Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
BEAUTY CONTEST THURSDAY NIGHT
"'" 11 1 .-nj.w
International Week:4 A World Excursion

By KAREN ENG
AMfetant Nam Editor
The Council of International Organizations (CIO)
describes this years International Week as a free
trip around the world. If thats what it is, you
might say it took off Monday night with an
informal reception in the Reitz Unions first floor
lounge.
The international talent show and beauty contest,
highlights of past International Weeks, are scheduled
for later in the week.
The CIO became the center of controversy last
quarter when Student Government failed to provide
financing in their 1969-70 budget. Only after a long
fight did the Student Senate vote to appropriate
SI,OOO for the organizations International Week
one of tiie most beneficial causes denied funds,
according to Student Body President Charles
Shepherd.
And so the only area of ClOs budget that

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PHIL COPE
TIGER, TIGER BURNING BRIGHT
Wall, ft may be a lion instead of a tiger, but the SAE's will tell you
it certainly was burning last Thursday. Someone got bored with just
painting and decided to cover the lion with tar, which the SAE's
burned off.

Committee Gives Approval
For Carswell Appointment

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate Judiciary
Committee overwhelmingly approved Monday the
Supreme Court nomination of Judge G. Harrold
Carswell. Debate on his confirmation in the full
Senate could begin sometime next week.
The vote was 13 to 4 with the opposition coming
from tiie committee's four Democratic liberals. Sen.
Marlowe Cook, R-Ky., abstained when the
committee voted but was giveit permission to vote
later and cast his ballot in Carswell's favor.
Sen. James O. Eastland, DMias., committee
chairman, predicted the Senate would approve
President Nixon's nomination of the TaQahanee,
Fla., federal appeals court judge by a 2-1 margm.
The committee, said Eastland, agreed to give the
four diandents 10 days to file a minority report and
would then formally send the nomination to the
Senate floor. The Senate lenient# could then eel

received funding is offering all UF students a
week-long festival of free movies, art exhibits,
beauty contests and a talent show.
Tonight begin* the two-day international film
festival. Lazarillo, a Spanish film and grand prize
winner of the Berlin Film Festival, is the highlight
of tonights films. Based on the classic novel of the
16th century, it chronicles the adventures of a
12-year-old urchin as he fights die battle of wits
with adult rogues he encounters. It is a Spanish film
with English subtitles.
Wednesday night features the Arab-French movie
The Battle of Algiers, winner of seven
international awards. It is the story of the rebellion
against the French between 1954 and 1957.
The other movies to be shown are Satyajit Ray
(India), The Mouse That Roared (British) and
King Swordsmen (Chinese).
An exhibition of international art objects will be
on display on the second floor of the Union
Wednesday and Thursday and the Union cafeteria

up the nomination for debate the day after it Was
received.
Eastland said he and another 'committee member,
Sen. Roman L. Hruska, R-Neb., telephoned
congratulations to Carswell at Tallahassee.
In Florida, UusweO said, 1 am grateful for the
favorable vote of the Judiciary Committee in the
exercise of its important responsibility." But thane
would be no celebration, Carswell told newsmen,
until after the full Senate votes.
The four dissenting votes came from Sens. Philip
A. Hart, Michigan; Edward M. Kennedy,
Massachusetts; Joseph D. Tydings, Maryland; and
Birch Bayh, Indiana.
Asked about chances of defeating the nomination
on the Senate floor, Tydangs,replied, It will be very
difficult.'*

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 88

INVITES ANYONE TO JOIN
Kirk Lists Members
Os 'Governors Club

JACKSONVILLE (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirk gave newsmen
a list of 226 persons who
contributed $201323 to his
disputed Governors Club over
a 22-month period, then went
on statewide television late
Monday to defend the club.
The Republican governor did
not give newsmen a list of the
amounts contributed by each
individual. But he promised to
make all records available to the
House Elections Committee,
which fought a successful court
battle to force the public
disclosure.
The committee seeks to
investigate whether
contributions to the club gained
state favors.
Os course there are members
of the dub who do business with
the state, Kirk told his news
conference on the air. But I
think it would be more
significant if the legislators

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Unfortunately these
people will not be praised
as they should
be .. they ll be harassed
and sm eared by
innuendo.
Gov. Claude Kirk

would determine those doing
business with the state who are
not members of the club.
In revealing the names of the
club members, Kirk said,
unfortunately these people will
not be praised as they should
be ... theyll be harassed and
smeared by innuendo.
Kirk announced he was
renaming die organization The
Peoples Chib and applying to
the federal government for
designation so that contributors
may deduct their donations
from their income tax.
Perhaps the dub has made
mistakes, Kirk admitted. I can

iitiilMilptiin
MASS DISORIENTATION
may be ahead for
society, author Alvin
Toffler warns. t page 5
Cliftodt 10
tditodab 8
Letters
Movies 10
Orange and Blue 12
SmaU Sodety 6
Sports..! 13

has on its menu for today and Wednesday some
international dishes both Chinese and Persian.
Miss International Week 1970 will be chosen
Thursday night at the beauty contest, combined this
year with an international fashion show. This event
begins at 8 p. m. in the Union ballroom..
The international talent show, with dancing,
singing, acting and music provided by the member
groups of the CIO will be presented at 8 p.m.
Friday in the University Auditorium. This is
traditionally the most popular event of
International Week.
Saturday night winds up the week with the
International Ball at Flagler Inn. Joe Whalen's band
will provide music for the semi-formal event. This is
the only event of the week with an admission
charge.
Because of the shortage of funds and the expense
involved, guests are being asked to pay $1 a couple
for the dance, CIO Chairman Juan Clark said
Sunday.

UF Prof Gets Award

Tuesday, February 17, 1970

think of one right off its
name. Im changing the name
right now.
He immediately solicited
anyone listening to join and said
the fee would be $1 a year
instead of the SSOO a year
Governors Club fee.
The list of Governors Club
contributors included W. W.
Arnold of Fort Pierce, Kirks
appointee to the Florida
construction industry licensing
board; furniture manufacturer
Barnard Castro of New Hyde
Park, N. Y.; Hamilton Foreman
of Fort Lauderdale, the man
who has announced a campaign
to raise SIOO,OOO to pay off the
political debts of Democratic
Secretary of State Tom Adams;
May Don Spicer of St.
Petersburg and George H.
Kunde, Miami engineering firm
executive who once said he
contributed $15,000 to Kirks
dub in an effort to get rid of the
governors former administrative
aide, Tom Ferguson.

An assistant professor at
the UF College of Law has
been selected as one of
Floridas -five outstanding
young men by the Florida
Jaycees.
James R. Pierce, an
assistant professor of law and
director of the Law Center's
Legal Aid and Defender
Clinic, received the honor at
die Jaycees* award banquet in
Panama City last weekend.
Pierce was cited for his
outstanding contributions in
the field of legal aid to die
poor.



Page 2

!. Th* Florida AMaotor, Ttiaaday, Fabcwry 17,1970

SO HUMAN
AN ANIMAL
Pulitzer Prize winner Dr.
Rene Dubes wraps himself up
in conversation with UF
students during the reception
Thursday night following his
Accent '7O talk on
population and income.

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writar
In his room at the Flagler Inn,
Harvey G. Cox, Accent speaker
and author of the best-seller
The Secular City was busily
packing his one suitcase during
an interview with the Alligator.
It was 9:20 Wednesday
morning. He had just finished a
leisurely breakfast with a group
of clergymen. At 10 he would be
speaking on the city of the
future in University Auditorium,
after which he would fly to
Boston.
Here in the peacefulness of
the room the bearded young
theologian spoke of the
celebration of life, and his new

DRAGON DOOMED?

Deputies Seize 'Harmful Films 1

By ED CROWELL
AMgrtor Staff Writar
UFs skin flick fans will have
to give up their migration to the
Dragon Drive-in this week.
State and county deputies
visited the Valentines Day
showing of Kiss Me Quick and
The Daisy Chain, seized the
films and arrested the owner for
screening harmful motion films
Norman Maier
Lectures Today
Dr. Norman R.F. Maier,
professor of psychology at the
University of Michigan, will be
on campus today as a participant
in the College of Business
Administration's lecture series.
Maier will speak on Creative
Management at 3:40 pun. in
Room 120 Bryan Hall (Old Law
Building).
Among his publications are
"Psychology in Industry,
Principles of Human Relations:
Applications to Management,
and Frustration: The Study of
Behavior without a Goal.

Jatruii ca
Puerto R ico
arch 21 28
378-9614

.THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The>
Alligator is entered as second Class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run

HENRY COX. ACCENT SPEAKER SAYS
Modern Man Has Lost Zest For Life

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book, The Feast of Fools.
In it, he notes the decline in
festivity in American society.
'There is too much emphasis
on work and performance. We
have paid a high price for our
production and technology, he
said.
Our religion has contributed
to the lack of joy in life, with its
constant exhortation to work
hard and be good.
The whole notion is that you
don't do anything that isn't
useful.
But Cox sees another vision of
life, where any action that one
does here and now is significant,
because ones life is significant.
Teople have to leam the

to minors.
Donn E. Davidson, 25, was
arrested and released on SI,OOO
bond. The films are being held
on a restraining order and
Davidson was ordered to appear
for a hearing Tuesday.
Davidson is charged with
admitting 15-year-old Robert M.
Hooten on Feb. 6 and 12 to see
the movies Marcy, The
Unsatisfied and Campus
Confidential. Hooten is the son
of Deputy Sheriff James
Hooten, a vice investigator for
the county
The complaint charges that
the bodies of women were
shown, revealing breasts and
other parts of their bodies,
including pubic areas. The films
were described as appealing to
the "prurient, shameful or
morbid interests of minors.
The arrest Is based on a new
state law passed last July.
It came as such a surprise,
Davidson said. I don't want the
kids there. Davidson, who lives
at the theater, said he has his
employes check the
identification of all young
people trying to enter the
drive-in.
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
Z gun dealer, Mi canopy.
* 466-3340.

value of play, he said. You
dont play because youll get
some reward. Like meditation,
play is its own reward.
Man has a great need for play;
for activities that have been
labeled time wasters, he said.
I know some workers,
friends of mine, who are so busy
fighting injustice and peace, they
are humorless and grim, he
said.
Im not against these things,
but you have to have joy too.
I want to bridge die chasm
between the life affirmer and the
world changers, he said.
Cox does not like to repeat
himself.
It is a living death for

Assistant State Attorney
Eugene T. Whitworth said the
Dragon Drive-in was not the
only theater to have been very
lax about admitting minors to
see X-rated movies. Many of
the citys drive-ins and indoor
movie houses, he said, have not
been complying stricdy with the
law.
Whitworth said the Dragon
Drive-in was singled out because
it shows nothing but X
movies.
Davidson said he has been
playing the adult movies
because it is the only way he can
make money. Most of diem are
pretty good, he said. But I
can't check every one of them.
Folk Fest Filmed
A Rathskeller folk festival will
be filmed tonight at 8 for later
broadcast over WUFT-channel 5.
Theres no admission charge
and students are invited to come
and be part of the production.
Student folk singers will be
featured along with audience
participation.

