Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
*. r VV/. t<>

I?6teiL
Ad Amnia*.

VoL 62, No. 90

IN RELEASED REPORT
SCORE Proposes
Abolition Os UC

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Aiiigaiof ouitt writer
The Student Commission on
Reorganizing Education
(SCORE) has called for the
abolition of University College
and the establishment of a
deanship of liberal studies.
Student Government
Secretary of Academic Affairs
Henry Solares Wednesday
released SCORES report, which
contained many points similar to
a proposal by UF Vice President
of Academic Affairs Frederick

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| DR. ROBERT CADE '*
... shares profits
Regents Receive 1
Gatorade Rights
By CATHIE REED j
The Florida Cabinet Tuesday unanimously assigned to the ||
State Board of Regents whatever rights the state might have to j
\ the patent on Gatorade
f The Regents are involved in a legal battle over royalties from ji
I the drink, which was developed at UF. j i
Under an agreement prevhMuly signed by UF, Dr. Robert |i
j Cade, and the UJS. Government, any products developed at the ;
j UF belong to the Department of Health, Education, and f
| Welfare. In turn, HEW is expected to assign any rights and :j:
Jj royalties received from such products bade to the UF with die
j inventor during in the rights and profits.
The problem is that the UF is not a corporation and :
: therefore, cannot hold patents. $
In order for UF to be assigned to these rights, the rights of j
jj the state to the patent had to be first assigned from the Florida
j Cabinet to the State Board of Regents. |

IN RIOT CHARGES
'Chicago Seven Found Innocent

CHICAGO (UPI) A federal court jury Wednesday found all the
defendants in the tumultuous trial of the Chicago Seven innocent
of conspiring to incite riots during the 1968 Democratic National
Convention but convicted five of crossing state lines with intent to
incite riots.
The jury of 10 women and two men returned its verdict after more
than 41 hours of deliberations over five days. It came 21 weeks to the
day after the militant antiwar protest leaders went on trail Sept. 24
before U. S. District Judge Julius J. Hoffman.
Guilty verdicts on the intent-to-incite riot charges were returned
against David T. Dellinger, 53, and Rennard C. Rennie Davis, 29,
leaders of the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in
Vietnam; Youth International Party Yippie leaders Abbott H.
Abbie Hoffman, 32, and Jerry C. Rubin, 31; and Thomas E.

The
Florida Alligator

Conner.
SCORE has suggested the
general education requirements
be spread over a period of four
years, with a baccalaureate
degree offered in liberal and
general education.
Faculty now in University
College would be given the
option of joining the
departments of their special
fields or remaining as a separate
department containing only
their course.
The report also suggested the

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

present comprehensive English
and logic courses would be
merged to form a five-hour
English communications
course, to be taught in
conjunction with the
Department of English.
A special Division of
Entering Studies would be
formed, which would include
freshmen and transfer students
with less than two years of
college.
First quarter students would
be required to take a course
which would include testing and
counseling in various fields of
study. At the end of the first
year the student could enter the
college of his choice.
The orientation course,
English communications, and a
senior seminar in the students
field would be the only required
courses. The other general
education requirements would
be met by taking a maximum of
nine hours from four of five
groups: physical sciences,
biological sciences, logical and
symbolic studies, social and
behavioral sciences and
humanities and fine arts. The
group omitted would be the one
closest to a students major.
SCORES recommendations
were sent to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd, Conner, University
College Dean Franklin Doty and
the Curriculum Committee.
Bt 1
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|| Jptmt
FREDERICK W. CONNER
... plan similar to his

Hayden, 29, a co-organizer of Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS).
University professors John R. Freines, 30, and Lee Weiner, 30, were
acquitted on both counts against them. They were charged with
(dotting to fire-bomb an underground garage near convention
headquarters.
Hoffman did not immediately sentence the five convicted men.
They face sentences of up to five years in prison and $ 10,000 fines.
All of the defendants already are in jail serving contempt sentences.
The sentences, which range up to almost 2H years, were imposed
Saturday and Sunday by the judge for courtroom disruptions during
the turbulent, 4Vi month trial. Hoffman refused to grant bail after
Wednesday*s convictions. I have determined they are dangerous men
to have at large,'* he said.

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_.___. PHIL COPE
GIVING BLOOD
Charles Brackins, IFC President, donates pint of blood to the
blood drive now in progress. See story page 3.
Crime Wave Hits
Vending Machine

By JEFF BREIN
AingKor oil it writer
University police Chief Audie
Shuler and Campus Service
Coordinator Steven Johnson
have released information on the
latest crime wave on campus.
Since the beginning of 1970
weve had over 60 break-ins on
campus vending machines
causing a product loss of
$1,996.88, Shuler said.
According to Johnson,
Gainesville vending machine
companies have spent over
$1,250 in machine repairs.
We have an average of two
break-ins a day, said Shuler,
who suspects a small group of
people are involved in the thefts.
This problem has us very
worried, it hasnt been this bad
before, Johnson said.

J
v 1 foT l^

Thursday February 19,1970

Gainesville area vendors,
Wometco, Coca Cola, Eli Witt
and Pepsi Cola have taken a new
stand to combat the vending
vandals.
(SEE 'REWARD' PAGE 2)
i TheGaior
STUDENT SENATE
i approved the first reading of
the student body budget
Tuesday page 2
-
Classifieds 14
Editorials.. i 8
Entertainment io
Letters .* 9
Movies .; ..... IS
Small Society 4
5p0rt5............ 24



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970
m-m-m m.m.m mm m _________ _ ___________

Senate Considering Student Body Budget

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday night began work
on the 1970-71 Student Body budget, approving
the budgets for the cheerleaders, Course and
Teacher Evaluation, Florida Players, Public
Functions Authority, speakers bureau, special
fund and the Student Senate.
All the budgets passed Tuesday must pass a
second reading at the next senate meeting before
they become law.
The Special Fund budget the operating
budget of the executive branch of Student
Government totaled $70375. An amendment
to have the Special Projects fund and the
President's projects funds $1,700 and $1,500
respectively transferred to the special
requests fund of the Senate was defeated.
Proponents of the amendment, which would

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DISCUSSING PROBLEMS WITH STUDENTS PH,L BANN,STER
... at Wednesday's "gripe session" on the Plaza

FOR OPEN GRIPE SESSION
Legislative Task Force Canvasses UF Campus

By MARYANN? GILLIS
Alligator Stqff Writer
Nine state legislators visited the UF
campus Wednesday to discuss the
problems in Floridas university system.
The legislator are members of a
Republican task force headed up by
Rep. William James of Delray Beach and
Rep. Earl Dixon of Jacksonville.
The purpose of the committee is to
listen to the students and discuss with
them the problems they have

SIOO Reward Offered

PAGE OUtE^
The companies are offering a
SIOO reward to anyone
providing information leading to
the arrest and conviction of
anyone breaking into campus
vending machines.
If convicted the person
involved can be charged with
breaking and entering and can
spend up to a year in jail and be
fined $500, Shuler said.
Shuler listed a few areas on

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR i's the official student newspapet of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during i
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The.
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless (
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the >
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator wilt not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.
. 1

encountered in the university system
and the possible need for legislation,
Dixon said.
We have by-passed the Regents and
their red tape, Roger Wilson of Pinellas
said. We came right to the grass roots
level. We want to find out whats going
on on campus as far as the students are
concerned.
House Minority Leader Don Reed,
R-Boca Raton, said, We want to give
the silent majority the chance to express
themselves rather than the militant

campus as prime targets for
thefts, including the Hub, the
law school and the research
library.
'These machines are placed
where the average traffic passing
by cant see them, making a
theft easier and more tempting,
Shuler said.
The University police chief
admitted the machines may be
eyesores in the open but
admitted that if thefts were to
decline consideration for moving
the machines should be given
prompt attention.

i 7 BUDGETS PASS FIRST READING

have denied the Student Body President and the
President's Cabinet funds for their own projects
except through the senate, argued that this was
too much money to be appropriating without
knowing specifically where it was going.
Those against the amendment argued that it
was an unnecessary infringement on the powers
of the executive branch and would be too time
consuming for the money to be requested as
needed from the Senate.
The budget for the Engineering Fair was sent
back to the Budget and Finance committee for
alteration. Several senators questioned the
proposed expense of S9OO for the Queens
Contest and Ball.
The Engineering Fair, which gets most of its
budget money from Industrial Exhibitors fees, is
requesting SBOO from the Senate. Many Senators
felt the senate would be subsidising an
engineering-oriented activity not available to all

MINI-FOSTia
JEANS DIXON
QU
/ TELLS IT LIKE \
ITS 6oINA
j
You can get your
SPmPMML
at Oscar's
Imported Car
Service
1222 South Main
376-9811

minority.
Dixon added, Students have found
that there is a missing link with the
legislature. They havent been able to
communicate with the legislature.
Students are citizens and taxpayers, and
feel they should have this right.
Seven legislators were dispersed at
various points around campus in order
to gain a cross-section of opinion,
Wilson said. Dixon and James remained
in the Plaza of the Americas Wednesday.
Attendance was large and a wide

the students.
The senate will meet tonight at 7:30 to
continue budget discussions. Those budgets
coming up for first approval are Interhall
Council, Mayor's Council, Homecoming,
SAMSON, The Council of International
Organizations, Student Government Productions,
University Religious Association and the Gator
Band. Attendance is mandatory for all student
senators.
In other business, the senate passed a
resolution favoring the continuation of planning
for a University Activities Center. The resolution
says since the students favor the idea of an
activities center in principal, the results of the
Feb. 4, 1970, referendum should not be
misinterpreted as lack of need or desire for an
activities center, but interpreted simply as a
statement that the students are not willing to pay
$6 per quarter proposed.

Dialogue Hosts ACLU
Guests on the Florida Blue Key-WRUF Dialogue open phone
program tonight will be representatives of the American Civil Liberties
Union.
u _^ mon topics to be discussed beginning at 11:05 p.m. on
WRUF-AM will be the loyalty oath, UFs tenure policy, UF academic
reedom, marijuana felony or misdemeanor, civic rights and capital
punishment.
392-0773 rS t 0 CaU t 0 COntribute t 0 Progra are 392-0772 and

u1 es Verns
Fantastic Submarine Sandwich
2003 S.W. 13th St. (S. on 441)
Phone: 373-1330
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Jub ol /loot II v//) nf '4-;;/ './/-/ (front frost) lot/ of von I)
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variety of topics was discussed. Students
brought up such problems as
recognition of leftist and militant
groups on campus, the Board of
Regents, the College of Law Education
Opportunity (CLEO) program, black
and minority problems and even
Gainesville utilities rates.
Dixon said the problems seemed to
be much the same all over the state,
although UF put particular emphasis on
conservation and environmental
problems.



