).
TOPCON-lfNl with 100 & 53mm
lens, case tripod, filters. 3 rolls of
film used. Worth $325, will sell for
S2OO. Call 378-8322 after 5 PM.
Student. (A-93-3t-p).
Complete Slmon-Omega B-22
Enlarger. All extras Incl. Filters,
safdllght beaker, develop tank, etc.
Cost $225 Sell for $125.
376-0317. Like new. (A-93-st-p).
N.W. 13th St. Ph 5724523
Across From THE MALL
IN
UNDEFEATED,
PLUS
A GREGORY PE CK
IN
THE CHAIRMAN
2 STEVE MCQUEEN
THE lIIIVERS
3 C T OT

gssteo::; xxs^xxx->w-x<-xx-xxxxs
FOR RENT |
flMSSflo e vx-x*x-xx-x-:xx*wxsw-nv?*&
HELP I'm Getting Married! Need a
man to take my place in a modern 2
brm. apt. with everything only 43.50.
Great roommates 376-5542, Danny.
(B-94-4t-p).
Fun In the sun-. 1 female roommate
needed for 2 br. Village Park poolside
apt. for spring quarter. Call Kathy
after 5:30, 378-7061. (B-94-st-p).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
furnished 3 blocks from campus.
Couple preferred, $ 100/mo., come
by before 10 PM, 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave, apt. 21. (B-95-st-p).
Point West 2 bdrm, 2bth, Lux. apt.
to sublet. $l9O. mo. 376-9966 after
6 PM. (B-95-st-p).
Sublet 1 big bedroom apt. 3 blocks
from campus. Air conditioned. 100 a
month. February rent free. 1613 NW
3 Place. 378-1828 come by or call.
(B-92-stp)
j
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C SH, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224, (B-81-20t-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom apt. end of qtr.
New clean furnished AC cable TV
pool. Close to campus & Med Center
$l4O month. 378-6013 after 5.
(B-94-2t-p).
One bedroom furnished apt. SIOO a
month. Close to campus, 1604 NW
4th Avenue. Kitchen, bathroom,
living and dining rooms. (B-94-st-p).
Sublet:* one bedroom apt. TWO
blocks from campus completely
furnished A/C 1605 N.W. 4th AVE.
Call 376-3425 after 4:00 (B-95-st-p).
SUBLET 2 bedroom apt. kit, bath
funished, AC, heater, w/w Carpet TV
cable walking distance to campus.
PHONE: 378-9248. (B-2t-95-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt.,
A/C, & H., pool, quiet nbhd, parking,
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph. 378-7834.
(B-94-st-p).

Hello there you pretty young thing. How
about accompanying me to Fr. Gannon's lecture
on "Sexuality on Campus" at the Union!
4 f)
FRESH
Diagolue with a Theologue
Feb. 26, 4:00, Lounges 122,123, Union
Sponsored by the Union & the URA
at
MORRISON'S CUTTERUr
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
FRIED CHICKEN
All You Coro To Eot 99 C
FRIDAY v
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 26,1970

;
FOR RENT
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Needed: 1 female roommate for V.P.
apts. $42.50/mo. Available anytime.
372- or 392-1107. (B-93-6t-p).
French Quarter Apt. to sublet Spring
qtr., come by apt 110 or call for
Infor 372-3061. (B-92-stp)
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt,
A/C, & H., pool, quiet nbhd, parking,
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph. 378-8734.
(B-93-st-p).
Sublease 1 bdr. apt., AC, furnished,
Private patio, Pets, available March 1;
slls Per mo., Village 34 Apt. 43,
high & dry, 376-0579. (B-93-4t-p).
Â¥*x-x-:*m.xxtw*x*x*x*xx*x<.!.:.vxv>w<^
WANTED |
y 5
wxxxx*x:.%ss*:*x*x*x*xx>mx?xt;?x*:*w
1 or 2 roommates needed for 2 bdrm.
Summit House Apt. for Spring
quarter. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361.
(C-91-st-p).
Male roommate for Spring quarter
Townhouse apt. PHONE
373- 307 S. W. 16th Ave,
Apartment 354. (C-94-st-p).
Tired of dorm life? We need two
male roommates for French Qtr. apt.
SSO per month plus l l* utilities. Call
373-2505. (C-93-3t-p).
Female roommate wanted for two
bedroom Williamsburg apartment. All
deposits paid. Call 376-5771.
(C-92-stp)
Im analyzing commercial radio and
TV programing and counter pro. etc.
Also Info, on any area of ETV. Write
Mike Seeman 6623V2 Whltset Ave,
North Hollywood, Calif., Your help
rewarded. (C-91-st-p).

I WANTED 1
1 female roommate for large
two-bedroom house with studio,
fireplace, two blocks from Norman.
41.25 mo. Call 378-4388 or
392-7656. (C-91-st-p).
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
enlglsh speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for
appointment. 3 92-2049.
(C-91-10t-p).
1 or 2 male roommate wanted for
two bedroom La Bonne Vie apt.
Spring Quarter Call 378-8525.
(C-95-4t-p).
1 female roomie for spring quarter
AC, 2 bdrm. apt. 2 blk from campus
own bedroom $41.67/mo +
$9.00/mO. utilities. Call 378-8711
after 3 PM. (C-93-3t-p).
Male roommate for spring qtr.
University Gardens apts. 1 bdm.
$67.50 /month. Poolside. Prefer grad,
student. 378-3767. (C-95-st-p).
Male or Female wanted for Spring
Quarter. Exotic 2 bedroom French
Quarter apt. For all the exciting
details, call Laird at 373-2743.
(C-92-stp)