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someone to copy a work over
and over because it was
successful once, he said.
I fought off a terrible
temptation for five years, to
keep repeating myself from my
first bestseller, he said.
The Secular City waged a
stormy controversy in religious
circles when it was first
published. It embraced urban
life, and hailed the progressive
secularization of mans work,
and his society.
New forms of liturgy also
fascinate Cox.

Student Senate Defers
Action On Wauburg

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Writer
The Student Senate will defer
action on the Lake Wauburg
renovation program pending an
on-site inspection by senators,-
architects and other officials
concerned, Ralph Nobo,
chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, said Monday.
"(Student Body President
Charles) Shepherd has arranged a
bus tour of Wauburg next
Saturday for senators, architects
and others, Nobo said.
Shepherd is a member of the
Wauburg committee.
Concern has been expressed
about possible pollution of
Wauburg and also about its
10-mile distance from campus.
However, Wauburg at present
is not polluted any more than
any other lake people go
swimming in and is perfectiy
safe, Nobo said.
He added the distance
problem will very likely be
overcome by a free bus system
between the campus and the
lake on busy days.

His latest was exorcism, an
ancient rite which chased away
evil spirits.
Exorcism was revived recently
in Washington, D.C., when a
group shouting OUT DEMONS
OUT, OUT DEMONS OUT
protested around the Pentagon
attempting to drive out the evil
spirits of war.
We weren't calling the
judges, or the defense
administration evil; it was not
directed at the people, just the
evil influences that had
surrounded them, he said.

The senate vote on the
Wauburg funds will not come
until after the inspection tour,
meaning next week at the
earliest, he said.
The senate will vote sometime
in the future on a constitutional
amendment providing for the
publication in the Alligator of
the name, offense and penalty of
all students found guilty of
Honor Court violations.
Nobo said the Judiciary
Committee has already
disapproved the bill but expects
to hold open hearings on it
nevertheless.
At its meeting tonight the
senate primarily will consider
most of the noncontroversial
budget items.
The senate will meet tonight,
and every Tuesday and Thursday
night until the budget is
completed, at 8:15 in Room 316
of the Reitz Union.
UAC Meets
The University Activities
Center Committee will meet
today at 1:30 pjn. in room 361
of the Reitz Union to hear
recommendations regarding the
proposed UAC.



By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
After all these years of being
named Huntley it must have
been destiny that someday Id
meet the real Brinkley.
It wasnt my fault I was
named Huntley. It was my
fathers name, and his fathers
name, on back to some
Scotsman as far as I know.
And I certainly didnt have
anything to do with Chet
Huntley and David Brinkley
getting together on NBC news
I was only seven years old at the
time.
*
But ever since I can remember
I've been plagued with jokes and
remarks about my name.
Wheres Brinkley? people a&
when Im introduced to them.
Do we have a Brinkley in
here too? teachers ask when
they call my name in the roll on
the first day of class.
What an appropriate name
for somebody in journalism/'
they say. Like if I changed my
name to Pulitzer I could win the
prize.
Are you related to Chet? is
an inevitable question.
He's my father by my first
marriage, I reply. It shakes
them up for a few minutes.
I always dreamed of becoming
engaged to a guy named
Brinkley. I could envision the
headline: Huntley-Brinkley To
Wed." It'd probably make
almost as many newspapers as
Julie Nixon and David
Eisenhower.
But, I never in my life even
met anyone named Brinkley
until Friday. And then I met the
REAL David Brinkley.
He had agreed to let me meet
him at the Jacksonville Airport
and ride with him to Gainesville
in a rented car.
When he stepped off the
plane, I recognized him at once,
but he didn't look quite the
same as he did on TV. He looked
older and more distinguished
at 49, hes beginning to gray.
He told me he'd only met one

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Huntley Meets
The REAL
Brinkley

other person named Huntley
before (not counting Chet), but
he sympathized with all the,
remarks I've received.
People are always saying
good night, David' to me and
breaking into hilarious
laughter, he told me. It was
true. I heard it at least twice
during the time he was in
Florida Gym.
But then, people dont know
my name until I tell them and
they know his just by looking at
him.
Sometimes it takes a few
minutes for people to recognize
him, because they just don't
expect to see him, he said.
When we stopped at a gas
How do you keep
from becoming cynical?
I asked him.
'Tm not sure that I
dont, he said.
vav/XlCwXw/Xw/WvWXvX'lv
station on the interstate
highway, the attendant asked us
if we were going to the drag
races. Then he took a closer look
at Brinkley.
Do you live around here?
the boy asked.
No, Brinkley said.
I know, youre on television,
aren't you?
It didn't take him long.
When we went into a
restaurant for dinner, a waitress
asked me in an awed voice, Is
that David Brinkley you're
with?
When I told her it was, die let
me use the telephone for free
and the manager went over to
meet him.
But Brinkley wasn't the
pompous TV star. He was
friendly and understanding and
answered my questions about
himself.
He lives alone, he said, and
has a cook, who comes in to fix
breakfast for him every morning;
but he can't get anyone to stay
late enough to fix dinner. They
all want to get home by 5:30.
And Brinkley doesn't get off
until 7 pm

He has three sons, including a
20-year-old who's a straight-A
student at Princeton.
Brinkley has a great deal of
faith in the news media.
The distrust many Americans
now openly display for the
media has always been there, he
said. Agnew made it
acceptable.
It is true now as it has been
for some time that people
believe what they want to
believe. It you say something
that disturbs them and upsets
them, they don't believe it.
Hes always gotten letters
accusing him of unfairness and
distorting the news now he
still gets letters, but at the end
they say Im beginning to
believe Agnew was right.
The basic problem is that the
American middle class does not
understand the function of
journalism.
He also has an answer for
those who complain there isn't
enough good news on his show.
To try to give a balanced
picture between good and bad
news is not news but an
entertainment medium. You'd
just be telling them what they
want to hear.
Brinkley started out as a
reporter for a small newspaper
and he recommends other
aspiring journalists do the same.
He worked for the Wilmington
Star-News in North Carolina and
then went to United Press before
joining NBC in 1943.
He and Huntley have been
together for 13 years and this
year theyll be breaking up as
Huntley leaves NBC. Huntleys
replacement has not been
chosen, Brinkley said.
Brinkley said his job is not
exactly what he wants, but Im
sort of trapped by success.
Because people are in the habit
of seeing his face on television,
NBC won't let him get away to
do as much reporting as hed
like.
'Television is very confining.
It has to be done in a certain
place and a certain time. I can't

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HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY PAIR
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get out as much as I would like.
I would like to be on only
when I feel like it when I have
something worth putting on.
1 asked him about the chances
for women in television.
He said many women work
for NBC, but whether a woman
would be able to have a job like
his depends as much on the
sociology and psychology of the
country as it does on us (NBC).
For the moment, when it comes
to big, important, frightening
kinds of news, people are more
inclined to trust men than
women.
How do you keep from
becoming cynical, when you
know how badly the government
is doing? I asked.
Im not sure that I dont,

Timriay, Ftknary 17, 1*70, Th* FtoMiAMplW,

he said.
He doesn't believe everything
the government tells him. When
the military sends in the
Vietnam death toll all I report
are the American Mnnlfjfg
because I believe they're
accurate." The South
Vietnamese and Viet Cong totals
are made up very largely out
of thin air, he said.
When I left Brinkley in
Florida Gym, the crowd was
pressed around him, thrusting
slips of paper into his hands for
autographs. He remained poised,
answering the questions shouted
at him above the noise.
Goodby, Mr. Brinkley I
said. Somehow it would have
been all wrong to say Good
night, David.

Page 3



Page 4

l Ttm Florida AlHgafor, Tuesday, February 17,1570

Amerirn Put A New Face On Architecture

Although the 70s are already
beginning to see a growing concern
among Americans for their
fast-disappearing natural resources, a
parallel concern for other resources,
such as man-made structures, is quicldy
developing.
In the coming week, interested
citizens will have an opportunity to learn
more about architectural preservation
during a conference at UF.
Workshop: Architectural Preservation
wfll be held Friday and Saturday in
rooms 103-105, Building B,
Architecture and Fine Arts Complex.
Sponsored by the universitys
Department of Architecture and the
Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects (ALA), the
workshop will acquaint participants
with die specific purposes, methods and
values of architectural preservation.
Ralph Grayson Schwarz, president of
the AIA-established Urban Design and
Development Corporation, is among the

Pesticides Benefit Economic Life
Explains UF Entymologist Eden

Pesticides are essential to the
economy, health, wealth, and
welfare of all citizens, and
should not be banned, a UF
*
entomologist believes.
Dr. William G. Eden,
chairman of the UF Department
of Entomology and Nematology,
said pesticidal chemicals are
involved in one way or another
in almost every facet of life in
the production of food, fiber,
forests, sods, ornamentals, in the
protection of man and his
animals against pests that carry
disease, bite, sting, and destroy
homes, food, furniture, and
clothing, and harm wildlife and

Symphonic Band Concert Set
The Gator Symphonic Band will present its Annual Formal Concert
tonight at 8:15 in the University Auditorium.
Robert Foster, the faculty trumpet specialist, will play the Rose
Variations, by Robert Russell Bennett, which is not only a brilliant
showpiece for Trumpet, but also includes some of Bennetts very best
band writing. The faculty woodwind quintet will play Newell Longs
Concertino for Woodwind Quintet and Band, a relatively new work
which is one of the very few pieces for this particular medium.
Selections from the traditional repertoire indude the Finale of
Tschaikowsky's Symphony no. 4, the Sousa march Semper Fidelis,
and a concert march, Sword and Shield

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workshops featured speakers.
As head of the non-profit
corporation, Schwarz is directing efforts
which include major work on
transportation in urban areas, existing
urban problems and the development of
new urban communities.
Schwarzs topic, Preservation, An
Urban Asset, will be presented at 8
p. m. Friday. Other topics are:
National Programs in Preservation, at
1:30 p.m. and Preservation and
Rehabilitation, at 4 p. m. Friday, and
Preservation at State and Local Levels
at 9 a. m. Saturday.
Workshop director is F. Blair Reeves,
professor of architecture at the
university and an authority on the
preservation of historic buildings.
Reeves serves as chairman of the
Florida AIA committee on historic
buildings, state preservation coordinator
and a member of the nation AIA
Committee on Historic Resources.
The universitys International Club

natural resources.
Eden said this extensive
involvement has been
particularly beneficial to man.
The DDT molecule, for which
the discoverer of its insecticidal
activity received the Nobel Prize,
has been reliably credited with
saving more human lives than
any other compound ever
discovered by man, he pointed
out.
The skillful and legal use of
pesticides and other improved
agricultural practices of Florida
and other food-producing states
have provided America with the
greatest supply and variety of

