Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Operation Consult Seeks New UAC Ideas

By ED CROWELL
AHifator Staff Writar
An outspoken opponent of last Feb.
4 referendum on the proposed
University Activities Center has formed
a group to consult all areas of the
campus for ideas and opinions on a
performing arts and athletic complex.
James Clark, who chaired a
committee opposing the UAC
referendum, said his new group, dubbed
Operation Consult, will present a report
with recommendations based on the

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PHYLLIS GALLUB
FULL OF WHAT?
If Jmne Dixon can m into tha future, we bet she never foresaw
what hovered over her heed at her Accent 70 address in University
Auditorium Wednesday afternoon. Some unknown prankster got in
the last word, but Mrs. Dixon didn't know it until much later... after
a bomb threat chased everyone outside to the Plaza of the Americas.
Sea story page 3.

CLEO Program Rejection
Condemned By JMBA
See editorial page 8

Members of the John Marshall Bar Association
(JMBA) decided Wednesday to present the Board of
Regents personally with a resolution condemning
the Regents* rejection of the U. S. Council of Legal
Opportunities (GLEO) program.
They also agreed to meet individually with
members of the Regents curriculum committee and
Higrirex the possibility of a state-sponsored summer
institute in 1971 for disadvantaged prospective law
students.
Twenty law students, law instructor Tom Hyman
and Law Dean Frank Maloney met for about 45
mimrfM Wednesday afternoon with UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and Executive Vice President
Harry H. Sisler to discuss what action they should
take.*
The CLEO program the Regents rejected was an
eight-week summer institute for disadvantaged
college graduates who desire to enter law schools,
but cannot meet entrance requirements. UF was
accepted as a sponsor for one of the 1970 sessions.
Regents Vice Chairman Louis Murray said the
program was rejected by the curriculum committee
because it had too many uncertainties, including
lack of a committment of federal funds to continue
the program. They also objected to the fact the
program would be open to out of state students.
OCowa m* iUmttr **

group's findings to the UF
administration.
He said he plans to consult with UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell but has
been unable to do so thus far. s
Clark said Operation Consult will
have as objectives to meet with people
from all segments of campus to gather
ideas, to determine through polling
what facilities are wanted, to investigate
possible methods of finance and to
initiate planning.
Working from the premise that
while UF students do not want a tuition

of the program, a
The JMBA resolution said the Regents action
was in total disregard of all the needs of the State
of Florida in developing leaders from all areas of our
society and which makes access to the legal
profession a near-impossibility for blacks and other
disadvantaged students in the State of Florida.
The JMBA resolution said since Florida A&Ms
law school was discontinued, the state should make
an effort to help those students who would have
entered A&M to prepare to enter other schools.
Three alternatives were suggested to the-Regents:
Accepting a summer institute offered by
federally and privately supported organizations.
Establishing a state-sponsored program.
Re-establishing a segregated law school, so
blacks and other disadvantaged students could get at
least some legal education.
JMBA members have agreed to offer their
assistance to the Regents in developing a new
program if the Regents accept the second
alternative.
The new program could not come out of the
present budget, OConnell said. It would have to be
built into the budget by the Board/ of Regents. The
program itself would also have to be approved by
the Regents, after it goei through the curriculum
committee.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 85

SHEPHERD MIDDLEBROOKS SAY
Revamping On
For Homecoming

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writar
Homecoming must change,
says UF Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, and Blue Key
President Don Middlebrooks
says it will change, but not
because of Shepherd.
In the Student Body Budget
proposed by Shepherd's
administration (but not yet
approved by the Student
Senate), Homecoming has been
allocated $7,000, an increase of
$2,000 over last year.
With the increase conies a
warning: We have asked
privately, and the senate is likely
to demand formally, that
Florida Blue Key undertake a
fundamental revamping of the
format of Homecoming or face a
total cut-off of student body
funds."

increase, they need and want a
performing arts and athletic complex,
Operation Consult is a positive step on
the road to such a facility," Clark said.
Clark said his group already has
widespread support, particularly from
faculty members. He said he intends to
gather alumni support, Tampa and
Miami alumni have expressed interest in
tiie project, he said.
Operation Consult will hold its first
open meeting next week. Dark said
anyone interested may submit ideas or
opinions to P.O. Box 13918, University

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

Blue Key sponsors
Homecoming, which includes
Gator Growl, a parade,
sweetheart and slogan contests,
banquets, the alumni barbeque
and skits.
Shepherd thinks Homecoming
expenditures need to be closely
examined.
There has not been a real
fundamental look at
Homecoming since it was
formed years ago.
He claims other organizations
had their requests carefully
examined, but Blue Key got its
appropriation for Homecoming
without intensive questioning.
They (the senate) took
'Celebration apart piece by
piece, he said. Celebration is
an arts festival originated by
Omkron Delta Kappa, of which
Shepherd is a member.
He said the Student Senate
would be asked to re-examine
Homecoming or could be put
in the politically embarrassing
position of having a double
standard.
I believe we ought to adopt a
line item approach to
Homecoming, Shepherd said.
Gator Growl is no longer
relevant to large crowds,
Shepherd said. The skits are
not effective ... Its not even
entertainment when you cant
see and cant hear.
As far as I know theres no
move in the senate to force
changes in Homecoming,
Senate President Jack Vaughn
said. I think its probably that
he (Shepherd) just doesnt get
along too well with Blue Key,
Vaughn said.
Sam Poole, senate majority
leader, called Shepherd's
statement a surprise tm me.**

Station.
Clark said Physical Plant Director
Walter Matherly is the only
administration official he has been able
to contact about Operation Consult.
Matherly could not be readied for
comment.
Ralph Glatfelter, who led support for
the UAC tuition hike, said Clark is
making it harder for everyone to begin
working together." He said Clark has
cut himself off by continuing in an
opposition role and not working with
the UAC Faculty Committee.

Thursday, February 12, 1970

Homecoming is something
that, of course, will be funded,
Poole said. The amount
probably will be greater than last
year. We wont discontinue
Homecoming.
The Senate's Budget and
Finance Committee will begin
reviewing requests from
Homecoming and other
organizations this month. The
budget will be voted on in the
Spring Quarter.
To implement changes in
Homecoming, Middlebrooks has
appointed a 10-member
committee headed by Bruce
Levy, Blue Key vice president.
I think Homecoming is
outmoded to some extent,
Middlebrooks said. I don't
think its relevant to the student
body. Its directed too much at
alumni. More groups should
participate.
He said he wants to involve
other groups, such as Interhall,
Panhellenic, Mortar Board,
Savant and the Black Student
Union in the planning stage of
Homecoming.
He also hopes to involve more
women in the participation stage
and is encouraging women to
apply for committee
chairmanships. Chairmen for
slogan contest and solicitations,
will be chosen this quarter.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has appointed a
Homecoming Advisory
Committee, but Middlebrooks
said it hasnt met with him.
About all they do is pick the
date for Homecoming, he said.
' I Irialdife 111 l
lIMIM lIMIMACCENT
ACCENT lIMIMACCENT 70 schedule of
events, highlighting Stewart
Udall, listed for today and
tonight page 4
Classified! .. 14-15
Editorials . 8
Entertainment 12
Letters 9
Small Society .4
Sports 18