' M ri^j
" v"*-^ 4 % < &>\ < Hk
rr *.._ Jr?
v-v.B H P7 §., v* 1 ii^ipipiH^fe-.
'K' J t'"- ||||||||% - 1
B -*v ,** jl
EM^u CKs^^^^B
c M
" I ;^ r '_ l I, ;' I I -.- I I~i, I m
/-^-ar* j y ptw y^^M^y s i *,* tl9 > i, gg >
,l ll 11 I
JMHUiUIIJt I a*i T* I m /nTm!T*tt^^^

5 /00Ww**'*** v vVi *v.v.v.*.'-'* - y
|| WANTED j!
Two cool guys needed for roommates
In really nice 3 br. house. SSO mo +
utilities. Large bath, kitchen, etc. Call
376-5762 anytime. (C-94-3t-Pl.
SINGLE MEN WANTED! Dating can
be fun. Tell us the type of women
you would like to meet. All matches
live In Gainesville. For Free
questionnaire and detail write:
Nationwide Dating Service, 177 10th
St., NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(C-94-7t-p).
Female roommates-for house 3 miles
from campus. Own room; central
heat/air. SSO/month, share utilities.
Available immediately. 373-1027.
(C-94-3t-p).
Female roommate for one bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus starting
spring quarter. Call 372-3750.
(C-94-3t-p).
Female roommate for spring quarter,
$47.50/month + V? util. Good times
guaranteed. Call 372-5128 anytime.
(C-94-3t-p).
Male roommate, 3 bedroom apt. Ige
private bedroom S4O. mo. 406*/2 NE
Ist Ave. 376-0317 after 5.
(C-94-st-p).



gator classifieds

:<:--- llinnnnD ooi]fii)tnnronfWÂ¥mi'~
rtttl* WANTED |
{ ... ~.yAWW^
application! for
Now c camp Counselors at
St jewlooD For boy! and girt* In
p|NE *nillle N.C. Write P. O. Box
H *Tc* rS Normandy Branch, Miami
{ffi 33141. (E-91-St-p).
mfpd MONEY??? Sleap laboratory
2* subjects aged 18-35 to
ntrtlclpate in steep experiment.
KJXs 21 consecutive days and
R |nht! Free. Possible to earn S6OO.
Interviews will be made 2/23 through
l/ST no appointments necessary.
sjace Science Building.
M 2-2007. (E-93-3t-p).
student with Electronic! experience
needed for part time work as
nrnto-type Technician and general
Tertlng work 37>-15l. (E-94-st-p).
second quarter German student
2s help. Looking for a tutor that
has had at least three quarters of
German. Call 378-0943, 9-noon, or
after 7 PM. (E-94-3t-p).
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
Part-time, male or female. Very High
Commissions, sales kit furnished. Call
372- between 7:00 and 9:00
PM. (E-93-3t-P).
Graduating Accounting Majors: Why
not remain in Gainesville In a state
career service position with the
University of Florida? Challenging
positions with excellent promotion
potential. Starting salary $615 a
month plus liberal fringe benefits.
Please contact Mr. Eagan
Employment Manager, Hub
392-1222. Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-92-st-p).
AUTOS 1
v .'.
yAw>;::o::.>a
67 MGB Roadster heater, oil cooler,
excellent shape, not off showroom
floor until 6B, NEED CASH. $1,500
make offer, 376-9540 PEACE.
(G-93-st-p).
Corvette *69 Coupe 350 HP 4
speed, full power $4,800. Call
378-5514. (G-93-4t-p).
Chevy Impala 59 Must Sell Best offer
Thurs. Frl. takes It! Runs great,
Inspected, good tires, new battery,
VB, radio 4 door, 378-6833.
(G-95-2t-p).
C*
1962 Studebaker SIOO or best offer
Call 372-7384 evenings. Runs good.
(G-95-2t-p).
Economical Dependable 1960 V.W.
NEW Tires, clutch, brakes. Engine;
great shape + 31 m.p.g. $350.00.
Flavet 3 apt. 253-5 after 6 PM.
(G-95-st-p).
Volkswagen bought In Germany fully
equlped light blue excellent
condition, low mileage must selL
Going overseas call 378-1121 after 5
PM. (G-94-st-p).
1964 Corvair, black, radio, excellent'
condition, rebuilt engine, SSOO, Call
Judy at 378-0082 4 thru 7 dally.
(G-94-st-p).
1960 Renault caravelle, good
condition. New tires and removable
hard top. $175 or best offer. Call
373- after 4:30. (G-94-3t-p).
Porsche 912/5, blue 1968. Air cond.,
am-fm, chrome wheels, radlals,
Konls, driving lites, headrest.
Unusually nice. Call 378-7301 eves.
IWWWKWX.I.X^X-XvX-XWKW'V'V.Vi
PERSONAL I
Pugsley Congratulations! I'm really
proud of you. Gee maybe now you
can get a pin that doesn't turn upside
jjown! I'm not a Loretta lunch
bucket, but I sure love you and
always will. Love, Heap; your
Snuggle Bunny. (J-95-lt-p).
11 Hlllll j I 111 B y
HP. VI

I Un onAudifnMaS^^^fl
'H-. 7:00 and 9:30 |
I I
":**'****'Um\uio*
ISKaa ilmSS*, |
-*
*. i 11

Thuraday, F*ruy 26.197#. Th. Florid. Allig.,or.