SOUTH MARKS VICTORY

North Integration Ordered

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Senate voted Wednesday to
force school desegregation in the
North the same as in the South,
giving Dixie its biggest victory
since the start of the civil rights
drive in the 19505.
Rejecting two Northern
counterproposals including one
endorsed by the Nixon
Administration, the Senate
passed Sen. John Stennis
amendment to eliminate th,e
distinction between school
segregation resulting from
Southern laws and that caused
by housing patterns, as in many
Northern cities.
The vote was 56 to 36.
Stennis, D-Mfcs., said the

IFC Wants Donors
For Blood Drive
By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Come tonight at 7, the IFC will be out for blood, fraternity men
your blood.
It's part of the yearly IFC blood drive in which the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center provides mobile units to make donating blood faster
and more convenient for the donors.
Tonight the unit wffl be stationed at the Sigma Phi Epsilon house
on Fraternity Row.
A second mobile unit will be set up at the Phi Delta Theta House
Feb. 26. Donors may also contribute at the Health Center 8 a.m. to 8
pm. Monday through Friday and on Saturday from 8 am. to 5 pm.
Aside from the self-gratification, other advantages of donating
blood are:
Once a person donates blood, he or any member of his
immediate family may draw all the blood they might ever need at any
time from the IFC account.
Donating blood can be an important service project for a
fraternity. Plaques will be awarded to houses donating 25 pints or
more.
Trophies will be awarded to houses donating the most pints in
the orange and blue leagues, to the house with the highest percentage
of members donating and to the house with the largest increase in
contributions over the last years total.
The first 400 men donating blood at the mobile units will be
given tickets for privileged floor seating at Winter Frolics March 6.
Independents donating must designate which house they are
donating for.
This year the IFC hopes to surpass last years total of 652 pints.
The IFC donates blood from their account to many worthwhile
causes. A recent case of this was when a young girl in Williston needed
150 pints for an operation. All 150 pints were obtained from the IFC
account.
According to Jay Howell, IFC blood drive chairman, more mobile
units will be sent by the Health Center if it is felt donors' response
warrants it.

I Try a bite of tenJern^tonight! I
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Served with a steaming-hot, buttery baked potato, \ AHIH
Texas toast and a cool, crisp, green salad
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amendment would make the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW)
stop working from a
presumption of innocence
outside the South and a
presumption of guilt in the
South."
He referred to HEW rulings on
whether school districts should
be denied federal school money
on grounds of racial
discrimination.
Stennis and his Southern allies
said the amendment if passed by
the House and signed by
President Nixon would force
HEW to either crack down on
the North's de facto segregation
or ease up on Southern
enforcement.

The Stennis amendment calls
for enforcement of school
desegregMion laws "uniformly in
all regions of the United States
in dealing with conditions of
segregation by race, whether de
jure or de facto, in the schools
of the local educational agencies
of any state without regard to
the origin or cause of such
segregation."
The Senate first rejected, 48
to 46, Senate Republican leader
Hugh Scott's substitute
proposal; It would have ordered
equal desegregation enforcement
North and South, but would not
have equated de facto and de
jure segregation.
Under present law, federal
courts and HEW have cracked
down only on school districts
which at least formerly practiced
de jure segregation, either
directly by law or through
gerrymandering of school zones.
The Nixon Administration
endorsed Scotts proposal on
grounds it would not challenge
de facto school segregation,
North or South, unless the
courts first ruled against such
racial separation.
Sen. Jacob K. Javits, R-N.Y.,
then tried to delete from
Stennis amendment the final
words: Without regard to the
origin or cause of such
segregation."
Stennis said this would
deprive his proposal of its
cutting edge" and Javits bid
was defeated 50 to 41.

HIGH-DRY
PLACE TO BE

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NEW AG QUEEN
Mbs Deborah McLeod, a transfer student from Broward Junior
College and a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority, is this year's near
Agriculture Queen.
7 TALK TO OUR CONSULTANT
MARCH 2 and 3,1970
ABOUT A STIMULATING SUMMER
JOB IN A FLORIDA PUBLIC LIBRARY
JL
o§l Slllt YOU H,GHT BE surpr,sed
ABOUT YOUR CAREER
CONTACT PLACEMENT OFFICE
FOR DETAILS ft APPOINTMENT

Thursday, February 19,1070, Tie FtesMs ARbNojv

Page 3



Page 4

Ttw Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

Film Class: No Popcorn, Plenty Qt Discussion

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Feature Editor
Nobody brings popcorn to Dr. William C.
Childers film class in the College Library on
Tuesday afternoon. But they usually invite a friend
or two.
Last quarter, says Childers, I had to ask those
not enrolled to leave it got that crowded during
the movie. The class has 50 in it now but weve had
nearly 75 for some movies like Citizen Kane and
Seventh Seal.*
CEH 194, Comprehensive English Departments
special Him seminar views a two-hour flick every
Tuesday afternoon. On Thursdays, the students
discuss the film of the week, relating it to current
films theyve seen, and to the course text, The
Emergence of Film Art, by Lewis Jacobs.
Film is the one real, valid discipline that is
overlooked here at the UF, Childers said. So
when I was given the (CEH) departments elective
seminar in September, I decided there was enough
need and interest for the study of films.
Childers is meeting this week with department
chairmen in Arts and Sciences, Journalism, and Fine
Arts to discuss preliminary ideas for a possible
inter-disciplinary College of Film Studies at the UF.
Films were chosen for the course that had
innovations, starting with the silent era. Childers
has formed a special film vocabulary so the class can
talk about films in movie terms. The first three
weeks of the quarter are devoted to learning terms
and introducing the techniques the students will
note in films throughout the quarter.
Mary Toomey, 3JM, said, Since hes made us
pay attention to things in the movies we watch in
class like changes from one scene to the next,
editing, cutting it makes me watch for them in
other films.
The best thing about the class is that Childers is
easy going the class is like a big discussion section
we can talk about almost any movie we want,
Miss Toomey added.
Childers said any movie is free to discuss in class.
They still want to talk about The Graduate, and
of course, Easy Rider we could have spent the
whole quarter on.
This week the class asked to talk about If,
which is currently being shown in Gainesville.
The film is an allegory like Seventh Seal which

New Research Program Permits
Undergraduate Technical Study

The UF is calling for
applicants wishing to participate
in an Undergraduate Research
Participation Program for the
summer of 1970.
The program will permit 16
undergraduate students in
engineering, mathematics and
the physical sciences to be
selected from institutions
throughout the state to
participate in individual research
programs.
Students will work on
separate projects under
supervision of one of 16 faculty
from various departments in the
College of Engineering. The
12-week program provides a
stipend of SBS per week in
addition to cancellation of most
University fees, including
tuition. Students will receive
academic credit for the research
under one of the special
investigation courses established
at the University.
The following quotation from
the grant proposal summarizes
the basic purpose of the
program:
... the college will try to
provide an experience which will
significantly broaden the
outlook and knowledge of the
participants, which will develop
their technical maturity and
individual capabilities and which
will motivate them to pursue
high-level technical
careers. .. Throughout, the
program will seek to develop in

participants a broad maturity of
thought and the ability to attack
research problems
independently.
Requests for additional
information should be directed
to: Dr. Martin A. Eisenberg,
Department of Engineering
Science and Mechanics, UF,
Gainesville, Fla., 32601.

W. Univ.
llrlMr 376-7657
| |
Dont leave those
Gatornationa! films
in your camera.
Take them to Ro-Mo
before they spoil.

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DR. WILLIAM C. CHILDERS SHOWS FILMS
... in his popular film seminar on Tuesday afternoons

we saw Tuesday, Childers said. lf starts out in
reality but ends up leaving it.
He pointed out the Holy family motif and the
knights quest in Ingmar Bergmans Seventh Seal.
He told the class how Bergman himself had written
that the film was an allegory for modem mans fear
of destruction by the atomic bomb.
I give the students clues to help understand the
picture and things to watch for, he said. We talk
about being verbally literate but today it is
important to be visually literate, too.
We see movies more than we read novels. Many
of us go to the movies for an escape and thats
fine. But good movies have an importance in the
totality of their effect and we can learn to
appreciate this.
Students ranging from freshmen to seniors are
evenly distributed in the class. Several colleges are
represented, and all grant four hours of elective
credit for the course. Freshmen must have a 3.0

Deadline for application is
March 16. Appointments will be
announced shortly thereafter.
Guns Guns Guns
4 Inventory over 450. Buy
4c Sell Trade Repair. 4
* Reloading supplies. Custom
M reloading. Harry Beckwith,
l gun dealer, Micanopy.
466-3340.

average and must have completed CEH 131,132 or
their equivalents to be admitted.
Childers admits that films are suspect for
academic study purposes. But I think its foolish
the way so many schools go on ignoring the
importance of films and their educational value, he
said.
Word of mouth recommendations by students of
the class to their friends has resulted in four sections
of CEH 194 being opened up next quarter, Childers
said.
Were going to try to hold the discussion
sections to 25 people. What we now have (50) is too
large for a class like this, Childers said.
All four sections will meet in a large auditorium
on Tuesdays to view the weeks film. Childers will
lead one discussion section. Frazier Solsberry, a
senior in journalism, and Yvonne Dell, an English
instructor, will handle the others. The fourth
instructor has not been chosen.

