Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Snoopy Elected Head Beagle

SNOOPY
... politico captures top spot

'Open UAC Group/
Clark Recommends
By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
A a mg
Aiiignor oiaTT writer
i
Several students attending a University Activities Center
committee meeting Tuesday suggested the committee be open
to anyone wishing to participate in the planning of the
complex.
Suggestions made to the committee ranged from the opening
its membership to anyone and everyone to a revamping of its
membership to include five students, three faculty members and
three representatives of the administration. The committee
currently has one student member.
Proposals covering the formulation of a new committee, the
planning of the UAC and its funding were made by Jim Clark,
chairman of the Committee to Defeat the Proposed UAC; Carl
Shadowski, Tom Ball, chairman of the Mayor's Council; Dr.
J. K. Watson, associate professor of electrical engineering and
Sam Poole, Student Senate majority floor leader.
The proposals mainly dealt with the planning and financial
aspects of the UAC. Clark, for example, proposed the UAC
committee be thrown open to all interested students, student
organizations, faculty and community members. He said a poll
should be conducted to determine student and faculty opinions
related to needed facilities, area or department of emphasis and
the willingness of the general public to support the center by its
attendance.
He suggested the results of the poll be used by the open
committee to formulate a program which would then be sent to
the American Institute of Architects for competitive bidding.
A subcommittee would be formed to seek methods of
financing, including the state. Alumni would be asked for
contributions immediately.
His final proposal was that Flavets be cleared by the
Environmental Action Group as a safe site for the center for the
surrounding ecology.
Most of the discussion during the meeting concerned the
make-up of the UAC Committee itself. Pooles proposal sets up
the committee to indude four full-time UF students, three to be
appointed by UF Student Body President Charles Shepherd and
confirmed by the senate, and the fourth to be from the senate.
Shepherd would also be induded in die committee ;i
Both Ball and Clark objected to this proposal, saying it would
both restrict the committee in scope of ideas presented and
rrmlfp it possible for Shepherd to control the committee.
Clark insisted the committee be thrown open to any student
who wished to take part and that every organization on campus
connected with the UAC be invited to attend.
Pooles suggestion for the design of the UAC was that a
preliminary design should be drawn up by architects working
with the committee. International competition would then be
held to solidt a final design.
A commitment by die student body to pay for part of the
center would only be considered as a last resort. Should this be
the case, Poole said, the designs and a model of the proposed
would be presented to the students and a referendum
held.
Shadowskis proposals were concerned mainly with reducing
the cost of the activities center as now proposed. For example,
he felt a sliding roof on the natatorium was unnecessary and a
simpler transparent roof would be cheaper.
He also suggested that members of the faculties of the
colleges of architecture and engineering be used to design the
center. Walter Matheriy, director of university physical planning
and a member of the present committee, said this would cause a
conflict of interest for the UF and would not be possible.
Dr. E. T. York, chairman of the committee, stressed the need
for proceeding with the UAC to see if the city and county are
interested in proceeding. He said both city and county were
interested in building a performing arts center and would
possibly go ahead on their own unless the activity center got
moving. This would deny needed funds to the center, he said.

By PEPPERMINT PATTY
AMfslor SpacW Corwpondint
In a surprise political maneuver Monday, Snoopy,
a dark dog candidate, moved up to the exalted
position of Head Beagle.
This is the greatest honor, Snoopy said, since
I won my Air Medal for my exploits against die Red
Baron.
Although a famed combat air ace, there was some
doubt as to whether the beagle would be eligible for
toe highest and most powerful position a beagle can
attain.
The reason for this seemed to be rooted in
Snoopy's reluctance to chase rabbits.
I am a humanitarian, Snoopy replied.
Not everyone seemed happy with this turn of

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 89

'BETTER EQUIPPED
Administration Endorses
Lowering Voting Age

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Nixon administration Tuesday
warmly endorsed a proposal to
let Americans start voting in
national elections at age 18 and
termed today's youth better
equipped for it than ever
before.
But Deputy Attorney General
Richard G. Klemdienst, speaking
on behalf of President Nixon,
said the voting age should be
lowered only for the election of
Presidents and members of
Congress, leaving states with the
discretion in local contests.
Kleindienst testified before a
Senate Judiciary subcommittee
considering proposed
constitutional amendments to
lower the voting age to 18.
He told the panel the
President after careful study
and consideration concluded
the change was desirable.
However, he added, in
recognition of the proper role in
which the states are called upon

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SMC CALLS SPRING ACTION

Student Mobilization Committst's national
conference in Cleveland lest weekend celled for
maeiive demonstrations agrinet the Vietnam War on
April 16. Along with 4.000 other delegates.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

to play in our federal system,
and in order to make possible
prompt ratification of toe
proposal, the President feels that
an amendment permitting
18-yearoMs to vote in national
elections only is the best
solution of alternative cxtiwnr
positions those which would
leave the matter to each state on
the one hand, and one which
would provide the rfcht to vote
in state as well as national
elections on file other.
Kleindienst said the
experience of the four states
which allow voting by those
under 21 indicates this would be
beneficial for the nation as a
whole.
The voting age is 18 in
Kentucky and Georgia, 19 in
Alaska and 20 in Hawaii.
He described the 10 million
Americans aged 18 to 21 as
better equipped today to be
entrusted with all of the

events. Lucy, a self-proclaimed fussbudget, said:
That stupid dog can't be the Head Beagle! Hell
bring ruination upon the country! HeU destroy us
all! Hes inept! Hes incompetent!
Snoopy declined to comment on this except to
say he felt it was politically motivated backbiting.
How can I prepare my acceptance speech, he
said, with all that shouting going on?
Snoopy said his administration will see
widespread reforms to achieve greater relevancy to
his constituency.
We will demand an immediate end to war, he
said, and self-determination for oppressed
minorities including beagles.
I seek an end to corruption, poverty and the
exploitation of canines on television dog food
commercials, the political genius concluded.

ANigalor staffer John Sugg attended the convention
and covered it for the looei madia. For a fuH atory.
saa page 2
w _w_

Wednesday, February 18, 1970

responsibilities and privileges of
citizenship...
Our young people are
involved in the political process
as no other generation has ever
been. We need look no further
than the Peace Corps, Vista or
the most recent national
political campaigns to know this
is true,** he said.
mrnrnmmmmmmimmm
NINE LEGISLATORS are
on campus today to listen
to students* complaints and
opinions page 2
Claniftods 10
Editorials... 6
Entertainment 12
Letters 7
Movies 10
Small Society 4
Sports 14
Whats Happening 4



!, The Florida AMgator, Wadnasday, February 18,1970

Page 2

SMC Calls Antiwar Action April 15

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator outt writer
CLEVELAND The largest
convention of American radicals
in recent history, the national
Student Mobilization Committee
(SMC) conference in Cleveland
last weekend, voted
overwhelmingly to call for
massive antiwar actions cm April
15.
Officially attended by 2,394
antiwar activists, Cleveland daily
papers estimated the gymnasium
at Case Western Reserve
University was filled with more
than 4,000 persons.
Os those who attended, it was
reported that well over half had
no affiliation with other political
groups.
Among groups represented at
the conference were Young
Socialist Alliance (YSA),
Socialist Workers Party (SWP),
Revolutionary Youth Movement
(RYM), International Socialists
(IS), Vietnam Moratorium
Committee (VMC), New
Mobilization Committee (NMC)
and various antiwar coalitions
from throughout the nation,
from Alaska to Gainesville.
The* major resolution, passed
after extensive heated debate,
was submitted by SMC National
Executive Secretary Carol
Lipman.
The resolution stated:
It is necessary to focus on a
day of mass antiwar action
which can involve the largest
number of people nationally in
the most visible way.
It has been proven that only
around such a focus can the
maximum unity of antiwar
forces be achieved and layers of
the population which have not
been previously involved be
moved into action.
. Calling for the week of April
13 to 18 to be the focus, April
15 will be the day mass actions
are slated to take place.
Early on that day, the

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.. sml s national executive secrotary presents majovTcy proposal
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The-
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of ail advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction mu>t be given before the next
insertion.

AT CLEVELAND CONFERENCE

resolution states, the campuses
should be turned into engines of
antiwar activity.
The character of the
demonstrations, should be like
that of Nov. 15, 1969, except
that they should occur in many
cities: they should be a massive,
united show of strength behind
the demand for immediate
withdrawal of all United States
forces from Vietnam.
The resolution called for the
antiwar movement to relate to
and win over various
constituencies such as
servicemen, labor, Third World
people and women.
There were about 15
proposals on the major goals and
emphasis of SMC of which only
two, including the one passed,
had any sizeable support.
The counter-proposal that did
receive support was made by a
coalition of RYM, IS, Yippies
and other groups, the majority
of which were organized into an
independent radical caucus.
Each of these groups
originally presented separate
resolutions.
What this coalition finally
presented was a vague amalgram
and there were many questions
from the floor as to exactly
what was proposed.
The main bond of unity of
these groups seemed to be
opposition to the current SMC
leadership and to YSA which
supported the majority
resolution. There was no
common political platform.
Conference Parliamentarian
Clark Kissinger, a radical writer
associated with RYM,
condemned the unprincipled
opposition** of his own
colleagues. He condemned the
attacks on YSA and reaffirmed
the non-exdusionary nature of
SMC.
However, he also opposed the
SMC majority resolution, saying:
We are opposed to the slogan
(Bring All the Gl*s Home

Now)... What we want is a
slogan that identifies with the
principle enemy in the world
today, UJS. imperialism.
Miss Lipman countered this
position, saying that the demand
of SMC was total, immediate
and unconditional withdrawal of
all United States forces as well
as self-determination for
Vietnamese and other Third
World people.
She said, however, that any
and all related slogans and the
political positions they represent
are welcome in SMC.
The SMC majority position
defeated the independent
resolution by a margin of about
six to one.
Early events in the program
included greetings from groups
throughout tiie world, including
the National Liberation Front,
as well as speeches by Dick
Gregory, Cleveland lawyer and
antiwar activist Jerry Gordon
and prominent New
Mobilization Committee
member Sid Peck.
Gregory, who said coming to
the conference was the' most
important thing he had ever
done, stated:
You represent millions upon
millions of people, even people
who are afraid to admit they
know of your existence.
Gregory said, I hear too
many people worried about
Nixon. Nixon is the slimiest,
most degenerate bastard in the
world.*
Os the antiwar activists
present, Gregory said:
You kids, with the moral
force and ethical diameter you
have, need not worry about
Nixon.
The faith and destiny of the
world depend on you. You have
the strength and power to end
war.
Gregory was met with
standing ovations throughout his
speech.
Gordon, who is chairman of
the Geveland Area Peace Action
Committee, said Nixon would
not sleep well that night.
Come April, he said, we
are going back into the streets.
No one who understands the
nature of war and of this war, no
one who understands the crimes
of the UJS. government, no one
could say ending the war in the
way we demand is
unreasonable.
Peck, who described himself
as a non-indicted member of
the Conspiracy (Chicago antiwar
activists on trial) said:
We represent a majority
movement. We could not have
hoped to bring out the
thousands we did in the fall if
we did not have the confidence
that we represent the majority
of the American people.