7."""' r .'..i.i.i........
PERSONAL
non thru sat. ruanas capes &
ponchos from Colombia 25
zodiac shoulder bags 30% off. leather
Skirts 25% off. SPANISH MAIN 1642
W- UNIV. OPEN 10AM-10PM;
(J-92-stp)
Need your term paper typed 7 will
type anything. Only 50 cents a page.
Broward Hall on campus. Call
392-9760. (J-94-2t-p).
Whats with the Drug Scene? WUWU
Radio scores another First Sunday
afternoon at 5:30 PM by presenting
Art Llnkletter discussing Drugs and
Todays Youth." Time 5:30 PM
Sunday on WUWU Gainesvilles
top station at the top of your dial!
(J-95-lt-p).
Folk Lovers get together at the Plaza
Frl 27th 3 PM-SPM Open
playing and discussion so bring your
Instruments. Call 372-3225 for
details. (4-95-2 t-p).
SWING WITH the SIP-IN crowd. A
social drinking club for the over 21
jet-set,' sponsored by Grad students
and faculty. A cozy, friendly,
atmosphere for those Friday blues.
Lamplighter Lounge 5:30 7:30
Friday. (J-95-2t-p).
Its been a TOGETHER place for 5
years. Come together at THE BENT
CARD Coffee House and celebrate
being. Frl. & Sat. 8:30 ?.
(J-95-lt-p).

YOUR ACADEMY AWARD THEATRES
/ ENTERTAINMENT q \
/ HEADQUARTERS MOF GAINESVILLE \
ELUOTT GOULD
UQm I jtf DYAN CANNON
nssMLAiwwTji f lUi
| T *4A 178-1434 IT J I IFJ
Wf BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
HELD OVER! Fw best supporting actress
Card @ Alice
NATALIE WOOD ROBERT CULP
JJAjjHTMJNIjSSSJ KM
i GOLDIES TOPS!
NOMINATED FOR AN
ACADEMY AWARD FOR HER
brillant performance in
j CACTUS FLOWER
, ll \\ yt m
** ' * *.*., I* F t I M V'.*
f %V < .v/.-,..
* *'' * 4 v *

Page 13

| PERSONAL
GIRLS Do you realize that
CUSTOM MADE clothes are cheaper,
fit better, allow you greater selection
of pattern, material A design, and
feature higher quality workmanship?
Distinctive Personal Dress, Wedding
Dress, Sportswear & Bikinis by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Phone: 378-0320. (J-95-st-p).
feuy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, u\3
[other gifts wholesale. Name brands/
.Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
.of our 200 page wholesale gift and'.
[Jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
[WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
jWflllston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
JJ-75-3t-p).
FRESHMEN Old man have a Job
waiting for you? Plan to join the
foreign legion. If so, congratulations.
If not, the UF Career Planning and
Placement Center can help you plan
your future, suite G 22. J Wayne
Reitz Union. (J-94-st-p).
YOUR SONS CHILDREN ARE
DYING. Help EAG keep your world
livable. Cali 392-1609, or see us In
RM. 323 of the UNION. (J-91-st-p).
A FREE GUITAR LESSON. PHONE
372-3225 or come to 1826 S. Unlv.
Ave and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years. NO
OBLIGATION. Folk and finger stylo.
Beginning to professional. Peace!.
(J-94-3t-p).

1 PERSONAL |
* %
460 a month, room & board.
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St: Call 376-6420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
:
WANT A THOUGHT PROVOKING
GUEST for DINNER? INFOR,
APPT. call RANDALL LANKE
7-Sp.m. 373-2821. (J-92-stp)
Tha Canter of Man wants to grok
you. Poetry, music, head trip Thur.
nlte, 2/26, 8:00 Presbyterian Center.
$1.50 gen. adm. 75 cents students.
|IOST $ FOUND |
LOST: Casette tapes at Mllhopper
Friday nlte. Please call 373-1537
(L-95-4t*p).
LOST: Small, brown puppy with
black face. Lost, Sun. In vicinity of
Shelley's. Please caH 372-5772.
(L-95-lt-p).
Reward Womans wrlstwatch
Gold, lost vie. of Peabody Hall
Computer Ctr. Initials on back
M.M.A., TEL 378-7751, 5:30
7:00 PM and after 11 PM.
(L-93-3t-p).
SERVICES
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afganistan,
Khatmnud. Lvs London Late June.
$545 fully Inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).

ggjfgff]
f I>H w W IM > V *yj
...
mm topaz as
O looeooooeooooeoo e* #
An Eloquent Film Os
1 nn a. w im.y,
Ff TER FONDA DENNIS MOPPE*jpi^^^R
iPltlltM | enjoy our new
ORANGE & BLUE
"GATOR"SEATS-
Spaced For Comfort
From the country that j
gave youLA WOMAN"
INGA" and I AM CURIOUS"
(YELLOW)
FANNY HILL* is a porno-classic!"
-ARCHER WINSTON
"In there with sex and love
all the way!" y v
8 and Nicholas Demetroutes
Fanny Hill
MW.i"a>ilfMi IWtIM
1 t'*'* '* '*

INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 3 78-6127. (M-3*-59-p).
*
.. ..
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
TNCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Untv. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Irregulars and Seconds colorful sheets
and towels all sizes. Sheet and Towel
Shop 103 S. W. Ist Street.
(M-91-st-p).
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will dean,
adjust, lubricate, and install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than slOl 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 yean
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Xlternators-Generators-'
Starters-Eiectrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
XEROX COPIES: spedlzatlng In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1617 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
FRESHMEN The UF Career Planning
and Placement Center has everything
it needs to assist you In your career
planning problems. EXCEPT YOU.
suite 22, JWRU. (M-94-st-p).