Page 2

!, Th Florida Attigitor, Thursday, February 12,1h70

AT PANEL PRESENTATION IN PLAZA
Mayors AareePollution Most Pressing Problem

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
Five Florida mayors all agreed that yes indeed,
pollution is our most pressing problem.
~~~ At a panel presentation, part of Accent 70, in
the Plaza of the Americas Wednesday, mayors Dick
Greco, Tampa; Stephen Clark/ Miami; Carl
Langford, Orlando; Walter Murphree, Gainesville;
and Hams Tanzler, Jacksonville addressed themselves
to the problems facing cities this decade.
The panel was moderated by Dr. Ernest Bartley,
UF political science professor.
Clark observed that his city, Miami, had 1.3
million people of which 25 per cent are Spanish and
25 per cent are black.
If people have a good place to live, Clark said,
you dont have to worry about pollution or race
riots and your people are easy to control. T

WONT FUND POLICEMEN
Senate Denies Flavet 111 Request

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday
night denied a request by Flavet
111 for S3OO to hire a
supplementary policeman to
protect the area from iheft,
speeders and peeping toms.
Marsha Madorsky, chairman
of the Budget and Finance
Committee, said There is no
real need for us to get into the
business of funding people for
policemen.
If we start funding Flavet Ql
for a policeman we will have to
start funding everyone else who
asks for one, she said.
Stewart Hershey, another
senator, described die proposal
as a Pandoras Box, saying

'Sign From Above Comes
To Jeane Dixon At Accent

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writar
Jeane Dixon was speaking
Wednesday afternoon of the
spiritual awakening which
begins in each individual when
a sign descended from above.
The five foot square cloth
sign, which was released from a
wooden Accent 7O sign about
five minutes after Mrs. Dixon
began speaking said, BULL
SH*T.
The letters were about a foot
and a half high black against a
white background. The star was
red.
Mrs. Dixon, unaware of the
sign, continued with her speech.
Hie crowd, of about 500,
seemed quite aware.
Accent chairman Joe Hilliard
said he had no idea who had
put up either sign.
The sign was released by a
string, probably hanging on the
left aide of the auditorium,
A thin girl in a blue trench
coat was seen in the left
balcony near the stairs taking

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspape* of tjie
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at tho United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments foi any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising, manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
morg than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
severalt times.; -J|#tices for .correction must be given before the ,j*ext v

that all the other married
housing areas would also request
funds for policemen.
The senate also passed a
resolution favoring free courses
for UF employes. The
resolution, which required a
two-thirds vote, passed
unanimously.
The students of the
University of Florida strongly
believe that these free courses
for the university employes serve
a very useful purpose a*.d wish
to see them maintained, the
resolution stated.
Both UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and Vice President for
Business Affairs William Elmore
contend that the courses cost
the state nothing, the resolution
said.

pictures just before and after the
sign was released, according to
two Gainesville High School
seniors.
She took more pictures after
the sign came down, and then
just casually walked out, one of
the girls said.
Neither girl actually saw
anyone pull the string.
A few minutes later, everyone
was asked to move outside to
the Plaza of the Americas.
It was later learned that an
unknown person had called the
information desk in the Reitz
Union and reported a bomb had
been planted in University
Auditorium, p
Richard Strum, the student
who answered the phone in the
Union, called University police.
He just said, There is a
bomb in University Auditorium,*
and hung up, Struss said.
Approximately 30 police
searched the auditorium, after it
was evacuated, University Police
Lt. Vernon Holliman said.
Mrs. Dixon continued her
speech outside.

Orlandos Langford jokingly said his city had
solved its problems already
On a more serious note, he added:
The closeness of cities can stimulate the best in
citizens and it can stimulate the worst.
In our exploding society of rising affluence, we
can easily bypass sections of our population. Some
groups may sink into hopelessness and despair.
We may be soon divided into the suburban rich
and the urban poor, each group distrustful and
hostile towards the other.
Murphree, of Gainesville, observed that our city
has little air pollution but faces the same problems
of solid and liquid waste disposal as other cities.
More concerned about the problems of rapid
growth of cities, Murphree observed, in Gainesvilles
case, that the city grew from about five square miles
to 20 square miles in one year, 1961.

Several senators from Flavets
said although their area was
patroled by the campus police
this coverage was not adequate.
Tom Ball, chairman of the
Mayors Council, said a man
living in Flavets is a bondable
policeman who would be willing
to do the job for SIOO a quarter
for the next three quarters.
The last time a policeman had
been hired this way, Ball said,
the senate had agreed that the
next time a qualified person
moved into Flavets and was
needed, a similar procedure
would be followed.
The students change, the
senate changes, but the word of
the senate should stand, he
said.
As the situation now stands,

Mrs. Dixon dedicated the
Accent time capsule, which will
be opened during Accent week,
1984.
The capsule, which will be
buried Feb. 27, will include a gas
mask, two books about Mrs.
Dixon and predictions of
students and faculty.

Dialogue Hosts Gator
Why did the Alligator editorially endorse the recent University
Activity Center referendum? How was this policy arrived at? Why
arent all letters to the editor published?
These and other questions will be answered tonight as two Alligator
editors will appear on Florida Blue Keys Dialogue program at Upm
on radio station WRUF. Managing Editor Dave Doucette and
Executive Editor Carol Sanger will answer questions from moderator
Bob Moore and those phoned in by listeners.
Anyone with questions, criticisms, or general comments
concerning the newspaper should take this opportunity to get the
answers, Doucette said. 8

HIE SEC CHASTER FLIGHT
1
$220 And $lO Administration Fee
TAMPA to AMSTERDAM
Florida at ftwultv 8 rtafT p P rox s ?P t 5 Op* 1 to all University of
by Feb. 27) now beinq taken in the '^* mmedi ta families. SSO deposits {due
are interested, please come by or i|?392 lOT6^urii£!!h l £!i% ,s qn OU
B:3OPM;Tins., Wed., Fri. 3:30 -fcOOPAi *"" thewhou, : Mon 7:3o

Jacksonvilles Tanzler, mayor of the largest
American city and the second largest world city,
began his talk by comparing Gainesvilles 20 square
miles to his citys 842 square miles.
About pollution, he said:
Pollution in Jacksonville is second to none.
Tanzler, speaking of Jacksonvilles recent
consolidation, blamed the lack of pollution control
on dying core cities where people who work in the
citierdontlive tiiereor rapport the city.
In Jacksonville he also blamed previous
governments bureaucracy and lack of coordination.
They (the old governments) didnt have the
political temerity to act. Our new government has
made it possible to face the problem (pollution)
head-on.

all state staff employes will be
allowed to take up to six hours
of free courses per quarter until
the end of the Spring Term.
State Secretary of
Administration Samuel Tucker
said Tuesday the 20-year-old
policy will be discontinued at
that time.
The senate Judiciary
Committee will hold an open
meeting tonight at 7:30 in room
316 of the Reitz Union to
discuss a bill requiring the name
of any student found guilty of
an Honor Code violation to be
printed in the Alligator.
The bill would require the
name and violation to be printed
only once for each violation and
immediately following the final
judgment.
Raul Ramirez, editor-in-chief
of the Alligator, will take part in
the meeting.
Miss Madorsky announced
that work will begin on the
student budget next week.
Hearings will take place daily in
the senate offices, room 305 of
the Union. The hearings will be
open.
Because of the budget work,
the senate will meet twice a
week beginning next week. The
Tuesday meeting will begin at 9
pjn.; and on Thursday, at 7:30
pm.

. ft v/X
1 Bundy, Cox
| Talk Today 1
Two men with contrasting $
jij ideological views concerning
ij theology and its social ;j;
ji ramifications will speak in jji