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E.T. YORK
... Agriculture provost
York Defends
Agriculture
On Pesticides
The provost of UFs institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) termed
unfortunate recent attempts
to make the pesticide
controversy seem a struggle
between the conservationists and
the agricultural interests.
I dont think this is true at
all, said Provost Dr. E. T. York,
Jr. in a speech before the Farm
Bureau Federation here recently.
No one is more concerned
about problems of conservation
and with giving the consumer a
high quality and safe product
than agriculture, he said.
York pointed out that IFAS
researchers are constantly
exploring ways to reduce the
application of pesticides,
particularly the need for
persistent compounds and to
develop, through biological
control, methods of completely
eliminating their use wherever
possible.
However, he warned against
the danger of making a hurried
decision to bar pesticides on the
basis of unsubstantiated
emotional appeals. Dr. York
urged that any determination of
pesticide usage be based on
factual information, and that
pesticides be considered
individually instead of treated as
a broad class of compounds.
Our position is that the
public well-being must
determine the use of pesticides,
Dr. York said, and that we
must weigh all the possible
consequences of actions related
to the use of pesticides.
York admitted that food
could be produced without
pesticides but said that, at the
same time, we know that
pesticides have made a major
contribution to making it
possible for the American people
to enjoy the most abundant,
highest quality, and cheapest
food of any people on earth.
If, in the interest of human
health or in the public interest
generally it is desirable to
eliminate the use of certain
pesticides, Dr. York said, by
all means this should be done.
What he opposed, he said, was
rushing headlong into what
could be an unwise and
untenable position. ,

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Tliuraday, Fabniary ti.Wd.Tto Florid. Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

Page 6

Bill May Allow
Legal Abortions
HONOLULU (UPI) A bill which would make Hawaii the first
state in the nation where abortion would be a matter between a
woman and her doctor today appeared certain to be passed.
Legislators said the final vote probably would come Thursday.
The measure would strike down Hawaiis 101-year-old criminal law
forbidding abortion and make it easier to obtain an abortion here than
in any other state.
Gov. John A. Bums, a Roman Catholic, has indicated he would
allow the bill to become law without his signature.
A draft of a report from a House-Senate Conference Committee
reached the Senate and House floors Tuesday.
The six-member committee agreed on a bill containing five
safeguards for a legal abortion. The bill would legalize abortions,
when performed by a licensed physician, in a state-licensed hospital,
on women who have been Hawaii residents at least three months.
The bill also provides immunity from civil liability for any hospital
or physician who chooses not to perform an abortion and felony
penalties for abortions performed by persons other than licensed
practitioners.
Atlanta Hosts SDX

ATLANTA (UPI) Sigma
Delta Chi, national journalism
society, will hold a Southeastern
regional meeting here April 4, it
was announced Wednesday.
R. T. Eskew, director for
Region 3 of SDX which includes
Georgia, Florida, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama
and Mississippi, said details of
the program will be announced
later.
Eskew, Southern Division
manager for United Press
International, said Dale Clark,
director for public affairs for
WAGA-TV, Atlanta, would be
general chairman with Dean
Filipinos
Riot Against
Americans
MANILA (UPI) Howling
Filipino demonstrators smashed
their way through two sets of
steel gates into the U.S. Embassy
office building Tuesday in the
most destructive anti-American
riots since the Philippines gained
independence from the United
States in 1946.
With no policemen nearby the
demonstrators spent 45 minutes
hurling rocks, torches, teargas
bombs and Molotov cocktails
and bombs at the darkened
embassy building. They broke
more than 100 windows, set off
deafening but harmless
explosions and started bonfires
in the courtyard.
The anti-American
demonstration was an outgrowth
of earlier demonstrations aimed
at bringing down the
government of President
Ferdinand E. Marcos. With
30,000 demonstrators in the
streets, police called it the
biggest anti-government
demonstration since Jan. 30
when six persons were killed.
No Americans were hurt but
20 Filipinos were hospitalized
after the destructive rampage
that swept through the
commercial areas where shops,
offices and cars were damaged.
Ground floor windows at the
Filipino-owned Hilton Hotel
were smashed.
F riendly Filipinos warned
Americans to stay off the
streets.
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Warren Agee of the Henry Grady
School of Journalism at the
University of Georgia as program
chairman.
Serving as hosts will be the
Atlanta, Northeast Georgia,
Georgia State University and
University of Georgia chapters
of SDX.

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I Feb. 19, 20, 21 at 9:00 & 11:00 pm
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the small society

I iWP&iZ-sTAMP IW e
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neither
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FASCINATED BY SURVIVAL SHOW

Boy Explorer Found Dead

GATUNBURG, Tenn. (UPI)
An Explorer Scout fascinated
by the idea of wilderness survival
was found dead in the Great
Smoky Mountains Wednesday
more than a week after he
disappeared during a hike.
Geoffrey Hague, 16, a slightly
built, brown-haired boy who
wore horn-rimmed glasses, was
found by a team of searchers
about a mile and a half from a
trail junction where he dropped
away from the other hikers on

Feb. 8.
A search for the boy was
fruitless until several days ago
when Hagues knapsack, extra
clothing and food were found
piled on a boulder.
We know that he had been
fascinated by a television
program he had seen recently on
wilderness survival, said Dave
Beale, assistant administrator of
the Great Smoky Mountains
National Park. He even talked
about it with his companions

by Brickman

during the camping trip.
The body was found in a
remote spot less than half a mile
from where Hagues equipment
was found. Searchers called for a
helicopter to meet them to bring
it out of the mountains.
There was no immediate
indication of the cause of death,
but temperatures have been in
the 10s and 20s during much of
the search and the mountains are
covered with snow. Snow and
fog had hampered the search.



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Page 7



l. The FttH*AMgatw/Ttiwtfttr, FSMrA*y>l9; 1970

Page 8

credit LNS]

Dixon Sign Subversive

MR. EDITOR:
Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Jeane Dixon addressed
an Accent 70 symposium in University auditorium.
Above her head was a harmless looking sign with the
words Accent 70,** written upon it. During her
speech a banner was released from this sign which
displayed the words Bull Sh*t to the audience.
UF was the scene of my first birthday, first step,
and first memories. I remembered this campus and
school as one of greatness, one that knew no
rebellious elements, radical influences and
subversive groups or organizations aiming at the
destruction of our society.
1 have witnessed a spectacle 1 would have believed
impossible a few years ago, when the words
courtesy and respect still meant something. Mrs.
Dixon is a lady of great stature and is respected
throughout the world as such, and to see her
disgraced at my university, which I have loved and

Vietnam: Wrong Is Right If Nobody Looks?

WASHINGTON President Nixon told a
Republican governor at the White House within the
past week that his plan for Vietnam will require
several more years of war. A more or less permanent
American force of approximately 250,000 men is
what the President sees as necessary.
He believes that this level of troop commitment
will be acceptable to an American public which
doesn't like die war but also doesn't like to bug
out, as the President is fond of defining the
alternative to war.
It is this news relayed by his visitor to
Republican Sen. Charles Goodell of New York
which is causing senators to ask themselves hard
questions. As the President's (dan permeates the
American conscience, others will be asking
themselves hard questions, too.
Antiwar sentiment in the United States has
always been divided between those who see the war
as wrong and those who see it aa burdensome. It is
this second group which the President is counting
on to support a policy which hides the war makes
it a minor nuisance, but one which the public will
bear.
A policy of concealment is under way. The
Presidents new budget, for example, nowhere
mentions the cost of die war. Those 30-odd billions
of dollars are no longer separated out. Within
months, it may be confidently predicted that the
cost of the war will not be a subject of public
debate because nobody will be quite sure what it is.
And as Vietnamizatkm prodeeds, the President is
also counting on fewer American casualties. Gen.
William Westmoreland's wistful reflection of three
years ago that the American public ought to tolerate
a death rate in Vietnam somewhat below the
number of automobile fatalities each year has been
tested and found false. But surely there is something
in the tfaeas. What about 5 £OO per year?

revered since infancy, was a shocking blow to the
pride and esteem which I have always held for this
campus.
I found myself helpless, wanting to say
something, wanting to defend my campus. These
was notiiing I could do, except watch.
It appears to me that the radical faction on this
campus and on other campuses has done an
excellent job of fooling the public into believing
they are trying to help solve the problems of the
day, when in actuality theyre creating far worse
problems, ones capable of immense and
revolutionary damage.
I conclude in asking the students and citizens of
Gainesville, to do our part. Lets put this country,
once the greatest, back in the lead. We cant do this
by dissent, we must not lose these principles, for
once we do, we have lost our identity.
GLENN BRYAN

_ jAnd so the question which Sens. J.W. Fulbright
and Goodell are putting to themselves, and in effect
to the American people, approximates the question
of whether wrong is right if nobody is looking.
The President has made up his mind that,
unpopular as it is, the war is right and that the
way to keep it going is to make it less noticeable.
Frank Mankiewicz- **
. Ton Braden
*>
- j
The danger that GoodeH, Fulbright and others will
be able to persuade the public to a different view is
£
But there is a great danger nonetheless. It is that
the President's plan won't work. The South
Vietnamese army still has an annual desertion rate
of 20%. It is underfed and underpaid.
Its soldiers find it essential to moonlight" in
order to support families at home. The generals
draw pay for enlisted men who are not present and
sometimes never were.
The South Vietnamese army does not like to
fight at night. It does not like to engage in active
patrolling. It often refuses to fight at all. That battle
in which it holds its own is still cause for active
rejoicing by Americans in Saigon.
- Moreover, it seems unlikely that this army can

I The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

EDITORIAL
Grow-Up
Accent 7O brought the problems of air pollution to the
fore on campus last week. But it also unearthed a form of
intellectual pollution which is equally as repugnant.
The diatribe which followed Gov. Kirks remarks last
Monday and the Bull Sh*t sign which descended behind
Jeane Dixons head as she spoke Wednesday are perfect
examples of an intellectual pollution which has no place on
a university campus. x r ... ..
Kirk has often been a target of criticism here. Much, if
not most, of it is deserved, we believe.
As governor he has only widened the gulf between
education and this state s government.
But as a speaker, and as a guest of this university, we
should be indignant at the way in which he was treated.
And if the unknown prmkster doubted Mrs. Dixons
authenticity he or she should have expressed this in debate,
not through spineless humiliation.
Mrs. Dixon was not humiliated, but we, as students here,
were.
This is an institution of higher education. It is not a
junior high school.
The sad thing is, no one would ever have known it
judging from the conduct of a few on this campus last week.
If we are to demand respect, we had all better work to
earn it.
Radicals: Note
MR. EDITOR:
Following the introductory evening of speakers for Accent *7O a
session of questions was requested. Since the speakers were expected
to restrict themselves to environmental considerations, should it not
have been expected that questions would follow that topic?
Unfortunately not.
Much to the consternation of many of us who had hoped to use
this occasion to ask questions pertinent to Floridas devastated
environment, we were regaled with the strident voices of highly
uninformed students* who could ask neither grammatically
intelligible questions nor those pertinent to the extremely important
issues that should have been broached.
We, who are truly concerned about the deplorable lag in political
and academic understanding of Floridas ecological problems, should
not have to fight through a morass of radical know-nothingism in
order to voice our own germane objections. Will the campus
radicals take heed and pay attention to specific causes.
PETER W. WESCOTT, 7AS

ever win the mind and hearts of the people," as the
American psychological warfare phrase goes.
It is commanded, without exception, by former
noncommissioned officers in the French army
(including President Thieu and Vice President Ky)
men who actually fought with the foreigner in their
own country's war for independence.
They are -in American counterparts men who
fought with the redcoats in 1776. Many Americans
did that. But they did not command the allegiance
of their contrymen thereafter.
In short, what may be in store for the President
and for aft the rest of us is an unmitigated
disaster, the kind of disaster which will begin with a
terrible defeat of the South Vietnamese, reach a
climax with an undermanned American Army trying
to restore the situation and end with Richard Nixon
struggling to determine for himself what he meant
by the phrase appropriate response.
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union. k
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 8&.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed m tne rlorida Algato^reThoseoF"
!!r .if., 0 <* of the writer of the article and not thoae
of Florida