Page 14

I. Tha Florida AMator, Thursday, February 26,1970

B||8 ||
*
t
/ i

Tup UADPY (WOittO^ftfr.
r | LmH I 11 Mklwi AimM rta*ra
Sm4Mu :." 4
Celebrating the Opening of our 156th. *t or ...Merritt Island, Florida a mg

SWIFT S PREMIUM
HALF OR WHOLE
SMOKED
Fully-
Cooked
Homs
pound
k

FwaOiik'Wwt&ft.
SwHfs PrtnluM Tra-Teadcr SIIcmI
Beef Liver 69*
trwwrt Star MlnCsrs
Sliced Bacon Ul 79*
Rath's Mack Hawk Ssaalsss
Smoked Dainties ... 99*
CsfdasTs Vasty
Sliced Picnics ST *!*
Ilanaaa's Orange Bass Braakfast
Link Sausage i. 59*
Swift's Premium Assarted Sliced
Celd Cots X 49*
(Belogea, Pickle 6 Piemate, Olive B Pimeete)
Always A Family Faverite,
TarnewWieners ... VLT49*
Uaex imparted Beaeless Mel lead
Canned Hams ...... *!I 4S
Plemp All Meat
Oscar Mayer WienersUT9*
leatee Seafsed Treat, Ceehed
Smoked Mackerel .. 99*
ieataa Seafeed Treat, Ready Te-Sat
Stone Crab Claws .. *l''
kcetee Seafeed Treat, Ready Te-Ceek
P&DShrimp

r
Jlcui* P>i+ce
I COOK S DELIGHT
I BREAKFAST CLUB
lEvaporated
Milk
I lO 12 ox. can
13*
h. j

F* ft. I)lraf ftp!.
SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTFN GOVERNMENT
: INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE!
Sirloin, Key Club or
Boneless Top Round
Steak Sale
per pound
l''\

SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Swift's Premium Seeder
Chock Steaks 79*
Ceekewt Special! Swifts Premlam
T-Bone Steaks ..... $ 1 29
Swift's Premlam Pretea Beaeless
Imperial Roast ..... 99*
Swift's Premlam Beaeless
English Cut Roast ... *l*
Swift's Premlam Beae-la
Pot Roast 79*
Swift's Premlam Pretax Beef ..
Short Ribs 59*
Heott, &. Beatty Kk Spadt
Lastre Cream Rep er ixtra Held
Hair Spray ir 49*
Kills Oerms ea Ceatact, Aatiseptic
Lister!tie ir 69*

r
PUBLIX
BREAKFAST CLUB
Regular
Margarine
1 -!fc>. c arlon

ice
I A
1

f 1
SAVE 11C
LIGHT MEAT
DEL MONTE
Chunk
Tuna
6 1/2-ox. cans

r#fB
(W Oiw. Defidluoi Dept
Ptlld<Â¥> SIIcmI
winw (( Nona ik. ww
OMWUHw
Uvtrwmt **
Tasty. IssJy It lnw
Mocotobl Salad 39*
3#cf
Mwkte. mi 39*
L*gs, iTMtlt, TU|hl m 99*
B^l



r
£, Jlcuo- P'u&e
PINK LIQUID
DETERGENT
Penny
Saver
32-oz. b ottl e
3"' $1
b A

PRICES ARE EFFECTIVE THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 26 THRU MARCH 4, 1970
l.th tb.r. Testy
Stuffed Olives w 59 e
Publix Twin-Pack
Potato Chips L 49*
SAVE 6c, Lady tatty
Prune Juice T 39*
SAVE 1 Sc, Dnl Manta
Spinach 5 t 3 *1
SAVE 15c, Arf Oraan
Lima Beans *1
SAVE Sc, Dal Manta Wkola Raalad
Tomatoes
SAVE 16c, Dal Manta
Stewed Tomatoes 4 *1
SAVE 24c, Datargant
Lux Liquid 39*
SAVE 2c Accortad Flavor*
Royal Pudding 066 0 6 pkg. 10*

r
U o ii- F-syn FfJ Psst. I
SNOW CROP FROZEN I
CONC. FLORIDA I
Orange I
Juice I
79*
cans JHw JM Hr

Pwwkl
K E
Wa reserve the
right to limit
quantities

n|m \ : jm
MZM *ti**^mk.*;^r J
yM ~ '[ > y.
- .-_.^x .-_.^x

PIIBLIa

WESTGATE SHOWNG CENTER
W. Univanity Avenua at 34th Strwi

FRESH COFFEE ]
ALL GRINDS |
Folgers
Coffee
1-lb. can
LIMIT 1 PLEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $5.00 OR MORE
k, EXCLUDING CIGARETTES

SAVE IOC
AUTOCRAT
ASST. FLAVORS
Ice
Cream
half gal.
LIMIT 2 PLEASE

SAVE 10c, Plain ar Saif-Rising
Pillsbury Flour t* 49*
SAVE 39c, Dal Maata Pinaappla-Orapafruit
Fruit Drink 4?.., $ 1
SAVE 22c, Dal Manta Sartlatt
Pear Halves 3r9 e
SAVE 4Sc, Dal Maata Craaia Style ar Wkola Karaal
Golden Corn ..... 5tr $ l
SAVE 16c, Dal Maata Dolicioos
Fruit Cocktail .. 4rl
SAVE 16c, Dal Maata Cut
Green Beans 4 # .r $ l
SAVE 16c, Dal Maata Rick Tkick
Tomato Catsup .. 4V£*l

SAVE 30C
KNOCKS OUT
DIRT & STAINS
Punch
Detergent
giant
pkg. I W m
LIMIT 1 PLEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $5 00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
i

WESTERN
FRESH CRISP
Iceberg
Lettuce
icirge C
head

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Straat
Store hour* -# Mon. thru Fit--7 Sot.