WORKSHOP FOCUS THIS WEEK:

top quality, nutritious, safe
foodstuffs at the lowest prices
ever known in the history of
mankind, Eden said.
By ingenious and proper use
of pesticides, among other
things, we have changed the
state of Florida from a swampy,
mosquito-infested bog into a
tourist mecca, Eden said.
The use of DDT and other
persistent compounds is being
greatly reduced in Florida,
EAG Tonight
On Dialogue
Three representatives of UFs
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) will be on the Florida
Blue Key-WRUF sponsored
Dialogue program at 11
tonight.
Bill Seaman, EAG president;
George Gardner, FAG executive
director, and Brad Raffle, EAG
information chairman will be on
the. air until 1 am. to answer
questions from the moderator
and those phoned in by listeners.
Numbers to call are 392-0771
and 392-0772.

will be observing International Week
in the next few days. The special events
sponsored by the dub begin Tuesday
with an International Film Festival at
7 p. m. in the Reitz Union Cafeteria.
This weeks schedule of events:
Through Friday Exhibit: .
Collections, current trends in San
Francisco-Bay area art chosen from works
by faculty and alumni of the California
College of Arts and Crafts, Teaching
Tuesday Annual Formal Concert, by
University Symphonic Band, University
Auditorium, 8:15 p. m.
Tuesday International Week: Films ot
Spain, India and Great Britain, Reitz
Union Cafereria, 7 p. m.
Tuesday and Wednesday Conference:
Biology of Human Dental Tissue;
College of Dentistry
Wednesday Lecture: Florida Attorney
General Ear! Fairdoth, sponsored by
University Young Democrats, Reitz
Union Room 349,88 p. m.
Wednesday Dialogue with a Theologue,
Father Michael Gannon, 122 Reitz
Union, 4 p. m.
Wednesday and Thrusday International

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Week: International Art ok-
Exhibition, Reitz Union Second How 4
to 8 p. m.
Thursday International Week: Chinese
Persian dinners, Reitz Union Cafetpt
4:30-7:30 p.m. tena
Thursday Faculty Recital: John Kith
assistant professor of music, University
Auditorium, 8:15 p. m. ty
Thursday International Week: Beautv
Contest, Reitz Union Ballroom 8 n m
Thursday and Friday Conference :
Insurance and Estate Planning
sponsored by Department of Finance and
Insurance and Division of Continuing
Education, Reitz Union 6
Thursday and Friday Conference: Sn or t
Medicine, 361-3 Reitz Union
Thursday and Friday Conference: 19th
Annual Air Conditioning Conference
sponsored by Department of Mechanical
Engineering, Flagler Inn
Friday International Week: Talent Show
University Auditorium, 8 p. m.
Friday Panhettenic Formal Ball, Reitz
Union Ballroom, 9 p. m,
Friday and Saturday Conference
Architectural Preservation Workshop,
sponsored by Department of Architecture
and the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Rooms
103-105, Building B, Architecture and
Fine Arts Complex
Saturday International Week: International
Ball, Flagler Inn, 9 p.m.



Mass Disorientation May Be Ahead Toffler

By JIM DAVIS
AHigator Writer
Society may be heading for mass disorientation
future shock Alvin Toffler told his 2,000
listeners Friday night.
The author and former editor of Fortune
magazine was speaking in Florida Gym as part of
Accent *7O.
Toffler defined future shock as a mass
disorientation of peoples lives brought on by the
premature arrival of the future.
The agent of future shock is the acceleration of

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GRINTER AWARDED

Dr. L. E. Grinter (right) becomes second UF
scholar to receive the Royal Order of thfe North Star
by order of the King of Sweden. Making the award
Sunday is Dr. Tore Tallroth (left), consul general of
Sweden, in presence of UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell and Dr. Per-Olov Lowdin, scientist and
professor at Uppsala University in Sweden and the

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The Royal Winnepeg Ballet
Sunday February 22, 1970 at 4:OOPM
Florida Gymnasium
A Student Government Production

BY PREMATURE ARRIVAL OF FUTURE

change in all aspects of life, Toffler said. The
speed-up riving is comparable to mans change from
oaroansm to civnizauon.
This is the biggest single break in 3,000 years.
After evolving from prehistoric man, we are now
going into the age of post-historic man.
Today population doubles every 30 yean, the
number of publications doubles every 15 yean, and
more energy is consumed now than in the last 2,000
yean, Toffler said.
Urbanization is increasing at 6.5 per cent per year
so that urban areas will double every 11 years.

UF. Grinter, as dean of the Graduate School, was
instrumental in establishing Quantum Theory
Project which Lowdin directs and has supported the
program over the years. The UF's Dr. Lester
Dragstedt, whose pioneering work in surgery
provided relief for sufferers of peptic ulcers, also
received the Swedish award.

If our present cities didnt expand, this would
mean wed have to duplicate all of the cities on
earth Tokyo, New York and all the rest in the
next 11 years.
One feature of the new era Toffler called
transcience rim rapid turnover of institutions,
issues and even buildings.
In our modem society, we tear down and
re-seed our cities today like so many crops.
Contacts with other human brings, institutions
and ideas are becoming more transient, Toffler said,
and the individual will have to adapt to them faster
than ever before.

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Tueoday. February 17, ItTO, Tba Florida AMfl^ar.

Page 5



Page 6

i,TIM Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 17,1970

S"- .-^..-.w.-.w.vw.v.waww.w-m.ww-w.w-p,
?
i Chicago Seven Lawyers I
I S
S*
i Draw Contempt Sentences!
CHICAGO (UPI) The Chicago Seven jury began another day of
deliberation Monday while two lawyers sought away to free the
defendants and themselves from jail sentences for contempt.
The seven defendants were lodged in Cook County Jail. Their
lawyers, William M. Kunstler and Leonard I. Weinglass, were at liberty
until at least May 4.
U. S. District Judge Julius J. Hoffman sentenced Kunstler to 4
years, 13 days. Weinglass got 1 year, 8 months, 5 days. Their seven
clients drew sentences ranging from 2 months to more than 2 years.
Hoffman said all nine were guilty of numerous instances of contempt
during the 5Vi month trial.
Shortly after the jury resumed deliberations Kunstler and
Weinglass, in another part of the federal building, went before Chief
Judge William J. Campbell to try to get their clients out of jail and to
the federal building, to permit them to consult the lawyers.
Campbell denied the motion but ordered that facilities in the jail be
made available for the defendants to consult the lawyers. Kunstler
said he and Weinglass would go to the jail immediately to see the
defendants.
The lawyers had been instructed previously to stay dose enough to
the federal building to permit them to get to the courtroom within
two hours after the jury signaled that a verdict was imminent.
Campbell apparently felt they could get from the jail, about six
miles west of the federal building, in sufficient time to hear the
verdict.
Kunstler tdd reporters work had begun on appeal of all of the
contempt citations. He said it may be filed sometime, today at the
U. S. Court of Appeals.
He said the appeal would consider, among other things, that no
bond was permitted by the dtations.

ON WAGES AND PRICES

CEA Hints Os Controls

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Chairman Paul W. McCracken of
President Nixon's Council of
Economic Advisers hinted
Monday that the administration
had decided to use some of its
authority to lnduce labor and
management to hold down
wages and prices.
McCracken said in testimony
before the House-Senate Joint
Economic committee that the
government's anti-inflation

Sorenson Advocates
Lowering Voting Age

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
former top aide to the late
President John F. Kennedy told
a Senate subcommittee Monday
the voting age should be lowered
to 18 to give young people a
piece of the action in
democracy.
Theodore C. Sorensen said
that youths who are drafted to
fight in Vietnam have no voice
whatsoever in the process which
determines whether they live or
die .. conscription without
representation is slavery.
The subcommittee is
considering a constitutional
amendment by Sen. Jennings

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policies had already slowed the
pace of the economy.
He added: Now that a
marked change in market
conditions has been brought
about, it becomes increasingly
important to assure that business
and labor respond to them in
making price and wage decisions.
We intend to watch this
response closely and use what
instruments the government
possesses to encourage and

Randolph, D-W. Va., to lower
the voting age. Randolph said he
has 67 co-sponsors, five other
certain votes and from five to
ten other posable supporters.
But he acknowledged the road
in the House will be tougher,
Rep. Emanuel Celler, D-N.Y.,
chairman of the House Judiciary
committee is said to oppose the
measure as now drawn up.
Randolph said an 18-year-old
can marry in most states without
his parents* consent, can make
wills in most states, can drive a
car, must pay income tax in
many cases-, arid can be tried as
an adult in criminal courts.

he small society

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Soviet Spy
To Leave
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
United States dropped espionage
charges Monday against
Aleksander Vasilyevich
Tikhomirov, a Soviet employe of
the United Nations, on
condition he leave the country
by Tuesday.
Attorney General John N.
Mitchell said dismissal of the
charges was agreed upon in the
belief that it would best serve
the interests of the United
States.
Tikhomirov, 37, was arrested
Feb. 7.

induce the needed response.
McCracken; did not specify
what instruments the
administration intended to use.
But his statement appeared to
signal a shift in the previous
hands-off policy of the
administration toward wage and
price decisions.
McCracken predicted that by
the final quarter of 1970, the
over-all rate of national inflation
would be at an annual rate of 3
to 3.5 per cent. That* would
reflect a high degree of success
in the anti-inflation fight. A
growth rate of that range is
considered about normal even in
a non-inflationary period.
McCracken again forecast that
the anti-inflation campaign
would be accompanied by a raise
in unemployment this year to
about 43 per cent of the
national work force. The rate
was 3.5 per cent in 1969.
The Treasury Department's
top economist, meanwhile, said
$1.3 billion surplus in President
Nixon's proposed budget for the
next fiscal year is needed to
combat inflation.