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The conference concluded
with reports and discussions on
workshops on such subjects as
campus complicity with the war
machine, civil disobedience,
labor, womens liberation and
black and Third World people
against the war.
The final event of the
conference was a demonstration
in support of Ahmed Evans, a

SMC VOTES
... resolution calls for regional actions
Politicos Hear
Students Today
...Republicans
Students may air their gripes today to nine members of the
Florida Legislature, starting at 10 a. m. in the Plaza of the
Americas.
Rep. Bill James, R-Delray Beach, and Rep. Earl Dixon,
R-Jacksonville, will remain at the Plaza ail day. They plan no
speeches, but will simply listen to students.
The other seven legislators will disperse to various points
around campus, where they will remain all day and listen to
students opinions and complaints.
James and Dixon are chairmen of the nine-man Minority Task
Force organization by G.OJP. legislators last term to study
problems of students in Floridas state university system.
...Democrats
Florida Atty. General Earl Faircloth, an announced candidate
for governor, and Sen. Robert Haverfield, D-Dade County, an
announced candidate for the United States Senate, will hold
receptions before and after the Ray Graves banquet today.
At the receptions, to be held at 6 and 9 pm., Reitz Union
room 121, Faircloth and Haverfield hope to problems
and politics with UF students, all of whom are invited.

black nationalist facing capital
punishment for an alleged
shoot-out with Cleveland police.
Local SMC Steering
Committee Member Brook Rood
said a full conference report will
be given at an SMC meeting
Sunday, Reitz Union room 349,
8 pm. Plans for the Spring
Offensive will be started at that
time, she said.



AFT Releases
'Oath Statement
The Gainesville local American Federation of Teachers (AFT)
has released a statement saying a loyalty oath has no place in a
university and charging UF President Stephen C. OConnell with
failing to provide leadership during the controversy.
The ten-page position paper said a university is characterized
by its dedication to free debate upon any and every issue
which may command attention. No one should be exculded
form the debate because of physical characteristics, his place
of origin or his political beliefs, it said.
Students and faculty suspend themselves from social,
political and economic institutions during the debate to attain
objectivity. Asking them to swear to loyalty is to negate the
very essence of the ideal of the university, the AFT paper said.
The organization said that while it was not expected that
OConnell become a martyr by publicity flounting the law, he
should have shown more leadership on behalf of the four
persons fired for refusing to sign the oath.
OConnell should have tried to delay enforcement of the issue
until the courts had derided what should be done. The
statement said OConnell knew a year before that some faculty
members had not signed the oath.
O'Connell was also accused of not understanding how the
faculty feels on the issue or the damage such an issue can do to
a university. Instead of realizing his obligation to defend his
faculty and university agains such outside pressures, he assumed
the characteristic role of an agent of their pressures, simply
handing down orders received form above to his hired hands,
the AFT said.
Some of die harm could be rectified if OConnell and other
members of the administration would join the plaintiffs in the
suite against loyalty oaths. The UFs real problem is to fight
the unconstitutional requirement, not to fight its own
employes.
O'Connell could not be reached for a statement.

Blood Drive Goal Set

The annual IFC blood drive,
which began Monday, has as its
goal the collection of at least
652 pints of blood.
The IFC coflected 652 pints
last year and hopes to equal or
exceed that amount this year in
the drive which ends March 5.
UF students or faculty may
donate blood either at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center Blood
Bank or at mobile units. A
mobile unit will be set up
Thursday at one of the
fraternity houses on Fraternity
Row and Feb. 26 at one of the
off-campus fraternities.
Donors must persent their
picture ID. and blue fee card

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APTS 378-5905
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1 7fj.00 FURAS 1 BR
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HOTPOINT APPLIANCE

your
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mail- order
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and must donate their blood in
the name of a particular
fraternity. One pint is the
maximum anyone may donate.
Trophies will be awarded to
the largest number of pints
donated by an Orange and Blue
league fraternity. Another
trophy will go to the fraternity
with the largest percentage of
members contributing, and still
another will go to the house
showing the largest increase over
last year.
Also, the first 400 men
donating at mobile units will
receive floor seating tickets to
IFCs Winter Frolics.

An expression of the human
soul and its emotions.
The Royal Winnipeg Ballet
Sun., February 22, at 4 p.m. in Florida Gym.
Tickets: S 3. $2. $1.50- sold at Union Box Off ice
a S. G. Prod.

OPPOSE CARSWELL NOMINATION

BSU Calls Rally Monday

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Wrtor
The controversy over the
possible Senate confirmation of
Judge G. Harrold Carswell to the
Supreme Court will hit the UF
campus Monday when campus
activists assemble at the Plaza of
the Americas for a rally.
Sponsors for the noon rally
include Black Student Union
(BSU), the Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC), the
Revolutionary Youth Movement
(RYM) and the Young Socialist
Alliance (YSA).
BSU members said the rally
was originally planned for
Wednesday, but a last-minute
announcement by students at
Bethune Cookman College
concerning a black power
conference this week forced the
organization to change plans.
The decision to hold a rally
was reportedly sparked by the
Senate Judiciary Committees
approval of Carswells
nomination to the hjgh court.
The Senate debate on the issue
begins March 2.
BSU Minister of Information
Steve Baker and BSU Chairman
join the fun!
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All over America people are taking to the
sky.. young and 01d... some Just for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
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CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road


Mitchell Dasher 11, said they
have interpreted Carswells court
decisions and past actibns in his
personal life to be racist.
In a letter to members of the
Senate, Dasher and Baker ask
that before voting members
kindly recall his (Carswell's)
earlier racist statements, sift
through his court decisions
where blacks sought through the
courts redress of historical
wrongs and investigate the
restrictive convenant in the deed
which prevented blacks... from
purchasing land which he
owned.
The letter also states that a
superficial interpretation of the
mans past will reflect that he is
an opportunist, but more
substantively, we feel he is a
racist.
Confirmation of Carswell to
the Supreme Court, in the
opinion of Dasher and Baker,
could have a cancerous ... rac racist
ist racist effect on the judicial body.
If any segment of America's
society should be free from the
cancerous, debilitating effect of
racism, it should be the high
court.
In conclusion, they ask

Free International Film Fest
at 7:00 p.m. The Battle
of Algiers a French, Italian
| film. 9:30 p.m. King of the
Swordsmen a classic Chinese
film in the Union Auditorium.
SPONSORED BY JWRU

Wadnaaday, Fabraary 18,1970, Tha Florida AWprtor,

senators to please answer for us
the poignant question
America, where are you now?
IFC Tickets
Sold Today
Tickets for the 1970 Winter
Frolics go on sale today at the
Reitz Union box office, the
Record Bar and Recordsvifle.
Tickets are $5.50 per couple
for the March 6 show which
features Johnny Rivers,
Sweetwater and the Celebration.
Shows are scheduled for 7:30
and 10:30 p. m. in Florida Gym.
ST maTsnis 1
H Book and Supply H
1712 w II
9 TEXTBOOKS B
1 SCHOOL SUPPLIES
H ART SUPPLIES 9
I ENGINEERING 9
l|lvj :usTOME PARKING