I- rv ]~ v,v> Fluted Columns-,
Goodbye, Brady
CZ__ By John Parker*H i

So long, Brady.
Guess Stephen C. scorched you too
with his far reaching cigar.
Brady Greathouse. An improbable
name. An improbable guy.
You told me two years ago what your
job as head athletic trainer was like:
Sometimes we stay here in the
training room 24 hours a day for three
or four days if necessary to get a boy
back on his feet. And there are always
nightly phone calls. Some of my boys
have been so sheltered at home that
they wont take an aspirin without my
| okay.
ij x Yeh, youve taped a lot of ankles in
$ five years. And patched up a lot of cuts,
bruises and sprains. But youve done
more than that, and perhaps thats the
!: reason why you became an institution
V at UF:
v
v Those kids come to me with
$ problems that you would think they
would take to a priest, you said.
You talked of the dressing down you
gave Spurrier when he started having
:j: trouble getting his head through
ij; doorways. You mentioned the time
Larry Rentz took your date-stranded
daughter to her senior prom. You talked
jj; of all the little psychological skills that
: went along with the technical
i; knowledge of your job.
But no more, Brady.

JWR Union
Study Area
Too Noisy
MR. EDITOR:
The third floor of the Union
is supposed to be for the
students purpose. Everytime I
have gone there to use the
typewriters, I find maniac
secretaries, and loud Student
Government Officials standing in
the outer main office loudly
screaming and screeching, they
all have offices they could stay
inside and talk.
This morning before lunch
break, ten women were sitting
and standing around gossiping
loudly. Dont they ever work? (I
was here for over 2 hours.)
Even the radio is much too
loud for students who happen to
be trying to study or type. I
would appreciate it if someone
could bring decorum to this
area. If there is not enough work
to keep these secretaries busy,
then they should not be here!
They are a waste to my Student
Government dollars, as well as to
the student body.
I did ask a girl at the main
desk if there was away the
loudness could be controlled.
She replied that this was not a
study area!
WHY are typewriters for
students use in such an area? I
would like to make a motion
that typewriters be placed in an
academic area ( the library) for
students use in an academic
environment.
NAME WITHHELD.

\ irresponsible a
J UNEMPLOYED |
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credit Sawyer Press/LNS
Notre Dame Bargain
MR. EDITOR:
Just a note on the letter from students Watkins, Marvo and Conlin
in your February 16 issue:
The Notre Dame Double Bubble was bid in 1965 and would cost
nearly sl4 million if bid today. If bid in 1972, as originally projected
for die Activities Center, construction cost inflation according to
reputable estimates (about 10 percent per year compounded) would
carry this total to about sl7 million.
While this may have been a bargain at Notre Dame, it was felt to be
too elaborate and too sports-oriented to be recommended for this
institution.
WALTER MATHERLY, DIRECTOR
UFs Dick Tracys
Put On Some Show
(EDITORS NOTE: Ed Novak wrote a letter printed in the
Alligator this quarter in which he asked for help finding a red-haired
girl at UF. Thanks to the publicity from his letter, they were
reunited.)
MR. EDITOR:
What can I say besides thank you to you and all of the UF Dick
Tracys. I hope you realize that I never expected anything like the
show you put on. You shouldnt have gone to so much trouble.
Whenever I think of what you did, I cant help but give a little snicker.
It was WILD! Thanks again.
ED NOVAK (U.S.A.F)
P.S. The outcome of this was even greater than expected. Besides
hearing from Sunny again, Im now writing to another, great coed of
the UFL_: .JL Afio <*w. sh&Lw 'suv*. i

Your choice was owning some
Gator-Ade stock that you didnt feel :j:
like turning over to the man. Good
for you. You never were one to take a
lot of guff from anyone.
So they canned you. And they did it
like you would expect, didnt they? $
They sent a student trainer over with $
the news. Good ol Gator Ray. Never
had the stomach for delivering bad
news. So you heard if from one of your
adoring underlings.
But you were Brady to the end. While :j
a bunch of the guys were sitting around
the training room bitching about your
raw deal, you got on your podium for :
one final time. $
Listen, you jugheads. I want you to &
remember something. When you get out
from under the wings of this institution,
theres a cold world out there. And !;i
there are some things that youd better
learn to get used to.
Sure, we know Brady. But how does ij:
a guy go about getting used to having a
knife inserted in his spine? :
Well, big Steve, Gator Ray, and all -j;
you other underlings scampering around :
to find your shelters from the toppling £
old regime, you got what you wanted. :
Your new coach, your plush jobs, and j
youre rid of a cantankerous old rebel
besides. $
"i
But I want to see you fill that big
damned lonely place you left.
*

FORUM:^^
( mi ViA&tot y
hnpo f or sh e com£}o££l}^^^^
The Movement
GE Protest
' By Caren Levy
In reply to the column, UF Students want GE, this is submitted,
not as a point by point refutation of Ken Morses article, but as a
general contribution on the myth of university neutrality.
The basic premise behind SMCs anticomplicity campaign is that
American universities are an integral and active component of the
forces that are continuing to pursue the war in Vietnam.
It is generally maintained that universities are liberal institutions
or free market-places of ideas, etc. Internally this may be true to
some degree (and many students are challenging this assumption with
demands for control over their universities).
However, this is blatantly false in regard to the relationship of the
university to the rest of society. The schools are institutions which
exist in a larger society. For such an institution to take no stand, is to
take a stand that is, in favor of the status quo.
By not challenging the existing systems, the university is helping to
maintain them.
Even declarations of neutrality are not true, as a matter of fact, the

The reasons for increasing interaction between the university and
the military-industrial complex are rooted in recent history, and
especially cold war ideology.
During the Second World War, scientists and military personnel
cooperated in making significant scientific discoveries.
The mutual benefits of such a relationship became so fruitful, that
when the Threat Os Communism arose, the universities were eager
to rise to the challenge by taking part in the planning of newer and
better ways of Combatting Our Enemies.
Today, more than two-thirds of the university research funds come
from the Department of Defense, Atomic Energy Commission and the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Colleges, in order to get more money for research, become captive,
and then active advocates of military operations.
And cooperation between the university and military is not
surprising when one sees that the schools are generally governed by
men representing corporations that stand to profit the most by
government research.
What this amounts to then is a symbiotic relationship between the
major institutions of our society education, which does the
research; business, which finances; government, which makes the
policy; and the military, which makes sure that the policy is
implemented.
The war in Vietnam is itself only one aspect (a very costly one in
lives and money) of the vast machinery that has taken hold of our
lives.
The members of a university community may have their own
individual philosophies and interests, but an institution which is vital
to the larger community cannot abdicate its responsibilities.
These responsibilities entail not only pursuit ot knowledge and
constructive work toward the solution of mankinds problems, but
also include disengagement from those areas of our society which
serve nothing more than financial interests or misguided chauvinism.
University approval of such efforts as war-related research is
maintained on the grounds that the academic freedom of the
researcher must be protected.
However, the academic freedom of any one individual does not
infer the right of a government to commission the development of
tools of genocide and repression.
It must be remembered that this government has already used
nuclear and chemical and biological warfare for military purposes.
Given these established policies, it is hard hot to assume the
possibility of their continued use.
Therefore, the academic community must refuse to do earch
(and other acts of complicity) necessary to maintain sue pobcw s.
This does not mean that actions against university invf Ivemert with
the war machine will alone end the war or prevent sim lar situations
from evolving again.
It does not mean that the antiwar movement wishes tha the
educational community resume an ivory tower status.
What it does mean is that a significant sector of our So,.;ty must
take a stand against the evils we have seen as a result of the Vietnam
c.c>nflicl}.and must act against'ttattbq OGV *wods. iwi\v .aiw/ir vl? l*.

Thurcdy, Fabfuary 4, 1970, The Hot** AlflUfr.

university aids and abets the war
machine through its extensive
intellectual and material
resources.
The abuse of the educational
system as a means of social
development has become so
great, that it can be said in many
cases that the universities are
participating in actions
detrimental to society, e.g.
development of chemical and
biological warfare, nuclear
weapons, etc.