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let me help you
the hump
j Come see A.IA film
1 i if I I tonight only in the Union
A/* I I room 123at7:00p.m.
{S / s Pend six weeks in Europe traveling this summer and eem 5-9 credit hours
I / American International Academy. All expenses paid, the total cost is
Mg-ITCg,

Free International Film Fest

i 1 W 11
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Why are these men laughing? Find out
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Tonite at 7:00 p.m. Lazarillo a
Spanish, award winning
classical film
9:30 p.m., The Mouse That
Roared Peter Sellers, British
comedy in the Union
Auditorium

SPONSORED BY JWRU



Nixon Pledges Assistance In Desegregation

WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon said
Monday his administration would give school
districts all assistance possible in working out
desegregation plans, with the goal of achieving a
minimum possible disruption for students.
The President issued a statement stressing that his
paramount interest as court-ordered
desegregation is carried out was assuring the
thousands of children involved a sound education
in an atmosphere conducive to learning.
The President named an eight-member
cabinet-level committee headed by Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew to study the broad range of
problems facing schools in achieving racial balance

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'MINIMUM POSSIBLE DISRUPTION

and to work out ways the federal government can
help solve them.
1 realize, Nixon said, that in the school
districts affected by the courts* mandates, putting
even the most carefully considered desegregation
plans into effect is going to cause controversy.
Required changes will inevitably be
accompanied by apprehension and concern at the
time of their implementation.
On one point there should be no argument: the
hundreds of thousands of children in the affected
districts deserve what every other child in America
deserves -a sound education in an atmosphere
conducive to learning.
This is my paramount interest, and in this regard

Tuesday,'February 1?iW0, Tha Florida Altigatar,

I am sure I speak for the nation.**
Nixon said three principles should be followed in
developing plans:
Desegregation plans should involve minimum
possible disruption whether by busing or
otherwise of the educational routines of children.
To the extent possible, the neighborhood
school concept should be the rule. Within the
framework of law, school desegregation problems
should be dealt with uniformly throughout the land.
As for the third point six senators from outside
the South have joined Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff in
support of a Southern-backed proposal for equal
enforcement of school desegregation laws in all
sections of the country.

Page 7



Page 8

I, TO* Florida AHigator, Tuesday, February 17,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Carswell Stands Mute

WASHINGTON To charges that he used his
position as U. S. district judge and as United States
attorney to deprive people of their rights under the
law and the Constitution, Judge Harrold Carswell
has now pleaded in effect no contest.
Frank Mankiawicz Mankiawicz_
_ Mankiawicz_ Tow Bradan
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee
asked him to answer the charge that as a judge he
arranged with a local sheriff to rejail some civil
rights workers a higher court had ordered him to
free. It asked him to answer the charge that he
helped to form an organization whose sole purpose
was to take over a public golf course and turn it into
a segregated one.
His letter of reply answers none of the charges,
although he denies any racial overtones in his
December speech to the Georgia Bar Assn. He says
the denial of such overtones by some of his
colleagues who attended the meeting speaks for
itself. So does the joke he told about a
dark-skinned person: Are you from Indochina?
No, suh Ah's from outdo' Georgia.'*
Carswell's letter answers in no way the charges
brought by civil rights lawyers during testimony
before the Judiciary Committee. A sitting judge, he
argues ought not to have to defend judicial
decisions.
But it is not his court decisions of which the
witnesses complained; it was, rather, extrajudicial
conduct. When a judge grants a writ of habeas
corpus, requires the prisoners' attorney to serve the
writ on the sheriff at the jail and then notifies the
sheriff that he has returned the case to local

End Racial Intimidation

MR. EDITOR:
We have sent the following letter to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Dear President O'Connell,
The Graduate Association of Sociology Students
believes that your administration, in dealing with
the recent dormitory incident, has failed to take
positive and constructive action in the handling of a
deddely internal problem.
This failure has already had several undesirable
effects, namely: 1) several individuals have had their
futures irreparably damaged; 2) the autonomy of
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Aims Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
u Publhhad by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Editorial. Buaaaaat Adeertiiing offices in Student
Publfootiom Suita, third floor. Reitz Union.
Editorial: phene 380-1686. 87. 88, or 89.
Business, Ariwortrimp; phone 392-1681, 82, 83, ~
or 84. C ?laion: 380-1619.
Opinions
the editors or of Hr sttthr of the article and not those
rf>f ths Uehusity of Florida.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

jurisdiction so that the prisoners can be rearrested
before they leave the jail, that is not a judicial act or
a judicial decision.
It is an action in violation of the constitutional
rights of a citizen, and it is forbidden by law.
When Judge Carswell, as the testimony alleged,
was confronted with the legal necessity to overturn
the conviction of other civil rights workers, he
advised the city attorney that if he commuted the
sentence to time already served the matter would
become moot.
He was not thus rendering a judicial decision. He
was using in the language of the law the color
of his office to see to it that the illegal practice
before him could continue without legal precedent
to prevent it.
Finally, when U. S. Atty. Carswell, knowing of a
pending case in his jurisdiction to desegregate a
public golf course pursuant to a Supreme Court
decision only a few months old, joined with others
to form a corporation to turn the public course into
a private segregated one, he was not performing any
judicial act.
He was lending the color of his office to a private
act that at best was behavior unbecoming a man
sworn to uphold the law.
So the committee and the Senate now have a
complete record on which to vote. There are the
charges made by lawyers in Judge Carswells court,
the record of the golf course segregation and his role
in 1956 as an incorporator and director of a
segregated fraternity house at a state-supported
college.
Against those charges Judge Carswell has elected
to stand mute. Inadvertently, he did reply to the
charge that his style as a writer of decisions is
hopelessly mediocre. The prose of his letter to the
Judiciary Committee confirms that.
Civil rights attorneys had told the committee that
Judge Carswell had lectured them in a hostile and
discourteous manner. Here is his reply:
Lawyers from all parts of the nation have
practiced before me over the years without any
suggestion of any act or word of discourtesy or
hostility on my part, notwithstanding assertions to
the contrary. In other words, there are no
complaints, except for the complaints.

the entire university has been placed in serious
jeopardy; 3) the claim of just and equal treatment
for all members of the UF community has been
brought into serious question.
We therefore, urge you to use all the powers of
your office to see that jurisdiction over this incident
is returned to the university, and to take immediate
steps to assure that any further episodes are handled
in a consistent manner which will assure equal
justice for all involved.
Furthermore, we affirm that this incident cannot
be viewed as an isolated event. The conditions
leading up to this episode, as well as its handling by
the administration, must be considered an another
manifestation of racial intimidation and oppression
existing on this campus.
UF has been party to harassment of black
students and faculty, and has perpetuated
discriminatory practices and dehumanizing working
conditions for employes. UF, therefore, must
assume responsibility for having fostered the climate
of misunderstanding and oppression that has given
rise to all of these incidents. We call on UF to make
a firm commitment toward the obliteration of these
social ills.
As a consequences of these indicents, the
Graduate Association of Sociology Students
promises support to the Black Student Union in its
efforts to eradicate all forms of discrimination on
campus.
niainai .as&iq vtto'iq ,
4 x l W&tlAMfc

editorial
Clean Soaps
We are pleased to see the newly-born uproar and
down-right indignation throughout America with what we
are doing to our environment.
The fact is that we couldnt have afforded to ignore the
environmental crisis facing us any longer. Its nearly become
a matter of survival.
But we have yet to see much concrete action come out of
the verbal fireworks recently displayed.
Certainly, it will take a tremendous input of financial
resources to turn the pollution tide currently sweeping
America.
But it will also take the commitment of every single
conscientious citizen. Heres away to begin: Phosphates
from detergents is but one form of deadly pollution being
dumped into our canals and waterways.
This is not being done by big industry. The task is
performed daily by millions of people who probably dont
know any better.
But now they can know better. Following is a list of the
most common detergents and their phosphate content
presented by Limnetics, a Milwaukee consulting firm, to a
House subcommittee hearing last December.
We will refrain from recommending any particular brand,
for the list is self-explanatory:
PHOSPHATE
DETERGENT PERCENTAGE MANUFACTURER
Axion 43.7 Colgate-Palmolive
BIZ 40.4 Procter & Gamble
Bio-Ad 35.5 Colgate-Palmolive
Salvo 35.3 Procter & Gamble
Oxydol 30.7 Procter & Gamble
Tide 30.6 Procter & Gamble
Bold 30.2 Procter & Gamble
Ajax Laundry 28.2 Colgate-Palmolive
Punch 25.8 Colgate-Palmolive
Drive 25.3 Lever Brothers
Dreft 24.5 Procter & Gamble
Gain 24.4 Procter & Gamble
Duz 23.1 Procter & Gamble
Bonus 22.4 Procter & Gamble
Breeze 22.3 Lever Brothers
Cheer 22.2 Procter & Gamble
Fab 21.6 Colgate-Palmolive
Cold Power 19.9 Colgate-Palmolive
Cold Water All 9.8 Lever Brothers
Whisk 7.6 Lever Brothers
Diaper Pure -5.0 Boyle-Midwest Inc.
Trend 1.4 PurexCorp.
Sk| i||||||v
re happy to have you here, Secretary Rogers, if for no
other purpose than to make one thing clear as regards your
government s policy towards the emerging African
nations*:? W'iBQWA



White Students Werent Treated Like Blacks

MR. EDITOR:
Ive sent a copy of the following letter to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
Dear President OConnell:
As an alumnus of UF and an employe of the
State for over five years, I am writing you to express
my concern about the recent events on campus
wiuch have given rise to charges and counter-charges
of racism, etc.
While I recognize that there is a continuing
investigation of the alleged gun-point incident in the
mens dorms, I do feel it necessary to remind you of
an incident which occurred while I was still enrolled
in UF when a young white student discharged a
gun in the dorm without legal or academic
repercussions.
What is disturbing to me is the failure of your
administration to at least follow the same guidelines
exercised by Dr. Reitz and Dean Adams in handling
that young man.
By claiming that you cannot interfere in the
investigation of the current case and by your
remarks which imply guilty until proven
innocent, you must surely see that you leave