|: Gainesville today. jji
Dr. Harvey G. Cox, jjj
ijj: professor of divinity at $
Harvard University, will
ij: discuss The City of the jij
ijj Future this morning at 10 >:
ijj a.m. in the University
ji Auditorium. His discussion, j:
j: sponsored by the College of ji
;j Arts and Sciences, is part of ji
jij Accent Week activities. Cox is :
: author of The Secular City. :
: Gen. Edgar C. Bundy, :j
executive secretary of the j:j
ij: Church League of America jij
ij and a religious conservative, jij
will speak tonight, 7:30 at jij
i*; the University Baptist §
| Church, 3401 NW 34th St. ij
ijj He will discuss How ij
:j Religious liberalism Produces ij
iji Marxism; jij
xnwi-eosTia
t 1



York, Brower Debate Mans Biggest Problem

What is mans biggest problem today?
Whether its feeding the worlds
population, or keeping it from
exploding, Mondays Accent 70
program had advocates on both sides.
Dr. E. T. York, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science provost, said that
feeding the worlds population is
undoubtedly the worlds greatest
problem. What more significant
challenge could anyone or any
organization have?
In contradiction to Yorks position
was the statement by David Brower,
founder of Friends of the Earth, who
said, The worlds population explosion
is problem number one.
Brower was applauded by students
when he added that the present
philosophy dictating our actions today

Pest Control Head Says
Roach Scare'Exaggerated

The reports of unbelievable
numbers of cockroaches in
Murphree area are highly
exaggerated and have no basis
in fact, Pest Control Division
Supervisor Frank Lee said
Wednesday.
He referred to an article
appearing in Mondays issue of
the Alligator in which Murphree
resident Tim Rogers, lUC,
announced a contest to see
which dorm floor in the area
could collect the most roaches.
Written by a Joumaliam 301
student, the story Wednesday
was picked up by the Associated
Press and used by the St.
Petersburg Times and the Miami
Herald.
Sure there are roadies all
over campus. Im not trying to
minimize the problem, but
youve got to be realistic, Lee
said.

REMODELING
SALE

.
WE'RE PUTTING OUR CAMPUS STORE BACK INTO
ITS ORIGINAL WARM, COZY SIZE...AND WE'RE
OFFERING SOME GREAT SPECIALS FOR THE
OCCASION ... ALL FALL ITEMS NOW:
£ OT OR MORE
dU/O OFF
PLUS
WE'VE PUT OUT TABLES AND RACKS AT LOW, LOW
PRICES
$1.99 (VALUES TO $6) .. 2.99 (VALUES TO $8)
$3.99 (VALUES TO $10) 5.09 (VALUES TO sl4)
INCLUDED ARE PANTS, SKIRTS, SHORTS, BLOUSES,
SHELLS, HANDBAGS, LINGERIE, SLEEPWEAR
AND:
WE'VE REDUCED DRESSES RAINCOATS COATS
JEWELRY BELTS
THIS IS A REAL CLEAN OUT SALE
CAMPUS TWIG ONLY 1131W.UIHV. At

is one of growth for the sake of
growth which he compared to the
ideology of the cancer cell.
He referred to the goal of Zero
Population Growth, Inc. (ZPG) as being
too conservative.
Our goal by the year 2000 should be
less than zero population growth. We do
have a population crisis, and we wont
fix it unless we break some bad habits.
York and Brower differed on the
subject of using pesticides to increase
world food production.
York advocated putting pesticides in
perspective.
We should recognize that almost
anything man does disturbs the so-called
natural environment in some way. He
added, However, such disturbance may
be warranted because of the benefits

We fumigate the rooms
during quarter breaks. The
students dont like us disturbing
them during the quarter, he
said.
1 Lee said he investigated
Rogers' room in the presence of
the maintenance supervisor for
roaches the morning the article
appeared in the Alligator. Cat
food on the desk and milk
cartons in the wastebasket, Lee
said.
The room had a zoo-like
odor, he said.
Then Rogers came in carrying
a big black cat.
The cat food probably
accounted for the more than
usual amount of roaches Rogers
saw, Lee said.
According to Lee, Rogers
then told him he had had little
trouble with roaches.
No official complaints have

AT MONDAYS ACCENT PROGRAM

been registered through the
Dept, of Housing about roaches
in the area, despite the original
articles claim of periodic
unanswered complaints, Lee
said.
Bill Elfenbein, Murphree area
counselor said Murphree area
has long been known for
roaches.
Its not so much that they
are running wild, but they turn
up at inopportune times, Uke
out of a water faucet when you
go for a drink, he said.
The contest wasnt meant
maliciously, we were just
laughing at ourselves, Elfenbein
laughed.

*§ t f~* Wim
W\. v Thurs. night 8:30,10:30
f\ ; - Fri. & Sat. night*-8:30,10:30 & 12:30
I ; JShk Advance Tiekats V'
dk J 3 | $1.50 Mambars

derived therefrom.
He warned the audience not to be
stampeded by unsubstantiated
emotional appeals into unwise decisions
relating to banning of pesticides.
There is scientific evidence, he said,
which shows that DDT has saved more
human lives than any medicine or drug
ever taken by mankind including
penicillin.
Therefore, if these compounds have
such potentials for good, do we ban
them and prevent their use, or do we try
to regulate their use in such away that
their harmful effects can be controlled,
if not eliminated?
This, to me, is a basic question
facing legislative bodies and other
groups concerned with pesticide usage.
Decisions must be made in this area,

Missing Paper Mystery
Solved At FSU
By RAFAEL BETANCOURT
Alligator otan wrvttr
The case of the missing student newspapers at FSU has been
solved.
Four male FSU students voluntarily signed written
confessions Monday admitting they took 15,000 copies of the
Flambeau early Monday morning. Their names were not
released.
The case is closely related to the Student Government run-off
elections held Tuesday where Independent Student Party
candidate Chuck Sherman defeated Action Partys Wayne
Rubinas for student body president. Monday's issue of
Flambeau contained an endorsement of Sherman by Rock
Leveille, former candidate of Now Party, eliminated in the first
election.
It is rumored that the suspects are members of a fraternity
which backed Action Party, but Flambeau staff reporter Paul
Bonapfel said the action is believed to have no political motive
but a campus prank.

Th*y, Fstmiaey t 2,1970, Th _Fl*i*

York said, that are truly in the public
interest.-
Brower claimed that the earth has
been poisoned by pesticides, and has
been done within a period of one
fortieth of a second on the seven day
creation scale.
We have poisoned the earth with
pesticides and radiation. He added that
President Nixons policy in support of
the super-sonic transport, and
trans-Alaska pipeline, his veto of HEW
legislation, and his appointment of what
Brower claims to be an untrained
Secretary of the Interior, are all policies
that will continue to pollute our
environment.
He said in conclusion, If you dont
believe we have a problem of pollution
in our environment, then smell the air
and taste the water.

Page 3



f The flwiirv 12,1970

Page 4

I 10 am. SPEAKERS: Arts and Sciences, University Auditorium,
DR. HARVEY COX, professor of divinity at Harvard, authdr
of The Secular City, The City of the Future, Bill Modlin,
ACCENT 70 host; Engineering, Reitz Union Auditorium,
FRANKLIN P. HUDDLE, technology specialist at the
library of Congress, Technological Assessment, Ed Boze,
I ACCENT 70 host; Forestry, Engineering Annex Auditorium, I
CHARLES WURSTER, chairman of the Scientific Advisory I
Council of the Environmental Defense Fund, George I
Gardner, ACCENT 70 host.
I 10:30 am. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
McCarty Auditorium, DR. C.E. BISHOP, vice president of
the University of North Carolina, former Director of the
Rural Poverty Commission, Rural American Poverty
Problem, George Seide, ACCENT 70 host.
11 am. J. Hillis Miller Medical Center, Medical Center
Auditorium, DR. ARTHUR C. BEALL, leading heart and I
lung transplant surgeon, Baylor College of Medicine,
Transplantation: Past, Present, Future, Donna Lerch, I
ACCENT 70 host.
I NOON Barbecue, Plaza of the Americas
1 pm. SPEAKERS, Plaza of the Americas, Ed Boze, ACCENT
70 host, DR. W.G. EDEN, professor of entomology, UF,
Proper Place of Pesticides MAJ. GENERAL F JP. KOISCH, I
director of civil works, Army Corps of Engineers, Cross I
Florida Barge Canal.
2:30 pm. ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENSE FUND, Plaza, Bill
Seaman, ACCENT 70 host, ROD CAMERON, executive I
director, CHARLES WURSTER, Scientific Advisory Council.
3 pm. Delegate Registration, University Inn I
8 pm. Speakers, Florida Gym, Joe Hilliard, ACCENT 70 host,
CHARLES SHEPHERD, History of the ACCENT
Symposium, DR. RENE DUBOS, 1969 Pulitzer Prize I
winner for So Human An Animal, world renowned
microbiologist, Population Size and Disposable Income,
HON. WALTER L. MAZAN, assistant secretary of
transportation for public affairs, 'Transportation and Our