Page 9



Page 10

I, Ths Florida Algator, Thursday, February 19,1970

Theyre Using Bullets At The End

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Films, of course, do what
they do with pictures and
sounds for the most part not
words.
So, it is hard to talk about
films in words. Oh, it's not hard
to talk about the average film.
The average film is the kind of
thing that can be reduced to
describing a situation. Describing
that situation gets the whole
thing well enough-
But thats the average movie.
1f... now playing at the
Plaza Theatre, isnt your average
film and Ive been sitting here
for an hour trying to figure out
how to talk about it.
Basically on that purely
descriptive level the movie is
about a bunch of boys who are
in an English prep school called
The College House. They are
there somehow against their will
yet they arent. That is, though
the whole thing is rather
unpleasant and they could leave
if they want to, they dont.
They stay and they suffer. They
fight what one of the schools
religious leaders calls, the good
fight.
But, that is only the basic
descriptive level. The film is
doing so much more than just
putting boys in that situation.
There is an impact and a force
that enters the audience that
perhaps can come through only
in cinema. Now, lets look at
that force, if indeed, it is a thing
that can be looked at and
studied.
The film is working for the
most part with the energy or
energies that are in the boys, the
powers that ate in them and
obviously not in the adult
characters in the picture. The
boys there are three or four of
them featured have things
tearing at them from inside and
at the end of the film those
tearing things, whatever they are
and wherever they come from
or go in most of us, rip outside
and the boys fly out of control,
out of their own control and out
of the control of the schools
administration and out of the
control of the members of the
outride world watch the school
with frightening interest.
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
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of it. others because their business bene benefits
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The energies, and 1 guess that
is as good away as any to
describe the forces that are
tearing at the insides of the
boys, the energies are many
things. Its sex for the most part,
lack of satisfaction and a
curiosity that is almost killing in
young boys. There, too, are
hints at homosexuality.
The films main character,
Travis, says while looking at a
picture of a naked woman,
Theres only one thing you can
do to a gill like that. You have
to walk naked into the ocean,
make love once, and go
somewhere and die together.
And so the boys fill their
study area with pictures of
women, alternating with shots of
war heroes and dead children. In
Travis first on-the-screen
contact with a woman, he is in a
small case, kisses the young
waitress, and gets slapped. Then
the girl, who becomes featured
more and more later in the film,
conies back to Travis, growls at
him like an animal and says, I
like tigers. I am a tiger. I am
going to kill you. They roll on
the floor, screaming and clawing,
nude all of a sudden. The scene
is incredible.
This extremely important
scene one in which we lgam
what is being held up insidetlffe
boys is a perfect example of
that which cannot be talked
about in words. It conies across
as much more than just two
people nude and growling. It is
cinema as good as can be seen
anywhere.
Beyond the unfulfilled sex,
there is a fantastic aggressiveness
that can never be satisfied or
quieted. It is put there by the
school in an attempt to bring the
boys together and the school
together and the country
together. The administration
naturally has no idea what
horrible things are being pushed
into the young men as they are
brutalized in everything from

WaablaftoaPa Birthday ipacial,
i Ililif f l lead with Buttarcraam, Dacaratad
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FILM COMMENTARY: 'IF. ._J

cheering from a rugby match to
running war games in combat
fatigues. The film ends with real
bullets. The school officials
misunderstand all of what they
are doing and the war games
become real. That, perhaps, is
the one thing I think comes
close to describing what the film
does to itself. The film ends with
real bullets.
Religion is tied into the movie
through several weak and
terrifically wrong clergymen
who guide the boys by telling
them generalizations that mean
nothing and solve nothing. The
religious head of the school tells
the boys once, Deserters in a
war should be shot. We are all in
this war with the Savior as our
commander and we all are
deserters. Naturally, the
clergymen old and afraid of
their own needs cannot tell
any of the hungry boys how to
find satisfaction or else go free
somehow of the need to find
satisfaction. They can only say,
Temptations are many. Fight
the good fight. Yet the boys
cannot fight because that war is
no war at all.
The headmaster of The
College House is a sociologist.
He keeps telling the boys
particularly the troublemakers
that he understands. He doesnt
at all and by saying he does he
only increases the frustration.
He is the statement of the
establishment. The frustration of
not being able to complete
anything (what the poet Pablo
Neruda calls the knock is that is
never answered, the name that
does not come clear), that
frustration grows until it bursts
out and that bursting out is what
1f... is about.
The picture is done
episodically, in six or eight
chapters or subsections that
trace the boys breakout. The
film opens with a quote from
the Bible, something about the
need to find wisdom at the same

time one is getting the tools
necessary to survive, at the time
when one is being outfitted to
live in a brutal world. The
episodic structure is very
effective in working toward the
statement that the boys are
being outfitted to live in the
brutal world but they are not
finding the wisdom that must go
with that knowledge of how to

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Mi Frijoles 294 Mexican Slaw 294 Ly
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* Steak Taco 794
£: Burrito (Neat treat) 49< Md
$ Jose Chili (Wow ) 39< £
s/ o'
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i v For Gringos (Americanized)
* Fried Chicken basket 1.09
Ivl Hamburger (Gringo Burger) 49C
K/l Ranchitos (corn chips ) jv
1624 S.W. 13th St.
L/l (Acrow from sin city) rV

kill to keep from being killed.
So, I suppose that is a start.
As in all well-structured and
finely-timed art, the movie does
not end when the time of it is
over,, it does not close when the
credits dose. Its beautiful
ambiguity necessitates
discussions of it which do not
give the illusion of ending or
being complete.



WHEN YOU CUP AND REDEEM
THE COUPONS ON THIS PAGE |ioW I
Gillettes. || 2
Double Edge Blades | 12. Vitalis Hair Dressing B* Rl AJ
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Thuraday, Fobruary 19.1970. Tha Florida AHfaator,

Page 11



!, THb Florida Alligator, Thunday, Fobruary 19,1970

Page 12

jfeiJl yov 9n covnton
mmmfct. PMx-forth*
)f/opfi*fDifference
of no ex fro cost
Celebrating the Opening of our
154th. Store in Tampa, Fla. ITfeflt Spfittflfe.
( ) To,t y L " Canter-Cut
SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. \J?SIS?"/ /x Pork Chop* 99*
Mkiwi Cnantry-Ctyln^
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE MhMR/ m Pork Bibs is. 69*
' -Z *\ |f Haw Zml4
A tr '. jN. Kotk't Black Hawk Mavarfwl
Swift*! P ram Iu hi Prctfld ambsL f OHS
Sirloin Steaks . $ l l9
Swiff* P ramiwvfi Prat* a Staaks j RWB!BB6ijiiifl jKflck Jf
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Key Club ,. s | l9 Turkey React *iC2
P / J ***" 100 extra SBH Oraaa Stamp! with
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Pot Roast 79* IMfljfeueii Ml &££?!
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Golden Corn 5:r $ l every day low prices HRSH
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?5^ n P * ,# 5 = sl Kings > Reg. $3.76 PIUIM Im
Green Beans sis ioos $3.83 11,I 1 r UDUA !fl
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Chili with Beans .. i.. 25 e v .4fl
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Pie Crust Sticks .. .rl9 ;., AA
SAVE 4Vx Jiffy White, Yellew er Devil* Peed tomato Juice CAN 3 / leOO
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Geld Medal s 49 ' d6 3/100
PRICES EFFECTIVE
Cri*p, Weatera CeUPelt J \f WED. NOON, FEB. 18 THRU I'DBIIV'I
Bilk. GBc / WED. NOON, FEB. 25 |;nWA;|
Carrots 2js2s* / v IHUr hr'-id
Herd, Oree. Pleride \ OHinHl^Hi
teled-Perfect Cherry f 39. all wbi?e |
Tomatoes #3 tr $ 1 [ 1
Florida Treplcnnn #
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Orange Juice £ 69* \SL-
(*a|MrM We*., 1*7.)
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Gainesville shopping center 22TS
10*4 N. Main W 2MO *W. 13* *r~t store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. *7 Sit U <1 fUomn

Thursday, February 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

THINKI
your own home,
fully furnished,
complete set-up
in park of your
choice.
LOW DOWN, LOW MONTHLY
3600.00
only at
MUSTANG MOBILE
HOMES
4820 N.W. 13th St.
378-1346
(We help locate
the park)
ram homes *3!
4820 N.W. 13th St. 378-1346

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DeodKn* -MO pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
ft
I lI 1| |f] £
a ft TD T S.? 52
8 ? 1 I &S I Q
33
i::i 5
_ z
_ _ >
ui .p* w to
: _&& & S 8 5
. p| |o
~ |s 38.
o -a- a. C
I f§ Z
c c
Q §. S
_ i Q > 3 z

r 5 r
m
CO
>
r~ r 3 >
o m
_ z
N m
l dm Imm I..C

1 FOR SALE |
X V
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
?fter 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
Mar (in 00-21 Guitar with hardsell
case $270. Call Greg 378-3271.
(A-88-st-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
Four 15 wirewheels for MGA SSO
FM tuner-multiplex S2O D-craft 14'
fiberglass with 50 HP mere. $750
Dual TT $75 Two university spkrs,
S4O 2 Teac speakers SIBO Fisher FM
receiver $l6O Sony 250 Tape deck
with mikes $125 Two shure mikes
$l5O ge Vacuum sls Garrard TT
S9O Ph. 372-7024 after 5..
(A-86-st-p).
Human hair frosted fall, must sell.
Shoulder length, cost SIOO new. Ask
$25 minimum. Call Cindy 392-8496.
May see at Graham, Room 212.
(A-87-st-p)
For a memorable afternoon, take a
pleasant 12 mile drive out to archer
where you can go to an authenic
antique auction. It's all happening
Sunday, 2 PM at C & J Auction
House. (A-90-2t-p).
Ger. shep. fmle. 8 wks. old $25.
378-9522. (A-90-3t-p).

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

' FOR SALE
i M
SONY MODEL 200 STEREO
RECORDER Hardly used. Payed
S2OO, will sacrifice for $l2O.
378-5033 after 5 P.M. (A-90-2t-p).
Selling Everything! Short Brown
Human Hair Fall S2O. Stereo S9O
Record Albums (Beatles, Hendrix,
Warwick, Supremes, Butterfly and
more. Stereo Speakers S4O ea. All
type of apt. decorations. 376-3622.
(A-89-3t-p)
BEAD FREAK has beads to* sell
variety of type and color. Strong
unstrung and custom made designs.
PO Box 16/331 or call 392-8986.
(A-89-3t-p)
1968 HONDA CL 90. Motor just
overhauled; runs like new. $200.00.
Call William at 392-8903.
(A-86-st-p).
I FOR RENT
x x
Hip female roommate needed. Own
bdrm. free utilities, free Feb. rent. La
Mancha apts. 70 month. Call
373-1815. (B-90-4t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
llvingroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
We need 1 female roommate for
spring qtr. Landmark apts. $46.25
per month. All deposits paid. Call
Norma Goldstein 378-4849.
(B-88-st-p).