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street
i.j

Thursday, February 26,1670, The Florida Alligator,

'
L J2o+u ft r^ce
DELICIOUS
O SAGE HALVES
Freestone
Peaches
2 1 c.m
L A

cUPaoJ^
/yTftm
/^coupons
EXTRA iF*!
reen Stamps [g|
Pristeen Feminine
Hygiene Spray
2Va oz. can $1.29
1 <
(lx#ires Wad. Marth 4. 1670)
tAAflAftAAflAAAAAAAAAyhftAAflftftftAftftnftAftftni
EXTRA
dWGreen Stamps gj
5-Day Anti-Perspirant |
Deodordnt I j
4 oz. size 69c I
! 2 (l.plr*. WW. Martk 4. 1*74)
xeeeaaeeeimaaaaftaaliuaMUuuMtaeeeaaeeen
EXTRA I
reen Stamps g|
> 1
Bufferin Tablets
100 ct. $1.19
3 |blrM Wmd. Hank 4, *)
> 1

HI-HAT BRAND
SALAD- PERFECT
Firm
Tomatoes
pint basket
It i

[WPWuceLawe
FrMlh'i Oonuin# Idaho Baking
Potatoes i? 79*
Crisp Florida Pascal
Celery £s 19*
Small Yollaw Cooking
Onions .Hi 49*
All-Pvrposo Controllod-Atmosphara
Jonathan Apples .... Hi 49*
3-NUnnto Wkito or Yollow
Popcorn Hi 25*
Frosh Pooch Flavor Slicod Chillod
Peaches STM*

fn
fry ./A

Page 15



The
Florida
Alligator

RAT COMES THROUGH AGAIN
Rotary Connection Opens Tonight

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entartainmawt Editor
We all read that there was
going to be a change in the
direction of The Rathskeller, a
change to more popular
entertainment, but most of us
didnt think much about it until

|F
Ellmil Bl A Kr
Ki bumm Hl j
x jp^
I Mayan Art Display Opens I

A special art exhibit of
photographs and artifacts of
Mayan arj opens today at the
Teaching Gallery and will be on
show through April 10.
The bulk of the exhibit
consists- of recent photographs
of Mayan archaelogical sites in
Yucatan, Mexico, and
Guatemala. The photographs
were taken specifically for the
exhibit by Roy C. Craven Jr.

PRICES EFFECTIVE __ /
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY Z-y, A/) _//- /fLs /
FEBRUARY 26-27-28 1970 rA£ffU£QjQ /
MTttn *(*.,
\ |J i | r 1 Ovllclou* Assorted Individual
If \ Danish Pastrits
sj| 6 's9
f .i Regularly $1.89, Tasty Large
8-Inch Frash Strawberry
Bavarian
Cream Pie
(plus 100 extra SAN T
Green Stamps with coupon)
[Regularly 51.89, Tasty Large |
8-inch Fresh Strawberry 1
Bavarian Cream Pie I
each $1.49 |
(Expires Sat., Feb. 28, 1970) f
AeAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA'AAAAAOAAAAUAAAAeeH
DANISH BAKERY
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-3885

BBBHWBiBHMWMHHMBI
ft§ MI pIfI li INM p 11l I
mS- n | liivnli'-'RS K

last weekend when Pacific Gas
and Electric got on stage at the
on-campus club.
The result was a rock em
sock em three days of truly
professional blues music, better
than anything heard around here
in a long time.
And the Rat isnt going to let

director of the University
Gallery.
More than 400 black and
white photographs and about
300 color photographs will be
on display. Some have been
transferred to slides.
The opening of this exhibition
correlates with a major
International Conference on the
campus.

up for a minute. Tonight
another nationally prominent
act, The Rotary Connection, will
open at the dub and these three
nights of entertainment have
every promise of being as good
as last weeks.
The Rotary Connection is a
group from New York. There are
seven people in the group one
chick and six guys. Theyve
recorded a couple of albums for
Cadet, played at several pop
festivals, and appeared in clubs
and on campuses almost
everywhere.
The sound these folks
produce is a good one. Vocally,
the group conies across with a
sound that has acquired a lot of
good things from soul music,
acquiring the same sort of things
that Sly and the Family Stone
got from the musk.
But just to say the music
sounds something like soul or
somthing like Sly and the Stone
doesn't really get close to what
the group can do. The group
sounds, for the most part, like
itself and that is about as much a
compliment as can be said about
a group in these days when so
many sound Idee so many others.
Instrumentally, Rotary
Connection does a lot of things
with a very strong and good
lead. Whoever plays lead guitar
for the group does so in an
imaginative and fresh way, doing
some things that are nicely
derived from jazz.. The first
album featured this strong lead
and backed it up with nice

| {FWJ Fish & Chicks a
&s9n nifayn 'BwJ* 1515 SW 13th St. 373-2330 9
B WrF a M-F4pm lO pm 5
w (J Free Delivery Sat & Sun 11 am lO pm 2
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MisififisaeisitiMsiegsieisiaiaMiHMaiMHasisisititMgagsaaiaii
j NEW FROM PORI'S! I
j "THE GATOR GETTERS" j
{ Gator Getter #1 The EYE POPPER SANDWICH Si
Ham, Salami, Bologna, Cheese 7n
on a Jumbo Roll V |
| j
j Gator Getter #2 Bar-B-Q Chicken *aq 5
8 Sandwich on a Toasted Bun *7
Gator Getter #3 Chicken Salad COO I
j Sandwich T'd/ |
I Gator Getter #4 Meatball a.. f
8 Hoagie with Cheese PDD I
| Gator Getter #5 Egg Salad Sandwich £49 I
| WEEKEND GATOR GETTER SPECIAL 1
| 3 piece Chicken Box $,99 |

i, Tha Florida AlHgator, Thursday. Fabniary 26. WO

Page 16

studio string arrangements. The
bass player again, whoever he
is is good, playing the bass as
an instrument, not just as a
backup beat.
On the groups album they
sang The Weight, Respect,
Sunshine of Your Love, and
The Stones The Salt of die
Earth. the group has
variety. Suprisingly enough, they
do nearly all of the things on the
album with a really nice touch.
Their adaptations are real
adaptations, not just copies of
what the original artist put on
record.
An official of the
Rathskeller announced last
weekend that in addition to the
fine talent offerings so far this
quarter, more is in store for the
university community next