Environment in the Decade Ahead, STEWART UDALL,
former secretary of the interior, author of 1976: Agenda
B for Tomorrow.
Flights Leave Tampa;
Land In Amsterdam

Instead of traveling to New
York or Nassau this summer to
catch your flight to Europe, you
can take off from Tampa on a
direct flight to Amsterdam for
$220 plus a $lO administration
fee.
Open to all UF students,
faculty, staff and their
immediate families, the charter
flights tentative departure date
is June 20 with return set for
Sept 5. American Fliers Airlines
will carry 250 passengers on a
DC-8 Stretch Jet.

Give Her I
Your Heart I
And Sai| 1 Care I
With Diamonds 1
v OPEN A STUDENT CHARGE ACC OU N ? g
SALES i
jwiLfh\
Were nothing without gour love. |

The charter flight is being
sponsored by the International
Association of Business and
Economic Students
(AIESEC-Florida).
Reservations can be made,
with a SSO deposit, in room 301
of the Reitz Union on Monday
between 7:30 8:30 pm., and
Tuesday, Wednesday or Friday
from 3:30 5 pm. Further
information can be obtained by
calling 373-2590 anytime or
392-1676 during the above
hours.

* II Prickman
.THiE tStfv'EfWENT
OF THE ANTI- A HCO- 0&Y!
BY THE ANTI- \/| PJI
fBoPLE I 'YjP
amp FofZ the Mvr I*(. fdl7m^)il ( V
ANTI -<2£>/WUJN IST I
SAYS RUTGERS PROF
U.S. Lacks Social Welfare

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writar
Calling the United States an anomaly, a deviant
in its lack of progressive social welfare legislation,
Dr. John Robert Howard of Rutgers University
Livingston Campus, discussed the failure of the
U. S. to eliminate poverty Monday night.
About 65 people attended the 8 pm. discussion
at Bryant Hall sponsored jointly by the Committee
for Speakers in Afro-American History and the
Department of Sociology.
Dr. Howard, a scholar and author, has published
several articles and books on subjects such as the

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nwa couch's

hippie phenomenon and blacks in the ghettoes.
Among his publications ate books called Where It
Is and Lifestyles in the Black Ghettoes. In
addition he has had numerous articles published in
Transaction magazine.*
Citing the U. S. as the only industrial democracy
that does not have an automatic system of family
and children income allowances, Howard
emphasized that America falls short of this and other
social welfare benefits which other countries take
for granted.
In his discussion of American poverty, Howard
said that a majority (80 per cent) of the poor or
economically marginal Americans are white.



THE DRAFT:
question & answer

(Editors note: Send all
questions to Daft Answer Man,
330 Reitz Union)
Q. I have a 1-Y deferment
and my lottery number is 90.
How long will that deferment
last? Will this deferment get me
out of maximum vulnerability if
I lose it before age 26?
A. A 1-Y (mental, physical,
or administrative deferment) is a
semi-permanent deferment
which should hold you unless a
national emergency occurs. In
order to maintain a 1-Y, it is
advisable to send in a Current
Information questionnaire to
your local draft board every six
months. These are available from
your local board.
If you lose your 1-Y before
your 26th birthday, you will be
placed in a first priority group
with all the other 1-As, and will
be drafted when your number is
called.
Q. The local draft board told
me that they receive two
numbers a month one is a
quota number, the other is the
number of inductees who are to
receive physicals. If this is true,
then some 1-As who are not
called for physicals can be
entirely skipped over by the
draft. Also, they start with the
26-year-olds and work down, so
it is conceivable that a
19-year-old may be entirely left
out of the draft call although he
is 1-A. My number is 279, what
is my vulnerability?
A. To begin with, the draft
The
hidden
offer in
this ad
is for free
information
about
a
career
with
Federated
Department
Stores, Inc.
The small
copy
will
ask you
to
write.
Fiad out about us (FDS)
before our recruiter hits
Write
Federated Department Stores, lac.,
Director of
Executive Resources,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
We have
nofhittg tnjudc.

board receives only one number
a month. This is number of
inductees that they are to call up
for that month. The board
attempts to call up for physicals
every possible inductee as he
becomes 1-A. This is dependent
on the amount of funds
available, but every eligible male
should have a physical soon after
registering with the draft.
Previously, the oldest were
called first, but under the new
lottery system, the first priority
group contains 19 year olds and
prioriy deferred registrants.
With a 1-A classification, your
vulnerability is difficult to
estimate. It is highly dependent
on your local board, for many
boards will work through the
entire list depending on the
number of eligibles in the
number classification. The
further your age is from 19, the
less apt you are to be called.

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ADV-PR Day Features
'The Marlboro Story

The College of Journalism and
Communications will hold its
annual Advertising and Public
Relations Day today in the
Reitz Union.
The day-long program
features six prominent speakers,
three from the advertising and
public relations field.
James C. Bowling, director of
corporate affairs for Philip
Morris, Inc. will present The
Marlboro Story, a promotional
masterpiece, in lecture and film
to tiie luncheon. Theta Sigma
Phi, women in journalism
honorary, will also present a
fashion show at the luncheon.
Eugene Jacobson, senior vice
president with Bloom
Advertising, Dallas, Texas, will
give inside tips on job hunting
with advertising agencies in his
address.
Ron Levitt, president of
Ronald Levitt Associates, a

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H
B: : :^H
'jfl
I W&
I M
JAMES C. BOWLING
... speaks at ADV-PR Day
Coral Gables public relations
counseling firm, will give
students an idea of what to
expect in their first year as a
working pUblic relations man-or
woman.
Laurence T. Herman,

Thurtday,, February 13; tITO/Th* fhiiii AHT/1

advertising director of the St.
Petersburg Times and Evening
Independent will apeak on
What every young person
should know."
Walter Mazan, assistant
secretary for public affairs for
the U. S. Department of
Transportation will speak on
Transportation Today and
Tomorrow.
Lowell Hehman, manager of
communications and
information for the Coca-Cola
company will present a film and
slide show on communications
from the Coke point of view.
The luncheon, sponsored by
the Florida Public Relations
Association, will have President
Stephen OConnell as a special
guest. All students and faculty,
campus-wide, are invited to
spend an exciting day in the real
world of advertising and public
relations.

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Thursday, February 12, 1970

Page 6

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Hard Rolls 2 AS 39 1
Danish Rings ....2 VS *1 K^^jqgg|si|SpH
Bb In No# i/2
V A!co^*p POn |
ifl BB 881 VAN CAMP W/ HBBY _
! Beans Chili 3 *l Pickle Relish .... 8 *l
WmJm Tomatoes 5 BJf *l Fruit Cocktail.... 4 S? M 4O
astor instant Jgm Green Beans 5 'S* s l Bartlett Pears ... 4 &T H
THRIFTY MAID WHaE SLICED OR CRUSHED^
SARDINE
THRIFTY MAID
II fll !F kies Cat Food 8 $i #
|| 11| ft. Liquid
Everyday Low Prices Everyday Low Prices \ \ 1 mfg
BEECHNUT STRAINED TAU THRIFTY MAID
Baby Food .*' 7 C Evaporated Milk... 3S 39 cVr As
DIXIE DARLING CARNATION, SILVER COW OR PET
Cake hustings .... 4SS *l. Evaporated Milk... 3Si 47 c IBS
Gelatins Apple Juice 3SS sl. J^^v^Hnfc^
Astor Salt 3* 9* line Peas 6Si? M. mpH
5ugar....... 5 a 59* Cat Food £2*lo* UpF "IB
LOG CABIN C DIXIE DARLING CAKE
Syrup SS39* Clorox K 37 M M M M T
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Cigarettes ........ ors 3 Cigarettes o**3o* B
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Tip ROAST u*l 3 Rib ROAST . s l 4 Beef Stew... 99' Patties
USOA CHO |C EW D BRAND USOA CHOICE W-D BRAND BONELESS ENGLISH CUT OR TOP flflk BB| FRESH PORK
Calif. ROAST 88 c Round ROAST .... .M | STEAK
USOA CHOKE W-D BRAND BEER CUJI 0 USOA CHOKE W-0 ERAND GROUND W .TO^
Sirloin Steak $ 1 Round Steak -98 c #^
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND NEW YORK BONI IH USOA CHOICE W4> BRAND BEEF BONELESS SIRLOIN DP OR a
Strip Steaks e^I 3 Porterhouse Steak... *M 4 brand boneless round
Shoulder Steak...... 98 c T-Bone Steak u.M 39 AP-.HdF
Swiss Steak . $ l O9 Chuck Steak 68 e I ffa§
Top Round Steak.... t. 5119 1 19 Delmonicos . $ 1 69
W-S BRAND K-Z CAKVt OVEN-UAOT IMML9B jF
-D BRAND GROUND
Cooked Horn.. V. 5! *1 Meet Loaf... £ 99 c WT
MESH OSTON UTT
Sausage 89 Pork Roost... 59' JM
Bologna 69* Franks ^59 e
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Jgi
Bi L V THRIFTY MAID GREIN GIANT MIX VEGETABLES, CREAM CORN, OR