J Alligator Ad Salesman Ht
Free yourself from the
everyday routine and get in Lj&*g
some real mindblowing |
t- experience. Guys and Girls Lm*
get paroled at: flm. 334
3 REWARD J|
" >74 Kg I

TICKETS NOW ON SALE
for
Florida Players production of
Philadelphia, Here I Come!
"a modern comedy
Opens February 23
H.P. CONSTANS THEATRE, 8:00 p.m.
General Admission: $1.50
All seats
Box Office: 392-1653

FOR RENT
Available Feb. 28. 1 bdroom apt
sllO/month, air cond, paneling,
furnished, all electric, cable TV, most
for money in sin city, no children or
pets. Couples or working singles,
392-1214 or 372-7024 after 5.
(B-89-st-p)
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20i-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom apt furnished ac
heater carpeted TV cable pool V 2
block to campus 2 blocks to SFJC.
Call 373-1047 $120.00 mo.
(B-89-6t-p)
WANTED |
1 female roommate for poolside
Landmark apartment for spring
quarter. Call anytime 378-2878.
(C-86-st-p).
Male roommate wanted for
Tanglewood Manor townhouse. SSO
per month + utilities. 373-2792.
(C-86-st-p).
ROOMMATE Furnished private
bedroom in house 4 miles from
campus. $32 per. mo., no lease. Call
373-1233. (C-90-lt-p).
Roommate 3 bedroom apt.,
offstreet parking, Ige. bath, kitchen,
LR. S4O mo. near Unlv. Law Stud.
& Adv. senior. 406V2 N. E. Ist Ave.
376-0317. (C-88-st-p).
Roommate: $35/Month and shore
expenses. Home phone 378-7032 or
Grove Hall rm. 47 or 50. Ph.
376-9171. (C-88-st-p).
1 female roommate for house 1 block
from campus, own bedroom $42 mo.
+ utilities, wanted immediately!!!!!.
378-2828. (C-88-st-p).

| WANTED j
1 male roommate, private rm.,
Archer Rd. Traitor Park, 40 mo. +
utilities. 376-0189. (C-89-st-p)
Wanted part time for maintenance
work inside and out. Can learn
outboard motor servicing if
mechanically inclined. (C-89-2t-p)
Photographer: Florida Alligator has
openings for news oriented
photographers. Please submit resume
and sample of your work to Suite
330 JWRU. Become part of a
nationally recognized news team.
(C-89-3t-nc)
Male roomate-grad-student-for 1968
2 bdrm. mobile home 3 mi from
campus. Paneled, a/c, bar. $55 mo +
V 2 util. Archer Rd. Village 36 20 sw
Archer Rd. lot C-13 after 5.
(C-87-st-p)
3 girls need 4th in beautiful 2 bdrm.
Hawaiian Village apt. Call 372-2949
any time. (c-90-st-p).
AUTOS
v v
For Sale: 1965 PORSCHE SC
FM-Am Radio. 473-3290 Keystone
Heights. (A-86-st-p).
Pontiac GTO 1967 black vinyl top
over red 4-speed new engine and
transmission good shape $1350 call
John 392-7450 or 372-6820 after 5
pm (G-87-4t-p)
Jaguar 1958 3.4 sedan. Like new
tires* Clean. Recent engine overhaul.
$495. Call 376-8586. (G-st-87-p)
Peugeot 404 red sunroof 4 dr. sedan.
4 speed man. trans. One owner,
43,000 mi. $695 or best offer
376-' 772 after 6 and weekends.
(G-90-4t-p).
Pontiac station wagon, 1963, auto.,
power brakes, steer., air cond,
bargain, $650 call 376-1884.
(G-90-2t-p).
1964 Corvair convertible with 4-spd.
synchro, bucket seats, radio, heater,
engine & transmission rebuilt. Call
Bruce Cashon at 378-5154.
(G-90-st-p).
1967 Volkswagen in great shape. His
name is Jose and he has only 41,000
miles to his credit. Call Rich Hull at
372-2257; only SIOSO. (G-89-3t-p)
1963 LeMans excellent condition
best offer over $425. 373-1754.
(G-89-lt-p)
f.x*x*xNv-vx;s\*x*x*x-x-x-X"X*x-v*W"v;%\
PERSONAL
- Q cDDO 0 Q 0
SIP IN celebrates Georges
Birthday Fri. 5:30 7:30. Join the
Swinging Singles at the Lamplighter.
25c cover!! DRINKS .50!!!
(J-90-2t-p).
Take a little loneliness out of
someones life on this impersonal
campus. Smile at them. (J-90-3t-p).
Travel and study in Europe. 6 weeks,
7 countries, jet crossing, private
coach, excellent accomodations, low
cost, loans available. Small UF group
lead by highly experienced graduate
couple. Arrangements by World
Academy. Call for booklet
372-5489. (J-90-st-p).
FLASH FROM CHICAGO! Hugh
Hefner 1$ moving his famous playboy
Club to the UF campus Feb. 28 and
setting up headquarters at Graham
from 6 l. See bunnies, enjoy
dinner, a floor show, and a dance to
help us prove that were no.l!
Tickets are $5 per couple and on sale
at the Graham office or from any
bunny. (J-90-st-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f PERSONAL
x
'*, ** *********-*** *********** *
'summer camp counselor
OPENINGS: Costal boys and girls
camps featuring seamanship plus
all usual camping activities have
openings for college men and women
toserve as camp counselors* June 10
August 22. Excellent character
references and ability to instruct in
camp program (sailing* motorboating,
aauatics, land sports) required. Good
Room and board furnished.
Quick answer upon receipt of
application. Apply to Wyatt Taylor
Camp Sea Gull/Seafarer Post Office
Box 10976 Raleigh, North
Carolina 27605. (J-90-3t-p).
PHI MUs Best wishes to newly
initated Sigma Omlcron Tau pledge
class. 1 -Your sweethearts, (j-90-lt-p).
Sip-In at the singles cocktail club a
social drinking club sponsored by a
group of grad students and faculty
rooms and bar makes a cozy
atmosphere for one and all
Lamplighter Lounge Friday 5:30
7:30 drinks 50 cents. (J-89-3t-p)
Free Introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-10t-p).
Lovely alaskan mining widow age 15
seeks love romance marriage. 3'2
blue eyes brown hair beard, arms legs
and all extras. Must like Taurus.
378-6081. (J-87-3t-p)
Best Dylan I ever heard RL, Albany,
NY coming soon so order now all
never heard before-type songs after
7pm 378-3121 happy valentine P
(V-86-lt-p)
Adventure and self-development?
Consider the outward bound school
watch It on ABCs American
Sportsman, Sunday afternoon, Feb.
22 (J-87-st-p)
Ideas? Students & faculty, why not
help plan new U.A.C. contribute
your ideas for a campus-wide poll.
Send to Consult P.0.80x 13918
Gville. (J-86-st-p).
FREE KITTENS! Five weeks old and
must find them a home. Call
378-7116 (we give green stamps)
(J-89-3t-p)
CJW Would you like to give me
personal flying lessons? It may take
forever I dont want to solo. I love
you my Leo lion Aquarius
(J-89-2t-p)
S6O a month, room & board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
Dog Lovers: Yorkshire terrier
puppies for sale. Adorable house
pets. Call 376-0289 after 5:00 on
weekdays. (J-88-3t-p).
S3OO REWARD FOR THE ARREST
AND CONVICTION OF PERSON
i OR PERSONS INVOLVED IN THE
THEFT OF A *6B TRIUMPH
BONNEVILLE METAFLAKE RED
LISCENSE NO 10A3695 ID
DU83993. CONTACT MARK
WHITMAN 378-5463 or
SHERIFFS DEPT. (J-88-4t-p).

I Baby, I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
THURSDAY I : ( >. vnil I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I 11 7 ou I
I FRIED CHICKEN qQ I I
I FRIDAY I I
I I I AMH HIKIMEP I We've got a book coming It features wild mobs §
LUINL.II MINI/ UIINIeCIX ou t. it's a thriller. screaming and lonely
I ROAST TOM TURKEY | ,fs about the dawning of Pe Pleal ne I
I Dressing, Cranberry Sauce I The Acie of I
l I and ideals and

:? aowww 889080000
| PERSONAL i
9 .J.
towwwi 0 BOOBBOOIXOWWiWWCfI
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
HIGH! HIGH! HIGH! 118 Years of
Brotherhood, LIVE EVER, DIE
NEVER; Phi Kappa Psl!! (J-88-4t-p).
I LOST & FOUND I
x >
Reward! Jdde bracelet with gold trim
to be lost between Anderson
and PIKE House. Valuable.
PERSONAL meaning. Please call
392-8642. (L-90-3t-p).
Reward! Psy 201 Text lost In
laundromat across from Gator Town
Apts. Contact Dudley 376-9516.
(L-88-4t-p).
Lost: Tobacco pipe carved in shape
of fish at Millhopper paths.
Reward sls. Not valuable except to
me. Lu Hardin 392-6189 from 8 to 5.
(L-89-st-p)

I Special Engagement!
W.C.FIELDS
F E S T I TFA-L k
I The one and only 1
I GREAT MAN & 1 wssssasr
I at his GREATEST U
pTUPENTSL. PAY ONLY SI

Thursday, February 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

SERVICES

x.Nssrx-x-x-x-x.xx-x-x-x-x-x-xxvx-x-x-Xv.
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will clean,
adjust, lubricate, and install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than $10! 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes form postage stamp to
24 x 44", 8" x 10" certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313,
(M-83-24t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).