1 / it
iHraHKjA ja,
mg^WF. jmjmr l? s V^HBHHHbI
-; 'S^HHk
t* 91
an J|
SM Sv:j?xy - -' >' ... 2U2BjMKffS&i3&. -ipIS
|,|H
THE NEED FOR A SEPARATE BLACK
SCHOOL SYSTEM
MR. HERMAN FERGUSON
visiting from New York, Mr. Ferguson will speak from his
experience as Minister of Education of the Republic of New
Africa and a 1968 candidate for the U. S. Senate.
Fri., Fab. 27 2:30 pm. Reitz Union Aud.
sponsored by J.W.R.U.

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

quarter. Acts that will appear, on
campus will include Grand Funk
Railroad, The Youngloods, and
The Mountain among several
others .Some of the groups will
be appearing in die stadium and
some will be on stage at The
Rat.
Student Government
Production, which has been
responsible for much of the
talent brought to campus in the
past, will be working on The
Grand Funk Railroad show and
some of die others. SGP also is
co-sponsoring the appearances
here of The Rotary Connection.
The group will be on stage for
9 and 11 pm. shows tonight,
Friday and Saturday at The
Rathskeller. Tickets are priced at
$2 for members of the club and
$2.50 for non-members. Prices
at the door will be a littie more.



BB I I 188 I I Bfl IBBBfI I1 I IB[ |Bb~~bbm 1
"Super-Right" Boneless Beef Shoulder or Cap'n John's Frozen Perch or (9-oz. Pkgs.)
CALIF. ROAST 88c HADDOCK DINNERS 2/89c
Kt f| i\\ GROUND CHUCK -79 c FLOUNDER FILLETS s 69c
Mr A rn iM CHUCK STEAKS 69c MEAT PIES 5 a 89c
mil JJmf SUCED BACON a 79c GAME HENS sr~ 75c
f Jane Parker
Jane Pqrker Golden or v 'N s CHOICE^BgWjU^m||
Jane Pfcrker Sour Whole
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Scottowds 3"' $ 100 [jjy[3^K^9MHiMiiiliKrJ£ Bathroom Tissue Spedall L^BBMBMm|^^^Jj^HBABBBKB^^B
Soft-W eve 3 79 cJM W W iff Frah Tender Spedall I
Calypso Fadal Tissue Spedall ""Tb A f ADDATC 7 Lb- IQ/
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=r f PH r 'T| LETTUCE z. 19c
Cream~Cheese 2 25c JATO ES10-79 c
PINEAPPLE 3 99c
Prices in this Ad are good
B -J through Saturday, February I^|tA^ULUiaiSPLAII
a 1 f V I M a j A 28, 1970 in the following I
B I 27 can ffwffffi
GOOD THROUGH MARCH I 2-28-70
* ran PsSn|
SCHICK PLATINUM PLUS BfflW CAN WIZZARD
V* GOOD THROUGH MARCH I 2-28-70 GOOD THROUGH MARCH 1 2 2B 7

Thursday, February 26, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 17



Page 18

I, Th Florida Alligator* fhu Allay, fcebruary 'ZC, WO

| Poet Denise Levertov \
\ Reads At Union Tonight I
I ) By MELISSA VOLKER
/ Alligator Entertainment Writer z
Denise Levertov, leader of a new wave of social poetry, will \
appear at the Union Auditorium at 8 tonight. Her reading is \
sponsored by the English Dept, and the Florida Quarterly. 5
There is no charge for the reading. i
One of the more established poets of our time, Miss Levertov b
has had many books of her poetry published, including The p
Jacobs Ladder, O Taste and See, and The Sorrow Dance. a
She was bom in London and grew up in suburban Ilford, \
Essex. She married an American writer Mitchell Goodman, and |
they now live in Boston. Y
Miss Levertov and her husband are active in the support of b
draft resistance. Her poetry relfects these and other political A
views and deals with current controversies of the war and \
poverty. She devotes a great deal of her time to reading her \
poems at colleges and universities across the nation. In 1968 she |
was named Visiting Lecturer at Vassar College. Miss Levertov Y
has been a Guggenheim fellow, a Scholar at the Radcliff b
Institute for Independent Study, and the receipient of a A
National Institute of Arts and Letters. Miss Levertov never \
attended a school or college. She was educated at home. \
In addition to writing poetry, Miss Levertov has published
several anthologies. Her most recent book, Selected Poems by ?
Guillevic, is a translation of the French poets work. She also Y
served as poetry editor for The Nation. b
Miss Levertov taught at Berkeley in 1969 and is currently A
poet in residence in Massachusetts Institute of Technology. a
Womens Liberation
In The Headlines