Racial Problems:
Many Causes
MR. EDITOR:
The following is addressed to Mr. Larry Tropp (2UC), in answer to
his letter of Thursday, February 5, 1970, concerning racial
discrimination at UF. He had written in response to my original letter
on the same subject. (The Alligator, Thursday, January 29,1970).
You accuse me of having superficially examined a possible
instance of racial discrimination in which a black student was nearly
run over by a white student driver, because I overlooked the fact that,
instead of the white student being charged with drunken driving, both
parties were charged with disorderly conduct as a result of an
argument afterwards.
However, I submit that if I did examine the incident
superficially, it was because I was given only superficial
information regarding it!. The original Black Student Union
statement, on which my original letter was based, merely said
Brother Steve Baker was almost run down by a white student.
The statement was thus open to virtually any interpretation,
including one that presupposed that Brother Steves would-be killer
did not even use an automobile!
As for the reasons for the small population of black students at UF,
I must admit that blaming the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test
on the basis of cultural bias is tempting.
However, I cannot logically accept this test as the single or primary
cause of racial imbalance on campus, as any number of factors may
come into play here the overwhelming ration of white residents to
black in this state, for example.
Nor can I swallow in like manner your observation that black
students score higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test than on the
Florida Placement Test, for it may be true that most white students
score higher on it also.
Furthermore, you must remember that if the test in question
discriminates against blacks, it does likewise to many whites who also
are not educationally or intellectually capable of meeting UFs
entrance requirements.
Regarding the recent Tolbert incident, you charge me with having
taken too many details for granted. I assumed that a gun was used to
coerce the victims only because they attested to that fact themselves.
For the sake of comment, am I not justified in making such an
assumption?
In support of your point that black students have been handled
unfairly in recent disciplinary actions, you mentioned a shooting
incident of two yens ago (in which) a white student fired a gun
wounding another white student (and) no criminal charges were
filed.
To set the record straight, that white student was shot accidentally
and preferred not to press charges for that reason.
Even more important is the fact that the incident took place not
two years ago, as you stated, but over three years ago, in November,
1966 (according to records of the Office, of Student Development),
several months before the assassinations of Martin Luther King (April,
1968) and Robert F. Kennedy (June, 1968)- during a time when
local authorities were presumably much more lenient with gun law
violators!
Granted, its always easier to imagine the worst in a given situation.
But interpreting as solely discriminatory the causes of all incidents
involving Hlarfr students will do nothing to futher racial harmony at
UF.
ANDREW BANKER, JUG

yourself open to a charge of racism had these
boys been as white as that young freshman in 1966,
would they have been arrested by the sheriffs
department (he wasnt)? Surely as a former judge,
the idea of legal precedence has some meaning here.
I might also remind you that while I was a
student here several other incidents occurred in
which gross violations of law were committed and
never, in any incident, were the students treated in
such a manner (the football players who tried to cut
off the alligators tail; the football players beaten
up by the 12-pound Karate expert, etc.).
Therefore, when these students, who happen to
be black, are treated in away quite different from
other students, who happened to be white, one is
forced to conclude that their blackness had to be a
factor.
I have been in Gainesville for the past 10 years
and have seen UF through its infancy as a biracial
FORUM:^^
C jAiLia mi ViiAMt j
hnno f or tfj e ( nrnrff^

I y|, Mil
As for the reasons for
the small population of
black students at UF, I
must admit that blaming
the Florida Twelfth
Grade Placement Test on
the basis of cultural
bias is tempting.
However, I cannot
logically accept this test
as the single or primary
cause of racial imbalance
on campus, as any
number of factors may
come into play here
the overwhelming ratio
of white residents to
black in this state, for
dv/imnfd

( Where Was Public Outrage?

8 MR. EDITOR:
;j: Where were the rest of us? Perhaps Mr. Dasher
>ij (in his excellent article of February 9) was right
on when he accused us of being sunshine
a? patriots.
I was appalled to see Earl Wilcox, Ron Jackson
and Joseph McCloud, one of whom was a former
student of mine, branded as criminals even
jj: before the investigation of the Tolbert incident

Save Gainesville Train Service

MR. EDITOR:
Dont want to knock bus service out of
Gainesville. They might pick up and leave. But, in a
nutshell its not a comfort to take the bus. Train
service out of Gainesville is miles ahead of leaving
the driving up to us.
If train service is dropped, God help the weary
traveller without a car and without the bread to
leave Gainesville above the clouds.
Takn the bus is a real drag. People packd like
jello. Hav to sit in the back next to a father raper
or a Grapes of Wrath character whos constantly
offern you a slug of rot gut wine he got for 98
cents at Winn Dixie.
You can't get up and walk around. CANT YOU
N V Please, pretty please, remain

institution. Unfortunately, after 8 years, it remains
in its infancy.
Economic strides are evident in terms of widened
job opportunities for Negroes (no longer relegated
to maid, laborer or technician status). From the
original enrollment of Negro females in 1962
(2/14,000), less than 200 black students
(200/20,000) are now enrolled, eight yean later.
The important thing, however, is not so much to
look back and say how far we have come, but to
look ahead to where we can go.
What is of primary importance is an attitude a
willingness to take a chance and lead, not follow.
There are so many ways in which your office, by
virtue of its attitude, could soften some to change
towards tolerance and lead students and faculty
alike.
Political maneuvering which attempts to placate
people dreaming of days gone by can only produce
disgust in those young people clammoring for a
chance at tomorrow. Please, as the spiritual leader
of UF, exercise some options on inspired thought
and action. As an alumnus, I feel it necessary to
express my feelings and hopes for the future of UF.
EILEEN B. FENNELL

Florida Education
Drastically Wrong
MR. EDITOR: # W
I recently wrote a letter concerning racial discrimination at UF. In
this letter I stated that cultural bias on the Florida Twelfth Grade
Placement Test was one reason for the small number of black students
atUF.
I was recently informed by a member of the University Board of
Examiners that they are doing research in this area and have found a
correlation between economic background of students and test scores.
Poor whites also made low scores.
Questions have also arisen concerning my statement that black
students score higher on the SAT than on the Florida Placement Test.
I received this information from a series of articles which appeared in
the Miami Herald about two years ago. Specific examples were cited
where black students scored higher on the SAT than on the Florida
Placement Test. I assume these articles and conclusions reached from
them to be valid.
Since it has been brought to my attention that economic
discrimination does exist I can only arrive at the conclusion that there
is something drastically wrong with the educational system in Florida.
The time has now come to improve public education in Florida so
that all the citizens of the state, regardless of economic background,
can receive a good education.
If certain state legislators, as well as our wonderful governor, would
quit playing politics with education and begin working on new
educational programs perhaps education in the state will rise above
mediocrity. A nice thought, though highly unlikely.
LARRY TROPP, 2UC

Tuesday, February 17,1970, The Florida AMfstor, I

was completed. The selective enforcement and
persecution of these fine young men by the
administration has been documented in letters to
the Alligator.
Where was the public outrage? Thank
goodness for the sensitivity and courage of Mr.
Schwack and Mr. Wessells in refusing to further
participate in this travesty of justice.
AUDREYS. WELLS, 7AS

seated while the coach is moving. But few on the
bus can read the sign so the driver with his cap tells
you m Alachua drawl: Vail pies tak yur seat.
But, I don't know where to tak it.
On the train it's better. You don't pay as much to
go to Jax as you have to when you take the bus.
You can get up and walk and stretch if you like.
And you can sit where you please. You can even
buy something to eat if you're on an expense
account. (Otherwise, save your bread. Food is much
expensive on the train.)
To dose this thing, I wish to say to Gainesville
Peoples: SAVE THE TRAIN SERVICE! For God's
sake, Let it be so that when we hav to split we
can do it in some kin da style. No forced bus'n
please?
! shrunk

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR. SALE I
1965 FIAT 850. Good gas mileage.
Radio, heatar. Owner leaving country
soon. $350. Call 376-1545 between
5-8 P.M. (A-85-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home. Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
Martin 00-21 Guitar with hardsell
case $270. Call Greg 378-3271.
(A-88-st-p).
305 HONDA SCRAMBLER 68 8300
miles. Runs well. Many extras. $425.
Call 376-5133. (A-84-st-p).
SALE: Honda Model CA 95; Asking
$260.00 or best offer. CALL
372- ask for David or leave
message. (A-80-10t-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-6 l-3t-c).-
Traller, 8 x 42', cozy, alrcondltlon,
oil heat, carpeting, 1 bedroom,
$1,400 or best offer. Try calling 9
AM l2 MN 378-6833. (A-85-st-p).
Four 15 wirewheels for MGA SSO
FM tuner-multiplex S2O D-craft 14'
fiberglass with 50 HP mere. $750
Dual TT $75 Two university spkrs,
S4O 2 Teac speakers SIBO Fisher FM
receiver $l6O Sony 250 Tape deck
with mikes $125 Two shure mikes
$l5O ge Vacuum sls Garrard TT
S9O Ph. 372-7024 after 5..
(A-86-st-p).
Human hair frosted fall, must sell.
Shoulder length, cost SIOO new. Ask
$25 minimum. Call Cindy 392-8496.
May see at Graham, Room 212.
(A-87-st-p)
STEREO COMPONENTS, ADC
303A speakers, AR turntable, Shure
cartridge (M9le) 378-6761 after 5.
(A-87-3t-p)
English Racer bicycle 3 speed
sl2 after 5 weekdays Phone
378-3292 Apt. 227 R Flavets.
(A-87-2t-p)
CRAOG CASSETTE recorder bought
In September, used very little S7O
new. Will sell for SSO 111 Weaver
Hall 392-7888 (A-87-2t-p)
Audio Vox Tape Deck Great Sound
$50.00 Lafayette 20 Amplifier 3
months old $40.00 Call Robby
373- (A-87-3t-p)
BSA 250 cc Sport Stur. New paint,
recent overhaul, low mileage, very
good condition. $295. 376-9723
after 6 P.M. (A-85-st-p).
1968 HONDA CL 90. Motor just
overhauled; runs like new. $200.00.
Call William at 392-8903.
(A-86-st-p).

JUL STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida _

TICKETS NOW ON SALE
for
Florida Playors production of
Philadelphia, Here I Cornel
"a modern comedy
Opens February 23
H.P. CONSTANS THEATRE, 8:00 p.m.
U. of F. Students: $.75 General Admission: $1.50
All seats are reserved
Box Office: 392-1653

1 FOR RENT |
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
Jlvingroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
LANDMARK APT. to sublet Spring
qtr., 2 bdrm. Call 378-9489 for Info.
(B-84-st-p).
Sin city, 2 bdrm. apt., furnished,
central A/C,' very groovy location.
But quiet nevertheless. Available
March 21 or 22. Call 373-1936
anytime. (B-84-st-p).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one & two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
Furnished, Private patio; available
around March Ist, slls. per mo.
Village 34 apt. 43, high & dry.
376-0579. (B-85-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. We need 1 female roommate for
spring qtr. Landmark apts. $46.25
per month. All deposits paid. Call
Norma Goldstein 378-4849.
(B-88-st-p).
| WANTED |
Nv.v.v.sxx-x-x-x-x-xxv.xxwx-x-x-x-sv*!*
1 female roommate for poolside
Landmark apartment for spring
quarter. Call anytime 378-2878.
(C-86-st-p).
Male roommate wanted for
Tanglewood Manor townhouse. SSO
per month + utilities. 373-2792.
(C-86-st-p).
2 roommates wanted for Hawaiian
vlll. apts, pool, 2 bath, separate
din Ing room, quiet, call 373-2493,
ask for Ray or Joe, for spring and
summer. (C-85-st-p).
Roommate 3 bedroom apt.,
offstreet parking, Ige. bath, kitchen,
LR. S4O mo. near Univ. Law Stud.
& Adv. senior. 406*fc N. E. Ist Ave.
376-0317. (C-88-st-p).
Roommate: $35/Month and shore
expenses. Home phone 378-7032 or
Grove Hall rm. 47 or 50. Ph.
376-9171. (C-88-st-p).
1 female roommate for house 1 block
from campus, own bedroom $42 mo.
+ utilities, wanted ImmedlatelyUill.''
378-2828. (C-88-st-p).