Page 15

XX-X-X.VX-X'X-X-X-X-X-X.r.VX-X-XX-X-X-Xv
SERVICES
*.
X:%NTX*X*X*X-XX.VX*X*X-X-XV.V.*.v.v.-.-.-.-.\-
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
SAVE $$ STUDENT PRIVILEGE
CARD Is now on campus. Local and
national disc. Call Fred at 372-9705
and save ss. (M-87-st-p)
fIH 4y **' 4MI NOUN m
Z countitJ
RON HAYES PRODUCTION I
Wk. Days 2:154:30 7:00 and 9:151
Sat. 2:15 4:30 .7:00 and 9:15
Sun. 2:15 4:30 7:00 and 9:15fl
s S?
HELD OVER
FOR 3RD
BIG WEEK
, .r*
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ Brti fl r. COLUMBIA PICTURES J

"services
XEROX COPIES: speclizating fn
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
Go to Bahamas over break only 889.
From Miami for four day cruise to
Nassau form Miami. Call Roger
Bowers. 378-6050. (M-85-st-p).
N.W. 13th St. Ph. 372-9523 *
ACROSS FROM THE MALL
ARLO GUTHRIE 5
IN S SALICE'S
ALICE'S SALICE'S RESTAURANTS
ALSO 1
ITS AT
RICHARD HARRIS
in ;i
CAMELOT
JAMES BOND
ON HER MAJESTY'S
SECRET SERVICE
iimmimminiHiiimiii
HSJJI NOW!
fThe
year%
best k#
comedyf
-SATURDAY REVIEW
Â¥
Cad
Â¥
Alice
A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
FOR COLUMBIA RELEASE
[ W|estricted GSr
|p||S*||NOW!
GO!-FOB THE FURY,
FORCE AND FUN OF
. If -.<*
ANGRY, TOUGH AND
FULL OF STING!_,!
A PICTURE YOU MUST
SEE THIS YEAR IS if-
LADItS HOUt JOURNAL
it-
Lra^ATOR^aJNTPJCTURE^



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

Page 16

SdkttU £)&CiaL& THRIFTY MAID WED. NOON, FEB. 18-25
a4O A M
DIXIE DARLING BROWN & SERVE FLAKEY
R 0115.... 4 *l~ %ll|a AU M|l|
Fig"Bon 39 c wAPRpPAR% RRRi
Bread ... 2 :r s 49 c >
Strudel.... 49 c ||H ||S lb. 1
THRIFTY MAID CAPTAIN Kin MACKEREL
astor all grinds %B Apple Juice 3 Cut Food 10 c
LIBBY VIENNA LILAC ASSORTED
jHH BLUE BAY THRIFTY MAID
.... i .'Hu. Corned Beef ~ 39*
* 1 pmv^pp no.ji/3 iJp thrifty maid gold
- cornX
CANS Quantity RighH Reserved WHOLE KERNEL 1 rJ
WINN-OUW STOtIS, IMC.-COmiOMT-ItTO y I
BBY SWEET THRIFTY MAID CUT GREEN Uh
Relish... 8 s l Beans... 6 S l RL D 1 sip
Sauce.. 5 s l Peas.... 6 s l
Apricots 3- $ 100l 00 Sauce.. 10 s l a w WWW m |M
THRIFTY MAID GREEN LIMA I M ij£ CHEK 28-oz. ASSORTED T B
Boa its A Drinks
Flower Cart Sheer 15 Denier Food Sticks 59 c Skim Milk 3/43 e Dry Milk 99
Fanty Assorted Colors 7V-Oi. BEECHNUT 120*. SWEI CHOCOLATE 3*. Blackburn made
HaCA pais ftftc Apple Betty .. .3/49 c Frosting 39 c Syrup 69
Flowar Cart Sfcr 15 Dam.r Super Stratch 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday i*n w w atu ct
Regular Popular Shad.. lOU n.W. 010 01.
Unco 9 AQc H,WAY 441 H,GH SPR,NGS hoi n. main st.
e e A vs SSHa*"" **v ' '?' .'if -a..,.
Flower Cart Sheer 15 Denier (Size B/j-l 1) [t|W */( ;f 111 bt Ml INA Kl7|T|| IE X.TR/% *. BfITIWEIKTrWA *
Stretch Popular Shades
lAjiaI A jia *1 7DC : ££§£ Tea Bo*. : £;:££ K£S s :r, a, N '' :K&£t usoao*-*-
HACO PAID m oooo thu rn 23 1 Candy > 'Uimmoi ... 5 reonNYOUNO
A A PA H M M BBjCf No. 1 >BS3jB ooooTMeuFCk.ls SSaIV oriliS? o l US'iiil TtlaClaanar HBRMr Turkov
llwl f T 'BfHf No 2 :E£a ho.* 0000 "'* -KTa
iiiwuiBHBMHBBHBEiBHBiiHBBBBEBBMBBBSfiSSSHSSSBBHSSSSSBBSSSiSSSBBBS&SSB&B33fiiSBSSSSSBS *



I^_____ __ ...
W-D BRAND E-Z CARVE RIB
10c Off ANY SOftDtNS HALF MOON IONOHOW
mmmm J A JKr fl| Ternow Pizza Cheese 67 c
FRESH PORK Rl ROAST or SLICED FOR MEAKSTONE WHIPPED
MILO DAISY STYLE
BBP |P IP IHP SURERBRAND COTTAGE
SUNNYIANO HAM & CHEESE, SALAMI or SPICED #l* A U. £f%r
IB I lunrk Mml !£ d0 c vheese .. L cup w
Bi 11 nuckl mH lurch mear 4* c*ftsucidh*tu*l
P PA, JJ2L SSST... a 89* S*- 49
/U; RtADY 1 ns:.. 69
RAAAn i3f IB W Perth Tillets 49' ****.. *l *l
- *l dklfil LB. |p LB. PRICES GOOD WED. NOON THRU
_ i __ i WED NOON FEB II 05
USDA CHOICE LAMB SIRLOIN or USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BBR |RR wvvw t ~ 1 .*~ XJ
Rib Chops $ 1 29 Shoulder Roast 89 c A||Uk| jfV?&k
USDA CHOICE IAMB USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND NEW YORK
Shoulder Chops 79 c Strip Steaks ... $ 1 39
Shoulder Roast 69 Calif. Roast... 79 dfcJP SMOKED sHouLDEr^R^r
USDA CHOICE H
Lamb Patties .. 49 c Chuck Steak... 79 c 1 1 k
Lamb Breast... 29 c Loin Chops .... s l s9
L^l9|^^L49i/
FRENCH FRF
H TBBR
OUV WINN-DIXIE STOKS. INC-COTWWMT -iwe
ft £A ,A t. THRIFTY MAID AU FLAVORS TASTE O'SEA
9 c Fish & Chips 59
S ~3sWf£k~ Pizza Pies 69* Fisk Fillets 79*
B*.. I sliced Beef -M Fisk Cakes 4
B 4B Veal Parmagian ... $ 1 Cream Corn 17*
Wa .jlJmB . Waffles 2 "- 1 00 Brussel Sprouts.. 4 SsM 0
HBByU jmg|B Jflk DIXIANA COUARDS, MUSTARD, or W/ROOTS DIXIE
10 Gink ... 3 *l** Whip Topping .. .. 3t*
U. S. No. 1
16-Oz. HEINZ B-B-G SAUCE W/ONIONS OR HEINZ HS B-B-Q RED RIPE
KTnn 41* Roka Dressing .... 47* Sauce W/Onions 49* Tomatoes o.19 e
9 3 Tjssar'"" 4oc r ~- ....
French Dressing ... 57* Dill Pickles 57 Towels 4y Ul|te# 2 ^ 39 PotataW 4 -59*
, 101 x/jcct UNIVERSITY AVE. OPEN on SUNDAY 130 N.W. 6TH ST. Apples 13 s l* Yogert 4 - $ 1
HIWAY 441 HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N MA,N ST OiwgesS & 79 Mrngmue 39 c
HIWAT 491, niLFn IX- r , 7 -9Qc M c
jlmlTwvSuTSfls 111111 l y T Qv^g; .* s
vxxms*!# Bit 'BXSi*** : Wtt* "=XSZ~ :| m3 mm Grapes 4 99* Jeke 2 -89*
:E >gr |H. 885 ?- I iyxq- 0 SSSTT ~~i-

Thu itchy, February 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

IM SOUTHERN INVITATIONAL

Swimmers Vie For Victory

UFs Gator tankers will get a
good sampling today, tomorrow
and Saturday of what they will
face in the SEC championships
March 5, as they participate in
the Southern Intercollegiate
Invitational at the University of
Georgia in Athens.
Leading the Gators are
All-American Bruce Williams in
the 200-yard-freestyle and
100-yard events, Andy
McPherson in the 100,
All-American Mark McKee in the
breaststroke and 200, Pete
Orcheidt, one of Floridas six
All-American freshmen, in the
1000 and 500-yard events, Gary
Chelosky in the 200 individual
medley and All-American Steve
Hairston in the 50-yard
freestyle.
Williams, McKee and Orchedit
led Florida over arch-rival
Florida State, 70-43, last
Saturday. Williams and Orcheidt
set new Gator records for their
respected events and McKee
swam the breaststroke for the
first time this year against the
Seminoles and won in a time
that qualified him for the NCAA
Your I;
birthdate
indicates
the
appearance
in your
life of
the phrase
Federated
Department
Stores, Inc.
This
presents
anew
career
opportunity
if you
answer the
ad.
Write
Federated Department Stores, Inc.,
Director of -1
Executive Resources,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
The stars say
hard work could
be followed by
signs of success.

GATOR SPORTS

GATOR SWIMMERS READY FOR MEET
... participate in Southern Invitational meet

championships in that event
later on this year.
Coach Bill Harlans strategy of
pointing to the NCAA meet
continues to be successful as all
the Gator swimmers are rapidly

A
book for
all seasons
.>, '
Good things happen as the
seasons change.
Things like a carpet of multi multicolored
colored multicolored leaves. A still cold
night. A flower in bloom.
And the Florida Quarterly.
We'll see you through the
seasons, from the Harvest

approaching top form. Last
years team peaked too early and
were consequently upset in the
SEC Championships.
The SEC meet will also be
held in Athens.