NEW YORK (UPI) The
Sixties go down in history as the
time of birth for the black
power revolution.
And if thinking females have
their way, the Seventies will go
down as the birth of the
womanpower revolution.
The women who bum bras in
protest represent a novelty
fringe. But others are deadly
serious.
At die front of the movement
is the National Organization for
Women (NOW), led by Betty
Friedan, author of the
Feminine Mystique.
In close~rank formation
behind now are dozens of
womens liberation movement
groups, many of them slaving
over their mimeograph machines
to produce liberation
newsletters.
They include Tooth and
Nail, from Berkeley, Calif.;
Off the Pedestal, Palo Alto,
Calif.; Revolutionary Age,
Seattle, Wash.; The Outpost,
Cleveland, Ohio; New England
Free Press, Boston, Mass.
This month the womanpower
revolution achieved new status,
being featured on the covers of
two major publications both
the egghead type.
The cover of The Saturday
Review shows a female hand in
the V for the victory sign. The
story to go with the cover is by
Lucy Komisar, board member of
New Yorks chapter of NOW. It
details the new feminism.
The other cover calling
attention to the rumblings of
womanpower; College and

Extinguishers
FREE PICK-UP f
DELIVERY >
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University Business, a journal
for administrators in higher
education.
The entire issue is devoted to
Revolution 11, Thinking
Female.
This revolution asks
something of us all, says
Lucigrace Switzer, senior editor
of College and University
Business.
As women define new roles
for themselves, men will have a
lot of learning to do ...
NFL Hall Os Fame
Canton, Ohio, is the site of
the National Football Hall of
Fame.
join the fun!
THB SWINGS
TO WINGS
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TV Movies? Are They
Movies Or TV Shows?

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -When
does a movie for television
cease to be a television show and
stand on its own as a motion
picture?
Its a puzzler even the experts
cant answer.
Sid Sheinberg, a vice president
of MCA parent company of
Universal Studios said the
difference lies not with the
budget nor the length of the
film.
His studio has embarked on
its 50th world premiere, a
catchphrase for two-hour movies
filmed for NBC.
Functionally a motion
picture begins mid ends when it
has an identity of its own,
Sheinberg said.
In essence, he was saying that
all world premieres are motion
pictures rather than
films-for-video in that there is no
continuity of characters, plot for
format.
Some have even been released
as movies to theaters before
being beamed on the tube.
Every one of our world
premieres is a pilot film for a
possible television series,
Sheinberg said.
He added that such current
television series as Ironside,
Marcus Welby, MD, and The
Bold Ones all spun-off from
world premieres. Another is
Dragnet which was reborn
after it appeared as a two-hour
movie for television.
The average budget for these

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pictures is a million dollars,
Sheinberg said, more expensive
than a lot of movies that are
being made.
Every stage at the studio-all
37 of them is filled to
capacity with either our series or
these movies. Os course there are
many subjects, situations and
uses of language which can be
shown in theaters that are
denied us on television.
But processes of adjustment
will take place. Television
reflects the mores of the mass
audience. As standards of the
masses change, so will
television.
Until such time as home
viewers may relent their vigil
against profanity and nudity on
Miss Seminole
Display Opens
The display of finalists for the
Miss Seminole contest has been
moved forward to the week of
March 2 to 6.
Seminole Editor Ken Driggs
said the move was necessary to
allow photographers time to
complete pictorial essays of each
of the five finalists.
The display will be in or near
the Reitz Union where students
will be allowed to voice their
preference in a Nickel Vote.
Proceeds will go to the Gator
Loan Fund.

television, Sheinberg says it is a
simple matter to snip the
offensive footage before it is
aired.
I disbelieve anyone who can
see too far into the future on
any subject, Universals
television production chief said.
But in the near future I see
more long-form TV
entertainment.
By that I mean the
90-minute show and the
two-hour form will continue to
grow. It is a hybrid between
movies and television.
So far weve hired 38
Academy Award nominees and
18 Oscar winners. You can see,
he concluded, Its not an easy
matter to draw the line between
a motion picture and television
show.
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I-



The
Florida
Alligator

LSU, Marquette Receive NIT Offers

NEW YORK (UPI)
Louisiana State, producer of the
greatest scorer in collegiate

_ r
mi
h \ \ ] MBm
BUS DONATED PH,L BANN,BTER
Terry Russell (left) and Mary Tarantino (right) present Marcus
Brown of Miller-Brown Volkswagen a trophy in appreciation for the
VW bus that he has donated to the Department of Intramurals for the
last five years.
5 1
Race Tightens
v V
STEVE ROHAN **3
The Orange League Presidents Cup race, as predicted, is getting
tighter and tighter by the event.
Oddly enough, Beta Theta Pi continues to hold down the first spot.
The Betas 'whipped the Fijis in handball and have drawn a 23 point
lead over Sigma Chi.
The Betas are now faced with the task of stopping the Pikes who
knocked off die second place Sigma Chis. The Pikes are expected to
roll over the Betas and move into the finals against the ATOs.
The ATOs must first stop a strong Pi Lam team to get there. Fourth
place TEP moved into a tie for third place with SAE as they topped
the Es in the opening round handball match.
The TEPs now face fifth place Phi Tau and the winner of that
match will have undisputed possession of third place.
Should the ATOs and Pikes successfully move to the finals, the top
eight teams in the league will be separated by only 85 points and
anyone of those teams could win the crown.
The Betas will definitely maintain their hold on first place for the
remainder of this quarter and will have to bear the pressure of golf,
tennis, track, and softball next quarter.
* *
Softball officials are needed for next quarter and those who are
interested are invited to stop by the intramural department room 229
Fla. Gym or call 392-0581 to sign up.