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 17,1970

WANTED
Â¥>;.;.;.:.:.:.;.;.v.v.-x*xvX*x<-x-x*v---.*. .xxxv
Male roomate-grad-student-for 1968
2 bdrm. mobile home 3 ml from
campus. Paneled, a/c, bar. $55 mo +
Vz util. Archer Rd. Village 36 20 sw
Archer Rd. lot C-13 after 5.
I HELP WANTED |
:%v.w
M KG, PR E ADV MAJORS
opportunity to get practical exper.
while earning ss. Work your own
hours. Call Fred at 372-9705.
(E-87-3t-p)
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p).
.;.;.;.X'X-X.VXvX"X*X*X*X.VX"XvX-X*X>X.V.*V
AUTOS
\ X
1964 Corvair 3 speed stand. 5 Good
tires. Excellent transporation. Best
offer. Call Tom 372-9303 after 5
P.M. (G-86-3t-p).
MG llOO, 1964, extra clean, with
abarth exhaust, shoulder harness,
only $499. Call 372-6740.
(G-85-st-p).
1961 Buick Electra; radio, white with
blue interior, good condition, a fine
town car; S3OO or best offer, call Bill
378-9087 after 4 PM. (G-85-st-p).
1966 Simca 4 dr. sedan, PB, radio,
heater, white-wall tires; very
economical, 35 + MPG; excellent
condition S6OO. Call 373-1220 after
4 PM, (C-85-st-P).
1968 VW Bug. 30,000 miles. Radio
and heater. BEST OFFER. Will be
shown on weekend. Call 376-7670 to
leave your name and phone.
(G-84-st-p>.
For Sale: 1965 PORSCHE SC
FM-Am Radio. 473-3290 Keystone
Heights. (A-86-st-p).
Pontiac GTO 1967 black vinyl top
over red 4-speed new engine and
transmission good shape $1350 call
John 392-7450 or 372-6820 after 5
pm (G-87-4t-p)
Jaguar 1958 3.4 sedan. Uke new
tires. Clean. Recent engine overhaul.
$495. Call 376-8586. (G-st-87-p)
K XKE White, new black top, new
tires, new paint job, Call Paul
378-7943. (G-86-3t-p).
PERSONAL
>
S6O a month, room & board.
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
KAPPA DELTA and your sweet BS
congratulate you Marylynn Davis on
initiation Now no more questions,
ok! Love in AOT, Becky. (J-88-lt-p).
Dog Lovers: Yorkshire terrier
puppies for sale. Adorable house
pets. Call 376-0289 after 5:00 on
weekdays. (J-88-3t-p).
Congratulations to the new Delta Tau
Delta brothers. It was a long haul but
it was worth It! DELTS forever!
Gayle and Barb. (J-88-lt-p).

PERSONAL
'x-xx-x-xxw.-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.v.w.vx-x*
S3OO REWARD FOR THE ARREST
AND CONVICTION OF PERSON
OR PERSONS INVOLVED IN THE
THEFT OF A *6B TRIUMPH
BONNEVILLE METAFLAKE RED
LISCENSE NO 10A3695 ID
DU83993. CONTACT MARK
WHITMAN 378-5463 or
SHERIFFS DEPT. (J-88-4t-p).
Students who attended PK Yonge,
needed to help In a survey, no strings,
just a few questions PLEASE Call
372-0274. (J-88-2t-p).
HIGH! HIGH! HIGH! 118 Years of
Brotherhood, LIVE EVER, DIE
NEVER; Phi Kappa Psl!! (J--88-4t-p).

pHiO
g& I 5:50 7:50 10:00
iiaim MSIUMAM
/JkV'Mhb^^
the SUNCXWCE KID g
I FEATURE AT ...
I | *-i* 1
\ 9:49 GO! FOB THE FURY,
\ FORCE AND FUN OF /
LOOK
\ ANGRY, TOUGH AND [\>r
X>ULL OF STINGr -u ||
REITZ UNION THEATRE
HUMANITIES SERIES
Mr .#
JTI
jjWfl'W
MON. 8 TUES. FEB, 16 8 17 7:00, 9:30 P.M.
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
54 BROILED CHICKEN
Yellow Rico $1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
MHMHHHSSIIBBSMniBSSL

w%v*vrtv>w>>>.W' # #A *-*-' ;
PERSONAL
** V
Turned on to yourself? Yoga may be
your way. Center OF Man presents
mike Geison, yoga instructor, 8:00
Tuesday, Catholic Student Center.
$1.50 General Admission. 75 cents
Students. (J-86-3t-p).
CJW I love you! Now the whole
world knows what else could I do?
You're stuck with me! Executive Is
the only way to fly! Love, Bugger.
(J-88-lt-p).
Separated divorced widowed or never
married? Then attend the singles club
social tonight all drinks 50 cents
Ironwood Golf & Country Club 8:00
PM on. (J-88-lt-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| PERSONAL
!v.y.;.;.Yi"Kv*>X"X^WOOWW*W.
Free Introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-10t-p).
N.W. 13th St. Ph. 372-9523
ACROSS FROM THE MALL S
ARLO GUTHRIE S
IN
ALICE'S RESTAURANT 5
ALSO
WHERE ITS AT
EIBS
RICHARD HARRIS 2
IN £
CAMELOT
mmummm
JAMES BOND
ON HER MAJESTY'S
SECRET SERVICE
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIS

Special Engagement!
F E S f-I Y A L k
COMEDY & THUm N se*t!
1 "YOU CANT CHEAT AN
The one and only 1 HOMEST WAN
V VHV M,,M I The incomparable funnv man in
II Ail I Two of his motion picture classics
Ulf Lfl I IVIIIIf I The Laugh Riot of the Yearl!
al Us MBTESI L
pMssrSj , r.?; PAY QUIT $0)1

Tuesday, February 17,1970, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL 1
X v
/V/Fyw)g) 800 WW y WWWWX-W'
Lovely alaskan mining widow age 15
seeks love romance marriage. 32
blue eyes brown hair beard, arms legs
and all extras. Must like Taurus.
378-6081. (J-87-3t-p)
Best Dylan I ever heard RL, Albany,
NY coming soon so order now all
never heard before-type songs after
Jp 378-3121 happy valentine P
(V-86-lt-p)
Alan, your wish is my command. If F
& ad can be extended, It will be that
much longer. Even that would be too
fi? rt though. LA,
LEG . (J-88-lt-p).
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress, Wedding Dress, Sportswear &
Bikinis by your English Dressmaker,
KATHLEEN. Phone 378-0320.
(J-84-st-p)
Adventure and self-development?
Consider the outward bound school
watch it on ABCs American
Sportsman, Sunday afternoon, Feb.
22 (J-87-st-p)
Cookie Man, Congratulations on
becoming a Delta Tau Delta brother.
Love ya, your lavaller mate.
(J-87-2t-p)
GREEN VAN! Thanks for the trip.
Maybe we can play again someday
when our paths cross again near
Fields. Till then: Peace. C&S
(J-87-2t-p)
Ideas? Students & faculty, why not
help plan new U.A.C. contribute
your ideas for a campus-wide poll.
Send to Consult P.0.80x 13918
Gville. (J-86-st-p).

I LOST & FOUND |
£
y%v.v.vX*xxxx*svsNs # ;*x*x*x*xxx*x>?
Reward! Psy 201 Text lost In
laundromat across from Gator Town
Apts. Contact Dudley 376-9516.
(L-88-4t-p).
| SERVICES
MARTHAS VINEYARD Summer
1970 EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES. Hundreds of
jobs! Detailed descriptions including,
restaurants, hotels, shops, Send $2.00
APPLIED RESEARCH
ASSOCIATES, Dept. 5, P.O. Box
3903, New Haven, Conn. 06525.
(M-83-2t-p).
XEROX COPIES: speclizating in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairsAuto Electrical Service, 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
Typewriter clean-up special extended
by student request. We will clean,
adjust, lubricate, and install new
ribbon on any manual portable
typewriter for just $12.50, electric
portable $18.50. Savings of more
than $10! 48 hr. service. All work
guaranteed. 30 days Jr. Office
Furniture Company. 620 S. Main St.
Phone 376-1146. (M-86-llt-c).

Page 11

SERVICES
C-
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect*
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes form postage stamp to
24" x 44", 8" x 10" certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313,
(M-83-24t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0701. (M-ts-57-c)
SAVE $$ STUDENT PRIVILEGE
CARD is now on campus. Local and
national disc. Call Fred at 372-9705
and save ss. (M-87-st-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Tennis rackets restrung, free pick-up
and delievery, call Mike 392-6004.
(M-88-lt-p).
Go to Bahamas over break only SB9.
From Miami for four day cruise to
Nassau form Miami. Call Roger
Bowers. 378-6050. (M-85-st-p).

\.e
BUSH
VOLKSWAGEN
SERVICE & REPAIRS
1311 N.W. sth Ave.
Ph. 376-4261
A reminder to our
customers and other VW
owners NOW is the
time for your periodic
service maintenance.
All work performed by
factory trained
mechanics using genuine
parts & special tools to
produce quality results.
MJINCWTH
Ends Thurs.
Wk. Days 2:154:30 7:00 and 9:15
Sat. 2:15 4:30 ,7:00 and 9:15
Sun. 2:15 4:30 7:00 and 9:15
IM3|7|73*V I Cont.
lUminiM r I From
I lots N. W. im St. \pyl 1:30
ONE OF LAST
THE YEAR'S 3
DAYS
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER
\ ftrir, < I r. COLUMBIA PICTURES J
liVtH lira 1 ast
2ii W. Uaivrtify Avt DAY
"MOW IVE SEEM
EVERYTHING.
Beverly Hilla Courier
>v. |
YES!"