Tr TURKEY IJR Ice Milk B r 49' Niblets Corn 3 NCOS.
EACH BIRDSEYE IESUEURKAS OR BROCCOU WITH CHEESE SAUCE OR
fW! AUBAwee COOI Whip eeeeee QUART 59* Cauliflower 2 CANS 89*
Puddinqs 2/09c iambrecht smin. bjrdseye
RRm r'iih'fi'iutV 2/*i. Cheese Cake 69 Leaf Spinach 4 M
Fish N' Chips 69* Orange Cake 69*
WELCH'S ESKIAAO STICKS OR STICKUSS PIE
Grape Juice 2 SS 89* Ice Cream eeeeee MW* 59*
LARGE FRESH HEADS
Lettuce 2 heads 39 c Radishes 2 & 29 c
Tomatoes 29 c Tomatoes 3, s l, IREGULAR
WASH. STATE EXTRA FANCY RED OR GOLD DU.C.OUS Q $ | LB.
inif
Oranges 5 59 c Carrots 2 u*. 33c
71-OZ. PITER PAN SvOOTH roz. FRENCH! WX_ HM.MUSSBUJANN CHUNKY
Peanut Butter...... Brown Gravy ...... 1 Apple Sauce 33 supirbrano gt. wah whh fmsh ro. large I
B-OZ. GA. MAID CANDY CR. KRINKLE 14-OZ. FRENCH'S .NSTANT NO. SWEH N> SOW CRIOU, SWS W* M*
Pickle Chips 29* Potatoes 55~ iSltan Sauce 39* UCC AM
3421 AVE 1401 N. MAIN ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 130 N.W. 6th ST. yi. j M ea ZZOOT2 T" ~ _ I

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Page 7



Page 8

9 loncn Aiiigetor, TViuiiCMy, Fcbvwvy 12,1970

The Florida Alligator

Fatal
All
A ntC'ufflit

I IJ ~ [
"Mind if we play through?" 1 "'
E Another View ssft| ^ is^s **^^^^^*ws:
Stop Meddling j
eiffiiM By Denver W. Sherry**!
I address die following letter to Mr. James S. Quincey, past
president of Florida Blue Key and alumnus.
Dear Mr. Quincey:
Where is the logic that you should have mastered as a freshman and
should, as a practicing lawyer, be using daily? Just because the FBK
chapter as a whole expressed a negative attitude towards a
poorly-conceived and poorly-worded referendum, it does not
necessarily follow that the chapter has no foresight or desire to help
UF.
Not does a majority opinion preclude the individual's feeling and
voting how he pleases without outside interference. You apparently
realized this in your last paragraph, but you wrote your letter anyway.
You are entitled to your opinion, Mr. Quincey, but so are the
members of FBK, both collectively and individually, and I object to
the appearance and the format of a letter such as yours on the day of
the referendum, a letter from a person outside the university
community attempting to influence student opinion.
What friend do you have on the Alligator staff, Mr. Quincey, who
printed your letter with a black border around it, and who let you
have nearly 700 words (nearly half a page), when the policy, which is
printed directly across the page, states that letters must not exceed
300 words?
Do the majority share any pride in any specific segment of the
UF, except possibly the football team? How many of these students,
In fact, resented then and resent now the fact that they were paying
for facilities they know they never would and never could use?
After all, Mr. Quincey, some of us leave the womb after we
graduate. Many of us even move to other states, and, believe it or not,
a few never return.
You openly supported a lost cause, but it was a politically ripe
plum. All the people whose favor you desire to curry came out for the
UAC, but what gives you the right to publicly enhance your
carefully-groomed image at the expense of the students'/After allys
not your $6.
Let FBK have their opinions, and stop meddling in the affairs of
the campus for your own personal or pofitkal ends. Let the students
say how they want to spend their money. Or do you specialize in lost
but politically valuable causes?
The black border around your letter turned out to be an omen
which symbolizes the demise of this attempt on the part of the
administration to get our money without letting us have a voice in
how they spend it.
But again, even though this plan for a UAC was defeated, it does
not necessarily mean that we do not want a UAC. It simply means
that many of us feel that if we are going to pay so much for it, and
even more important, to commit future students to paying so much,
we would like to have a greater voice in the planning of it.
Surely there are other alternatives. Surely a less expensive UAC can
be built. Few of us really want to see the idea go down the drain. The
defeat of fedfcferendum shows that we want to investigate the matter
further, not drop it. Let us now reason together, in the words of,*
famous ex-politician, and see what we can come up with.

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-in-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

EDITORIAL
One Last Chance

Legal channels have long been the
accepted way for oppressed groups to seek
social change.
By turning down CLEO, the Board of
Regents have in effect, helped close off
those channels to disadvantaged groups.
The U. S. Council of Legal Opportunities
(CLEO) would have brought an eight-week
program to the UF campus this summer to
help prepare disadvantaged college graduates
(mostly black) to enter law school.
It's a program that is sorely needed in
Florida since the Regents discontinued
Florida A&M's law school. Many black
students who would like to enter law school
cant without the additional help a program
like CLEO would provide.
Currently there are but six black students

i "I**.Fluted Columns^ v,v,v,w,v,v,v ww ....
Take That,
Fratty-Civb Boys ___
i By John Par Ice rH i

Groovy. Now I have to write a
dull old column to defend
myself and point out the flaw:
in Mark Kamens answer to my
flying drop kick at the Gator
Greek.
I don't mind rebuttals. Its
just that I have a feeling no.one
reads them except your
"opponent** and possibly the
copy editor. But after all, a
challenge is a challenge and the
Fluted Columns have never been
one-upped by any fratty-chib
mo racketeer.
Mark Kamen attempts to
justify the fraternity system by a
rather weak and well-worn
analogy between the Greek
System and college athletics.
The comparison makes
surface sense, but just does not
bear up to doses scrutiny.
A greek fraternity is an
ARTIFICIALLY induced
brotherhood. What is the
common goal that keeps them
bound together? Simple. There
isn't any. They are bound
together by a mutual desire to
be bound together. It is a kind
of synthetically imposed
cohesion whose sole purpose is
for the sake pf
brotherhood.
Oh, sure, frats try to improve
on this poor ideological
foundation. But nowhere in the
frat system is there anything to
compare with the true
brotherhood of athletics.
In athletics, competition is a
cold, hard fact of life. Not just
between two teams, but among
members of the team itself. If
you aren't good enough, you
can't just go pledge another
team.
In other words, there is a real
selection process in athletics,
and it is based on pure, raw
ablity, not on who your father
was, how you dress, or how
tough your dates are. If there is
any pride of belonging on an
athletic team, it is earned. There
are no rewards for mere
existence.
Fraternity "Hell Weeks are
good examples of the way a frat
will try to induce more into a
group than is naturally there. In
athletics the problems and
hardships are all too real to
invent new ones.
But in Jfnt*B haring
?r procedures 4re utilized to "make
it all mean something. In other

words, the fraternity finds it
necessary to needlessly subject
pledges to physical and mental
hardships in order to instill a
sense of unity and spirit
There are no such parallels in
athletics. The pain is real. The
physical exertion is real. The
joys and the tears are real, too.
And that makes the brotherhood
real.
No, Made. A fraternity is not
a castrated intercollegiate sport.
But for years it has served as a
poor substitute. But more and
more this crutch is being cast
aside. People realize that there
are other ways to achieve
self-wordi than picking a social
identity and fading in
But my main contention,
Mark, you failed to address
yourself to. The reason, perhaps,
is that there is no successful
argument to meet it. The fact is
that the greek system is dying
out.

FRAT PINS
Alligator Staff
** w^SSU.
\
Wary Toomey All
Editorial Assistant HrtwTSST
aumioKnf'th St D Ude tS of ,he University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publication.
r? neSS o^ dVert S n9 of *' ces ln Student Publications
R A e '* Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686.87.
Circulation Sia 9 392-1681 82 ~ M
the wnter onh "trticlC AUi *? tor of the editors or of
1 -'?? c nd not th <*e of the University of Florida.
_

enrolled in UFs College of Law and there
has been only one black graduate.
Similar programs to help disadvantaged
college graduates prepare for post-graduate
work are already in effect at UF in the
Colleges of Agriculture and Medicine.
A program like CLEO is needed in the
College of Law. It is needed in all graduate
areas.
It is particularly deplorable that the
rejection of this program should come the
