Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

VoL 62, No. 94

f Halt Shepherd's Plan,'
Morgan Tells Senate

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Editor-in-chief
Student Body Vice President
Walter Morgan Tuesday night
ladied out at Student Body
President Charles Shepherd's
proposal to develop Camp
Wauburg and threatened to veto
the proposed legislation if
submitted to him for signature.
Morgan, who will become
president upon Shepherd's
expected graduation at the end
of the current quarter, said the
Wauburg appropriation bill is HI
conceived and the project itself
too expensive to build or
maintain, irrelevant to the
immediate needs of the students,
and relevant only to the
immediate political needs of one
student.
He was referring to Shepherd.
Morgan unleashed his ire at
Shepherds proposal during a
Student Senate meeting late
Tuesday evening.
He charged that the project
would not only absorb reserve
moneys for the current year, but
also will eat up all student
monies for many years to
come.

| t
1 Women Meet Tonight
* **
To Plan Day
$ ¥
V V
$ The International Womens Day Coalition is meeting tonight,
Reitz Union room C 4 at 7:30.
The coalition, formed of members of local Womens $
Liberation groups, women in Student Government and the £
ij Alligator staff and campus and community women, is planning
jij actions for March 8, International Womens Day. :*j
>: First celebrated in 1908, International Womens Day began as :
a result of struggles by members of the Ladies Garment :
Workers Union. >:
All community and university women are invited to attend >:
>: tonights meeting.
V

University of Florida, Gainesville

In fact, Morgan said, he
(Shepherd) has proposed a
half-million-dollar monument to
Mr. Shepherd.
Morgan said he became aware
of discrepancies in the oral
report from a senate fact-finding
committee which visited the
Wauburg site nine miles from the
campus Friday.
"After listening to the
Wauburg committee report last
Friday, Morgan said, I have
concluded the only factor which
determined the cost of phase
one of the project is that
$ 127,000 is all that we presently
have.
He said that a $500,000
project is what is really being
proposed, adding the proposal
would financially tie the hands
of the senate for years to
come.
Morgan further charged that
the Wauburg project is the
brainchild not of the current SG
administration or executive
branch, but of "primarily one
man Shepherd.
Whether you are told that
these are the proposals of the
Wauburg committee or that they
are his own, they are one and

Wednesday, February 25, 1970

the same, he said.
Remember, Morgan added,
the Wauburg committee is
headed by Mr. Shepherds'
roommate, Mel Sharpe, the
student chairman.
Sharpe, currently doing
graduate work in education, is a
former administrative assistant
(SEE "MORGAN' PAGE 3)

New ABM Expenditures
Presented To Congress

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
administration asked a sharply
divided Congress Tuesday for
money to thicken its planned
shield against a Soviet nuclear
strike by adding a new
antiballistic missile installation
in Missouri.
It also proposed to begin
broadening the controversial
system to guard the population
against a potential Red Chinese
threat, but ran into firm
opposition from key Senate
supporters.
Defense Secretary Melvin R.
Laird, contending the $1.5
billion request was the minimum
necessary to protect the nation,
asked for authority to construct
a new ABM site to guard a
Minuteman silo field located at
Whiteman Air Force 3ase, Mo.,
and to increase the number of
missile interceplorsfor two sites
Congress authorized last year at
Malmstrom Air Force Base,
Mont., and at Grand Forks Air
Force Base, N. D.
The purpose of the
interceptor increase would be to
protect the offensive missiles in
these three areas from the
possibility of a Soviet attempt to
knock them out and destroy the

UF Shuttle Bus
System In Need
Os Revamping
By PHYLLIS 6ALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
An estimated SO to 60 per cent of students who use UFs shuttle
bus system have not bought parking decals, according to Parking and
Traffic Coordinator Lee Burrows.
Chief Justice of the Traffic Court Bob Wattles said this means those
people have contributed nothing to the financing of the system.
He said something should have been done about this situation long
ago.
It is not fair for some students to bear the entire cost of the
system, while others benefit/'
Watties said the situation could have been cleared up by the fifth
week of the first quarter. Instead, the second quarter is almost over,
and still there has been no adequate solution."
The best situation would require a pass for boarding the bus.
Those people who buy decals would get a pass automatically. Others,
who wish to purchase a decal could do so," Wattles said.
Burrows said the pass system has two major drawbacks.
First, is the time factor. The Blue buses run every five minutes.
Burrows said showing passes as people board the bus could slow
this schedule considerably.
Second, he said, identification could become a problem.
There is no system which will please everyone. We are trying to
discover something which is fair, feasible and good for the university
as a whole, he said.
Burrows said he did think there would be a change in the shuttle
bus system next year.
The Parking and Transportation Committee discussed three
solutions at a recent meeting.
First, a tuition assessment of $2.50 a quarter was suggested.
However, this would require legislation and is not really feasible,
Burrows said.
Another suggestion is to assess people living in on-campus housing a
fee of $2.50 per quarter, for those who do not buy decals.
Watties said he doesn't think either of these ideas is equitable.
It would be forcing students to pay for something which some of
them have no desire to use," he said.
A third suggestion would instigate two separate systems. An express
bus would leave from the commuter lots, dropping passengers at the
various stops, but not loading.
A second system would run to and from dorm areas. Passengers
would be required to either pay each time, or on a pass basis.
Burrows visited the campuses of Georgia, Tennessee and
Auburn recently to investigate their bus systems. He said he is going
to compile all his data and attempt to use this information to improve
UFs system.

backbone of the U. S., nuclear
arsenal.
In addition to the three sites,
Laird asked for authority to
begin buying land and some
equipment for five additional
sites located at undesignated
places in the northeast,
northwest, the Michigan-Ohio
area, Warren Air Force Base,
Mo., and in the Washington,
D. C. area.
He said these sites, in
conjunction with the other
three, eventually could provide a
thin shield across the northern
tier of the United States as
well as for the nations capital
that would deal with an
unsophisticated Chinese missile
raid or an accidental launching
of one or two missiles by any
nuclear power.
The anti-Chinese part of the
proposal drew immediate
opposition from Sen. Henry M.
Jackson, D-Wash., a ranking
member of the Senate Armed
Services Committee who was a
key factor in last years narrow
victory for the safeguard
antimissile system.
Jackson said he had grave
doubt of the wisdom of moving
now to the thin anti-chinese area

defense.
He noted that Red China has
not even fired a missile yet and,
consequently, no one can give an
accurate assessment of their
capability.
Jackson suggested, instead,
that the entire ABM effort be
concentrated this year on
meeting the Soviet threat,
adding more interceptors than
planned at Malmstrom, Grand
Forks and Whiteman and
perhaps adding a fourth ABM
site at Warren Air Force Base,
Wyo., with the purpose of
guarding the Minuteman fields.
BMlilliliillgj
The oJMlll
THE UNIVERSITY Senate
is to consider a new
proposal for required
physical education ... page 3
Classifieds 10
Editorials. 6
Entertainment 13
Letters .., 7
Movies 10
Small Society 4
Sports is
Whats Happening 5



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

Page 2

Camigras Coming
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The doubt which surrounded this years Camigras has finally
been eliminated.
Eddie Floyd, chairman of the Gator Loan Fund (GLF), the
organization which sponsors Camigras said Tuesday the
carnival would be held this year.
Floyd said Camigras would be the week of April 13 through
18. It will be on the drill field across from the stadium.
Floyd said it will be twice as big as last year, with more
concessions and rides.
Question arose as to whether it would be feasible to hold the
carnival this year. A Gainesville ordinance, which city
commissioners admit is designed to discourage carnivals, taxes
concessions.
The tax last year was more than $1,200. The GLF paid it,
and was later reimbursed by several Gainesville businessmen,
Floyd said.
If the GLF were going to have to pay it this year, it would
have made the cost prohibitive. However, carnival owners with
whom contracts were signed last year, have now agreed to pay
the tax.
Therefore, it is now feasible for the carnival to be held, he
said.
We expect full participation from all students, Floyd said.
Fraternities, sororities and other organizations can get booths
said.

UAC Issue Is Still Alive

The University Activities
Center issue is alive and well.
A new proposal for its
planning will be discussed at an
open hearing of the Student
Senates Information and
Investigation committee today
at 4 pan.
The 11-point proposal which
was presented at an earlier open
meeting for the Activities Center
by Senate Majority Leader Sam
Poole will be distributed at the
committee meeting in room 325
of the Reitz Union.
After opinions, and/or
changes have been heard a
resolution supporting the
proposal will be introduced in
the senate Thursday night by
Poole.
One of the major changes
proposed is the formation of a
new University Activities Center
(UAC) committee which would
not be appointed by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.