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Timday, February 17,1970

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
CLC 142 and CLC 145
MID-TERM Test will be given
Wednesday, Feb. 18, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A report to Floyd 104 or
106; B to Little 101 or 109; C to
Leigh 207; D-E to Little 113,
121, or 125; F to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; G to Little
213, 215, 217, or 219; H to
Little 221; 223, 225, 227, 233,
235, or 239; l-L to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; M to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117, 118, or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, or 112; P-Q
to Floyd 108 or 109; R to Flint
101, 102, 110, or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium, T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb.
18, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A-L report
to Peabody 1,2, 4,7,10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CBS 261 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 17,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M .to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118,0 r 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110;or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110,0 r 112;S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 17,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101,102, 112,
or 114.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22, Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June and August grads,
unless indicated otherwise.
Feb. 16-17: Gulf Oil Corp.
Feb. 17: Robertson, May
Zima and Co.; Vitro Corp. of
America; Al Johnson
Construction Co.; The Rust
Engineering Co.; Celanese Corp.;
Citizens and Southern National
Bank; Chicago Bridge and Iron

balance and do you ever save when you
wnl jmmwsjf >efore signing papers anywhere else. I
vV 'VV\ Payroll deduction available for share and
GAINESVILLE FLORy UNION Q £

Administrative Notices

Co.; Jacksonville Electric
Authority.
Feb. 17-19: Proctor &
Gamble Co.; Central Intelligence
Agency
Feb. 18: TRW Systems
Group; Navy Civilian Personnel
Division; Osmose Wood
Preserving Co.; R. J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co.; State Farm
Insurance Co.; U. S. Army
Materiel Command

Tuesday, February 17,1970
Muslim Students Prayer, 122
Union, 10:00 a.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
International Film Festival,
Union Cafeteria 8t Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Perry House, Newberry Road,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: University
Symphonic Band, University
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, February 18
Secondary Ed. Foreign Language
Lecture, Randy Marshall
Phi Delta Kappa Research
Seminar, 150 Union, 12:00
noon
International Art Objects
Exhibition, 2nd floor Union,
4:00 8:00 p.m.

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

a book you
dont have to
speed-read...

Fe. 19: Naval Air
Development Center; Tampa
Electric Co.; Motorola Inc.; The
Upjohn Co.; Naval Ship Systems
Command; Sav-A-Stop Inc.
Feb. 19-20: Arthur Andersen
& Co.; Ford Motor Co.
Feb. 20: U. S. General
Accounting Office, U. S. Army
Engineer Topographic
Laboratories, Touche, Ross and

Sigma Nu Fraternity Meeting,
362 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Chinese & Persian Dinner, Union
Cafeteria, 4:30 7:30 p.m.
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 p.m.
Young Democrats, Speaker: Earl
Fairdoth, 123 Union, 6:00
p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
Speaker: Ray Osborne, 349
Union, 8:00 p.m.
International Film Festival,
Union Cafeteria & Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Reception, Senator Robert
Haverfield, Rm. 123 Union,
9:00 p.m.
Thursday, February 19
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:QO

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Co.; American Hospital Supply
Corp.; Colgate-Palmolive Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Feb. 17: LTV Aerospace
Corp.
Feb. 18: R.J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co., N. C.; The Boeing
Co.
Feb. 19: California State
Personnel Board
Feb. 20: Naval Personnel
Research & Dev. Laboratory

p.m.
Chinese & Persian Dinner, Union
Cafeteria, 4:30 7:30 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 356
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: Faculty Recital,
John Kitts, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Rathskeller, "Pacific Gas &
Electric," 9:00 & 11:00 p.m.
Friday, February 20
Muslim Student Association
Prayer Meeting, 123 Union,
12:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "Elvira Madigan,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Veterans Club Meeting,
Rathskeller, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
International Talent Show,
University Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Panhellenic Formal Ball, Union
Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, "Pacific Gas &
Electric," 9:00 & 11:00 p.m.
REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE:
Royal Winnipeg Ballet:

GENERAL NOTICES
INDIVIDUAL needed to
translate a 40-page article
written in UKRAINIAN. Will
Pay. Please call Dr. Levy,
392-2007.
CRICKET PLAYERS who
wish to participate in a match on
Saturday, Feb. 21, should ask
for further information by
calling 376-7746 or 372-2224.
$3.00, $2.00 & $1.50;
Audubon Tickets: $1.50,
SI.OO & $.50; Pacific Gas &
Electric: $1.75 members,
$2.25 non-members.
RED PM aA I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
ORANGES
$2 bushel
U-Pic-em
MODEL HOMES
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143

Nobody's going to get
mad if you don't finish
the first 63 pages by
tomorrow morning.
Or give you a bad grade
because you can't
remember who wrote
one of the stories.
That's because it was
created for your reading
pleasure.
Something you may
have forgotten about.
Remember.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.



The Florida Alligator

Gators Lose To Vols, 72-61

By KEN MCKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
KNOXVILLE Able to.score
only one field goal and two free
throws in the first nine and one
half minutes of the first half,
Floridas Gators could not catch
up to the Tennessee Volunteers
and dropped their final game of
a four-day road trip 72-61, here
Monday night.
Building up a commanding
lead in the early going, the Vols
lead 32-16 with 4:22 remaining
in the first half. Cliff Cox then
hit a 22-foot jumper for the
Gators and led a charge for the
remainder of the half that saw
UF outscore their opponents
124. The score at half was
36-28-
Even with the surprising
shooting (18 points) and

&t . *''£< .-> c- \ g? A.v\>
aKfe?. 'Hi;
Mp * jH
f ** us
HHvi ae
ANDY OWENS (45) BATTLES FOR REBOUND
... in last night's contest with Tennessee

WEVE RAISED OUR RATES!
PERSONAL CHOICE SAVINGS PLANS NOW
OFFER MORE FOR YOUR MONEY
ONE: You have many plans to choose from
TWO: We've raised the rates
Os Course, we could mention a third:
Your savings enjoy the protection of
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let your money go to work at
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF GAINESVILLE
ae Starting now, your interest will be increased to
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4y 2 % REGULAR SAVINGS
This is the account which pays you more for
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The 5% interest is compounded quarterly. You
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5% CERTIFICATES principal at that time provided it's been on
nC DACIT deposit a full calendar quarter. $600.00 opens
Or D6ro2>H this new account for you.
5 1 / We've left the minimum requirements and
10 / raised the rates from 5% on maturities of one
y w /o year. Let us safeguard your money for one
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5Vi% CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF GAINESVILLE

rebounding (10) effort from big
Dan Boe, the Gators could not
put it together the second half
to overcome the poor shooting
in the first part-of the first Half,
We shot poorly the first half
and didnt get the shots
Tennessee got, UF Coach
Tommy Bartlett said. We also
didnt handle their full-court
press very well in the first half.
In the second half we didnt
make as many mistakes off the
press, but the breaks didnt fall
for us.
Andy Owens, who also hit for
18 points, missed the first shot
of a one-one free throw with
1:57 remaining in the game. If
he had made both of those, the
Gators would have been down
by only five. He missed another
one with 1:26 remaining.
Don Johnson led game sewers

Tuesday, February 17,1970, The Florida Alligator,

with 23 for the Volunteers.
Dickey Johnston added 13 and
Bobby Croft 12.
Jerry Hoover and Cox both
had 10 for the Gators.
Florida hit 44.4 per cent from
the floor to UTs 39.7, but the

Frazier Victorious
In Fifth Round

By JOHN G. GRIFFIN
UPI Sports Editor
NEW YORK Unbeaten Joe
Frazier, scoring two
knockdowns with his thundering
left hook, became the first
undisputed world heavyweight
champion in nearly three years
Monday night when he
hammered Jimmy Ellis into a
technical knockout in five
rounds at Madison Square
Garden.
Frazier, fighting like a berserk
buzzsaw with relentless,
boring-in frenzy, floored Ellis
twice in a stunning fourth
round.
And the end came for Ellis,
who had been recognized as
world champion by the World
Boxing Association, when
Angelo Dundee, his manager,
refused to permit him to come
out for the fifth round. Under
New York state rules it was a
technical knockout in the fifth
round.
A crowd of 18,000, paying a
gate of $600,000 at Madison
Square Garden, saw Frazier spill
Ellis midway in the fourth round
with a two-handed barrage when
he pinned Ellis in his own

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

Vols hit on 72 per cent from the
line to the Gators 61.9.
Tennessee outrebounded Florida
50-36.
UFs Baby Gators dropped an
earlier game, 76-66, to the Vols
frosh squad.

comer.
Ellis, who had tried in vain to
spear the onrushing
Philadelphian with long pot
shots, pitched forward onto his
face and seemed unlikely to beat
the count. However, the
Louisville, Ky., battler struggled
to hi? feet at the count of eight
and managed to survive almost
another minute.

Page 13

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Page 14

i, Tlw Florida AMstor, Tyadoy, Fabvvary 17.1870

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: 'V
PHIL BANNISTbH^
I lv& a ~_
*js P-j| tfdjll'
jl &i *MI JTSP
ip.
PHIL BANNISTER
RAIL DRAGSTERS
Own Chenevert (above) takes the win in the Top Fuel Eliminator
competition, beating out Jim Paoli in the finals.
A gas dragster (below) has trouble coming off the line as did many
other drivers during final day of racing at the local dragway.

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PHIL BANNISTER

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[ON WHEELS
Surprise Ending
i BOB THOMAS
Drag racing is one of the worids most unpredictable sports, and the
first annual Gatomationals was a classic example.
After consistently recording four runs under the national record,
local favorite Don Gadits of Tampa lost the Top Fuel Eliminator title
in the semi-final round. Running against Jim Paoli of Springfield, 111.,
Gaiiits tires lost their bite tod his car swerved slightly.
Dave Chenevert of Metarie, La., then won the tide, beating Paoli
off the line in the finals. It was Cheneverts first Championship
victory.
But the crowd of 23,000 didnt go away in disappointment. Bill
Grumpy Jenkins of Malvern, Pa. drew as much applause as Garlits
as he continued his domination of the Pro Stock category. Jenkins put
down Ronnie Sox of the famed Sox and Martin team in the final
round.
Beating the Hemi-Barracuda off the line, Jenkins drove his 427
Camaro over the quarter mile in 9.90 seconds.
Top Gas Eliminator was won by Gordon CoDet of Westerville,
Ohio, but only after a close battie. Pre-race favorite Jack Jones lost in
the semi-finals when DA. Santucci beat him off the line by nearly a
length and held him off for the win.
Santucci then went on to red light in the finals. In winning Top
Gas, Collet retained his record of winning every Championship event
at least once.
Most of the excitement in Funny Car category occured during
qualifications as 20 cars fought over the eight starting berths. Every
car that made the cut was under the national record of 737 seconds.
Both Candies andHughescars made it to the finals. Leonard Hughes
of Houma, La., drove one, and Larry Reyes of Memphis, Term., who
drove the Hawaiian funny car to victory at the Wintemationals two
weeks ago, drove the other.
Even though Reyes turned a better time, Hughes beat him off the
line and led all the way to the finish.-
The hole shot, or beating the other driver off the starting line,
proved to be the difference between winning or losing for many
drivers. In Top Fuel, Pro Stock, and Funny Car, the loser in the finals
had the fastest time, but lost the race coming off the line.