same week the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare submitted its report
criticizing the UF for its racial balance.
We endorse the John Marshall Bar
Associations efforts to seek another, similar
program, and we hope the Regents will not
repeat their mistake.

Time magazine stated in
1966: The percentage of
students who join greek societies
is shrinking steadily.**
At Illinois, despite a student
body increase of 4,000, fiat
membership shrank steadily. At
Bexkeley, die system lost 25 per
cent of its membership while the
student body grew 13 per cent.
At Williams College they have
been slowly iboihhmg all 15
greek societies.
Last year at Emory the IFC
actually passed a resolution
recommending the abolishment
of the greek system on the
campus.
Thats what I said. The
Interfraternity Council
recommended its own demise.
In any event, it seems hats
will be flushed out with an
enema of water balloon fights,
road-trips, and paddle sessions.



Senate Will Forgive But Not Forget

WASHINGTON I believe in the forgiveness of
sins goes the Apostles Creed, and on that basis the
Senate Will probably confirm G. Harrold Carswell to
the Supreme Court, though there is not one among
them who does not believe that even Clement
Haynsworth, for all his conflicts of interest and
hedging the code of judicial ethics, was not a better
man.
To appoint a man who in 1948 could author the
words I am a believer in white supremacy and H*H
always be so governed is an astonishing thing to
do.
True, Judge Carswell has repudiated those words,
and senators have talked of youthful error. But
there is not a Southerner in the Senate who
~ in 1948, before or since found it necessary
to use that language.
To appoint such a man in 1970, under the guise
of strict constructionism, is not just a mistake but
a dangerous one. To say to men like Charles Evers
and Whitney Young that they must believe in the
system and in slow but orderly reform, and then

wHUk
T AL
Kr JIMw
HrCM ,%jf
W&m. \ | \ \
Parentalaiscipline is the gateway to
knowledge ... Democracys greatest flaw is its intransigent
commitment to individual freedom
I SPIRO AGNEW
Wool Pulled
In Accent VO
DAY OF INVOLVEMENT HA!
The wool has once again been pulled over the students eyes.
Originally, Thursday, February 12, had been planned to be a Day of
Involvement for Accent *7O.
Classes, according to official sources were to be suspended so the
student could get involved, participate actively and feel a part of
Accent *7O. Students were under the impression that they would not
have any classes to attend so they could devote their time to the
speakers.
It as though there will be classes on the 12th and all day
long. According to Presidential Aid, It is up to the individual college
to decide.
In UC for example, it is suggested that they not have classes in
order tp participate. Well, the suggestion didnt take place because
lectures and classes are still going to be held.
In Arts and Sciences a history professor said, There will be class
but attendance isnt mandatory. I say thats BULL. Attendance isnt
mandatory in the first place but if he holds classes you better be there
to take notes or suffer the consequences (bad grades).
The school of Journalism has scheduled an Advertising Day on
the *" day as the Day of Involvement. How can the students get
involved in Accent if they are at the Advertising Day?
It is time that something be done. Students understood that they
would finally have a chance to really leam something about the world
and get involved in Accent.
President OConnell, I ask you to reconsider and think about your
students getting involved. Is it too much to ask to have one day of
classes suspended for a really worthwhile cause?
Or is the only worthwhile cause a Presidents convocation?
Remember students, who went to dames when President Nixon asked
for a National Day of Mourning for the death of ex-President
E *ThatTright. We did. But who had classes suspended when our
dearly beloved President was commented? Right again. We did.
Mr. Accent Chairman Joe Hilliard, don't count on having a
Day of Involvement because the students will be in
it's not too late to solve this problem. It is tune the students
got together to get involved. Let's do something about it now so we
can benefit from this program. Lets get involved.
MIRE LEVIN
a *'c. ,-v t. v.v v v #v*v-v ** w twwv &
4 *i t * .*

Frank MankSnwScz-
Tom Bradon
appoint Judge Carswell to the Supreme Court, is to
hand the Ekhridge Cleavers a victory of enormous
proportions.
Nor does Judge Carswells subsequent judicial
record bear out repugnance for his earlier view. IBs
civil rights opinions have been regularly overruled,
and one Washington lawyer who worked in

tod Diiittt
There is no hope for the complacent man
[Speaking Out
Good News Week I
David Miller J

An anti-Establishment columnist (?) such as
myself is often accused of being extremely
fault-finding in regard to the Nixon Administration
(or the **Thurmond Administration, as cynics refer
to it).
It seems that were always criticizing, never
praising. Were always attacking the Agnews, the
Mitchells, and the Lairds; were never pointing out
the good points of the Administration. Well, today I
wish to show the positive aspects of file
Establishment; I wish to spread some of the GOOD
NEWS concerning Nixon and his henchmen.
New Bombing Erupts Over North Vietnam
(St. Petersburg Times). U.S. warplanes blasted a
North Vietnamese missile base Jan. 28 in the first
outbreak of aerial warfare over North Vietnam in 15
months. Lets hear it for the peace offensive,
folks.
Nationalist China To Receive Jets
(Gainesville Sun). The U. S. is hauling 34 old FIOO
jet fighter bombers out of storage and will give them
to Nationalist China, it Was disclosed Jan. 31. Three
weeks ago, the U. S. acknowledged it had decided to
give Nationalist China a squadron of 18 FlO4
interceptor jets to help modernize Formosa's ail
force. Lets hear it for our new attitude toward
Red China, folks.
Federal Aid To A Racist (The Miami
Herald). Jack Anderson wrote on Jan. 17: When
Americas most notorious anti-Semite, Gerald L. K.
Smith, sits down tonight to write his hate sheets, he
should include kindly words for Secretary of
Commerce Maurice Stans and Secretary of
Transportation John Volpe. For they, at the
suggestion of Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller of
Arkansas, went ahead with a $182,000 federal grant
to build a fine road to Smith's Christ of the
Ozarks project near Eureka Springs, Ark.
For those who have never encountered Smith's
literature, it bristles with hatred for the Jews whom
Smith calls *Satanic and for the blacks whom he
describes as savages.* Smith's own records show
that his anti-Semitic party (the Christian Nationalist
Crusade) funded the tax-free foundation that built
the Christ of the Ozarks statue. Gee, folks, we
invited John Volpe to Accent.
U. S. Now Testing Super N-Weapons (The
Miami Herald). The U. S. discolosed Jan. 30 that its
nuclear weapons experts have been testing new
weapons concepts conceivable dealing with such
bizarre weapons as the laser bomb, the neutron
bomb, and the pure fusion hydrogen bomb. The
Atomic Energy Commission is trying to develop the
fearsome neutron bomb, which has been
described as a kind of death-ray weapon. Yes, we
withe SAI.T. of the earth.! -n xu x ) >
i ABM Plans Attacked (Gainesvaie Sun). Mfce
.f!' . Vi \

Thurpdty, February 12,1*70, Tha Florida AWfator,

Tallahassee as a civil rights volunteer in 1964 recalls
Carswell delaying a habeas corpus petition because
the paper on which it was written was improperly
lined.
The President wanted a Southerner who would go
slow on desegregation and the rights of the accused,
and there were men available whose appointments
would not be insulting to anyone. There ate deans
of Southern law schools whose conservatism is
unquestioned, but whose dignity and moderation
are also.
Or the president could have made a symbolic
appointment. Either Sen. Sam Ervin or Sen. John
Stennis would have met his requirements, and
neither of them ever felt the need or the inclination
to advocate white supremacy.
One Southern senator -a Haynsworth
supporter spoke of the Carswell appointment as
an example of the Administration's unerring
instinct for mediocrity in the appointment of
Supreme Court judges. But the Senate will almost
certainly find Carswell qualified.

Mansfield, Senate Majority Leader, on Jan. 31
challenged Nixon's proposed expansion of the
Safeguard AMI system, asking "Where the hell is it
going to end?"
Mansfield added:
"The President has resurrected the Chinese threat
which he said, about a year ago, if 1 remember
correctly, he 'couldn't buy.' If we go ahead with
this huge ... combination system, we had better
realize that it will cost in the tens of billions of