Racial, Sexual Discrimination
Hit At Anti-Carswell Rally

Protests against racism and
sexism were made Monday at
a rally on the Plaza of the
Americas.
The rally began as a protest
against the nomination of G.
Harrold Carswell to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
However, before the rally was
over, several hundred UF
students heard speeches against
President Richard Nixon, UF
President Stephen C, O'Connell,
Distinctive Custom Made
Personal Dress, Wedding
Dress, Sportswear & Bikinis
by your English
D ressma ker, KA THLEEN.
Phone 378-6320.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Instead, the two faculty and
four student representatives
would be elected through their
respective senates.
Representatives of
administration, planners, faculty
and staff would all serve on the
same committee.
The purpose of the proposed
UAC committee would be to
explore all the aspects of an
activities center for the UF and
draw up a plan acceptable to
students, faculty and
administration.
All the meetings of the
proposed committee would be
open, and the dates and times of
the meeting published in the
Alligator.
The creation of a separate
UAC Financing Committee to
research all possible methods of
financing was also proposed.
The committee would indude
representatives from the College
of Business Administration, and

the Chicago 7 trial, male
supremacy, racism and poverty.
Members of the Womens
Liberation also held a bake sale
in front of the library. Cakes and
cookies were sold to raise money
for literature packets they want
to publish. Men from the
Student Mobilization Committee
manned the bake sale tables.
The baby son of one of the
women in the crowd wore a sign
which said, 1 am not a male
supremacist (Yet).
,44 i

Warm Reception Greek
President Pompidou

WASHINGTON (UPI)
French President Georges
Pompidou began a politically
sensitive state visit Tuesday with
a lavish welcome from President
Nixon, scattered protest
inddents and a declaration that
this country was not against
Israel.
Greeted on the White House
south lawn by a 21-gun salute,
full-dress honor guard, national
anthems and a red carpet leading
to the White House door,
Pompidou told Nixon that we
will find that nothing
fundamental stands between
us.
Then, seated on gold brocade
chairs before a fireplace in
Nixons office with interpreters
present, the two chiefs of state
held their first meeting, which
both sides regarded primarily as

the treasurer of the Florida
Alumni Association.
A questionnaire to all UF
students would also be
distributed to determine the
nature and characteristic of a
center the students would want.
In the planning area, the
proposal has suggested launching
a competition for the design of
the center in order to attract
some of the best, or
internationally-known designers.

fife'-- **
HP.*?'' /
. .. Tit
PETE KNOCKE
GATOR GIRL
. Thi j chi rmi >9 ch * k lounging contentedly it Petersburg Versatile in her interests, Lexi enjoys
' ? ? s ln^* ib| e coeds. Petite, swimming, singing and strumming the guitar,
five-foot-two Lexi is a freshman from St.
GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
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dinner (}j}M
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a mutual attempt to establish
personal relations. It lasted a
little more than two hours.
At the welcoming ceremony
in sunny, 50-degree weather,
both leaders spoke of their
countries 200 years as friends
and allies, but neither mentioned
the French stand in the Middle
East that has threatened to mar
Pompidous eight-day visit to the
United States his first abroad
as President Charles de Gaulle s
successor with Je wish-inspired
protest demonstrations.
Even as Pompidou had begun
speaking at a National Press Club
luncheon, an 18-year-old coed
from American University
shouting French Hitler! was
dragged screaming from a gallery
overlooking the dining hall.
Before he arrived for the
luncheon, police took into
custody 15 demonstrators
outside the National Press
Buflding who were sponsored by
the Jewish Defense League of
New York City.
Speaking in French,
Pompidou told the diners that
Frances sale of 108 Mirage jet
fighters to Libya and its dispatch
of advisers was to fill a vacuum
resulting form the Arab African
countrys expulsion of
Americans and British.
France had not provoked the
vacuum, he said, but politics
and France, like nature, must fill
the vacuum. He indicated he
hoped his countrys action
would discourage a large-scale

intervention by Soviet advisers
in Libya.
We are not against Israel"
Pompidou said. Weve had very
close relations with Israel. The
capital of France is not in Cairo
neither is it in Israel. We seek
peace in the area.
The French President said
nothing could be more
dangerous than a great power
confrontation in the Middle
East. France, he said, favored
direct Israeli-Arab talks with
general conditions laid down by
the United Nations, the United
States, Britain, France and the
Soviet Union.
If I had a rabbit in my hat, I
would produce it, he said. I
believe no one has a solution.
But it is indispensable to
reestablish peace
MINI-POSTER
wd're in
MCB'ROLE country
0



Morgan Hits Wauburg Plan

PAGE ONE^
to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
Morgan added he did not
advocate the money should be
left to sit idle.
They never should have
been, he said.
The funds in question had
been accumulated over a period
of years by SG for capital
improvements and state officials
recently requested SG to put
them to use.
Morgan said the money could
be channeled to a better use as a
foundation for a continuing
student loan fund.
This could be set up on the
basis of short term loans, he
said. Loan money is needed.
The hardship of not having
enough and having to work part
time has been voiced loud and
clear in the recent tuition hike
referendum.
Morgan said under his
proposal the money would not
be forever lostbut always
available for reoccuring needs.
He again lashed out at
Shepherd:
I think our president has
forgotten who elected him,
Morgan said. He seems to feel
in his second term that
furthering oneself and
self-satisfaction is more
important than the needs of his
electorate.
Morgan said the committee in
its oral report had stated that
maintenance of a 15-acre tract in
the north section of the
Wauburg facility is currently
costing some $28,000.
In the same breath, he said,
Environment
Course Offered
Technology, Civilization and
Man (EGC 300) will be offered
again next quarter, sixth period
Tuesdays and Thursdays, for
two hours credit.
Taught by Dr. Seymour
Block, the course focuses on
population, pollution, the
environment and technology.
It was offered for the first
time last quarter and included a
number of guest speakers. It has
been nicknamed a Course in
Human Survival.
The course is a cultural
elective for all students and has
no prerequisites. Non-engineer Non-engineering
ing Non-engineering students may choose to take
it on a pass-fail basis.
if I
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CLUTCH JOBS
FRONT END WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
BRAKE JOBS
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Free pick up & Delivery in City
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378-4943

the committee tells us that it
will only take $28,000 per year
to maintain the 70 acres to be
developed on the south side.
Either we have overspent in
the past or someone has greatly
underestimated in die planning,
he said.
What you senators must
realize, Morgan added, is that
you will be faced with a fait
accompli. You will have a
complex which costs more to
maintain each year but, once
built, a complex too expensive
not to maintain whatever the
cost.
You must think about this
now because no one else is going
to bother to tell you later, he
added.
Morgan added Shepherd was
giving an erroneous impression
that more money for the project
would, come from the Board of
Regents.
He said that, while the
Regents recently created a fund
for the construction of student
unions and other activity-related

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facilities, the funds would
probably not be made available
to the UF because of need for
student unions at the University
of South Florida and other state
institutions.
This state will no sooner sink
several hundred thousand dollars
into a lake, nine miles off
campus, than you would, I
hope, he said.
Use Recorders
Educators use videotape
recorders in a multitude of
classroom situations from
developing teacher insights into
behavior patterns to a new,
workable theory of instruction.
~ >
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>

Phys Ed To Be Debated
The University Curriculum Committee has submitted a new
physical education proposal in which students would be
required to take only three quarters of phys ed.
Each quarter would carry one hour of credit.
As it is now, students are required to take six quarters of
phys ed, with no academic credit.
This proposal will be considered by the University Senate
when it meets Thursday at 3:30 p. m. in McCarty Auditorium.
These courses would indude understanding of physical health
and its relation to total health, the beginning of a developmental
fitness program; and the place of recreation and leisure in
contemporary sodety.
The total number of hours required by graduation will not be
increased as a result of this change, and the courses may be
taken under the satisfactory-unsatisfactory grade option,
according to Ernest H. St. Jacques, acting chairman of the
committee.
The committee in September recommended that phys ed be
dropped as a requirement for graduation.

McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
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1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-8585

Wednesday, February 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,

fSrr
Excellence in Food

Page 3



The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

Page 4

IN COURT ORDER

Rich Get Richer
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court Tuesday upheld for
the second time the right of a state to provide proportionately more
money to wealthier school districts than it does to poor ones.
The courts brief order affirmed a lower tribunals dismissal of a
suit asking the courts to order equality of educational facilities in
school systems run by the state of Virginia.
The Supreme Court thus in effect went along with a U. S. district
courts opinion that the courts lack the knowledge, means and
authority to dictate the educational quality in various sections of a
state.
Just last year, the high court unexpectedly agreed with a lower
court in an Illinois case that states have no constitutional duty to
bring about such equalization.
The Tuesday decision was on a suit brought by 11 families with
school age children in the county of Bath in western Virginia. It
challenged the state system under which larger amounts of state funds
are allotted to school districts drawing relatively high revenues from
local property taxes.
In other actions the Supreme Court:
t Sidestepped the controversy over state abortion laws, letting
stand a California Supreme Court opinion that such statutes must not
broadly invade a womans right to protect her life or to decide
whether to have children.
t Refused to consider an appeal by nine Roman Catholics,
including two priests, sentenced to prison for burning draft cards in
Maryland, but also refused to examine dismissal of federal charges
against 10 persons who burned draft records in Milwaukee.
t Agreed, in a Mississippi case, to hear a challenge to effects of the
1965 Voting Rights Act on local election procedures in the south.
Let stand a ruling in a Louisiana case that a work seniority
system outlawed by the 1965 Civil Rights Act cannot be applied in
future promotions of black employes.

Nuclear Construction Opposed
At Turkey Point Generator

MIAMI (UPI) A federal
official opened a water pollution
conference Tuesday with a
threat to go to court if necessary
to block any hasty attempts to

AGAINST GENOCIDE
ABA Nixes Treaty

ATLANTA (UPI)
Reaffirming a stand it first took
years ago, the American Bar
Association voted 130-126
Monday against U. S. ratification
of an international treaty against
genocide.
ABA President Bernard
Segal had proposed a resolution
supporting the treaty President
Nixon urged Congress last week
to ratify.
The treaty, already approved
by 75 nations, including the
Soviet Union, would make
genocide a crime under
international law. Genocide is
defined in the treaty as an act
intended to destroy, in whole
or in part, a national, ethical,
racial or religious group.
We alone hesitate, and we
stand alone among the
democratic nations of the world.
The eyes of the country are
upon us, Segal said.
The ABA first rejected the

put a nuclear power plant into
operation on lower Biscayne
Bay.
The conference was called by
federal and state officials to

idea shortly after it was
proposed 21 years ago. Most of
the arguments Monday were that
it would make American soldiers
vulnerable to genocide charges
by North Vietnam and would
endanger prisoners of war.
Opponents argued the treaty
includes a provision making any
American accused of genocide
liable to extradition to the
country in which the crime
allegedly occurred, although that
nation might offer no
constitutional safeguards.