Page 3



i. The Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, February 18,1870

Page 4

PENgTKAtE CAIR6
Israeli Planes Hit
By United Prate International
Israeli warplanes penetrated to within 19 miles of Cairo Tuesday to
bomb Soviet-equipped Egyptian missile bases in their deepest strike
into Egypts heartland in almost a week. Other Israeli pilots attacked
Egyptian military targets along the Suez Canal.
Egypt said three soldiers were killed and seven wounded in the
Israeli air attacks against two military positions on the fringes of Cairo
but made no mention of damages.
A Cairo military spokesman said Egyptian planes retaliated by
bombing fortified Israeli positions and tanks in the occupied northern
sector of the Sinai.
The air strikes came as:
U. N. Secretary General Thant warned in New York that only
some very strong measures could avert the catastrophe of another
full-scale Arab-Israeli war.
Israeli Premier Golda Meir in Jerusalem appealed to the Arab
people and their rulers to stop the fighting and negotiate a peace
settlement with Israel as equals.
t The Soviet press reiterated Moscows pledge of all necessary
support for the Arab states in their struggle against the Israeli
aggressors and their imperialist patrons ...
A military spokesman in Tel Aviv said the targets in Tuesdays air
raids inside Egypt were surface-to-air missile (SAM) sites supplied by
Russia to protect the Soviet-built and financed heavy industrial
complex at Helwan, 13 miles south of Cairo.
He said all Israeli planes returned safely from the strikes against the
SAM base six miles southeast of Helwan and another at Dahshur,
about eight miles to the southwest. Egypt said the attacks were
carried out by two Israeli planes but made no mention of ground or
air opposition.
The raids were the deepest into Egypt since last Thursday when an
Israeli jet bombed a civilian factory at Abu Zaabal, 13 miles north of
Cairo. Egypts semi-official Middle East News Agency (MENA)
Tuesday upped the death toll from the 70 announced last week to 80.
Scores of other Egyptian workers were injured.
ARE YOU A CAVE-MAN?: If so, the Florida Speleological
Society may be just your niche. Find out. The society meets every
Wednesday at 7 pm. in room 361 Reitz Union.
FOREIGN FILM FIENDS AWAKE!: The Council of International
Organizations (CIO) is sponsoring a foreign film festival which will
continue through today in the Reitz Union auditorium. The Battle
of Algiers, a French and Arab film, will be shown at 7 pm., followed
by King of the Swordsmen, a classic Chinese film. Admission is
free
A NOTICE TO ALL POTENTIAL POLITICOS: All students are
invited to attend two receptions Wednesday sponsored by the Young
Democrats in room 125 and 125 of the Reitz Union. A reception for
gubernatorial candidate-Florida Atty. General Earl Faircloth will be
given at 6 pm., and another for Robert Haverfield of Miami, a
candidate for the U. S. Senate, will follow at 9 pm. Bring your
questions; the candidates will bring the answers, or try to.
A VETERAN IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH:
Think so? The Florida Veterans Club is having its monthly meeting
Friday at 7 pm. in the Rathskeller. Upcoming speakers and the blood
drive will be discussed.
GATOR SAILS IN THE SUNSET: The Gator Sailing Club meets
Thursday night at 7:30 pm. in room 355 of the Union.
ETfish '"i
L FRY A
I*'
2035 N.W. 13th St. / Gainesville, Florida / 378-2304

the small society

- THAT'S MAT
*
Wwfci njkm* Star Sm*cM. !<**
Javits Urges Senate Rejection
Os Southern-Backed Amendment

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Sen. Jacob K. Javits, R-N.Y.,
urged the Senate Tuesday to
reject a Southern-sponsored
amendment to extend
desegregation guidelines to all
parts of the country. He said
it would hinder integration
rather than speed it.
Javits, long a Senate civil
rights leader, suggested that

Display Over
Journalism instructor John D.
Lindstroms photographic
masters thesis is no longer on
display in the Reitz Union.
| Study in l
> Guadalajara, Mexico J
t The Guadalajara Summer School, as
ftully accredited University of Arizona I
Iprogram, will offer, June 29 to Augusts
18, art, folklore, geography, history, po-w
[litical science, language and literatures
jtourses. Tuition, $160; board and room, j
tslss. Write Dr. Juan B. Rael, Office ofv
[Summer Session, University of Arizona, A
Fucson, Arizona 85721. J

OBristol-Myers Co., 1970.
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A message to stimulate thinking
j^y^paC^ you think when y u re tired

the Senate approve a
substitute amendment calling
for a year-long study of the
school desegregation issue.
The Southern amendment,
introduced by Sen. John C.
Stennis, D-Miss., would
require that school
desegregation guidelines
imposed on Southern schools
be enforced equally in all
sections of the country.

Good Food of
Reasonable Prices^.
Breakfast Anytime!
OPEN 24 HOURS
Carry Out Closed:
Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133

by Brickman

In a Senate speech, Javits
said:
There is indeed separation
of the races in too many of
the schools of the North, but
its cause, quality and remedy
differ markedly from the
segregation in a state like
Mississippi; and even to this
day the extent of segregation
is much more widespread.



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VALENTINES FESTIVAL AT TWILIGHT

One thousand UF students celebrated St Valentine's Day by
participating in a love-in, rock festival held in the Plaza of the
America! Saturday.
The activity, which ran from noon until 8 pjn., featured the sounds
of "The Two Shades of Soul," "Dead or Alive," "Emergency Exit"
and 'The Celebration." Forty-five participant! remained to sleep
overnight in the Plaza on blankets and sleeping bags.

Foreign Film
Shown Tonight
The award-winning
Arab-French movie, The Battle
of Algiers, will be shown
tonight at 7 in the Reitz Union
Auditorium part of this year's
International Week.
Also shown will be The
Mouse That Roared (British)
and King Swordsmen"
(Chinese);
The exhibition of
international art objects begins
today on the second floor of the
Union and today is the last day
the Union Cafeteria will be
serving Chinese and Persian
meals.
-
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

I
. I !H Bia iilil
plus
Hard, Heavy & Blue Nate and John I
at the Rathskeller
Feb. 19, 20, 21 at 9:00 & 11KX) pm I
TICKETS 2.25 non-member 1.75 member I
Slightly higher at door I
Tickets on Sal# at RAT, REITZ UNION A RECORD BAR 1
TONIGHT: ALL YOU CAN EAT! SPAGHETTI $1.15! I

Andy Kramer, 4AS, an organizer of the love-in, said, "we came
together for peace within ourselves and to make the world better for
everybody."
Another "coming together" is tentatively planned for Saturday, in
the Plaza. All participants are asked to bring old clothing and food
which will be donated to Neighborhood House, Inc., a non-profit
organization that works in ghetto areas.

MM*. fttMy . 1970, Th Ftartd* AMptor,

SUBSIDIZED STUDY
IN DUON. FRANCE
SEMESTER SB9O- YEAR $1,590
(TUITION, FEES, ROOM 6- BOARD)
ALSO SUMMER 70 OK 71
REGIS CENTERS
of I NTT_ STUDY, Inc
R. D. 5, BLOOMSBURG, PA 17815
Putaprsit^^rSulrrs
Adjacent Kbit's Food Host
t X-TRA quick watch repair /y
t Diamond Setting - Jqr
0 Ring sizing
e Jewelry repairs 'T{
0 Charms soldered ijaV
0 Trophies-plaques Z^\
i Florida crest jewelry *% r
0 Lavaliers
Claw rings
Engraving
CAMP COUNSELOR
Boy's camp, Lenox, Mass.
(42nd yrj has op swing far coming
summer. Campue imMvhws.
Unusual staff from aR parts of
U. S. and Europe. Opaninp fat
openings in archery, rlflary,
tennis, fine arts, caremlaa,
ybook. Wrlta fully to aamp
Mah-Kae-Nac, 137 Thaahar Lana,
South Oeanga, NJ. 07070

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, Fabruary 18,1970

The
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Peter Principle Rules Us

By RUSSEL KAY
Among a variety of items I received from a
generous Santa Claus last Christmas was a book
entitled The Peter Principle** written by Dr.
Laurence J. Peter and Raymond Gull. I found it to
be a devastating satire that completely spotlights the
Age of Incompetence in which we live.
I have never read a better explanation of Why
Things Always Go Wrong.**
We are constantly hearing of costly bridges that
collapse and fall in the drink, flood control projects
that fail, welfare plans that cost millions and
accomplish little or nothing. We are confident that
somebody, somewhere along the line, goofed. But
we dont know how or why.
If you seek an intelligent answer to why our
schools do not bestow wisdom, governments cannot
maintain order, courts do not dispense justice and
utopian plans never generate utopias, you wfl! find
the answer in The Peter Principle.**
Peter tells us that we are all governed by the Peter
Principle. We are all travelling toward the Peter
Plateau of Incompetence. Most of us are competent
in one respect or another. We are competent
carpenters, plumbers, draftsmen, and the like.
Because we are, the hierarchy demands we leave our
competent plateau and through the principle of
promotion be advanced to another plateau. We
become supervisors, superintendents, and if our

WASHINGTON The Vice Presidents speech
last Thursday in which he attacked college and
university admissions policies as a special kind of
madness won a flood of favorable telegrams. The
news is even worse than the speech.
University officials and faculty may wonder with
Yeats What rough beast, its hour come round at
last, slouches toward Bethlehem to be bom?
At Yale and Harvard, at Dartmouth and
Princeton to name a few of the countrys ancient
seats of learning it is easier for a black student to
enter the freshman class than for a white of equal
scholastic achievement.
These colleges and others are trying desperately
to reach a quota that is, to achieve a student body
roughly representative of the number of blacks in
the nation approximately 11 per cent. It is not
easy to reach this quota.
Chances must be taken; remedial work must be
arranged. Volunteers must be found among students
and faculty to bridge the gap which admissions
officers find between black students intelligence
and their preparation a gap opened up by two
centuries of slavery, segregation and second-class
ghetto education.
But the nations private and public institutions
have -by and large bravely attempted to meet
the challenge. Their sense of duty is bom of
that as blacks demanded equal
opportunity it was somebodys job to provide the
education to prepare them for it.
y/ *l-!* v7 y v

Admission Standards: Agnews Attack

mHHlrr I feAAfeftU kloAii m m

competency still shows, we are advanced again and
again until we finally reach our plateau of complete
incompetence.
He points out that a man may be qualified as an
experienced mechanic but because of his lack of
knowledge and experience, temperament and social
background, totally unfit to successfully become a
foreman or superintendent. As a fellow worker on
the same plane we are liked and respected but when
we are advanced, we find we are not capable of
dealing with fellow workers as a superior.
As we are advanced we are confronted with
problems of management and finance with which
we are totally unfamiliar and unable to cope. Thus a
good and capable mechanic becomes a floundering,
incompetent foreman.
In the military, we insist on advancing men
periodically to sergeant, lieutenant, captain, colonel
or general on the basis of time of service. It is a rule
that must be followed and so we read of gigantic
boo-boos.
The Peter Principle explains why we are where we
are today with traffic congestion, planes stacked up
at airports, polluted air and water and so on. In
business and industry, government, the military and
everywhere else we are developing incompetence
that is rapidly driving us to the end of our rope. We
are too smart for our britches and just beginning to
find it out.
Florida News Service

To build a society in which black people hold a
proportion of die top jobs because they can do
these jobs as well as whites is their aim, in the
name of justice but also in the name of social
stability.
Frank Mankinwicz-
Tom Bradan
The question that must be asked now is whether
the goal they set is wrong. The Vice President of the
United States has attacked it in language which goes
straight to the jugular.
Would you like to be operated on, the Vice
President has asked the nation, by a man who was
admitted to medical school as part of a quota?
Despite some evidence to the contrary, Spiro
Agnew is not a fool. He knows there is not a
ft \ M, V I j *t 'I I
v \ \ *i A *V I *.