DOUG CASE
LOSERS
Famed Sox and Martin Pro
Stocker (above) lotas out in
finals at first annual
Gatomationals. Della Woods'
Funny Car, "Funny Honey"
(below) failed to place after a
near accident on Saturday.

AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
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East Side ACL Depot
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376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
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buses.

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Tickets Still Available For Banquet

Former Gator football stars
and state politicians highlight
tomorrow nights banquet in
honor of UF Athletic Director
Ray Graves.

-
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HHf
; : HK&IsIfHRL ,V
flk *>
HkVifl V JiSS*
RETIRED UF FOOTBALL COACH RAY GRAVES
... his 27 years of coaching to be honored Wednesday

UFs Joel Dobb Sets Mark
In National Rifle Match

Joel Dobson set a new range
record Saturday, as the UF rifle
team captured the National Rifle
Association Conventional Rifle
Match in the indoor range at
Florida Southern College.
Dobson scored 293 points out
of a possible 300 which is the
highest score recorded by any
UF member during NRA
competition this year.
More Awards
For Alvarez
Carlos Alvarez, chock full of
honors after his sensational
sophomore season of football at
the UF, might be in line for one
of the most meaningful awards
of all.
Alvarez, an honor student
majoring in Pre-Law, has been
nominated for the Academic
All-America team selected each
year for the NCAA by COSIDA
(College Sports Information
Directors of America).
Alvarez has already been
named to the SEC All-Academic
team.
join the fun!
THE SWING S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
*ky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Gainesville Airport
n Waldo Road
MSmSL

The Kappa Alpha Theta
sponsored ceremony evolves
around the theme of Graves* 27
years of coaching, and is slated
to begin at 7 pjn., in the Reitz

On Friday Lee Duke captured
the girls competition by scoring
258 points out of the possible
300 to lead UFs rifle team to a
respectable second place finish
in the NRA International Rifle
Match, with Florida Southern
finishing in the first position.
Dobson finished second in
this match with UF team captain
Dean Ettinger finishing fourth.
The UF rifle teams next

[paa TIIAOB 41 Free Bottle of Ripple wine
VK IllUee With $5 Food Delivery Order
__ _ CLIP & SAVE
i FREE DELIVERY M HEATED
I Cl ft Os OVENS PHONE 376^1322 j
~W P r T. £_ SPUTA MDNIGHT [Closed Mon.)
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! PI 7TK PASTA SPECIALTIES
1 9 12 SPAGHETTI, 1.60 HOME MADE BAKED LASAGNA 2.55
I pEWEROM iCHEESE 145 1.95 1.50 VEAL PARMIGIANA/SPAGHETTI 2.55 I
| SAUSAGE 1*45 L 95 sPAGHETtT 180 VEAL AND EGGPLANT I
MEATBALL 1.45 1.95 Mushrooms PARMIGIANA/SPAGHETTI 2.45
o SALAMI 1.45 1.95 SPAGHETTI 180 1
C GARLIC 135 1.85 CHICKEN CACCIATORE >
v GREEN PEPPER 1.35 1.85 SPAGHETTI 1.80 SPAGHETTI 2.55 2
* SHRIMP 1-60 2.10 Clam Ssuce MANICOTTI 2 44 4
J ANCHOVY 1.60 2.10 RAVIOLI 1.90 MAmWIU 255 a
< MUSHROOM 160 210 on All above orders include 3
" COMBINATION 1.7 S 2.55 Meat Sauce 180 ItoU
I (any two above RAVIOLI 200 ITALIAN TOSSED SALAD .40 |
DELUXE 1.95 2.85 Mushrooms MINESTRONE SOUP .35
] ITALIAN SUB DESSERTS DRINKS
; SANDWICHES CHEESECAKE .55 COKE < ORANGE SPRITE I
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IN HONOR OF RAY GRAVES

Union.
Tickets to the program may
be purchased at Stag *N Drag
(downtown and the Mall), UF
Sports Publicity Office and the
KAT house. Prices range from
$4 for students to $6 for adults.
Tickets for the program only,
which features a color film of
Gator football history, can be
purchased for $2.
All money received from the
donations will go into the
university activity center fund.
Guests include, Attorney
General Earl Fairdoth, State
Rep. Ralph Turlington,
Commissioner of Education
Floyd Christian and State Rep.
William Bevis.
Fairdoth is expected to
announce his candidacy for
governor in a press conference
following the program.
Gator football players
attending include Heisman
Trophy winner Steve Spurrier,
All-American Larry Dupree, and

match will be March 7 in the
All-Florida Intercollegiate Rifle
Championship at the UF rifle
range.
Mays Homers
SAN FRANCISCO Willie
Mays was the last big league
player to hit four homers in a
game. The San Francisco Giants
outfielder clouted four home
runs on April 30,1961.

Tom Shannon.
Also, Astronaut Allan Bean,
who almost didnt go to the
moon because he didn't want to
miss the Miami-Florida game, is

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International Jet Set
by Winning your Wings
as a
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Fly to the international capitals of the world.
PARIS LONDON ROME TOKYO
Immediate overseas flights are yours
after only 5 weeks training.
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Weight 105-140 pounds.
Good Health. Good Vision.
Knowledge foreign language.
Positions are based in:
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SEATTLE LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO
Interviews on campus will be conducted
February 27, 1970
University PtsosmantCentw
Reitz Union, Suits G 22
. For Interview Appointment I
\ contact your Placement Director. /
An Equal Opportunity Employer Y

Timdoy, February 17,1970. The Florida ~srtar.

trying to make arrangements to
attend.
Jacksonville television
personality Dick Stratton wo
serve as emcee of the event.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tu-day, Fatoruary 17,1970

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GATOR SKI TEAM MEMBER ON SLALOM RUN
... team remains undefeated after Saturday's meet

HIGHEST PAID DODGER
Wills Signs For $95,000

LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Maury Wills, base-stealing
shortstop, became the highest
paid member of the Los Angeles
Dodgers Sunday when he
publicly signed his 1970
contract for an estimated
$95,000.
The veteran infielder was
signed by Dodgers
Vice-President and Director of
Player Personnel AlCampanis on
the playing field at Dodger
Stadium before the team went
through a public workout and a
practice game with the
University of Southern
California.
Wills had appeared for the
workout and Campania, in mode
seriousness, said he could not
partiripate unless he signed his
contract. The Dodger executive
drew a contract from his pocket
and a pen and had Wills sign the
document on the bade of
infielder Ted Sizemore.
The 37-year-old Wills returned
to the Dodgers last June in a

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trade with Montreal. For Los
Angeles, Wills batted .297 in 104
games and his seasonal batting
average was .274. He had 40
stolen bases, giving him 542 for
11 major league seasons, fifth on
the alltime list.
The signing of Wills for
approximately the same amount
he received last year put him an
estimated $20,000 ahead of
Willie Davis, who signed last
month for a reported $75,000.
With Wills in the fold, the
Dodgers now have seven players
unsigned. They are pitchers Bill
Singer, Don Sutton and Pete
Mikkdsen, catchers Tom Haller
and Jeff Torboig, infielder Jim
Lefebvre and outfidder Len
Gabrielson.
The Trojans defeated the
Dodgers 4-0 in the five-inning
exhibition game before a crowd
of 20,000 Sunday. The Dodgers
used a number of farm players in
the game.
The team leaves next

Saturday for Vero Beach, Fla.,
and the start of spring training.

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Cont a c t
lenses are made
of modern plas plastics
tics plastics which have en- 1
tirely different charac characteristics
teristics characteristics than the tissues |gpP
and fluids of the eye. Conse Consequently
quently Consequently your eye cannot handle
this foreign object without help.
So, in order to correct for
Mother Natures lack of foresight,
you have to use lens solutions to
make your contacts and your eyes
compatible.
There was a time when you
needed two or more separate

Mother Nature
never planned on
contact
lenses

Gator Ski Team Wins
Tampa Tournament

UFs Gator ski team remains
undefeated after competition in
jumping, slalom and trick skiing
in Saturdays intercollegiate
tournament at the University of
Tampa ski site.
Tampas scholarship skier,
Alan Kemp ton, took first place
in all three mens events leading
an attempt to upset Floridas
undefeated status.
This effort was thwarted by
UFs proficiency in depth, which
gained them all the second place
finishes in men's competition
and a majority of the other three
places in both men's and
womens.
University of Tampa placed
second and the University of
South Florida was third. Polk,
Seminole and St. Petersburg
Junior Colleges participated but
didn't field complete teams.
UFs men, paced by John
Bedingfield, Bill Cox, Ronnie
McQueen and Dick Moffett,
took the slalom, jumping and
mens overall trophies.
Kim Anton, Linda Aust, Trish
Green and Poppy Johnson skied
the womens team to victory in
slalom and women's overall.

solutions to
properly mod modify
ify modify and care
Ifjfff for v ur con
tacts, making
IphadWlw them ready for
''' your eyes. But now
theres Lensine from
the makers of
|M§iP Murine. Lensine,
for contact com comfort
fort comfort and convenience.
Lensine is the one solution
for complete contact lens care.
Just a drop or two of Lensine coats
and lubricates your lens. This al allows
lows allows the lens to float more freely
in the natural fluids of your eye.
Why? Because Lensine is an "iso "isotonic"
tonic" "isotonic" solution, very much like
your own tears. Lensine is com compatible
patible compatible with the eye.
Cleaning your contacts with
Lensine retards the build-up of
foreign deposits on the lenses.

The tournament was
highlighted by the entry of
world-champion skier Liz Allan,
a freshman at Seminole Junior
College.
This was her first
intercollegiate tournament and
she won all three women's
events by setting intercollegiate
records of 102 feet in jumping,
SI buoys in slalom and a record
trick run.
The Gator Ski Club will
display the trophies and show
slides of the tournament at a
meeting 7:30 pm. Wednesday,
Feb. 25 in room 150-C in the
Reitz Union.
Billy Kidd
To Turn Pro
GENEVA, Switzerland (UPI)
- Dynamic Billy Kidd
announced Monday he would
turn pro and compete in a
$30,000 ski meet at Veibier,
Switzerland, Feb. 22-24.

And soaking your contacts in
Lensine between wearing periods
assures you of proper lens hy hy
hy giene. You get a free soaking-stor soaking-storage
age soaking-storage case with individual lens com compartments
partments compartments on the bottom of every
bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated that
improper storage between wear wearings
ings wearings permits the growth of bac bacteria
teria bacteria on the lenses. This is a sure
cause of eye irritation and, in
some cases, can endanger your
vision. Bacteria cannot grow in
Lensine because its sterile, self selfsanitizing,
sanitizing, selfsanitizing, and antiseptic.
Let caring for your
contacts be as conven convenient
ient convenient as wearing them.
Get some Lensine...
jHHH Mothers little helper.