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the small society

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Maddox Passes Axes

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Gov.
Lester Maddox of Georgia and a
Negro House member engaged in
a shouting match in the House
restaurant Tuesday when the
congressman objected to
Maddox passing out ax and pick
handles in the restaurant.
Rep. Charles C. Diggs,
D-Mich., a Negro, said he
threatened to throw Maddox out
of the restaurant. In return,
Maddox called Diggs an ass and a
baboon.
Other lawmakers having lunch
nearby agreed there was plenty
of shouting and name-calling.
Some said they thought Diggs
and Maddox might come to
blows, but a plainclothesman,

determine the effects that the
discharge of high temperature
water from the Florida Power
and Light Co., Turkey Point
Nuclear power generators will
have on the aquatic life of the
bay.
Across the bay from Turkey
Point lies a string of Florida
Keys called Islandia on which
the federal government will
establish the Biscayne Bay
National Monument.
A power company spokesman
issued a statement before the
conference saying the company
had received approval from the
Dade County Pollution Control
Agency to dig a six-mile canal at
a cost of $8 million to cool the
discharge waters to 95 degrees
before they are released into the
bay. Some scientists contend
that water of such temperature
will result in thermal pollution
of the shallow bay.

whom Diggs said he took to be
an FBI agent, broke them up.
Shortly afterward, Rep. John
Conyers, D-Mich., another of the
nine black House members
denounced Maddoxs conduct

on the House floor. Biiir mm
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by Brickman

n====n



Latin American Conference Opens

How the presence of North American educators in Latin America
has affected the transition of Latin American colleges and universities
is the central theme of the 20th annual Latin American Conference at
the Reitz Union, today through Saturday.
Universities in Transition is the first of a series of conferences on
The U.S. Presence in Latin America, sponsored by the
universitys Center for Latin American Studies.
Beginning today, a working core of about one dozen top US.
and Latin American scholars will begin a four-day discussion of topics
relevant to US. Latin American relations.
These include: Foundations and Universities, The U.S.
Government and Latin American Universities "Promoters of the U.S.

AT CONSTANS THEATRE

'Great Irish Play Showing

Now playing at the Constans Theatre is one of
the most popular contemporary Irish plays to hit
3roadway.
The play by Brian Friel contains all of the local
color found in his native county in Northern
Ireland. Written as part of Friels ambition to write
the great Irish play, it attained second place
among the best plays of the 1965-66 Broadway
season.
The unusual format of Philadelphia, Here I
Come! that presenting both the public and private
selves of a young man, Gareth ODonnell, offers
new opportunities to the actor and director, and the
play promises to be another of the unique
productions of the Florida Players.
Philadelphia, Here I come! also brings several
new faces to the stage of the Constans Theatre as
well as a few familiar ones.
In the role of the twenty-five-year-old Gareth
ODonnell is a newcomer, Lowell Stanley. Playing
his alter ego, Private, is Harry Murphy, who was
seen last quarter in the role of the Capitano in A
Company of Wayward Saints. Gareths father, S. B.
ODonnell is played by another new face, Bill
Stradtmann. The ODonnells housekeeper, Madge,

WHAT'S
HAPPENING
ONLY SHADES OF GRAY:
A free lecture The Need for a
Separate Black School System
by Herman Ferguson will be
given in the Reitz Union
auditorium Friday at 2:30 p.m.
The lecture is part of the Black
America series sponsored by the
Union.
THE STRANGE SILVER
BIRD: The deadline for the SSO
deposit for the charter flight
from Tampa to Amsterdam for
$229 round trip is Friday.
Payment can be made to the
AIESEC office in the student
activities center in the Union.
ARE CRICKET MATCHES
CRICKET?: Saturday at 11 a.m.
the UF cricket team will host
Miami-Dade Junior college
Cricket club in a one-day match
on the ROTC drill field. Players
should be there by 10:30.
PEOPLE WHO NEED
PEOPLE: The Befrienders will
have a meeting Wednesday at 6
pjn. at 1823 NW 2nd Avenue.
Bring your own dinner.
GATORSKI-WASNT HE A
POLISH WAR GENERAL?: The
Gator ski club will meet
Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Reitz Union, room 150-C.
Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair Jfj
0 Diamond Setting JCT
0 Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
§ Charms soldered J/A
0 Trophies- plaques
0 Florida crest jewelry
0 Lavaliers
0 Class rings
0 Engraving
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub
I^BECK^^ECK^oy^^^MM
V

MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES AH ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

Hello there you pretty young thing. How
about accompanying me to Fr. Gannon's lecture
on "Sexuality on Campus" at the Union!
FRESH
Diagolue with a Theologue
Feb. 26 f 4:00, Lounges 122,123, Union
Sponsored by the Union & the URA
Good Food at
Reasonable Prices...
Breakfast Anytime!
OPEN 24 HOURS
Carry Out Closed:
Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133

is played by Christine Robinson, an instructor in
foreign languages, who surprisingly comes to us
from the same area in Ireland as the author, Brian
Friel.
Portraying Gars last love is Deborah Kondelik,
who may be remembered in such roles as Isabella in
A Company of Wayward Saints, Angelique in
The Imaginary Invalid, and Viola in Twelfth
Night. Her father is played by Alan Winson.
Gareths old neighborhood friends, played by
Gene Touchet, Andrew Banker, and Steve Reuther,
his old schoolmaster (Rob Sharkey), and the village
Canon (Thomas C. Nash), all call on Gar on his last
night home, arid Gar does a bit of his own
reminiscing as he thinks of how the chance to go to
America came about. A September visit from his
uncle and aunt from America (Dennis Jensen and
Kay Kasting) with one of their rich American
friends (Lloyd Jeffords) thoroughly convince Gar
that he should go to America and get away from
home.
The delightful and sometimes emotional events
which follow make for an entertaining evening.
Philadelphia, Here I Come! plays through
Saturday, at 8 p. m. at the Constans Theatre.

Model in Latin American Universities and The Relevance of U.S.
Models for Latin American University Development.
An open conference, it is designed to evaluate and interpret
U.S.-influenced changes in Latin American education during the past
decade.
Conclusions reached during the first three days of the conference
will be presented in two special sessions Saturday.
Among featured speakers will be John Hugh Crimmins, deputy
assistant secretary of state for Inter-American Affairs, U.S.
Department of State. Crimmins subject will be Toward a More
Mature Partnership: The Nixon Administrations Latin American
Policy.
Crimmins will speak 8:30 pjn. Friday in room 361, Union.

AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL. Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

I 1
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§ DRESSES ;
1 SKIRTS 1
I BLOUSES 3
SWEATERS SUITS 1
JACKETS PANTS
BAGS PANTS SUITS
REDUCED AS FOLLOWS
COO
Values to 15.00 Nov/ w
Values to 30.00 Nov/ 1 000o 00
1 coo
Values to 45.00 Nov/ I Co
g Values to 65.00 Now. 20 00 |
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§ ODD AND END GROUP
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§ BLOUSES AND SHELLS 2 §
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S LADY BOSTONION 3
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§ LOAFERS Now /2 Price iii
ALL WEATHER COATS
(Some with /ip Out I ineij J
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MANY ONE OF A KIND ITEMS
ALL SALES FINAL
NO LAY AWAYS OR APPROVALS
NO PHONE ORDERS
LADIES DcPi. Mezzanine Floor |l|
SILVERMANS DOWNTOWN Z:

Wednesday, February 25,1970, The Florida Allifator,

join the fun!
THe'SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky young and old.. some )ust tor the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease Come visit us today.
[378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
mnrm Waldo Road
mmfytm C*ntor

Page 5



Page 6

t. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Black Racism: A Reaction

MR. EDITOR:
RE: Caiiyle S. Swofford, Jr.s letter to the editor,
February 18,1970
I suppose it makes little or no difference to
students like Swofford that, in the United States,
those charged with a violation of the law are
presumed innocent until proven guilty.
Why is it that the three students charged in the
now infamous incident at Tolbert Hall
automatically have been assumed guilty? They
maintain that guns were not used to threaten the
white students.
The Black Student Union merely has sought to
aid these students by supporting their position.
A careful examinatkmof Swoffords letter reveals
that certain of his attitudes have colored his
judgement. To quote from the letter, You blacks
want human rights; you want your place in
American society as American citizens. With rights
and citizenship go maturity and responsibility.
First, Swoffords words show that he knows that
blacks have been denied both their fundamental
human rights as well as their rights as Americans, for

Slander Was
Cowardly
MR. EDITOR:
In support of the article
written by Warren Kniskem
which appeared in the Alligator
on February 16,1970, we would
like to say thank you, Mr.
Kniskem, for expressing so well
what many of us felt. We, too,
felt that the slander of Mrs.
Dixon was unjust, cowardly, and
in extremely poor taste;
CHERYL NETZLOFF
NANCY BUSCH
CATHIE GRIFFIS

The University Curriculum Committee is presenting to
the University Senate Thursday yet another proposal on the
question of required physical education.
This time, the committee is recommending students be
required to take a three-quarter one-credit hour sequence of
physical education and health.
The total number of hours required for graduation would
not be increased as a result of the phys ed changes, and the
courses could be taken on the pass-fail grade option.
We think this is a reasonable plan.
A significant clause in the proposal is a basic outline of
what the courses should teach:
... these courses would include understanding of
physical health and its relation to total health, the beginning
of a developmental fitness program and the place of
recreation and leisure in contemporary society, the
recommendation stated.
Taught in this manner, physical education would indeed
be a valuable component of our general education. Phys ed,
while not a prerequisite to the future professions of most of
us, is useful in boosting physical health and importing sports
skills.
At the same time, six quarters of required phys ed is a bit
much.

Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Karen Eng
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
___ John ~ T V
Mary Toomey Editorial Assistant nnfl Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,87,
88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82, 83, or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

EDITORIAL
Phys Ed: A New Plan

no one actively wants that which he already has.
Second, who has the authority or audacity to place
conditions on human rights? Neither maturity or
responsibility are prerequisites or co-requisites with
human rights.
Third, Swofford posits that maturity and
responsibility accompany American citizenship. To
whom or to which institution are these qualities
directed? To the white racist American society,
or to the U. S. Constitution, or to ones fellow man
(black or white).
The inherent racism present in most white
Americans is obviously apparent in Swoffords
letter. Before whites search black organizations for
racism and bigotry, they should seek first to root
out these very qualities which are institutionalized
in American society.
If racism is present in black organizations it must
be understood in context as a reflection of and a
reaction to white racism and bigotry. It must not be
excused but eradicated with all bigotry in the
American society.
ROBERT T. ERNST, 7AS

It cuts into the time students need for their academic
programs and adds no hours to their transcripts!
The curriculum committee originally wanted to scrap
required phys ed altogether, substituting personal
development courses of a participatory nature with
academic credit attached.
But UF President Stephen C. OConnell questioned the
committees original intent:
On the basic question of whether physical education
should be required, I do not believe it can be disputed that
one of the greatest challenges and most relevant courses of
study in this age is personal health, the care and use of ones
own body, and the relationship of exercise, recreation,
hygiene and other everyday activities to health, he said.
We agree.
We think the committee has come up with a proposal
that would ease the burden of students scheduling six
quarters of phys ed, yet not eliminating it as a requirment.
We hope the University Senate and OConnell will be
inclined to approve the proposal, and end the phys ed hassle
once and for all.
The Establishment
Pollutes Minds
Dozens of books and millions of words are written about the
dangers of pollution in the air, our rivers and streams. It gets front
page headlines.
When the air becomes too polluted, our scientific mechanical
engineers will come up with appropriate gas masks.
When our waters become too polluted for drinking or bathing, our
sanitation experts are sure to come up with some kind of chemical or
filtering device to eliminate the hazards.
There is a more dangerous pollution pollution of the minds of
our youth caused by a revulsion against accepting our present
standard of values. Our new generation has lost hope and has no
confidence in a future dictated and controlled by the
Military-Industrial Complex, and what they refer to as the
Establishment.
The young minds of our new generation cannot accept the
permissiveness, hypocrisies and brutalities accepted by their elders. We
preach democracy and support dictatorships, where losing candidates
for President wind up in jail or in exile.
We vote billions of dollars for foreign aid and welfare, and instead
of food for the hungry, we send them armaments. It takes Congress a
year to vote a 15% increase in Social Security for the most needy of
our citizens, and our highest Government officials claim that it will
endanger our economy, yet hundreds of millionaires dont even pay
one cent of income tax through loopholes in our tax laws.
The turmoil on our campuses is a form of protest against insecurity
due to Vietnam and a society that allows hunger in the midst of
affluency.
It is a protest against the religious leaders of our churches and
temples who stand by in silence while a priest who dares to speak out
against hunger and injustice winds up in jail.
There is no equal justice under our laws. Our youth would have
more respect for law and order and a better sense of values if a rich
man or a criminal with proper connections who commits
premeditated murder were not allowed to go free on a technicality,
and a poor man who steals a loaf of bread would not wind up rotting
in jail.
Rebemon of our youth is the result of their frustrations. To show
uieir resentment they turn to drugs and protests, not for any pleasure
it may give them, but to sort of get even with an environment they
cannot absorb.
A fter World War 11, we gave the new generation a hope for a
Peaceful world by creating the United Nations, and all we have had
eversince is continued wars, both hot and cold.
Dont blame or sell the new generation short. They are the product
o our short-comings. They are much more intelligent, informed, and
more sensitive to social injustice than we ever were at their ages, and
W Til ** protest, they have a good reason for it.
me term square our youngsters use so often, has become a part
of our language and it is really another word for hypocrisy.
.. m^ y be very as some apologists state, that at the present
o y one percent of our youth are the actual troublemakers, only
ten percent are dissidents and the rest are okay. Let us not become
? nt u USe tbe game. I would suggest that
you look up the word contagious inTdicrionary.
6 rea f e d disease that mankind suffers from today is
Ki.f u Science W *U certify that cancer starts with one tiny
h M 1 a P^ er to spread, that medical science has not yet
comnarahi ? Tj 0 p Uution of the minds of our youngsters is
comparable to the dangers of a cancer.
ABE SOLOSKO
MIAMI BEACH



Equal Woman
Looks Like
A Mess!
&

UF: Love It Or Leave It, Says Bothwell

MR. EDITOR:
For the advantage of those students who were
not present Wednesday afternoon in the Plaza of the
Americas to speak to the state representatives
(where were you students? apathy lives!), I would
like to recap some of the gems of knowledge
showered upon those present by Repr Bothwell:
To paraphrase Mr. Bothwell:
On the meaning of getting an education:
Youre here to get an education stick to the
books.
On student protest: Students should remain
within the channels of the established system to
protest and quit marching around in circles with
placards.
On facing the issues squarely, here and now: If
you dont like the education youre getting or feel
its inadequate, dont rebel against the system go
somewhere else.
On an active program of recruitment and
tutoring of underprivileged students, black and
white: I dont believe a student who has been
deprived of a quality education for 12 years can be
brought up to the level of university study.
On a student silent majority: I came to hear
from the student who doesnt make the headlines as
protesters (student silent majority: where were
you?)
f In light of Rep. Dicksons statement that many
things at UF remain in the same need of reform
today as in 1950-6: It may take time (20 years?)
but you must direct your reforms within the
established channels (complete with red tape).
§ With regard to a request that the present state
legislature do something NOW about ONE relevant
issue of the day: To take legislative action offensive
to popular opinion would be to jeopardize
re-election and thus rob the government of
experienced legislators. (Is it experience or
job-security which you desire, Mr. Bothwell?)
The general impression I received from Mr.
Bothwell was that of a hopeless political
stick-in-the-mud, unable or unwilling to reply to the

!7Ae SiUrtL Pfojor-th/

MR. EDITOR:

My idea of the Womans Liberation Front is liberating a front when
you didnt really have one anyway. Or, stuffing Kleenex into your
ROTC shirt in order to look sexy.
Really, I dont see all the fuss. Ive been working in the Theater
Shop for over a year now and I dont think its been the most
stimulating experience possible, even though, Im assured, Ive been
treated most equally.
Every time I get started on a good hammering project the song If I
Were A Carpenter sifts into my mind. After all, girls, can you think
of any boys (well, normal boys) that actually would be interested in
having any kind of relationship legal or illegal with a creature of
broken fingernails, splintered hands, sawdusted hair, and
hammer-like grip (how else can you get one but by hammering)?
After a normal working afternoon you do not come out looking

FORUM:-^^
C Aim mi DiftAwt J
go hope fnr^i^''nrnpl< I<:er 1 < :erx l~* 0,0^ >^
The general impression I received from
Mr. Bothwell was that of a hopeless political
stick-in-the-mud, unable or unwilling to
reply to the questions of the students. His
answers were seldom direct, often
non-existent. Through skillful evasion of the
issues . Rep. Bothwell managed to
undermine relevant discussion and retain his
cherished ignorance of student issues.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
questions ot the students. His answers were seldom
direct, often non-existent.
Through skillful evasion of the issues brought
forth and the interspersion of petty witticisms
(quite inappropriate in light of the gravity of the
subjects discussed) Rep. Bothwell managed to
undermine relevant discussion and retain his
cherished ignorance of student issues.
At the risk of giving a completely pessimistic
account of the meeting with the legislators, I feel I
must add Ithat I found Rep. James and Rep. Dickson
most receptive, interested and involved.
Among the topics discussed were: the
bureaucracy of the Regents, the possibilities of a
black studies program, the monopoly of off-campus
slum lords, the possibility of scaled tuition
according to income, the sub-standard facilities at
F.A.M.U., the problem of forced busing, the loyalty
oath, the problems of pollution, the role of student
activists, the maintenance of black social integrity,
and many, many more.
I only hope that the ideas brought out in this
forum will see the light of day in state government.
DENNIS SULLIVAN, 2UC

like an Amazon you come out looking like a MESS.
Even the fake Stardust they use is darned hard to wash off.
Ah! you say, but, the Womans Liberation Front stands for
gaining the intellectual freedom that the male has and equal
satisfaction in sex! May I appeal to a little reason? If we all thought
like men, wed have to be pretty perverted to enjoy sex.
And Id hate for the state of affairs to get so mixed up that Id be
raped on my way home from the library some night -by Broward
coeds.
So, put your clothes back on, baby. Nobodys going to pan you for
wearing make-up; youll look more awake in morning classes.
Nobodys fcoing to grimace because of a shy smile. You might get
taken out to dinner one of these nights and thats, at least,
economical.
NAME WITHHELD

n. M £
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STATE REPRESENTATIVES IN THE PLAZA
... some receptive, some not
Crusade at Home

MR. EDITOR:
In reference to your critical
editorial And We Wait
concerning the failure of
America to provide an example
of what freedom can do -for
example, the drifting integrative
process of the South: Milch of
what could have been said, and
rightly should have been said,

Wednesday, February 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,

was left unmentioned.
Unnoticed have gone those
paradoxical facts and figures
implying that the famed UF too
drifts along at its deliberate
speed.
Like other southern
innovations and self-made
obstacles UF lingers in
developing special methods or
programs to attract even the
cream of the crop among black
students.
The situation and statistics at
hand prove that less than one
per cent (.77 per cent) of the
over 20,000 full- and part time
students are black. There t re no
blade instructors, professors, or
interns on the teaching staff. If
it were not for the janitors,
maids and cafeteria hdp, the
average student (white, of
course) could spend hours or
even days seeing little and
understanding less of the
evergrowing, intensely audible
and increasingly unified black
race.
Granted, illustrations and
examples are helpful and at
times necessary. Also granted,
open criticism has away of
fostering new thought. Lets
work together to do what should
have been done with the opening
of this university let's fully
integrate, or stop bringing up the
problem.
Someone once gave a
wanting: Make sure the finger
you point is clean. Take heed,
wondering Alligator; turn your
toward home, it
make* tor sounder and safer
sleep.
JULIUS M. JOHNSON