EDfTORIAL
Accent In Perspective
Accent *7O has come and gone.
We believe Accent 7O was a pertinent respite from the
political themes that usually involve Accent weeks.
Environment the theme of Accent 7O was particularly
appropriate for 1970, a year in which our polluted
environment is of utmost concern.
Accent offered something for everyone. Dr. Rene Dubos,
famed microbiologist, Stewart Udall, former secretary of
the interior and Walter Mazan, assistant secretary of
transportation for public affairs, presented an evening of
thought-provoking speeches Thursday.
Henry Gibson got his concern about environment across
in his own unique style of humor; Alvin Toffler expressed
concern about changes coming up in the future, and David
Brinkley, undoubtedly the highlight of the week, told of
governments inequities and inefficiency in his witty, urbane
manner.
Accent offered us a chance to become involved in the
issues confronting our society. Whether it was Dr. Harvey
Cox discussing the city of the future or Anthony Mazzochi
lamenting pollutions effects upon industrial workers,
Accent offered us the issues.
Accent gave us no answers, true. But it gave us a new
perspective to the issues it brought the issues to us.
It put Tomorrow in Perspective.
We think congratulations are in order for those who made
Accent possible. We are grateful to those students whose
tireless efforts gave us Accent. In particular, we think Joe
Hilliard, Vicki Fagan and Bob Martin deserve our thanks for
a job well done.
JIl V/ 1
/ bet that's how they plan to get us out of Vietnam. They're
going to send us all to Thailand.

medical school in the country which would graduate
a black doctor who could not fulfill its
requirements, and no one proposes that they do so.
For that matter, there is not a liberal arts college
or university which would graduate a black student
who could not meet its standards. But the
distinction between an admission standard and a
graduation standard is one which Agnew and his
White House speech writers chose to ignore. The
result is political hay at a very high cost.
For some time, Agnew has been snuffling along
the American trail, seeking the beast that is in us all.
It would appear that he has found him and
identified his diet.
The question is, what kind of America does the
Vice President want? There are short-term votes
among white parents who fear their children will be
forced to shop among second-choice colleges and
professional schools. There are even more votes
among construction workers who see their jobs
threatened by black apprentices.
Agnew appealed to these prejudices, President
Nixons Philadelphia Plan or no. If the Vice
President means what he says, we will soon be two
Americas, both armed.
President Nixon, who was elected he says to
bring us together, owes an apology to the
educators and college officials who have been trying
to save his country. Failing that, he could at least
tell his Vice President to stop making racist speeches
on Lincoln's Birthday.
****



Whites Move To Private Schools

MR. EDITOR:
Since no one else at this school has
recently written concerning school
desegregation, I thought Id be the first.
I really am being awfully impatient,
hasty, and uppity in doing so, since its
been only 16 years since the Brown vs.
Topeka Board of Education ruling.
Nevertheless, I shall state my opinions,
at the risk of getting four years for
contempt.
Carolyn Jay Wright, in the Feb. 15
Miami Herald, wrote of a new private
school," i.e., the new wing of Grace
Baptist Church (Yes, folks, in LIBERAL
MIAMI!): It is one of scores of private
schools which are cropping up around
the state as federal demands for
immediate desegregation of the public
school system become more and more
insistent. For example:
i In Dade County enrollment is up
2,379 in the 103 non-public schools
listed with the Dade County School
Board.
In Broward and Palm Beach
Counties, as in Dade, many private
schools are expanding or planning
expansion. A Baptist preacher in
Broward says his church school will
double enrollment next year because of
parents objections to busing.
In Gadsden County, in the
panhandle area, black students
outnumber white ones by a ratio of 7 to
3, and an abandoned 1927 school
building has been renovated to
accommodate the demand for a private
school for white students.
In Indian River County a group

SR ,? w L-w* -fc'jfv;hl 'J9k r 'b/&i S j&S'&it l^^p> K?f T
"j f m for a fully integrated school system and this is the only
way to get there

Students Not Misled On UAC

MR. EDITOR:
The result of the referendum leaves no doubt that
the proposed plan for the UAC was unacceptable to
the majority of the students, who, by voting in large
numbers, demonstrated their concern. It is,
therefore, amaziiig that OConnell *hdd try to
attribute the outcome to confusion and l**of
understanding (Alligator, Feb. 5). Also, the editorial
in the same issue suggested that the student body
was deceived by the organized opponents of the
Pl Thi, insulting sttitude reflects contempt forth*
student body. We are not a flott ofeaafly
confuted sheep, but concerned and thmtay
individuals capable of weighing **
recognizing issues and problems, and making mature
Tigert Hall and campus politicos ever
realize this?

from the Church of God has opened a
school of 25 students in a small, rented
home.
In Manatee County parents are
transporting their children eight miles
across the Manatee River to an all-white
school in Oneco.
William Mansfield, also in the Miami
Herald of Feb. 15, pointed out that one
can charter a school in Florida by
paying $37.50 and waiting about three
hours for papers to be processed. Why
the sudden emergence of private
schools throughout the South? The
answer is simple: Racism.
My child, says a young Florida
suburban housewife, is simply not
going to school with all those Negroes.
If that sounds bigoted, I cant help it,
thats the way I feel.
Georgias Herman Talmadge once
said: As long as I am governor, Negroes
will not be admitted to white schools!
The line is drawn! The threats that have
been held over the South for four years
are now pointed like a dagger ready to
be plunged into the very heart of
southern tradition!
In 1966, Georgia House Speaker Sol
Blatt (a Jewish Fascist, like Julius
Hoffman), opposing a bill to require all
children between the ages of 7 and 16
to attend school, shrieked at his
colleagues: Do you want some
16-year-old nigger holding the hand of
your granddaughter in the classroom?
Frantz Fanon writes in Black Skin,
White Masks: The Negro is the
incarnation of a genital potency beyond
all moralities and prohibitions. Sen.

What remains is the question what should be
done now about UAC. It would net be very
democratic if, as suggested by OConnell and the
editorial mentioned above, the proponents and
planners of the defeated project sat back to watch
their opponents create a mote reasonable, perhaps a
mote modest, project.
The Alligators attempt to place the burden of
proof on the shoulders of the opponents (as
though they were guilty of a crime!) does not help
the cause either.
The decision of last Wednesday was that of the
student body, not of a group of organized
opponents. The situation clearly calls for a
compromise in which the opinion of the students, as
expressed in the referendum, should be given proper
consideration.
PETER U ROOS, 7AS

MR. EDITOR:
RE: Black Student Unions statement of position,
Monday, January 26,1970:
The poor Black Student Union! This a racist,
bigoted campus because we don't condone students
threatening other students with lethal weapons.
And of course the Alachua County Sheriffs
Department consists of racist pigs because they had
the nerve to arrest three blacks. After all, the only
thing these blacks were charged with doing was
allegedly point a presumably loaded pistol at fellow
students!
I imagine the Black Student Union would be
screaming like he if three whites were charged with
so threatening black students in university housing.
You blacks want human rights; you want your
(dace in American society as American citizens.

Dont Condemn Me, Parker

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is addressed to
John Parker the person; not
John Parker the independent.
I sincerely believe that
everyone deals with life in the
best manner he possibly can.
Dont condemn me because
Im a member of a greekletter

Richard Russell of Georgia (where
else?), recently praised by Mr. Nixon,
said in 1964 that the 64 Civil Rights
Bill would admit the Negro into every
bedroom in America.
Florida Governor Claude Jerk (sic)
has assured his re-election by jumping
on the racist bandwagon, with Rep.
Cramer and others chiming in. In
Georgia (damn, I must have Georgia on
my mind) Gov. Lester Maddox
announced he will suspend Georgia's
compulsory school attendance laws in
Bibb County effective Feb. 16 and will
likely take similar action for other areas
of die state. Where is the law and
order crowd nowadays? Why are
Leonard Weinglass and Dave Dellinger
going to jail, but not the governors of
Florida and Georgia?
The IJ.S. Supreme Court in 1954
ordered desegregation with all
immediate speed. But Jerris Leonard
and John Mitchell seem to be quite
adept at backing down when it comes to
desegregation. Just ask the state of
Mississippi.
By the way, Rev. Richard M. Frost,
headmaster of Grace Baptist Churchs
private school, says The most
important value is to know and accept
the Lord Jesus Christ as your personal
savior. When asked whether or not he
would allow Negroes in his school, Frost
said he didnt like the question. He
added, however, I love the Negro
people.
Awfully white of him.
DAVID MILLER, 4AS

BSU Exhibits Racism

organization. The fraternity
fulfilled my needs. It enhanced
my self-concept. It provided me
with many of the things I value
in life.
I admit the greek system has
hurt many people. So does an
informal organization of friends.
Thats what we in a fraternity
am John, friends. We choose our
brothers for file same reason you
choose your friends. What
synthetically imposed
cohesion holds you to the
people with whom you
amodate? We plastic people are
as human as you. No one pushes

Bus Door Clamp
MR. EDITOR:
Last Friday as I was boarding a bus in front of the Hub, the driver
abruptly dosed the doors on me. I realize that the buses are crowded
and we must observe safety precautions, but do you call this a safety
precaution when the driver doses the doors on someone?
When die buses become crowded, why not tell boarding students
instead of your policy of dosing the doors on them? And a warning
to the person in charge of the buses, whoever the hell you are, had
better change your present policy before someone gets injured.
DAVE SCHAFFTBR, 2VC

WednMday, February 18,1970, Th* Florid* Alligrtor,

1*
There is no hope
for the complacent man.