dollars in my opinion well beyond SSO billion."
Speaking of SSO billion, Nixon recently vetoed a
bill that would appropriate $19.7 billion for HEW,
to be spent on such luxuries as health and
education. As a matter of fact, Nixon has been
trying to kill OEO ever since he took office.
But, then again, what right do those poor niggers
have to live? If you've seen one, youVe seen 'em all,
eh, Spiro?
"Freedom Threat" (St. Petersburg Times).
North Carolina Sen. Sam Ervin, a rare Dixiecrat civil
libertarian,: called the Secret Service's requests for
reports on American protesters "a direct threat to
First Amendment freedoms."
He said the SJS. (Sound familiar? It should.) had
asked for reports from other government agencies
on people who make abusive statements about high
governmental officials, people who take part in
demonstrations, and people who personally contact
high government officials "for purposes of a redress
of imaginary grievances.
Hmmm. 1 wonder if I qualify.
By the way, Tom Wicker wrote in The New York
Times:
It is a good thing that neither the Bill of Rights
nor the Magna Carta is the pending business of the
Senate these days. If either were to be presented to
the world's greatest deliberative body, in its present
mood of political panic and myopia, it would
undoubtedly be voted down as a needless restraint
in the war on crime."
The rights of criminal* are the rights of all
Americans, and the inescapable truth is that if they
are. taken away from criminals they are taken away
from every one of us. And unless the House now
acts courageously to prevent it, that is just what wfll
have happened."
Let's hear it for the no-knock" bill, folks.
By the way, folks, theres good news overseas,
too. Guess what happened in Lesotho, Africa? The
pro-South African premier seized power and
suspended the constitution, with security police
jailing more than 30 opposition leaders. The winner
of the Jan. 27 election, Matelu Thabane, acting head
of the Pan-African Basuto Congress, was arrested
under Leebua Jonathan's, stato of emergency."
QOPPNEWS!

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 12,1970

ofp Pvb/ix "forffre
fop/yD/fore/tce
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limit quantities ....
SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. *TniSi&FHtar
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE CigarCttCS $3.76
RNii tw Irfeflt Uqt lortsw
.... £** ~.-*~ h ~ Cigarettes a. $3.83
c£wcb -s- Imperial R0a5t.....99* JR
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Thuiwfay, FdMuory 12,1970, Th* Florida Aliior, I

Page 11



a
The 1
Florida i
Alligator i

A Non-Kid Looks At The Rock Scene

(EDITORS NOTE: This is by
a veteran newanan with UPI,
John Meehan* who digs rack
music. A UPI note on it
apologizes for the fact that
Meehan is over 30* and he dees
make a few mistakes* bat theyre
honest ones. And even if these
are some screwed up parts* its
worth reading for the quotes
from the rock stars. Also its fun
to think of this guy trying to
make sense out. of Frank Zappa.
D.V.)
By JOHN J. MEEHAN
s United Prate International
Youll never get them to see
it straight. Everything about it
gets twisted. Thats the way it is.
Everything about it gets bent.
Speaking was Paul Kantner of
the Jefferson Airplane, the San
Francisco rock music band. Paul,
Grace Slick* Marty Balm and
other members of the Airplane
were in the RCA studios in Los
Angeles at the time recording
final tracks for their current LP
album* Volunteers. We were
discussing the huge gulf between
the many serious positive
elements that writers of the new
music seek to put into rock
and the vast numbers, mainly in
older age groups* to whom the
exploding rhythms and electric
melodies 'represent little more
than noise.
To perhaps a preponderance
of older Americans* much of the
new music has been at best a
sorry deterioration of the
popular songs of their own
youth, at worst an ear shattering
din concealing within its
cacophonies insidious invitations
to licentiousness.
To large numbers of
Americans under 27 years of age
5O per cent of the population
rock music of the 1960 s in its
many aspects reflected their
ideas, attitudes and hopes. It
was* in the words of many of
them and is the voice of
youth, sung to guitar
accompaniment from California
to universities in Budapest,
Belgrade* Warsaw and Prague.
Still unanswered is the
question raised by John
Sebastian of the California
group* Lovin Spoonful, yean
ago:
How dyou tell a stranger
*bout rock-n-roll?
V

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Get back! the Beatles
suggest in the title of their first
album released in 1970.
Get Back to what* seems
the next question. Whatever
youth or their parents think it is*
some of it at least gives pause for
reflection.
Several yean ago* Bob Dylan*
the Minnesota-born musician
who with the Beatles became a
major force in the new music,
wrote and sang of the growing
frustration of the young with
older people who rapped youth
without listening to what they
were trying to say:
Look out kid*
Its something you did.
God knows when,
But youre doing it again ...
Look out kid*
Dont matter what you
did...
You dont need a
weatherman
To know which way the
wind blriws.-
Another early Dylan lyric
spoke directly to adults seeking
to suppress without hearing
youth who, having crusaded for
dvfl rights in southern Freedom
Rides, had resolved to regear
society to what they saw as the
20th Century's Changin
Times.
Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And dont criticize
What you dont
understand
For the times, they are a'
changin'.
From the beginning, members
of the Jefferson Airplane,
formed in 1965* considered the
group a medium for expressing
the thoughts of the more
intelligently inquisitive of
American youth. The early
Airplane message was rooted in
love* Im so full of love* I could
burst apart and cry, and:
If you hear the song I'm
singing*
You will understand:
You hold the key to love
and fear
All in your trembling hand.
One key unlocks them both,
you know.
It's at your command.
Hosts of new music lyrics
have shouted discovery of an
exuberance in lives in which
older persons found the feats
and frustrations that were
driving them in increasing
numbers to bars, liquor stores
and psychiatrists.
. jr* %' * v
3/

Do you believe in magic? a
lyric by John Sebastian of the
Lovin Spoonful asked.
Well go dancin'
And maybe youll see
How tiie magic's in the
music
And the music's in me.
Concentration on social
problems is heavy in the music.
The late Brian Jones, the Rolling
Stone guitarist who drowned in
his swimming pool last summer,
spoke at length during a
discussion one evening of
differences between popular
music now and the June-moon
lyrics which topped 1930 s and
1940 s hit parades.
There's always been
something to take away the
attention of kids Brian aid.
There was always a war* and if
there wasn't a war there was a
depresrion that didn't give
people time to think. That's why
their music was escapist* full of
forevers and moons and Junes.
People needed to escape. Now
there haven't been any really big
wars or depressions for some
time. Kids afl over the place have
had the chance to get better
educations than they ever did
before. Kids have time to think.
They don't need to escape.
That's why our music's the way
it Is.
The way it is since 1968,
the year of the assassinations of
Dr. Martin Luther King and Ben.
Robert F. Kennedy, street
clashes in Chicago rind university
turmoil worldwide, looks bleak
to many of the musicians:
Street Fighting Man by the
Rolling Stones was reported to
have been banned from
broadcasting in Chicago at the
time of the Democratic National
Convention. Yet what can a
poor boy do except sing for a
rock 'n roll band? Jagger asks.
The dismissal as pop or
hit of what they consider
highly serious embitters some
musicians, strikes others with
irony. A number have
abandoned hope of capturing
understanding among a
substantial older public and have
plunged into Progressive and
Underground themes so
deeply only initiates can
understand. Many are turning to
pure music* particularly to
injecting the vitality of rock into
jazz. Others, convinced of the
vital importance of their
message, have determined to
span the communication gap.
... .... V:' \ '

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Thunday. Fabniary 12,1970

Page 12

Jimi Hendrix, whose
American Indian features,
bizarre hair styles and
multicolored attire have shivered
record numbers of parents
spines, spoke on the subject one
day.
One day I want to be a
parent. That's what the world is
all about, having kids, Jimi
said. I know a lot of people are
blocked out, but I hope they'll
come to understand the music
soon. I'm going to write an
album which wffl simplify it all