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florida ANigator, Wednesday, February 26.1970

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Ca^ 3 paves the waves in the new spring zingy bikinis.
The bra top has underwire and hidden push up pads, and is
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Mehrick^ SC> ava ** a^e * m^'ma tching coverup. Modeled by
FIGURE FAIR 1
Look as bright and fresh as a daffodil in a sleep coat of
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MAAS BROTHERS
Add a few continental lengths to your wardrobe of minis
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TWIG
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SUSAN SCOTT
Nows the time ... for all smart girls to come to the aid of
their wardrobe, and Susan Scotts got just the thing. These
100% cute cottons knit coordinates are machine washable
and fun to wear. By Redeye; theyre red, white, and
beautiful and priced so as not to spoil the fun. Modeled
by Carole.
SEARS
The polyester knit goes lazy and plain to create this
interesting little dress in pastel shades for Spring. Found in
Sears Junior Bazaar, and modeled by Carole.
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STAG AND DRAG
Peace ... thats the print in this catchy bikini and matching
top of black and white jersey by Twins. The top doubles as
a dress. Modeled by Pam.
s
SILVERMANS
Free expression is the mood and the material in this
free-moving body conscious shift by Tootique. The outfit is
machine washable (100% polyester)... great for Spring
classes.

mdnrnday. February 26.1670. AHigator,

Page 9



UiSaiiAJmiiu
| 1 2nd WEEK!
4 Academy Award
Nominations
| JK M Including Best
H Supporting Roles ..
Dyan Cannon and
wL Elliott Gould
m NATALIE WOOD/ROBERT CULP I
_ "THE MOST RECK- I
A| # LESSLY ORIGINAL
II 1 COMEDY OF
g THE YEAR!
HURRY LAST TWO DAYS!
1* A LET IT SUFFICE TO
-S-fc- SAY THAT 1C IS A
JLE MASTERPIECE. PL^Hoy

the UF Board of Student Publications is now accepting applications for I
Editor, Florida Alligator I
Term 111 only, 1970 Deadline Friday Noon. I
Applicants Who Have Applied For I
2 Terms Under The Previous I
TV
Application Request And Who I
Are Interested Do Not I
Have To Reapply. I
f
- General Instructions
-e H
All applications are to bo picked up and roturnod to Rm # 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union. ..1;
Each applicant must return an original plus two copies of his application. t
Applicants should be prepared to appear before the Board of Student Publications
< v, *r
for a personal interview.
Watch the Florida Alligator for the announcement of B.S.P. interview meetings.
For Further Information Call Mr. Norm Going, 392-1680. §

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
DONT Merely brighten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them ... eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-43-c).
Spring is Here! Solve your
Transportation problems with a 2
year old Suzuki 50cc ($110) Must
sell now. Call Bill 392-7511.
(A-94-st-p).
Giant sale 1963 chevy conv.
w/stereo tape sale/trade $785 15w
amp. sls Zenith amfm $35 Sony
200 c tape rec. $l2O carcover $7,
great savings, ph. 378-8771
(A-94-3t-p).
1968 Vandyke 12 central air
two bedroom 2 bath like new,
graduating must sell $950 equity +
take over payments. Call 378-6529.
(A-94-st-p).
HONDA, 1969 C 8350 2,900 mi,
extras, crashbars, backrest, luggage
rack, $675, excellent condition, 423
S.E. Bth St., Phone 376-8470.
(A-94-2t-p).
Beat the rent racket, own your home.
8 x 47 mobile home with 10 x 20
paneled cabanna; 10 x 10 covered
patio AC, Central Heat, ect. Call
372-8722. (A-94-st-p).
AKA I 1710 W Reel to Reel
stereo-mono tape recorder. 3 speed,
excellent sound reproduction. 6
months old. S2OO. or best offer. Call
378-5120. (A-94-st-p).
Healthways scuba tank backpack
boot Sortsways single hose regulator
SIOO Swift spotting scope Is to 60
power eyepieces tripod SSO VW top.
Luggage rack S2O 372-2155 after 5
pm. (A-92-4tp)
( ~ =^
4M la? 2
v y

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

Page 10

I FOR SALE
:< ft
;.y^.v.%*xvx*x-XX-w.v.w;-:vx-x-X'X*v-v.
Yamaha Twin 100. Good condition,
electric start, 4,000 miles. $225. or
best offer. After 6:00 PM 378-7724.
(A-93-4t-p).
LEAR JET STEREO. Eight-track
tape player, with amplifier and
speakers. Excellent condition. SIOO.
378-7943 Ask for Marc. (A-93-st-p).
Hand painted turned on step van all
aluminum body very good condition.
Great for bands, trips or delivering
bread. 373-2681 378-5425. BILL.
(A-93-3t-p).

STEREO Silvertone solid state. Only
$25.00. Call 373-1748 and ask for
Nance. (A-93-2t-p).
TOPCON-UNI with 100 & 53mm
lens, case tripod, filters. 3 rolls of
film used. Worth $325, will sell for
S2OO. Call 378-8322 after 5 PM.
Student. (A-93-3t-p).
Complete Simon-Omega B-22
Enlarger. All extras incl. Filters,
safelight beaker, develop tank, etc.
Cost $225 Sell for $125.
376-0317. Like new. (A-93-st-p).
1968 1 2 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
HONDA SUPER 50. Great Shape.
Gotta sell, only $125. Call Dan at
372- (A-92-3t-p)
Honda 90 excellent condition
runs and looks great with helmet.
Only $l5O. Call Jeff at 392-7128.
(A-92-3tp)
1969 HONDA 90 $225 or best offer.
White step-thru with auto clutch.
ONLY 2000 miles. Call LARRY at
373- or 376-9450. (A-92-3tp)

The Florida Alligator is now
accepting applications for
ADVERTISING SALESMEN
Prefer Junior or First Qtr. Seniors
w/ experience and afternoons FREE.
Come by Rm 330 JWRU M F.

rwwwwoC'K'C'WWWK'WKOCflC'fl'WC^
FOR RENT
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Large paneled single bedroom In two
bedroom apartment. S3O a month
plus utilities 916 SW 7th ave apt 1
call Dan 378-7392. (B-92-3tp)
Sublet 1 big bedroom apt. 3 blocks
from campus. Air conditioned. 100 a
month. February rent free. 1613 NW
3 Place. 378-1828 come by or call.
(B-92-stp)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
Jlvlngroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
Needed: 1 female roommate for V.P.
apts. $42.50/mo. Available anytime.
372-9904 or 392-1107. (B-93-6t-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt,
A/C, & H., pool, quiet nbhd, parking,
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph. 378-8734.
(B-93-st-p).
French Quarter Apt. to sublet Spring
qtr., come by apt 110 or call for
Infor 372-3061. (B-92-stp)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt furnished ac
heater carpeted TV cable pool */2
block to campus 2 blocks to SFJC.
Call 373-1047 $120.00 mo.
(B-89-6t-p)
Sublease 1 -bdr. apt., AC, furnished,
Private patio, Pets, available March 1;
slls Per mo., Village 34 Apt. 43,
high & dry, 376-0579. (B-93-4t-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


FOR RENT
HE IP I'm Getting Married! Need a
man to take my place In a modern 2
brm apt. with everything only 43.50.
Great roommates 376-5542, Danny.
(B-94-4t-p).
cnhiet 1 bedroom apt. end of qtr.
New clean furnished AC cable TV
nool. Close to campus & Med Center
*l4O month. 378-6013 after 5.
(B-94-2t-p).
One bedroom furnished apt. SIOO a
month. Close to campus, 1604 NW
4th Avenue. Kitchen, bathroom,
living and dining rooms. (B-94-st-p).
Fun in the sun. 1 female roommate
needed for 2 br. Village Park poolside
aot for spring quarter. Call Kathy
after 5:30, 378-7061. (B-94-st-p).
WANTED: One male roomate to
sublet a La Manca apt. Own bedroom
many extras inquire apt. 28
LaMancha ask for Paul. (B-94-lt-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt.,
A/C, & H., pool, quiet nbhd, parking,
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph. 378-7834.
(B-94-st-p).
| WANTED |
1 female roommate for large
two-bedroom house with studio,
fireplace, two blocks from Norman.
41.25 mo. Call 378-4388 or
392-7656. (C-91-st-p).
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
enlgish speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for
appointment. 3 92-2049.
(C-91-10t-p).
Male or Female wanted for Spring
Quarter. Exotic 2 bedroom French
Quarter apt. For all the exciting
details, call Laird at 373-2743.
(C-92-stp)
Female roommate wanted for two
bedroom Williamsburg apartment. All
deposits paid. Call 376-5771.
(C-92-stp)
2 female roomie for spring quarter. 2
bdrm. apt. 1 blk from campus, own
bedroom $41.67/Mo. + $9.00/Mo. all
utilities, Call 378-8711 after 3 PM.
(C-93-3t-p).
Tired of dorm life? We need two
male roommates for French Qtr. apt.
SSO per month plus A utilities. Call
373-2505. (C-93-3t-p).
Im analyzing commercial radio and
TV programing and counter pro. etc.
Also info, on any area of ETV. Write
Mike Seeman 6623Vz Whitset Ave,
North Hollywood, Calif., Your help
rewarded. (C-91-st-p).
3 girls need 4th in beautiful 2 bdrm.
Hawaiian Village apt. Call 372-2949
any time. (c-90-st-p).
1 or 2 roommates needed for 2 bdrm.
Summit House Apt. for Spring
quarter. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361.
(C-91-st-p).
Male roommate for Spring quarter
Tow n h ouse apt. PHONE
373-1448, 307 S. W. 16th Ave,
Apartment 354. (C-94-st-p).
Two cool guys needed for roommates
really nice 3 br. house. SSO mo +
Large bath, kitchen, etc. Call
J/o-5762 anytime. (C-94-3t-p).