With rights and citizenship go maturity and
responsibility. The statement of position by the
Black Student Union shows neither. Just why do
you think you are immune from the laws and
statutes? Why should you not be held responsible
when you violate the law and others* rights?
Apparently anyone who disagrees with you is
automatically a bigot or a racist. I say the Black
Student Union exhibits as much, if not more, racism
and bigotry as a redneck Klansman. When you
people pull your paranoid heads form the clouds
and remove the chips from your shoulders, perhaps
this campus can work together to improve racial
relations. Part of the responsibility is yours. We
certainly arent perfect, but we migfrt not be as
racist as you think.
CARLYLE S. SWOFFORD, JR., 4FY

us into a fraternity. We're there
because we want to be.
Don't tell me the fraternity
system is dying and therefore it
is bad. As long as it fulfills the
needs of some individuals, it will
survive. Like all organizations, or
institutions for that matter, it
will cease to exist when it ceases
to benefit those involved.
Allow me to bade in my
ignorance as you see it, but
don't condemn me. I've
experienced something you
haven't and I object to your
judging me by your standards.
TEDREMLEY

Page 7



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Page 8

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MAAS BROTHERS ]
"I SPY" a good-looking
raincoat of navy crinkled
patent that makes you pray
for rain. White crinkly shoes
and racing gloves complete
the look. Found in the
Junior Terrace. Modeled by
Cyndi.
V
SUSAN SCOTT
The flair of knit* never
quits! This laced tunic looks
just right over legs or pants.
High in style and high in
good looks; this dynamic
duo comes to you in orange
ribbed acrylic knit from
Bobbie Brooks. These and
more are to be found at
Susan Scott in the Mall.
Modeled by Carole.
*




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COLONY SHOP 1
Cute for school, a rayon |
and flax dress with a drop j
waist, red blouse, and black
and white check mini skirt |
by P.J/s. Black patent shoes ]
by Miss America. Get it at 1
the Colony Shop. Modeled 1
by Judy.
\ I
FIGURE FAIR
Be blushingly bold when
you wear this lounge set of
black lace and tricot. The
pants are made of tricot
jersey and the tunic is lace
in a ballerina style with
| pleated edging on bottom.
Color is black only, in sizes
32 to 36. Price about I
' SIB.OO. Modeled by Kathy.

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Wednesday, February 18, 1970, The Florida Alligator



*
0
SILVERMAN'S
"Saba" yellow and navy
print acetate top joins a
solid skirt for a great
fashion in 1970. Top with a
tunic and you're ready to
go! Modeled by Joan.
SEARS
Nautical f but nice are the
words for Carol's navy and
white polyester knjt
co-ordinate... with the go
anywhere look. Sears Junior
Bazaar.

Page 9



MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti 99c
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
You Care To Eat 99c
GAINESVILLE MALL
L'Vi^SSM
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25, Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DaodKn* -%00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* <> M n
I l1 I | L aaoaooaa 5
Z I I I If 11!Iff 1
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,

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
1965 FIAT 850. Good gas mileage.
Radio, heater. Owner leaving country
soon. $350. Call 376-1545 between
5-8 P.M. (A-85-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
Martin 00-21 Guitar with hardsell
case $270. Call Greg 378-3271.
(A-88-st-p).
Honda Model CA 95; Asking
$26 0.00 or best offer. CALL
372- ask for David or leave
message. (A-80-10t-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
Trailer, 8 x 42, cozy, alrcondltion,
oil heat, carpeting, 1 bedroom,
$1,400 or best offer. Try calling 9
AM l2 MN 378-6833. (A-85-st-p).
Four 15 wirewheels for MGA SSO
FM tuner-multiplex S2O D-craft 14
fiberglass with 50 HP mere. $750
Dual TT $75 Two university spkrs,
S4O 2 Teac speakers SIBO Fisher FM
receiver $l6O Sony 250 Tape deck
with mikes $125 Two shure mikes
$l5O ge Vacuum sls Garrard TT
S9O Ph. 372-7024 after 5..
(A-86-st-p).
Human hair frosted fall, must sell.
Shoulder length, cost SIOO new. Ask
$25 minimum. Call Cindy 392-8496.
May see at Graham, Room 212.
(A-87-st-p)
STEREO COMPONENTS, ADC
303A speakers, AR turntable, Shure
cartridge (M9le) 378-6761 after 5.
(A-87-3t-p)
Audio Vox Tape Deck Great Sound
$50.00 Lafayette 20 Amplifier 3
months old $40.00 Call Robby
373- (A-87-3t-p)
BSA 250 cc Sport Stur. New paint,
recent overhaul, low mileage, very
good condition. $295. 376-9723
after 6 P.M. (A-85-st-p).

n ^
IN. W. 13th St. at 23rd RD Z 1 SI KXXgLUVi^M
Tataphaw 373-2434 j f |
~T~ 1 AN ENTERTAINMENT
| J | BLOCKBUSTER!
"THE YEARS
BEST COMEDY!
Hollis Alport, Saturday Review
Ct THE LIVELIEST
I AMERICAN
f I COMEDY
V .rtiTjl SOFAR
VI THIS YEAR!
Routine Keel,
The New Yorker
u "THE FUNNIEST
T I AND FRESH FRESHEST
EST FRESHEST FILM OF
IKfl THE YEAR!"
I -McCalls
A. "AS FUNNY AS
\JL ANY AMERICAN
n COMEDY THIS
H Ima DECADE!"
[ PERSONS
COLUMBIA PICTURES prasant* A FRANMOVtCH PRODUCTION UNDER
NATALIE WOOD/ROBERT CULP 117
| BOBACAROL&TEDAALIcTI I NOT
ELLIOTT GOULD/CYAN CANNON L ADMITTED

BHSIR4 GO!-FORTHE FURY,*
ANGRY, TOUGH AND >s9**

I, The Florida Alligator, February 18,1970

Page 10

FOR SALE
1968 HONDA CL 90. Motor just
overhauled; runs like new. $200.00.
Call William at 392-8903.
(A-86-st-p).
Selling Everything! Short Brown
Human Hair Fall S2O. Stereo S9O
Record Albums (Beatles, Hendrix,
Warwick, Supremes, Butterfly and
more. Stereo Speakers S4O ea. All
type of apt. decorations. 376-3622.
(A-89-3t-p)
BEAD FREAK has beads to sell
variety of type and color. Strong
unstrung and custom made designs.
PO Box 16/331 or call 392-8986.
(A-89-3t-p)
Bookshelves, four and five shelf
metal. 1012 N.W. 4th Ave. p.m.
WED ONLY. (A-89-lt-p)
Would like to find home for lVt yr.
old German Shepard (preferably in
the country) $25. Call after 5:00.
Good markings. 372-4151.
(A-89-lt-p)
Wollensak stereo tape recorder unit.
Recently serviced, in great condition!
Call 3786277. (A-89-st-p)
4oooemwwxwxwx->x*w^
| FOR RENT
?moo e b vxx-x*x-x-x-x-:x:-x.v.v.v.v.v.vv&
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
llvlngroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B6t-41-c).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one &. two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Available Feb. 28. 1 bdroom apt
sllO/month, air cond, paneling,
furnished, all electric, cable TV, most
for money in sin city, no children or
pets. Couples or working singles,
392-1214 or 372-7024 after 5.
(B-89-st-p)

FOR RENT
X.X.X*X*X*X-X X*X-X*X.X.NV.X:"XX*XX-X*XW
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. AH
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
We need 1 female roommate for
spring qtr. Landmark apts. $46.25
per month. All deposits paid. Call
Norma Goldstein 378-4849.
(B-88-st-p).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
Furnished, Private patio; available
around March Ist, slls. per mo.
Village 34 apt. 43, high & dry.
376-0579. (B-85-st-p).
Sublet 1 bedroom apt furnished ac
heater carpeted TV cable pool Vz
block to campus 2 blocks to SFJC.
Call 373-1047 $120.00 mo.
(B-89-6t-p)
WANTED |
1 female roommate for poolside
Landmark apartment for spring
quarter. Call anytime 378-2878.
(C-86-st-p).
Male roommate wanted for
Tanglewood Manor townhouse. SSO
per month + utilities. 373-2792.
(C-86-st-p).
2 roommates wanted for Hawaiian
vill. apts, pool, 2 bath, separate
din Ing room, quiet, call 373-2493,
ask for Ray or Joe, for spring and
summer. (C-85-st-p).
Roommate 3 bedroom apt.,
offstreet parking, Ige. bath, kitchen,
LR. S4O mo. near Unlv. Law Stud.
& Adv. senior. 406% N. E. Ist Ave.
376-0317. (C-88-st-p).
Roommate: $35/Month and shore
expenses. Home phone 378-7032 or
Grove Hall rm. 47 or 50. Ph.
376-9171. (C-88-st-p).
1 female roommate for house 1 block
from campus, own bedroom $42 mo.
+ utilities, wanted Immediately!!!)]
378-2828. (C-88-st-p).
Male roomate-grad-student-for 1968
2 bdrm. mobile home 3 ml from
campus. Paneled, a/c, bar. $55 mo +
Vi util. Archer Rd. Village 36 20 sw
Archer Rd. lot C-13 after 5.
(C-87-st-p)
1 male roommate, private rm.,
Archer Rd. Traitor Park, 40 mo. +
utilities. 376-0189. (C-89-st-p)
Wanted part time for maintenance
work Inside and out. Can learn
outboard motor servicing If
mechanically inclined. (C-89-2t-p)
Photographer: Florida Alligator has
openings for news oriented
photographers. Please submit resume
and sample of your work to Suite
330 JWRU. Become part of a
nationally recognized news team.
(C-89-3t-nc)
| HELP WANTED j
MKG, PREAOV MAJORS
opportunity to get practical exper.
while earning ss. Work your own
hours. Call Fred at 372-9705.
(E-87-3t-p)
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p).
ji;x*xx-xi?i?.*;v;v.v;x-xrv.vi-;*;*:x*x:.;*j<
AUTOS
2cxx;ss?k-:*>:*x*:*>x*xx*sx;-;->x-xx<*>:*
MG llOO, 1964, extra clean, with
a berth exhaust, shoulder harness,
only $499. Call 372-6740.
(G-85-st-p).
1961 Bulck Electra ; radio, white with
blue Interior, good condition, a fine
town car; S3OO or best offer, call Bill
378-9087 after 4 PM. (G-85-st-p).
For Sale: 1965 PORSCHE SC
FM-Am Radio. 473-3290 Keystone
Heights. (A-86-st-p).
1966 Slmca 4 dr. sedan, PB, radio,
heater, white-wall tires; very
economical. 35 + MPG; excellent
condition S6OO. Call 373-1220 after
4 PM. (C-85-st-oK
Pontiac GTO 1967 Mack vinyl top
over red 4-speed new engine and
transmission good shape $1350 call
John 392-7450 or 372-6820 after 5
pm (G-87-4t-p)
f.* u r t 1 58 3.4 sedan. Like new
n ,n overhaul.
$495. Call 376-8586. (G-st-87-p)
1963 LeMans excellent condition
best offer over $425. 373-1754.
(G-89-lt-p)
For sale: 1951 Chrysler S2O, 1958
Karman Ghla $95 and 1962 Stud.
Lark S6O all work but need work.
(G-89-lt-p)
1967 Volkswagen In great shape. His
name Is Jose and he has only 41,000
miles to his credit. Call Rich Hull at
? 72 *? 5 7 .=. .<>?? (O-0-3t-0)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