Moon to the first dandilion
and beyond...
As long as you remember.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

Page 18

s INTRAMURALS
v
| Cage Finals Start |
S

iixvxxvxrviw STEVE ROHAN *:
Phi Kappa Tau and AEPi powered their way into tonights Orange
League finals, with convincing victories over Sigma Chi and Lambda
Chi Alpha respectively.
Phi Taus rode the hot hand of Ken Fowle to big first and fourth
period margins in the 44-32 win over the Sigs. The victory prevented
Sigma Chi from overtaking the Betas in the Orange League race.
Fowle hit for 17 points, while teammate Paul Register got seven.
Richard Bennett led the Sigma Chis with 12 points.
Richard Harrow's 18 points led the AEPi's to a decisive 41-18 upset
of the Lambda Chi Alphas. A strong AEPi defense limited the
Lambda Chi's to only five points in the first half.
Luis Lamela contributed 10 points and Larry Rodriquez eight in
racing the AEPi attack.
The wins cast both Phi Tau and AEPi into contention for the
Presidents Cup. Both fraternities are now within 83 points of the
Betas and within striking distance.
The two fraternities will battle for fifth place tonight as only six
points currently separate them. Fifth and sixth place Pikes and ATO
have fallen to seventh and eighth place respectively.
I THBU-BUS I
I NEW ORLEANS I
I ATLANTA I
I SAVANNAH I
'A-/;
H Tamiami Trailways
527 W. University Ave. PHONE 372-6327 H
I Trailways I
easiest travel on earth
From: Gainesville
Only 2% hours Non-Stop
0 SARASOTA
The only Thru service
0 AUGUSTA
mm Thru service via short route H
0 MOBILE
H Thru Express service

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor



Vo Is Should Have Let Gators Score

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
Did Tennessee pass up a big
chance to pull out a win in the
Gator Bowl last Dec. 27?
Ray Hamilton, a reader of the
St. Pete Times, forwarded a
theory dreamed up by George
Turner, sports publicist at
Norwich University.
The Turner theory is that a
team trailing by one point in the
closing minutes of a game should
allow their opponents to score,
thereby getting possession of the
ball on the ensuing kickoff.
For example, Florida led
Tennessee 14-13 with less than
.two minutes left in the game.
Florida had the ball on the
Tennessee 20-yard line
first-and-10 and Tennessee was
about out of timeouts.
Rather than pray for a fumble
or some other equally unlikely
turnover, Tennessee could have
made it look natural but
permitted Florida to bust one.
Florida would then have led
20-13 and could have missed
either a two point or a one point
conversion, which would have
given Tennessee possession of
the ball with time to make one
last drive to win or tie.
Coach Bubba McGowan of
the Florida staff pointed out
that the theory had been tried in
other aspects of the game. For
instance teams owning a seven
point advantage who were in
possession of the ball on their
own one, two or three yard line
very late in the game have in
some instances purposely given
the other team two points
through a safety in order to kick
the ball out from their 20 yard
line instead of from behind the
goal posts.
If Tennessee had allowed
Florida to score, how many
points would the Gators have
gone for on the extra point
conversion?
Simple, said McGowan,
the computer has the answer
already determined. Wed go for
two points to put the game out
of reach.
Former defensive head coach
Gene Ellenson had different
ideas. Wed go for one point,
explained Ellenson. Weve gone
contrary to the computer before
and I think the rational
approach would be to make
them get eight points to tie.
Ellenson pulled out his
personal statistics to back up his
one point decision on the extra
point. If you score one then
the other team has to score two
~~lfy6uUked
VOLKSWAGEN...
YOULL LOVE
DATSUN
Station Wagon $2,268*
GODDING a CLARK
115 S.E. 2ND ST.
378-2311 Til 7PM Mon Sat.
p -O.E. t p| US tax, t ag, oca flight,
D. & H.

IN CLOSING SECONDS OF GATOR BOWL

to tie and the odds are very slim
against that. If the other team
gains possession of the ball on its
own twenty yard line on the
kickoff, it will have only one
chance in 17 of scoring.
Ellensons stats were passed on
the performances of Floridas
opponents this year.
As a defensive strategy to
regain the ball both coaches
agreed that the Gators would
probably never use it.
At Florida there are two
ways of getting the ball, good
defense and defensive time
outs, Ellenson said. And if
there were no more time outs
available, well its so contrary
to what we teach these boys that
I doubt that we could ever use
it.
McGowan pointed out that
once Florida did get the ball
they would have to pass and

§ U| mjL wrmMtMKKtm
jjjjjjj f ' 1 ; 'l' IK I
PSm,. m§f i-% r IPJIt **jl ) o]TiWl TfTuimMaTll 11
1 Pi H[ ! I
.- 4 ., :. A J 81 Sd 8 | | | a 8 La Bigg | a Ik.] y I I I I IT
M MR HBIHf M k
i 1 IJ i

when you pass, three things can
happen and two are bad. Either
the ball will be intercepted,
incomplete, or completed.
Although the Florida coaches
were somewhat reticent about
the theory, a number of eastern
coaches considered the move to
be excellent and a unique
strategy.
Penn States Joe Patemo said
he would use the play and would
drill his offensive team not to
score if he were faced with the
possibility of an opposing coach
pulling it on him.
If you recall, Florida was at
the one yard line when the game
ended against Tennessee. We
werent trying not to score,
exclaimed Ellenson. We were
just playing smart football by
taking our time and staying on
the ground.

u I sm&sak. .jS&sSE
jjf 111 B ujf/f JaN
jgflHp ?1< Jup ? ML ..#'.& jk^jpg
JBSe[L \^ x ;^^ml^bw^ / wb#
V: lir j|p
PHIL BANNISTER
TENNESSEE'S BOBBY SCOTT IN GATOR BOWL
... could Volunteers have beaten the Gators?

Thursday, February 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 19,1970

SPORTS LNE
% v:
| 1
A Day In ...
§ # ; > §
8 ¥
| §
§ V
KLINKENBERG
A Day In The life or You Sport Guys Don't Have Much To Do
When Football Is Over, Do You?
* *
7:45 aon.: Get out of bed and get ready to go to Editing Class.
Start looking forward to later on this afternoon. This is the day I get
to write a column!
8:30: Start trying to come up with an idea for a column. Cant
concentrate. Teacher expects undivided attention in class.
10:30: Get home and decide to do a column on the real reason Ray
Graves quit. Give up the idea and make my bed instead. Also throw
dirty kleenex tissues in garbage pail.
12:30 pm.: Become despondent when reminded by history
professor that 417 page book must be read by Friday. Take rotten
notes during lecture.
2:00: Have pea soup for lunch. Think about doing a column on
What Gator Athletes Have For Lunch but forget upon discovering
that Sociology class started five minutes ago.
2:45: Leave Sociology class early when professor does not show up.
Still no column idea and the day is almost gone!
3:00: An idea. Decide to call up Carlos Alvarez and do column on
the Ray Graves Banquet.
3:15: Try to think up some decent questions so Carlos doesnt
think reporter is a dummy when he only asks one question and hangs
up.
3:30: Call up Carlos Alvarez. Am told by roommate David Peek
that Carlos just left for class. Ask David when hell be back. David
says he doesnt know but he usually runs a while in the afternoon.
You dont have an idea when hell be back? I ask. Maybe 7 oclock,
David says. Believe David and decide to try again about 7.
3:40: Congratulate myself on a job well done while eating spiced
gumdrops. It looks like Ill have a column after all. Ive done it again!
4:00: Take a well-deserved nap and dream of winning Pulitzer.
5:30: Sit down to a plate of spaghetti. Its good. Ill be talking to
Alvarez on a full stomach, at least.
6:55: Only five more minutes and Ill be talking to Alvarez!
7:00: No answer at Carlos place.
7:15: Sit down and start writing this. Make plenty of typographical
errors and curse a lot. Not used to this electric typewriter. Ive blown
it again!
SCs John Roche
Is Not Selfish

COLUMBIA, S.C. (UPI)
John Roche could be racking up
baskets like Pete Maravich if he
wanted to, says University of
South Carolina coach Frank
McGuire.
He can do it any time he
wants to, says McGuire, But if
anybody is selfish you wont
win.
Roche agrees, and South
Carolina fans are as accustomed
to seeing him drive toward the
basket only to pass off to hfc
6-foot-10 best friend from high
school days, Tom Owens, as
they are to seeing Roche pull off
his characteristic falling-away
jump shot which looks awkward
but works.
Roche is hitting a respectable
24 points per game clip, but the
statistics really dont tell the
story of what the ball-handling
wizard does for the nationally
ranked Gamecocks, a team in
contention for the NCAA title.
What really counts is who
has the best shot, says Roche, a
boyish-looking New York
bankers son with a shock of hair
that balls over his forehead.
The Roche and Owens
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combination is one of the top
duos in college basketball.
Roche, who has found himself
double-teamed practically all
year, fires a pass to Owens who
sort of guides it into the basket
without ever catching it.
He always knows the right
spot to be, says Roche,
Whether Im driving for the
basket or blocking for the pick.
McGuire says the two
communicate on the court in a
way people just dont
understand because they have
been playing together seven
years in New York schools and
for the Gamecocks.
Roche grew up on 66th Street
in New Yoik City, playing
basketball in grammar school for
St. Vincent Ferrer and hanging
around the Lenox Hill
Nejgborhood Association Center
on 70th Street shooting baskets.
He tried and won a
scholarship to LaSalle Academy,
which is when coach Danny
Buckley, who played under
McGuire at St Johnson got hold
of him and his almost inevitable
path toward McGuire started.
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91 DENNY MCLAIN CASE
No Charges Can Be Filed

NEW YORK (UPI) A police
chief said Thursday his
department got numerous tips
that Detroit Tiger star pitcher
Denny McLain was a partner in a
1967 bookmaking operation in
Michigan and investigated them
fully.
However, Chief James
Rutherford of Flint, Mich., said
he was unable to file any charges
because the sources of die
information refused to testify in
any criminal proceedings so he
turned the case over to federal
officials.
McLain was in seclusion, but
United Press Internationals
Milton Richman learned the
celebrated 30-game winner told
friends he was duped and
used in the matter. My
biggest crime is stupidity,
McLain said.
His wife, Sharyn, arrived at
the Tampa Airport without her
husband Tuesday night and told
newsmen she was behind
Denny 100 per cent. He hasnt
done anything to hurt baseball.
Rutherford said the

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Ive been duped and used in the matter. My biggest
crime is stupidity.
Denny McLain
Detroit Tiger Pitcher

information he got from outside
sources closely paralleled that in
a copyrighted story in this
weeks issue of Sports
Illustrated.
The magazine said McLain
and a soft drink executive
contributed money to support a
Mafia-sponsored bookmaking
operation that had its
headquarters in a Flint
restaurant where McLain worked
as an organist in the off season.
The story also mentioned Lou
Boudreau, McLains
father-in-law, who was named
recently to Baseballs Hall of
Fame. It said Boudreau asked a
man who won $46,000 on a
horse race to be patient and he
would get his money. McLain
was being pressed to come up
with the money.
Sports Illustrated also said its

sources reported that a foot
injury that kept McLain from
playing from Sept. 18 to Oct. 1
in 1967 was caused by a Mafia
enforcer who stepped on his
toes.
A spokesman for the
magazine said it had not been
contacted by McLain, his
lawyers or any other persons
mentioned in the story.
The restaurant mentioned in
" the story called the story false
and said it would ask for a
retraction.
I believe that Sports
Illustrated has made these
absurd and outrageous
allegations in reckless disregard
of the facts, said attorney Paul
Gadola. We will request the
magazine to publish an
immediate retraction of these
remarks.