NOW PLAYING
PHILADELPHIA, HERE I COME!
, \ /
"a modem comedy with an Irish flare"
A Florida Players production Tonight through Saturday
8:00 p.m. Constans Theatre
U. of F. students: $. 75 General Admission: $1.50
All seats are reserved
Sox Office: 392-1653

| WANTED
Female roommates for house 3 miles
from campus. Own room; central
eat { a,r ; 450/month, share utilities.
Available immediately. 373-1027
(C-94-3t-p).
Female roommate for one bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus starting
uarter c aH 372-3750.
(C-94-3t-p).
L e ?f' e / oommate for spring quarter,
$47.50/month + */ 2 util. Good times
?^ a £! n i eed CaH *72-5128 anytime.
(C-94-3t-p).
Male roommate, 3 bedroom apt. Ige
private bedroom S4O. mo. 406V2 NE
Ist Ave. 376-0317 after 5.
(C-94-st-p).
SINGLE MEN WANTED! Dating can
be fun. Tell us the type of women
you would like to meet. All matches
live in Gainesville. For Free
questionnaire and detail write:
Nationwide Dating Service, 177 10th
St., NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309
(C-94-7t-p).
HELP WANTED
v
Now accepting applications for
Summer Camp Counselors at
PINEWOOD For boys and girls in
Hendersonville, N.C. Write P. O. Box
4585, Normandy Branch, Miami
Beach, Fla. 33141. (E-91-st-p).
Graduating Accounting Majors Why
not remain in Gainesville in a state
career service position with the
University of Florida? Chalenging
positions with excellent promotion
potential starting salary $650 a
month plus liberal fringe benifits
please contact Mr. Egan Employment
Manager; Hub 392-1222 Equal
Oppertunity Employment.
(E-92-stp)
Light yard work 6 to 8 hours weekly.
No lawn mowing, set your own time.
Salary open Dr. A. H. Spivack
1010 N. W. 36th Road, PHONE
372-3252. Call anytime day or
evening. (E-93-3t-p).
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
Part-time, male or female. Very High
Commissions, sales kit furnished. Cali
372-9408 between 7:00 and 9:00
PM. (E-93-3t-p).
Student with Electronics experience
needed for part time work as
proto-type Technician and general
Testing work 378-1581. (E-94-st-p).
Second quarter German student
needs help. Looking for a tutor that
has had at least three quarters of
German. Call 378-0943, 9-noon, or
after 7 PM. (E-94-3t-p).
NEED MONEY??? Sleep laboratory
needs male subjects aged 18-35 to
participate in sleep experiment.
Requires 21 consecutive days and
nights. Free. Possible to earn S6OO.
Interviews will be made 2/23 through
2/26, no appointments necessary.
101 Space Science Building,
392-2007. (E-93-3t-p).
Graduating Accounting Majors: Why
not remain in Gainesville In a state
career service position with the
University of Florida? Challenging
positions with excellent promotion
potential. Starting salary $615 a
month plus liberal fringe benefits.
Please contact Mr. Eagan
Employment Manager, Hub
392-1222. Equal Opportunity
Employer. fE-92-st-p).

Wednesday, February 25,1970. The Florida Alligator,
_

AUTOS
Volkswagen bought In Germany fully
equiped light blue excellent
condition, low mileage must sell.
Going overseas call 378-1121 after 5
PM. (G-94-st-p).
1964 Corvalr, black, radio, excellent
condition, rebuilt engine, SSOO, Call
Judy at 378-0082 4 thru 7 dally.
(G-94-st-p).
1960 Renault caravelle, good
condition. New tires and removable
hard top. $175 or best offer. Call
373-2901 after 4:30. (G-94-3t-p).
Peugeot 404 red sunroof 4 dr. sedan.
4 speed man. trans. One owner,
43,000 mi. $695 or best offer.
376~2771 after 6 and weekends.
(G-90-4t-p).
1961 Volkswagen, 25,000 miles on
new engine. Entire new brake system,
1,000 miles on new tires. Body and
interior are excellent. One owner,
complete service record. $490. Call
378-1951 evenings. (G-94-lt-p).
Porsche 912/5, blue 1968. Air cond.,
am-fm, chrome wheels, radials,
Konis, driving lites, headrest.
Unusually nice. Call 378-7301 eves.
(G-94-st-p).
67 MGB Roadster heater, oil cooler,
excellent shape, not off showroom
floor until 6B, NEED CASH. $1,500
make offer, 376-9540 PEACE.
(G-93-st-p).
1964 Corvalr convertible with 4-spd.
synchro, bucket seats, radio, heater,
engine & transmission rebuilt. Call
Bruce Cashon at 378-5154.
(G-90-st-p).
Corvette 69 Coupe 350 HP 4
speed, full power $4,800. Call
378-5514. (G-93-4t-p).
PERSONAL |
Travel and study in Europe. 6 weeks,
7 countries, jet crossing, private
coach, excellent accomodations, low
cost, loans available. Small UF group
lead by highly experienced graduate
couple. Arrangements by World
Academy. Call for booklet.
372-5489. (J-90-st-p).
FLASH FROM CHICAGO! Hugh
Hefner is moving his famous playboy
Club to the UF campus Feb. 28 and
setting up headquarters at Graham
from 6 l. See bunnies, enjoy
dinner, a floor show, and a dance to
help us prove that were no.l!
Tickets are $5 per couple and on sale
at the Graham office or from any
bunny. (J-90-st-p).
- 1
-: 1 a hr?
\ ;

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA 4
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti Vr Vr I
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN

Page 11

| PERSONAL ]
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, an
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
L.
FRESHMEN Old man have a job
waiting for you? Plan to join the
foreign legion. If so, congratulations.
If not, the UF Career Planning and
Placement Center can help you plan
your future, suite G 22. J Wayne
Reitz Union. (J-94-st-p).
The Center of Man wants to grok
you. Poetry, music, head trip Thur.
nite, 2/26, 8:00 Presbyterian Center.
$1.50 gen. adm. 75 cents students.
(J-94-2t-p).
Need your term paper typed? Will
type anything. Only 50 cents a page.
Broward Hall on campus. Call
392-9760. (J-94-2t-p).
Have your own jokes published, rm
310 reitz union needs 1 & 2 liners
now! send them to the program
office you may see them In print,
thanks! (J-92-3tp)
mon thru sat. ruanas capes &
ponchos from Colombia 25
zodiac shoulder bags 30% off. leather
skirts 25% off. SPANISH MAIN 1642
W. UNIV. OPEN 10AM-10PM.
(J-92-stp)
N.W. 13th St. Ph 372-9523
Across From THE MALL
IJOHN WAYNE IN
UNDEFEATED
PLUS
GREGORY PECK
IN
THE CHAIRMAN
2 STEVE MCQUEEN
IN
THE REIVERS
3 HELD OVER
CAME LOT

PERSONAL
J YOUR SONS CHILDREN ARE
DYING. Help EAG keep your world
livable. Call 392-1609, or see us in
RM. 323 of the UNION. (J-91-st-p).
Kecttn Ckmir
I^TOIPAZ^
ONE OF L ~ ST4
DAYS
THE YEAR'S
10 BEST I
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ B*e-,*l r COCUWW* WCTURCS /
|uuiild9|
aglfsy*
From the country
that gave you,
"I A WOMAN, ||9B
INGA and IU
1 AM CURIOUS
(YELLOW)
Edu
Enjoy our new
orange and blue
"Gator" seats
spaced for comfort



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
V
/X*>/Xv>vVAVA%\v>Xv;';v!v.yv.vv. iv;/
WANT A THOUGHT PROVOKING
GUEST for DINNER? INFOR,
APPT. call RANDALL LANKE
7-Bp.m. 373-2821. (J-92-stp)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON. PHONE
372-3225 or come to 1826 S. Unlv.
Ave and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years. NO
OBLIGATION. Folk and finger style.
Beginning to professional. Peacel.
(J-94-3t-p).
If you like Interested people,
relaxation, music, movies, games,
coffee, poetry, stories, and fun;
you'll like the BENT CARD
COFFEE HOUSE. (J-94-lt-p).
-$6 0 a month, room & board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-tf>p).
.;.vv.%nn%v.sss*X'W-x*x x x-:-n:.v.vx ;*X'#;:
I LOST & FOUND |
Reward Womans wristwatch
Gold, lost vie. of Peabody Hall
Computer Ctr. Initials on back
M.M.A., TEL 378-7751, 5:30
7:00 PM and after 11 PM.
(L-93-3t-p).
y.-.vX-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.x.x.v.v.-.-.'.-xvx-x-xv.
SERVICES 1
> v
nwwnv. x > xw:wwv.vasw;w;vxv;'.:!
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S. W. 4th Ave., across from
Greyhound Bus St atlon, 378-4480.
(M-ts-59-c).
Overland expedition to India via
Turkey, Persia, Afganistan,
Khatmnud. Lvs London Late June.
$545 fully Inclusive. Encounter
overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-94-12t-p).
Quoth our store never more! /'Our
famous door is no more / Hacked and
chlsled, bashed and beat / It has been
replaced with one thats neat / It
happened on one dark night / The
morning after was a fright / The walls
left bare without a care / For those
of you who'd like a pair / But dont
dlspalr for we do care / And have
replaced with many a new pair.
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS
378-4480 Oh yes, drive your own
waiting room. (M-92-3t-p).
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will clean,
acljust, lubricate, and Install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than $10! 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).
Don't be cheated by the student
scalping photographic studios of
Gainesville. I use the same equipment
and the same lab as the high-priced
professionals, but my price is one
fifth of theirs. I shoot In your dorm
room or outdoors and try to capture
the essence of you. I don't
mass-produce, therefore my quality is
much higher. Fast service. For prices
and information call Ronnie
376-6042. (M-94-lt-p).
. 13 1,13,111
I 7:00 and 9:30 B
S SI.OO .for students B
| $1.50 general admission 8
tickets on sale now m