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GATOR SPORTS

basketball history, and
Marquette, which Tuesday
turned down a bid to play in the

GEORGIA TECH, ST. JOHNS ALSO GET BIDS

NCAA tournament, were
selected Wednesday with two
other teams to play in the
National Invitation Tournament.
The NIT committee also
named Georgia Tech and St.
Johns to the field for the 33rd
annual tournament, which will
be held at Madison Square
The Baby Gators end their
basketball season tonight as they
take on Miami Dade North
Junior College in the Florida
Gym at 8.
The Gators who upset Brevard
Junior College Monday, 5649,
enter the contest with a 13-7
record.
Brevard, previous to the
encounter, had been ranked
number two in the nation for
junior colleges.
There will be no charge for
admission to the game.
* *
The Gator tennis team opens
its home season today as they
take on Southern Methodist
University at the university
tennis courts.
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Thuraday, February 26,1970, The Florkle Alligator,

Garden, March 13-21. All four
teams have accepted the bids.
LSU, enjoying its best season
in 16 years, features the nations
top drawing card in 6-5 guard
Pete Maravich. Maravich this
season became the first major
collegian ever to score more than
3,000 career points and
currently boasts a
47-point-per-game average.
Coached by Petes father,
Press Maravich, the Tigers are
tied for second place in the
Southeastern Conference and are
17-8 for the season. They will be
competing in the NIT for the
first time.
Marquette was offered a bid
Tuesday to play in the NCAA
Tourney but turned it down
when it learned it would have to
play in the Midwest regionals,
instead of the Mideast bracket.
The Warriors, coached by A1
McGuire, are ranked 10th in the

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Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

nation with a 19-3 record and
will be participating in the NIT
for die fourth time. Marquette
finished second in the 1967
classic.
Georgia Tech will be making
its first appearance in the NIT
and only its second appearance
ever in a post-season basketball
tournament. The Engineers
participated in the 1960 NCAA
Tourney when they were a
member of the SEC.
The engineers are led by Rich
Yunkus, a 6-9 center who is
currently 10th in the nation in
scoring with a 29-point scoring
average. Yunkus has paced the
Engineers to a 16-8 record,
including back-to-back victories
over North Carolina and North
Carolina State.
St. Johns, a four-time winner
of the NIT, will be appearing in
the classic for a record 19th
time.

Page 19



Page 20

l, Th* Florida AMgator, Thursday, February 26.1970

McLain Earned Flake Taa As Rookie

(EDITORS NOTE: UH
Baseball Editor Fred Down
reveals the three faces of
Denny McLain*' in a series on
taebdTs no; 1 bad boy. In the
second of three parts, he
examined McLain, the flake.)
By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK (UPI) Denny
McLain began to earn ms
reputation as a flake in 1962
when he was an 18-year rookie
minor leaguer pitching for the
Harlan, Ky., Club in the
Appalachian League and the
Clinton, lowa, Club in the
Midwest League.
First, Denny created an
uproar among hometown fans
by calling Harlan a hick town.
Then he caused a furor at
Clinton by jumping the team
seven times in one month.
Thats a record for the club and
the league, he says.
Since then Denny has risen to
stardom with the Detroit Tigers
only to become involved in
baseball's worst scandal since
eight members of the Chicago
White Sox were banned for life
for allegedly throwing the 1919
World Series to the Cincinnati
Reds.
Along the way he has more
than lived up to the nickname,
super flake, given him by his
teammates. It is a term with two
meanings. One is that he is a
likeable oddball. The other is
that he is an arrogant prima
donna. Which meaning is
intended at any given moment
depends upon who is doing the
talking.
McLain has branded Detroit
fans the worlds worst and
said he would rather play the
organ than pitch. He readily gave
credit to his teammates for
making me a 30-game winner
in 1968 but peevishly insulted
Mickey Lolich after the latter
starred in the World Series. He
has deliberately misled writers I
dont like but grooved a pitch
so Mickey Mantle could hit the
535th homer of his career in the
New York Yankee stars final at
pirof
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bat in Tiger Stadium.
McLain was asked once what
he wanted out of life.
I want to make a SIOO,OOO
salary, he said. I want yachts
and huge houses, maybe palaces.
I want all the money I can spend
and, brother, thats a lot.
On another occasion, Denny
was being interviewed by a
horde of newsmen and TV
broadcasters in the Tigers
clubhouse.
Dont be humble, Denny,
said a teammate. Just be
yourself.
If I were a writer, Id like
Denny McLain, he confided
during another interview.
That's because Im good copy.
McLain has always been
good copy. As a rookie he
claimed he drank 25 bottles of a
name brand soda pop every day.
As a star he has been easily
accessible although at times he
refused to talk about baseball
and babbled away about his
outside interests. At times he

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can be genuinely funny. At
other times he can be a crashing
bore.
Im the only guy on the club
who has a telephone in his car,
he told reporters during his
30-victoiy 1968 season. Heres
die number. Give me a ring some
time.
If Im not telling the truth,
he said on another occasion
during the season, let God
strike me dead.
Thats the last time Im
going on a plane with Denny, a
teammate said.

McLain, already a 30-game
winner, had a 6-1 lead over the
Yankees on Sept. 19,1968 when
Mantle went to bat in the eighth
inning. The snail crowd of
9,063 thought it might be the
last appearance of Mantles
career in Tiger Stadium (it
turned out the fans were right)
and gave the Yankee star an
ovation. Mantle then had a
career total of 534 home runs
and needed one more to place
him third on the all-time list
behind only Babe Ruth and
Willie Mays.
Mantle had been McLains

boyhood idol. Denny patiently
waited for the fans to finish
their salute and nodded to
Mantle. Then he threw a straight
fast ball right down the pipe
and Mantle hit it into the right
field stands for his 535th home
run.
In the clubhouse after the
game, McLain insisted that he
had put everything I could on
the ball.
All I know, said Mantle
when asked about the pitch, Is
that Denny McLain made a fan
out of me.
But thats only one of the
three faces Denny has shown die
sports world.
Theres also Denny the
flake the cocky, talkative,
controversial Denny liked by
some and disliked by others.
And then there is Denny the
fool the young man who
thought stupidity or worse has
made himself his own worst
enemy.
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