|* w ra)N Slp-ln at the singles cocktail club a
social drinking club sponsored by a
group of grad students and faculty
for the over 21 crowd 2 private
rooms and bar makes a cozy
atmosphere for one and all
Lamplighter Lounge Friday 5:30
7:30 drinks 50 cents. (J-89-3t-p)
To the occupant of room 17, on 14
Fraternity Row: Happy 5 months! Je
t'aime beaucoup toujours. Avec
amour, your flipped out chick.
(J-89-lt-p)
Free Introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-lOt-p).
Lovely alaskan mining widow age 15
seeks love romance marriage. 32
blue eyes brown hair beard, arms legs
and all extras. Must like Taurus.
378-6081. (J-87-3t-p)
Best Dylan I ever heard RL, Albany,
NY coming soon so order now all
never heard before-type songs after
7pm 378-3121 happy valentine P
(V-86-lt-p)
Adventure and self-development?
Consider the outward bound school
watch It on ABC's American
Sportsman, Sunday afternoon, Feb.
22 (J-87-st-p)
Ideas? Students & faculty, why not
help plan new U.A.C. contribute
your ideas for a campus-wide poll.
Send to Consult P.0.80x 13918
G'vllle. (J-86-st-p).
FREE KITTENS! Five weeks old and
must find them a home. Call
378-7116 (we give green stamps)
(J-89-3t-p)
Karen and Candy We knew Red and
Blusher could do It. Congratulations
on making DU Little Sister. Hugs and
Kisses Turtle Hall (J-89-lt-p)

HWASTEDai
Ad Salesman H
K you are the mM
Aggressive Upperclassman
looking for a valuable experience
J i" I* vertin'* rareef Turn Yourself In: I
Mdfl Rm334JWRU BP
3 REWARD j

TICKETS NOW ON SALE I
for I
Florida Playor* production of I
Philadelphia, Here I Come! I
g/' ip'i- t. ~ ||
"a modern comedy I
Opens February 23 I
H.p. CONSTANS THEATRE, 8:00 p.m. I
General Admission: $1.50
All seats I
Box Office:

PERSONAL
\
Davey: Im so very happy. You're
great! I wuv you. Linda. (J-89-lt-p)
Harris Happy Birthday to the biggest
BMOC. You are the best older
brother a guy could have. Glenn
(J-89-lt-p)
CJW Would you like to give me
personal flying lessons? It may take
forever I dont want to solo. I love
you my Leo lion Aquarius
(J-89-2t-p)
S6O a month, room & board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
Dog Lovers: Yorkshire terrier
puppies for sale. Adorable house
pets. Call 376-0289 after 5:00 on
weekdays. (J-88-3t-p).
S3OO REWARD FOR THE ARREST
AND CONVICTION OF PERSON
OR PERSONS INVOLVED IN THE
THEFT OF A *6B TRIUMPH
BONNEVILLE METAFLAKE RED
LISCENSE NO 10A3695 ID
DU83993. CONTACT MARK
WHITMAN 378-5463 or
SHERIFFS DEPT. (J-88-4t-p).
Students who attended PK Yonge,
needed to help In a survey, no strings,
just a few questions PLEASE Call
372-0274. (J-88-2t-p).
HIGH! HIGH! HIGH! 118 Years of
Brotherhood, LIVE EVER, DIE
NEVER; Phi Kappa Psll! (J~BB-4t-p).

Wednesday, February 18,1970, The Florida Alligator,

y^sx.sv.ss:.-.
I LOST & FOUND 1
v >J
Reward! Psy 201 Text lost In
laundromat across from Gator Town
Apts. Contact Dudley 376-9516.
(L-88-4t-p).
LOST: Glasses in black case
between Union & Matherly. Name on
case. Please call 392-8288. Reward
offered. Are mens glasses with
brown frames. (L-89-lt-p)
Lost: Tobacco pipe carved In shape
of fish at Mlllhopper paths.
Reward sls. Not valuable except to
me. Lu Hardin 392-6189 from 8 to 5.
(L-89-st-p)
.. wvwwwwxwmwss-wxwwx-MM;
SERVICES |
NSVWW^vIW-SwWX^XvV-V.'.WvK'Xv!
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Aiternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will clean,
adjust, lubricate, and install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than slOl 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes form postage stamp to
24 x 44", 8 x 10 certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313,
(M-83-24t-p).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Opticians at 519 S.W.
4th Ave. Across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-59-c)
RUBYS ALTERATIONS
1958 N.w. 4th Street
376-8506
Mrs. Ruby Mills (M-89-lt-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
: Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
I 376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
i'flin
H ACROSS FROM THE MALL
ARLO GUTHRIE
I ALICE'S RESTAURANT =
ALSO
ITS AT
ft RICHARD HARRIS
I! IN
II CAMELOT
JAMES BOND j£
ON HER MAJESTY'S
! SECRET SERVICE
iiiijmiimiiiimtimiiMii
ti

Page 11

| SERVICES
XEROX COPIES: spedlzating in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
Go to Bahamas over break only SB9.
From Miami for four day cruise to
Nassau form Miami. Call Roger
Bowers. 378-6050. (M-85-st-p).
SAVE $$ STUDENT PRIVILEGE
CARD Is now on campus. Local and
national disc. Call Fred at 372-9705
and save ss. (M-87-st-p)
\uNGtf
Excellence in Food
HI WlrM
JSm' TMkpF' MQH
THV sfh J
Wk. Days 2:154:30 7:00 and 9:is|
Sat. 2:15 4:30 .7:00 and 9:15(
Sun. 2:15 4:30 7:00 and 9:15J

Special Engagement!
WIFtELDS
FBST I W L
COMEDO V g THUt J mu
oAsstcs i g-\y
1 "YOU CMn CHEAT AH
ine one ana oray \ JESUS
GREAT MAN 1 Sfflsssasr
at Ms GREATEST 1
Usmans... "TCSL- w o*y !
i
FORESTS CANT
FIGHT FIRES

THINK!
your own home,
fully furnished,
complete set-up
in park of your
choice.
LOW DOWN, LOW MONTHLY
3600.00
only at
MUSTANO MOBILE
HOMES
4820 N.W. 13th St.
378-1346
(We help locate
the park)
Mustanyd^
MOBILE HOMES MOV
4820 N.W. 13th St. 378-1346
O 1 Cont.
hSLSUULSJkW AI From
i 10IS N. W. im St. WI 1:30
ONE OF LAST
THE YEARS
10 BEST
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ t! COLUMBIA WCTUgtS___y



The
Florida
Alligator

. vSU
PHIL BANNISTER
CHRISTINE ROBINSON
... perfect for role
Hirt Learns
Fate Os Up
Friday
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) Big
A1 Hirt, who sold millions of
Java, Cotton Candy and
"Sugar Lips records, finds out
Friday whether he can still play
his trumpet.
Someone threw a chunk of
jagged concrete at Hirt while he
was riding a carnival Boat
Sunday night. Doctors had to
use 16 stitches to sew up Hirts
powerful, beard-covered upper
Up.
The stitches are scheduled to
come out Friday, but the fate of
Hirts career remains in doubt.
I spent 40 years working to
develop that muscle where I got
hit, he said.
It was unlikely that the
missile was directed at him
personally since he was
costumed, masked and
unrecognizable on the float.
Several similar incidents were
reported but no one was injured
as Hirt was.
The musician said he has
received sympathy messages
from President Nixon, Jackie
Gleason, Johnny Carson and
other celebrities.
_
CENTRAL AUTO
SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RINGS & VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS
FRONT END WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
BRAKE JOBS
Mon.-St. 8:00 AM to S:00 PM
Free pick up A Delivery in City
1027 S. MAIN.
378-4943

^KKivK/B^iKSvS?:: nH%AKxvn:m :^F

IN NEXT DRAMA PRODUCTION
An Irish Girl For An Irish Role

By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Entertainment Writer
When youre Irish, a female
and interested in theater what
do you do?
The answer for Christine
Robinson, an intern assistant
instructor of romance languages,
was to tryout for the Florida
Players next production,
Philadelphia Here I Come, a
play about an Irish boys last
night in Ireland before leaving
for American.
What resulted was a genuine
windfall for director Dr. Richard
Green and the lead female part
for Christine.
Actually, its all very chancy.
Gene Touchet (a veteran of last
quarters production) walked
into my office in the language
department and I asked if he was
connected with the Florida
Players, she said.
Touchet directed her to
Green. After' a reading Green
gave her a chance to play Madge,
an aged Irish housekeeper in
the play.
Not only does she come from
Ireland, but she was raised in the
same area as the author, Brian
Friel. Friel was bom and raised
in Northern Ireland. Christine
comes from Belfast, the areas
major city.
While she was studying
French and German at Queens
University in Belfast, Christine
saw the author read one of his
short stories at an arts festival.
He impressed her as being quiet
and Irish-looking.
He reads in a very quiet
manner. This, I think, is seen in
Thiladelphia, she said. There
is a very dry sense of humor.
Christine added, If you
didnt like his style, youd