SOMETIMES ADVERTISING IS THE ONLY WAY TO GET PUBLISHED

I SERVICES
FRESHMEN The UF Career Planning
and Placement Center has everything
it needs to assist you in your career
planning problems. EXCEPT YOU.
suite 22, JWRU. (M-94-st-p).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
\ j

I # vtvmKm. A ''BBB. wWBm
Eotarp BSJ Connection
Hotarpj m Connection
at tfje &atf)Sfeeller
9pm and 11pm $2.50 non-members
I Tickets sold at: Union Box Office, Record Bar, Rat
Tonight Spaghetti Dinner-$1.15-all you can eat
I 'Afonarchs of the Ring Film Festival
Dempsey vs Tunney Louis vs Schmelhg Robinson vs Graziano
Added Attraction: 'Greatest Knockout Thrills of the Century I
plus: Charlotte 500 Stock Car Thrills 1

Page 12

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

[ serwceT^""]
Irregulars and Seconds colorful sheets
and towels all sizes. Sheet and Towel
Shop 103 S. W. Ist Street.
(M-91-st-p).
XEROX COPIES: speclizating in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376 2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

Advertising Mojoiil
The Florida Alligator I
has openings for Advertising Salesmen I
/* mmo \ able to begin work I
immediately and I
continue through I
next < f warter I
M Earn money while I
gaining experience. 1
Come to I
330 and apply. I
SSv iffe



The
Florida
Alligator

'ShowMagazine: Film And Much More

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
These days everyone is trying
to pick up on the youth market.
According to people who keep
statistics, we who are under 30
BBB&I
or 25 or something like that are
buying tons of stuff and
apparently no one in the
business world figured that out
until a few years aeo.
So, in that line in last years
weve seen most of the
magazines in America change
their formats to create a
younger look, hoping that they
would pull us and our money in.
A new magazine that attempts
from its outset to appeal to the
young and does a good job of
doing just that is Show, a
two-issue-old California
publication that calls itself, The
Magazine of Films and the
Arts.
From the subject matter to
the typography to the ads,
Show is youth-oriented and
has a very good feeling. The
features running from
comments or new films coming
but to pictorial studies of the
history of the performing arts
are for the most part well
written, lively, and informative.
The pictures are good. There is a
lot of color work. The
typography and design is
absolutely refreshing and
unique. The editorial stance
seems to be bright, humorous
and strong.
The magazine, sold locally at
several newsstand locations,
costs a dollar a copy. A
subscription knocks that price
down to 50 cents an issue if you
get into the special introductory
offer thing. Regular subscription
rates are supposed to be ten
Mustangd^
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1970
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bucks a year, for twelve issues.
The premier issue of Show
released in the middle of
December and called the
January issue, shows the
magazines immediate desires to
become a magazine for youth,
the youth who, surveys have
shown, are the ones who make
up about 60 percent of the
audience of most movies and
who have made the whole
entertainment business come to
life in this country. So, the first
issue had articles on the Beatles
business concerns in the Apple
Corp., a story on plans to adapt
Phillip Roths Portnoys
Complaint to the screen, and an
astrological chart outlining, for
those who care, what will
happen to Marlon Brando in the
next month.
Outstanding articles in the
first issue include a look at
Leacock Pennebaker, the

WINTER are $5.50 per coupl^V
I FROLICS Bar and Recordsville.
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underground filmmaker who
came above ground to make,
among other things, Montery
Pop, and made a success of it.
Although there is a
considerable stress put on the
new developments and the pop
movements in film, the magazine
spends more than enough time
working with more sophisticated
and scholarly looks at the art of
the cinema and, although this
particular angle doesnt seem to
be the magazines primary one,
some good things get said. A
good example of this scholarly
and academically sound
approach to film can be seen in
the second issue of Show, in
which a long article tracing the
history of the guerilla movie
appears. The guerilla movie is
defined by the article as those
films which work for political
goals,the object is to wound, to
incite political action, the

Wedrwaday, February 26,1970, The Florida Alligator,

article says.
The magazine doesn't deal
only with films. The latest issue
also includes copy on dance,
television, commercials, the
theatre, and a thing called, The
Editors Bless and the Editors
Blast an editorial comment
feature.
Design-wise and
typographically, the magazine is
attractive and interesting. There
is much use of colored paper for
special sections and articles and
imaginative type faces and
graphic design work. The layout
and design is so good that it isnt
' i _. =r
-'-MSK. ffiSyyjjfefr
bS*%Bh?Z
\ s

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Page 13

even offensive in its
brillance.
So, it looks as if we have a
new magazine that is striving to
be ours particularly and striving
it seems in the right way.
Br in
i/ Mexico
lummer School, ai
ersity of Arizona
une 29 to August'
aphy, history, po-i
ige and literature
; board and room,
B. Rael, Office of 1
ersity of Arizona,,
!1.



Page 14

l, The Floride Alligator, Wednesday, February 25,1970

m
4P nr
I >
git
. /^Hp /^Hp;'
;' /^Hp;' Bp" %: : "
; 'V J f., '' J t --.' B^
POET READS HERE
Poet Denise Levertov, author of The Jacobs Ladder, With Eyes at
the Back of Our Heads, 0 Taste and See, and The Sorrow Dance, will
appear at the Union Auditorium at 8 p.m. Thursday. Her reading is
sponsored by the English Department and the Florida Quarterly.
Tickets On Sale
Now For Frolics

Tickets are on sale all this
week for the Interfratemity
Council-sponsored Winter
Frolics March 6 featuring singing
star Johnny Rivers and two
popular groups, Sweetwater and
Celebration. Tickets are priced
at $5.50 per couple. There will
be two shows in the Florida
Gym, one at 7:30 p.m. and
another at 10:30 pjn.
Rivers has had a number of
songs that have become hits on
top 40 radio stations across the
country. He also has appeared in
many clubs and done numerous
appearances. Although his
success first came several years
ago, he has remained popular
and has released records steadily
since his first hit.
Second-billed on the IFC
show is Sweetwater, a rock
group featuring members with
strong classical music
backgrounds and an
instrumental sound that includes
an electric cello, an electric
flute, and a lead electric guitar.
The vocal work for

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Sweetwater is handled by all the
members of the group and
creates a sound that also has
classical influences although it
definitely is rock. The group
has released one album released
by Warner Bros./Reprise. The
third act to be featured on the
bill for Winter Frolics is
Celebration, a hard rock group
with some members who attend
the university. The group got
together in Miami and worked
for some time in the Miami area,
appearing at one time with
Three Dog Night. The group,
which features a wide
assortment of original material,
also appeared at the Miami Pop
Festival.
Tickets are on sale at the
Reitz Union Box Office, the
Record Bar, and Recordsville.

Mixed Feelings On Play

By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Entertainment Writer
An Irish boy spends his last
night at home. He is tom
between dreams of a better life
in America and the security and
comfort he has always known in
the village of Ballybeg.
This basically is the story
behind Philadelphia, Here I
Come, which opened Monday
night in the Constans theater
with the Florida Players.
Philadelphia, a one-time
broadway hit, is distinguished in
its characterization qf the
leading character. Author Brian
Friel, chose to portray Gareth
ODonnell publicly and
privately. Visualized in front of
the audience and his inner
torments, his frustrations, his
desires and broken dreams and
hopes.
Lowell Stanley portrays
public Gar and Harry Murphy is
the private Gar. This is Stanleys
first major role at UF and he
shows potential of developing a
powerful talent. Stanley,
however, was nearly dwarfed by
the forceful acting of Murphy.
Known as a comedian,
Murphys plays this role fairly
straight. He relies on voice
inflection and facial contortions
to get the dry, sarcastic humor
of the play across to the
audience. He does this so well
that the outward character
seems to become overcome by
the ravings of the inner
thoughts.
Unfortunately for the play,
both Private and Public arent
equally presented and it seem as
if they should be. Philadelphia
is a play rich in folk-type
characterizations for those that
have the ability to carry them
off. The current production falls
down in handling this aspect. In
the play are many flashbacks
and group scenes which demand
that the actor become the
character. In too many of these
scenes, the actors only act the
character. Couple this with
the affected accents that all but
one character have, and some of
the folk-type characterizations.
GUI Stradtmann is good in his
role as Gars father until he
talks. Suddenly he turns into an
1 Remember Mama Swenson
type of character. Madge, played
by Christine Robinson, is the
most convincing character of the
cast because of Christines own
Irish background. She seems able
to control the role although she
lacks acting experience.
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

STORY REVIEW: 'PHILADELPHIA'

Probably the most memorable
performance given by any
master Boyle by Rob Sharkey, a
new face. Sharkey portrays an
accurate account of what life
can mean to an unfulfilled
teacher-poet, now old and
drunk. The play is made

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Youll drive safer with our brake and
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Were the students friend, so stop in
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worthwhile when Sharkey begins
to unwind his melodrama of
unadmitted failure.
Philadelphia will run
through Saturday night. Curtain
time at the Constans Theater is 8
pin.



The
Florida
Alligator
in nMirnfir" :
tx-ymsmu

tBL
PETE ORCHEIDT
... set two records

$ INTRAMURALS
| Phi Tau Wins Championship |
STEVE ROHAN

Phi Kappa Tau squeaked by
AEPi in an action-packed
overtime basketball game 37-33
to take the Orange League
basketball championship and
move into fifth place in the
league only 63 points behind
Beta Theta Pi.
The Phi Taus, trailing by one
at the end of the first half, went
to reliable Paul Register and Ken
Fowle to catch the AEPis at the
end of the game, 30-30. In
overtime, Phi Tau outscored
AEPi 7-3 to clinch the win.
Register scored 17 and Fowle
10 for the Taus. Richard Harrow
scored 14 and Larry Rodriguez
13 for AEPi.

MEET THE CARD CARRIERS!
YOULL WANT TO JOIN THEM
Have you spotted the card
carriers? They're all over
town, all over the world, and
they're pretty hard to miss.
They're the people who are
having more fun and spend spending
ing spending less money because
they carry their Student
Privilege Cards everywhere
they go.
Card carriers get free
food coupons good at thou thousands
sands thousands of national franchise
restaurants! Discounts of
from 10 to 40% at some of
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new cars foreign and do domestic!
mestic! domestic! Huge discounts at
sports events, plays, films
and museums! Tremendous
savings on records, tapes
and books! Discounts from
local merchants on clothes,
gas, shoe repairs,
candy practically every everything!
thing! everything! They get lots of free
samples, too!
Being a card carrier is
almost as good as being in-

811 l R. Horne Photography, 1232 W. University Ave.,
Gainesville, 20% discount to Cardholders
The Boutique, 617 W. University Ave., Gainesville
20% discount to Cardholders
Cousins Boutique, 1025 West University, Gainesville
10% on purch. over $25
Cycle Center of Gainesville, 819 W. University Ave., Gainesville
10% discount to Cardholders on accessories

GATOR SPORTS

GARY CHELOSKY
... broke seven records

In the Blue League, KA
stormed over Chi Phi 42-35 to
take the Blue championship.
Jimmy Drake led the KAs with
15 points and John Ortega
added 12. Steve Kaufman led all
scorers with 17 for Chi Phi and
Bruce Weeks added nine more.
Wayne Kruer led the Ball
Busters over the Walking

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NOW AVAILABLE ON CAMPUS:
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10% discount to Cardholders
Four Winds Aviation, Inc., Route 1, Box 27-G, Gainesville
10% discount to Cardholders
Fran's Dance Studios, 1013 W. University Ave, Gainesville
10% discount to Cardholders
Hide N Chic Wig Salon & Boutique, 1013 W. University Ave.,
Gainesville, 10% discount on purchases; $1 off on services
Krispy Kreme Doughnut Co, 310 N.W. 13th St., Gainesville
10% discount to Cardholders per doz. doughnuts
Lamar Pearson Automatic Transmission Service, 1527 SW 13th St.
Gainesville, 10% discount to Cardholders
Lewis Jewelry, 200 West University, Gainesville
10% discount to Cardholders
L & W Cafeteria, 313 W. University Ave., Gainesville
10%
McGuire Trophies & Engraving, 1706 W. University Ave.,
Gainesville, 30% disc, on pewter mugs plus monogram, disc,
to student orgns. on misc. items.
Pizza Hut of Gainesville, 1723 SW 13th St., Gainesville
$1 off on large-size pizza
Pizza Hut of Gainesville No. 2, 2200 NW 13th St.,
Gainesville, $1 off on large-size pizza
Quik-Save Store, 1620 West University, Gainesville
$1 on xerox over $2
Quick-Save Records, 1638 West University, Gainesville
$1 on xerox over $2
Quik-Way Copy Center, 1638 West University, Gainesville
$1 discount on Xerox over $2
Smith Mens Shop, 4 East University, Gainesville
5% discount on slacks

MEET SET FOR MARCH 5
Tankers Bid For SEC Title

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF swim team is reaching
its full potential as it prepares
for the Southeastern Conference
Championship March 5.
Gator records are falling
rapidly to the 1970 squad led by
an even composition of rookies
and veterans.
Biggest news of the year
continues to be freshman Gary

Wounded 37-30 in the Law
League finals. Kruer scored 23
points and Frank Saier added
nine more. Mike Rollyson led
the Wounded with 16 points.

Wednesday, February 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,
(

Chelosky, in breaststroke and
individual medley. Chelosky led
the entire team effort in last
weeks Southern Intercollegiate
Championships as he won three
first places, while breaking two
varsity, three freshman, and one
pool and one meet record.
Pete Orcheidt who started this
year rather slowly, set a new
varsity and freshman record in
the 1650 freestyle.
Mark McKee broke his own
varsity and freshman record in
the 400 individual medley by
three seconds. Bill Domey who
already holds the school record
in the 200 backstroke captured
the 100 backstroke record in the
meet also.
Greg Hardee and Bill Strate,
two outstanding performers
throughout the year have been
limited in their efforts because
of the flu.

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Sports Editor

However, Coach Bill Harlan
and the entire team were
encouraged by the recent
coming into form of some of
Floridas veteran swimmers.
Twelve men can place in the
championship meets and every
10th, 11th, and 12th place finish
adds to the total point score.
Rugby Team
Drops Two
The UF rugby team was
defeated this weekend by
Alabama, 34-3, and by
Tennessee, 8-6, at the Festival of
Arts Rugby Tournament in
Birmingham, Ala.
The next Gator rugby match
is tentatively set for March 7 at
4 p. m. against the New Zealand
Flight Squadron on the ROTC
field.

dependency wealthy and
now you can be a card car carrier,
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If you hurry, you can even
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Page 15



Page 16

i, Tlte Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 26,1970

BASEBALL'S NO. 1 BAD BOY

McLains Rise To Stardom

(EDITORS NOTE: UPI Baseball
Editor Fred Down reveals the
three faces of Denny McLain in
a series on baseballs no. 1 bad
boy. In the first of three parts,
he examines McClain, the
fireball.)
By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK (UPI) The
three faces which Denny McLain
has displayed to the sports world
are those of a fireball, a flake
and a fool.
In this first of three articles
on baseballs no. 1 bad boy, the
Detroit Tiger Pitchers meteoric
rise to stardom will be traced.
The personality which caused his
teammates to nickname him
super flake will be explored in
the second article and the
weakness which brought about
his third suspension by
commissioner Bowie Kuhn will
be analyzed in the third.
McLains career on the field
has been an unqualified success
story. Few athletes have risen so
far so fast. At the age of 25 and
with only six major league
seasons behind him he has
achieved goals which stamp him
asahkely hall of famer. He has, in
truth, been a fireball on the
field.
Denny has been a 20-game
winner three times and is the
only major, league pitcher in the
last 35 years to win 30 games in
a season. He has won the
American Leagues Most
Valuable Player award once. He
has won one Cy Young award as
the Leagues no. 1 pitcher and
shared the award another time.
He shares the league record, for
most consecutive strikeouts in a
game. He has played in a World
Series and won a game. His
composite 55-15 won-lost record
for die last two seasons is one of
the best in baseball history.
McLains rise to stardom
began at Mt. Carmel High School
in Chicago where he compiled a
38-7 won-lost record which
brought him to the attention of
major league scouts. He was
signed off the high school
campus by the Chicago White
Sox for a $17,000 bonus in
1962 and assigned to their
Harlan, Ky., Farm Club. Three
years later he was a star for the
Detroit Tigers.
McLain had an indifferent
season as a minor league rookie
in 1962. Although blessed with
an excellent fast ball and good
control, he had no curve and was
only a thrower. He was 1-1 at
Harlan and 4-7 at Clinton in his
first season and was just an
18-year old kid trying to make
the White Sox roster when he
went to spring training in 1963.
What appeared to be a bad
break in the spring of 1963
turned out to be the springboard
for his career with the Tigers.
The White Sox had decided to
retain two of three rookie
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[DENNY McLAIN: %J (
THE FIREBALL US I
THE FLAKE f^ 35 *"
AND
THE FOOL I
*fe"e"e*e%"e"e*e%%""e*e*e"e%"ee"e"e*e"e"e"e"e%*e*eee"e"e"e%"*%""**" # %r*d%%*e"e"e.e e^e e e # e - o (- p ..a'

pitchers from among McLain,
Dave Debusschere and Bruce
Howard. Debusschere had been
paid a big bonus and so the
choice narrowed down to
McLain and Howard. Howard
had enjoyed a better rookie
minor league season, was a year
older and had a good curve. The
White Sox chose to keep
Howard and expose McLain to
the rookie draft which meant
any other major league club
could draft him for SB,OOO. The
Tigers jumped at the
opportunity and brought him up
for a look at the end of the
1963 season after he had a 13-2
record for Duluth and a 54
mark for Knoxville.
Oddly, McLain was still just a
thrower but he wasnt for
long. The late Charlie Dressen,
then manager of the Tigers, took
the strong-armed youngster aside
one day in Wellington, D.C.,
and in 15 minutes taught him
how to throw a change-up curve.
G6d gave me my arm,
McLain said many times
thereafter. But Charlie Dressen
made me a pitcher.
And what a pitcher. He was
16- in 1965,20-14 in 1966 and
17- in 1967. He finished the
1967 season under something of
a cloud a cloud which now
threatens to haunt him for the
rest of his life because he
&72
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failed to win a game after Aug.
29 and the Tigers lost the
pennant by one game to the
Boston Red Sox. It was during
this period that he was sidelined
with the foot injury which has
become a major issue in the
charges now swirling about him.
Whatever his failures may
have been in 1967, Denny made
the baseball world forget em in
1968.
Now a complete pitcher,
McLlain won eight of his first
nine decisions had had a 14-2
record by the end of June. No
major league pitcher had won 30
games in a season since Dizzy
Dean in 1934. And no American
League pitcher had won 30 since
Lefty Grove in 1931 but it was
obvious McLain had a good
chance to achieve that total.
The Tigers hadn't won a
pennant since 1945 but they
rolled toward one in 1968 as
McLain kept piling up victory
after victory. He had a 21-3
record at the end of July and a
26-5 mark at the end of August.
The countdown toward 30 was
on. He won no. 27 on Sept. 1,
No. 28 on Sept. 6, and No. 29
on Sept. 10.
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