STEREO TAPES
AT DISCOUNT
Regular $6.98 BTrack Tapes
5.75
LARGE SELECTION OF UNDERGROUND
Records
Car Players
; v 3
Home Players
I e*
r J 5
Discount Tapes
and Music Center
1230 West University Ave.
(Next To Flagler Inn)

probably think him dry and flat.
He doesnt put himself forward.
Its his way.
Friels works are based heavily
on life in Northern Ireland.
He excels in local setting,
Christine commented. But the
fact that Philadelphia was a
Broadway hit shows its
widespread appeal, she said.
According to Christine, Friel
is quite accurate in his account
of life in Ireland.
America is the land of milk
and honey. The main character
views America as a place of
driveins, fat blondes, and a
chance. There is a great pull on
him to go to America and a great
hold on him to stay in Ireland.
This is why Irish-Americans
always come back to revisit the
place where they were bom,
she said.
Philadelphia is set in the
county of Donegal in the
extreme northwest part of the
Republic. Christine explained
that Ireland is separated into the
Republic, which is self-governing
but has an economic dependence
on England, and Northern
Ireland which is both politically
and economically tied to
England. Rural Ireland, she said,
is very different from life in the
cities.
People dont seem to grow
up, especially the men, she
said. Gar, the main character, is
divided into Public and Private
so the audience can know him
better. Public Gar is 25 years
old, but he is treated as if he
were five. This is especially true
of the rural areas, she said.
Christine feels that she can
sympathize with the role of
Madge because she knows the
background that Madge has.
The role portrays ideas in

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 18,1870

Page 12

Ireland that are really there,
she said.
Madge is the only one that
has real communication with
Gar, Christine said. Their

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Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

relationship, however, is covered
up by bar rough exterior, she
said.
Tickets now are on sale at the
Reitz Union box office.



Underground Grows On WRUF-FM

After what is called
overwhelming response,
WRUF-FM has expanded its
programming of progressive rock
music to include shows every
night of the week except Sunday
night.
The program of underground
music, called 103.7,
previously only was aired Friday
and Saturday nights.
The station announcer who
will be in charge of the
weeknight broadcasts of the
underground music, Sebastian,
said early this week that the
additional air time came after
repeated response from the
audience.
We had a lot of letters
coming in, Sebastian said, and
everytime the show ran on the
weekends, we had a good phone
call. So we talked to the
stations management and they
approved some additional air
time.
The weeknight time for the
rock show is 12:30 to 1:30 ajn.
Monday through Thursday
nights. The weekend shows wffl
continue with their present
times, 12:30 to 2:30 am. Friday
nights, and 10:30 pm. to 2:30
am. Saturday nights. Sebastian
and the other underground
announcers Jack Page and
Danny America will continue
to alternate on the weekend
shows.
The great thing about the
music we're airing on the rock
Duke Nominated
For Oscar
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) John
Wayne, the sentimental favorite
for best actor for his
performance in True Grit,
won a nomination Monday from
the Motion Picture Academy.
Contending with Wayne for
best actor were Richard Burton
(Anne of the Thousand Days),
Dustin Hoffman and John
Voight (Midnight Cowboy), and
Peter OToole (Goodbye Mr.
Chips).
Best actress nominees were:
Genevieve Bujold (Anne of the
Thousand Days), Jane Fonda
(They Shoot Horses, Dont
They?), Liza Minelli (The Sterile
Cuckoo), Jean Simmons (The
Happy Ending), and Maggie
Smith (The Prime of Miss Jean
Brodie).

k> *4kS*vV% * JR$.
** v >r^B
yi m&L a
FOR INFORMATION WATCH
ABC TVS AMERICAN SPORTSMAN
Feb 22nd 4:00 P.M.

show is that its the most
popular around and it is fairly
easy to please the audience,
Sebastian said. Sure there are
differences in taste in rock music
among different people, but
music in the progressive rock
vein is easy to program for the
most part because its what
everyone wants to hear. You
dont see a predominance of
*bubblegum rock records in the
stores and people arent that
interested in buying that type of
music, so why should a station
play it and not progressive
rock?
The young announcer said the
station has played a lot of blues
in the past and will continue to
do so although there will be
some attempts to broaden the
programming to include more
folk-rock music and other kinds
of rock-based music.
We would like to include as
many variants of rock music as
we can and with the expanded
air time, weve got a lot better
chance of doing so, Sebastian
said. The extra time gives us a
chance to do some of the things
such as special shows that weve
been wanting to do all along,
he said.
The first of the popular
progressive rock or underground
music was heard on WRUF-FM
almost a year ago and the show
has seen continued expansion
and good audience response
since its inception.
The rock show began with
only one or two hours on
Saturday night and then we had
some sponsors sign up to help
pay for the program and the
thing really got going,
Sebastian said. Since those
early days weve done nothing
but grow, he said.
There are no other progressive
rock music programs aired in the
Gainesville area although there
were some plans at one time to
being a program similar to
WRUF-FMs on one of the citys
AM rock stations. The plans
didnt result in anything
concrete.
In my opinion, there can be
some real problems with
programming a rock show of this
type, Sebastian said. I guess
the main thing is convincing the
management that there really is
an audience wanting to hear the
music we play. Its hard for one
thing to define exactly what
underground music is. In the

rock six nights a week

early stages of our planning here
at WRUF-FM, it was our job to
convince the management of the
station that we werent going to
feature a lot of totally
meaningless noise, he said.
But theyve been really
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Responsibility? Youll never believe!
Involvement? Up to your neck!
Advancement? Fast. If you work for it!
Learning? Learn while you do!
yn get pail for it Well paid!
DO YOU NEED ANY MORE
REASONS lb COME AND
SEE WHY UNCLE JOSEPH
WANTS YOU?
If so, look up Chuck Kline on campus.
* Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co., Milwoukee and other great cities.

Wednesday, February 18,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

understanding and eager to keep
the program going now that it's
on and they can get a real idea
of what it is and can be.
The station is at 103.7 on the
FM broadcast dial, according to
Sebastian.

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Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

HI :pK|l V Bp |
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,tin
~gdHL
, : m \ ,# >

The Two Sides Os Ray Groves, As A Coach (left) And As Athletic Director (right).
RAY GRAVES:
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IMMlMMilllllHlHltlllllllllllltlltllllttlflllllllllllllllllMllllliflMHHMWllllllllllllllllllllllllliilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
From Coaching To Administration

By SAM PEPPER
A picture hangs in the office of UF Athletic
Director Ray Graves.
It is a photograph taken of Graves and members
of the 1960 football team during the closing
seconds of the Florida-Georgia Tech game.
A much younger looking Graves has his arm
raised with two fingers pointed skyward, signifying
to go for two points,** the two points that upset
the Yellow-Jackets, 18-17.
I guess that photo portrays my philosophy of
coaching best,* the beaming retired football coach
said, That is, Beat a team, dont keep them from
trying to beat you.
I suppose we could have settled for the tie but I
didnt think that would be fair to the team, he
reminesced. They had been playing their hearts out
all day and they deserved a chance to win it all, he
said.
In Graves* ten years of coaching the Florida
Gators, the Georgia Tech game stands out in his
mind best.
I guess its just because of sentimental reasons,
he explained. It was my first big game as a head
coach and I felt that I had to prove myself.
One year prior to the contest, Graves had served
as assistant coach under Bobby Dodd Sr. at Georgia
Tech.
He won the game with the rambling, gambling,
wide-open brand of football he promised Gator fans
before taking over his coaching duties.
A decade later, following a 14-13 upset over SEC
Champion Tennessee in the Gator Bowl, Graves
stepped down as head football coach at the UF to
devote more time to my duties as athletic
director.

GENE ELLENSON:
f A Pleasant Relationship

By NICK CAIN
Alligator Sports Writsr
Never criticize the chief until
you wear his mocassins for two
weeks.
The words have guided former
Assistant Head Football Coach
Gene Ellenson into what he calls
a pleasant relationship with
head coach Ray Graves through
their eleven years of UF
football.
You have to have a lot of
sympathy for a man in Coach
Graves* position, said Ellenson.
My goal was to try to help him
* much as I could.
Ellenson believes that to be
happy you need a dream to

GATOR SPORTS

work and struggle for. After the
disappointing season of 1968,
Coach Ellenson formulated the
idea of an Impossible Dream
for the team to strive
towardss ... an undefeated
season.
That dream carried us for six
games, said Ellenson. And we
played good enough to win them
all.
Ellenson*s goals in life have
changed now in his new
position, from success in
football to success in the
business world of athletic
administration.
I look at the change as a
beginning and not an end,** said
the University of Georgia

He had just taken a young sophomore team,
whose only claim to fame was being selected to the
Associated Press* Bottom Twenty pre-season poll,
and guided them to a 9-1-1 season, the best ever
recorded in Gator football history.
In looking back at his career as coach of the
Gators, Graves remembers the big games, Penn State
in the Gator Bowl, Alabama at Tuscaloosa, LSU in
Baton Rouge, as well as the stars he has coached,
Steve Spurrier, Larry Dupree, Larry Smith and
Larry Liberatore, and most of all the support the
fans had given him.
I dont think Ive seen more student support
than that which followed our victory over Alabama
in Tuscaloosa, Graves said. We had to circle the
air field three time before we could land because the
thousands of fans that came out to greet us at the
airfield had spilled out on to the runways.
This season (1969-70) was much like that one,
he continued, The students were caught up in the
same spirit that the team was.
Graves also cited two surprises that highlighted
his career as a coach at Florida.
The first came when Spurrier, upon accepting the
Heisman Trophy in 1966, gave the award to UF
President J. Wayne Reitz.
Steves winning of the Heisman was the biggest
thrill of my coaching career, Graves said. His
returning the trophy to the university just further
exemplified his unselfish attitude. He felt that the
university, the team, and the students had just as
much claim on it as he did.
His second surprise occured on Sept. 20,1969 at
Florida Field.
There his team of under-rated sophomores
opened the season against the highly touted

graduate. I plan to learn all 1
can about athletic
administration to prepare myself
for a career in this field,
centered around a future goal of
being Athletic Director.**
Ellenson feels his new job is a
highly prestigious position with
less pressures than those
associated with coaching
football.
As a coach you are second
guessing yourself all the time
said Ellenson. There is always
pressure on you, whether it is
the coming game or next
season.
As a player himself, Ellenson
was first string guard on
(SEE 'ELLENSON' PAGE 16)

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ASSISTANT ATHLETIC DIRECTOR GENE ELLENSON
... tried to help Gnwes as much as he possibly could

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 18,1970

Page 14

Houston Cougars. The Gators exploded for 59
points -a scoring spree that began with a 76-yard
scoring pass from quarterback John Reaves to
Carlos Alvarez on the third play of the game.
These memories are just part of the past for Ray
Graves, as he now turns his ambitious efforts to the
future.
By serving as both head coach and athletic
director simultaneously, I wasn't doing either of the
jobs justice," Graves pointed out as his main reason
for retiring.
As athletic director, Graves says he felt his major
goals would be finding away to build the University
Activities Center, making capital improvements in
programs such as basketball and swimming and to
dose the gap in the academic requirements of SEC
schools.
But above all, Graves dreams of the day when the
Gator football team will win the SEC crown and
possibly the national title.
This was one of the reasons I felt it was
necessary for me to retire as a coach," he related.
With the appointment of Doug Dickey, Florida
will have its first full-time football coach. He will be
able to give the team his undivided attention a
factor that is needed in order to achieve a
championship."
I even think Ill be able to get much more close
to them (the players) as athletic director," he
added.
Although his days as a coach are over, it is
unlikely that the legend of the Bull Gator will draw
to a close. As he puts it, Weve been so close to
achieving that Impossible dream, that someday I
think well get it. And when that day comes, I want
to be a part of it.

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor



SAY FORMER GATORS
Graves Respected Players

By NICK CAIN
Alligator Sports Writar
We respected Coach Graves
not only for his coaching ability,
but for his fairness and respect
for everyone on the team,
whether first or third team.
This seems to be the
unanimous opinion of players
like Steve Spurrier, Larry Rentz,
and Larry Smith who have gone
on to professional football.
Coach Graves was the type'
of person who kept *ll activities
xgLi
||p|ll|
I m
LARRY RENTZ
... 'Graves spoke straight'
UF Wrestlers
Vie Tonight
The UF wrestlers face
Georgia, their first SEC
opponent, tonight at 7 in the
Florida Gym. The Gator
grapplers carry a 6-0 record into
the contest.
The Gators are led by senior
Gary Duven in the 190-pound
category, sophomore Jeffery
Shaffner in the 158 and
167-pound categories and
freshman Jonathan Banes in the
142-pound category.
Graves Banquet
Tickets Left
Tickets for the Ray Graves
banquet can still be purchased
today at either Stag *N Drag
(downtown and the Mall), the
Kappa Alpha Theta house or the
UF sports publicity office. Some
tickets will be sold at the door.
Prices range from $4 for
students to $6 for adults.

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well-organized, always keeping
in mind the players well-being,
1966 Heisman Trophy winner
Steve Spurrier said.
Spurrier is presently playing
with the San Francisco 49ers as
second team quarterback behind
John Brodie and as first team
punter.
While at UF Spurrier set
career records in total offensive
yards gained, passes attempted
and per cent of passes
completed, and most touchdown
passes thrown and yards gained
passing.
Every player who goes into
professional football should give
a lot of credit to his coach, and
Ray Graves is no exception,
Larry Smith, first team fullback
for the Los Angeles Rams, said.
While at UF Smith set career
records in total yards gint*l
lushing and several Orange Bowl
records including most yards
gained rushing and longest run
from scrimmage.
Head coaches usually talk a

HEISMAN TROPHY WINNER STEVE SPURRIER AS GATOR
... always had the players' well-being in mind"
iA A 1232
4ilhulU W Univ Univ-376-7657
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| MMERA |
Dont leave those
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lot and promise the team a lot,
but Coach Graves spoke straight
to the players and always lived
up to his words, versatile Larry
Rentz of the San Diego Chargers
said.
Rentz, as a sophomore at UF,
was selected All-Southeastern
Conference safety man in 1966
and led in pass interceptions that
year for the Gators.
As a junior, Rentz played
flanker and split end before
taking Jade EckdahTs position at
quarterback after Eckdahl broke
his leg.
The Chargers activated Rentz
last year off the taxi squad as a
defensive back and punt return
specialist.
The three former Gators
reached a consensus on one
point:
Coach Graves was more than
a coach, he was a gentleman who
was respected by every player
simply because he gave his
respect to each player.

Wednesday, February 18,1970, The Florida AMsetor,

L. A. RAM STAR LARRY SMITH
... gives credit for pro success to Graves
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Our story begins where other sedans end
As we go to press, nobody has found a use for
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Well, the Volkswagen Squareback doesnt end
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Instead, as you see, it ends in a square back backneatly
neatly backneatly grabbing an extra 24.7 cubic feet of lug luggage
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Then, for its next trick, the Squareback gives
you an 8.1-cubic-foot trunk up front where most
cars have their engines. And a rear seat that folds
down to add another 17.7 cubic feet of space.
With all this you can fit more than twice as much
luggage into the Squareback as any other sedan.
And yet you dont need a big space to fit the
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Hows
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Gainesville AUTHORIZED
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Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida AMgstar, Wadnwday, February 18,1970

Pucksters Plead Innocent To Assault

OTTAWA (UPI)A national
Hockey League player cant
back down from a fight. If he
became known as a
scaredy-cat by NHL-ers, they

Ellenson Liked Best
Defeating FSU Twice

PAGE 14*J|
Georgias bowl teams on 1942
(Orange Bowl) and 1943 (Rose
Bowl).
As a coach, Ellenson has been
assistant line coach and head
defensive coach at the University
of Miami, and offensive line
coach and head defensive coach
at UF. Only three times has an
Ellenson-coached defense
finished the season out of the
nations top ten, during his years
at Miami and Florida.
I fed my contributions as a
coach seem to be slanted more
towards the younger athlete,
said Ellenson. The most fun of
my ten years at UF has been
being a part of the players life,
and them being a part of mine.
Ellenson feels this years UF
team was the most inspired
group he has seen in his twenty
years of coaching football.
Before the game even started
they would go out and carry the
two captains off the field
whether we won the toss or
not, said Ellenson.
In his ten years at UF,
Ellenson has seen many
All-American selections and

To Anyone Furnishing Information Leading To The
Arrest And Conviction Os Any Person Or Persons
Found Breaking Into Any Vending Machine On Campus.
* i
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Wometco Vending Co.
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Pepsi Cola Vending Co.
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'CANT BACK DOWN FROM A FIGHT

would throw you right out of
the league.
That was the testimony of
St. Louis Blues forward Wayne
Maki, who pleaded innocent to a

many spectacular games, with
die defeat of Tennessee in this
years Gator Bowl being his
favorite.
There were a lot of great
individual defensive efforts
against Tennessee from players
like Tom Abdelnour, David
Ghesquiere, and Mike Kelley,
who ran back the punt which
standout Steve Tannen
blocked.
Especially gratifying, for
Ellenson, has been the defeat of
FSU these last two years.
Our defense held FSU to
only one touchdown against
greats from FSU like Ron Sellers
and Bill Cappleman.
Ellenson thought Floridas
greatest defensive game was in
the 20-13 loss to Miami in 1966.
Miami scored on two freak
plays, said Ellenson.
Otherwise their offense
couldnt show plus yardage.
The greatest defensive season
for the Gators came in 1965.
That year we had players
like Bruce Bennett, Dick Kirk,
Larry Gagner and Alan
Trammel, said Ellenson. And
we played good enough to win
them all.

charge of assault causing bodily
harm, spoke in his own
defense.
Both 25-year-old Maki and
Ted Green, 29, a defenseman
with the Boston Bruins, are
being tried on charges arising out
of a Sept. 21 exhibition game.
During that game the two
were involved in an incident in
which Green received a serious
head injury. It sent him to
hospital to have a steel plate put
in his head and has prevented
him from returning to hockey.
NHL President Clarence
Campbell fined both and
suspended them for a month.
Maid served his suspension,
while Green still faces his,
should he return to active play.
Mondays trial of Maki, is
expected to be duplicated in
Greens case, which is to follow.
The trial is the first time in NHL
history a player has been in
court as a result of an on-ice
action.
Maki, obviously nervous, told
the court Monday he was just
trying to protect himself when
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he swung at Green.
He made a motion with his
stick towards me and then I
swung to make sure he didnt hit
me again, said Maki.
He told the court he did not
try to skate away from Green
during the fray.
They would throw you right
out of the league, he said. Tt
would get known in the league
that I was a scaredy-cat. Maki
said he had never before struck
anyone in that way.
Lynn Patrick, managing
director of the St Louis team,
said a player going out on the ice
might expect blows on the head.
He agreed with Blues coach
Scotty Bowman that they had
seen more vicious blows than
either of those landed by Green
or Maki.
Bowman, whose hockey
career ended in 1953 when he
had his skull fractured by a
swung stick, said professional
hockey payers accept the risk of
head injury, although he noted
that stick-swinging is not a
common thing on the ice.
Many stick swingings are just

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menacing gestures, he said,
noting that he expected his
players to defend themselves,
and that they were brained to
react on impulse.
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