and bridge the gap between
parents and kids.
The Moody Blues recent
album To Our Childrens
Childrens Children, begins
with the electronic roar of a
rocket thrusting into space
where the Moodies discover, not
a momentous mechanical
achievement, no Soviet or
American first, but a childs
uncluttered outlook on the
world and universe. Space flight
they see as a climb to
tranquility ... finding its real
worth, conceiving the heavens
flourishing on earth...
With the eyes of a child
You must love how to see
Your world spinning round
And for life you will be
A small part of the hope
That exists in the eyes of a
child.
A child doesnt have any of
the preconceived ideas of truth
and beauty that we build up as
we get older, musician Graeme
Edge explains. The child has
the truly open mind. Thats
what we should try to keep, an
open mind all our lives. So many
people are hung up on how
different they are to everybody.
They ought to start
concentrating on how theyre
the same.

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THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 4?>*Av7 iWIK /
FEBRUARY 12, 13, IA, 1970 f'lSh lAStpU&QjQ f
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Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-38$$
'** tfOQp l jfS?.- t-f jjf

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Frank Zappa and the Mothers
of Invention put Graemes last
sentiment another way:
We are the other people.
You are the other people,
too.
Found away to get to you.
fl I BB
join the fan!
THE SWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just tor the fun
of if. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying'trtps to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
jtlSl $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
mtfm Waldo Road
mmPG* Cm*mr ..
m^"mm mmm "*mmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmM



m 160 Avg. Whole M JL
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ORANGES 10 ~49, DEL MONTE DRINKS
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r 3 LtllUlt / Glo-Coatr; 51.55 PledgeSl.39 i
FEATURE TABLE** Prices In this S.W. 2nd Ave. 000 throuoh . i *l4-70 mod throuw m. n *>l4-70
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i^M

Thursday, February 12, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

]| FOR SALE a
SALE: Honda Modal CA 95; Asking
$260.00 or bast offer. CALL
372-9367 ask for Davkl or leave
massage. (A-80-10t-p).
Sony tape deck. TC 255 $135. Sony
cassette TC 100 sso. Both only 6
mos. old and still under warr.
378-7496. (A-85-2t*p).
1965 fiat 850. Good gas mileage.
Radio, heater. Owner leaving country
soon. $350. Call 376-1545 between
5-8 P.M. (A-85-st-p).
1968 12 X 60 Fleetwood mobile
home, Beautiful large front kitchen,
AC, washer, 2 bedrooms, S7OO &
assume balance. $63/mo. 372-5912
after 5:30. (A-85-15t-p).
bsa 250 cc Sport Stur. New paint,
recent overhaul, low mileage, very
good condition. $295. 376-9723
after 6 P.M. (A-85-st-p).
1966 SUZUKI 50cc. Only 7100
miles. Good condition. Sale priced at
S6O. See at 2002 N. W. 12th Road or
call 372-0996. (A-85-3t-p).
Trailer, 8 x 42, cozy, alrcondltlon,
oil heat, carpeting, 1 bedroom,
$1,400 or best offer. Try calling 9
AM l2 MN 378-6833. (A-85-st-p).
Wollensak stereo tape unit recently
serviced, bell cycle helmet sz. 7 5/8,
Phllco 19*' portable tv all items In
great condition. Call 378-6277.
(A-83-st-p).

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dtodin* -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* fa> n
I I lI 1 | J
in& 11 *? §
m'iiiig
-== 1 1 I
, z

Ol 00 fO
- g- 8- £§
< 4? 4? 45, *5 9
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§?£ JJ |o
. mmmm __ ___ § Q- Q. ~
Z Z Z Z | a It
ZZZ Z 1 Q> §1
Rip
18
mmmmmm 'mmmm mmmmQ wmmmmm
-
EEEE \ IP

| FOR SALE §
Nearly new white 9* x 12* nylon
carpet & pad. pile, dual needs
shampoo. Best offer over $25. Call
378-2121. Moving. Must sell.
(A-84-3t-p).
305 HONDA SCRAMBLER 68 8300
miles. Runs wall. Many extras. $425.
Call 376-5133. (A-84-St-p).
Super Reverb amplifier. Fabulous
condition. Need cash for school.
Only 200 dollars. Call Fred Fey at
SAE house. 372-6471 evening.
(A-77-10t-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/C, full carpet, washer/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, .partially furnished/
Immediate occupancy.ss, 9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p).
FOR RENT |
1 male. Immediately, private rm.
mod. townhouse, $65 or 1-3 to
occupy end mo or quarter $165/mo.
1020 D N. W. 38th Ave. Buddy
373-2353 or 8-6580. (B-83-st-p).
Sublet (as of Mar. 1) big bedroom
garage apt. 3 blox from campus.
Come see or call 378-6796 at 301 N.
W. 19th St. (off 3rd Ave.) SIOO per
month. (B-73-st-p).

Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 12,1970

j ; v
| FOR RIOT J
LANDMARK APT. to sublet Spring
qtr., 2 bdrm. Call 378-9489 for Info.
(B-84-st-p).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one $ two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-C).
Sin city, 2 bdrm. apt., furnished,
central A/C, 1 very groovy location.
But quiet Available
March 21 or 22. Call 373-1936
anytime. (B-84-st-p>.
Single rooms, central heat, linen &
maid, siso/quarter, utilities Ind.,
renting also -for 3rd quarter. Call
378-7222. Tom Ford. 115 N. W.
10th St. no. 10. (B-84-3t-p).
Male roommate needed: Private
bdrm., cen. A/C,AH. pool, furnished,
close to campus. S7O/Mo. Ind. all
utility. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224 (B-st-81-p).
Female roommate need: Prvt. Bdrm.
cen. A/C.&H, pool, furnished, close
to campus. S7O/mo. inclu. all
utilities. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224. (B-81-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C AH, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
Sublease 2 bedroom apt. Furnished
or unfurnished. Immediately or at
quarter break to August. Call
378-4339 ANYTIME, Day on,Night.
(B-83-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
llvlngroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).

I Ml I
I I
I ABOXOFFICE I
If INTERNATIONAL
PICTURE
I I
HH. -VVv $. SS
I A SECRET CUIB OF NUN FLYNN SVCVS... Irjf f 1
AND HIM ROUIM MWHWMBI

1 FOR RENT I
Sublease, 1 bedroom apt., AC,
Furnished. Private patio; available
around March Ist, slls. par mo.
Village 34 apt. 43, high A dry.
376-0579. (B-85*5t-p). ___________
I""* WANTED J
2 roommates wanted for Hawaiian
vNI. apts, pool, 2 bath, separate
din Ing room, quiet, call 373-2493,
ask for Ray or Joe, for spring and
summer. (C-85-st-p).
WANTED: Need a ride to Pensacola
and back. Leave anytime Friday 13.
Ratum Sunday 15. Urgent need. Call
Dave 392-7360. (C-84-3t-p).
Two good guys need third roommate
Immediately. Private room, close to
campus, stores, really nice. Call
Rusty' or Robbia at 378-8946
anytime. (C-84-3t-p).
Female roommate Landmark Apts.
We have everything but you. Color
TV, dishwasher, pool, kinkajoo. No
deposit. $46.25 a month. 378-3518.
(C-84-3t-p).
Need 1 or 2 female roommates. $65 a
month Includes RENT A UTIL. La
Bonne Vie. Call 373-1029 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-82-p)
Male roommate wanted, immediate
occupancy, central AC/Heat, Vz mile
from campus. Call 373-1951 for
details. (C-83-3t-p).
COED roommate for luxurious
Tanglewood townhouse.
DISHWASHER, 3 NICE ROOMIES,
only SSO a month. Call 376-1015.
(C-83-st-p).
TWO MONTHS RENT FREE! Help!
I Bombed Out! Need one female to
take my place at Landmark 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-81-6t-p).

fWANTCP §
Summit House One male
roommate needed for 2 bdr. 'apt.
Feb. rent free, central air and heat,
pool, etc. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361
(C-81-st-p).
I HaP WANTED §
fty^'dtOOOMMW'^rOOCOMWWWWw
NEED Three young ladles to work
full or part-time In plesant downtown
Gainesville office. 1.60 to 2.20 to
start. No experience necessary.
373-1006. (E-84-3t-p).
Wanted: GO-GO DANCERS. Up to
$l5O per week. No Experience
Necessary. Must be good dancer. Call
376-9175 for audition. (E-10t-77-c)
Receptionist, Typing, Phone Work,
opening day or evening shift,
Full-time. Apply Mr. Ray 2929 N. W.
13th St. no. 3. Gainesville, Fla.
(E-81-7t-p).
Bookkeeping machine operator
experienced persons only apply. Call
392-0393 Mrs. Decker for appt.
(E-81-st-c).
Cocktail Waitress. Part or Full Time.
No Experience Necessary. Call
376-9175 After 4:00. DUBS STEER
ROOM. (E-10t-77-C)
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p).
| AUTOS
67 Mustang 6 cylinder, 3 speed,
36,000 ml. air wide ovals, $1,300 or
best offer. Call 378-0970 after 5:30.
(G-85-3t-p).
1966 Slmca 4 dr. sedan, PB, radio,
heater, white-wall tires; very
economical, 35 + MPG; excellent
condition S6OO. Call 373-1220 after
4 PM. (C-85-st-p).
MG llOO, 1964, extra dean, with
abarth exhaust, shoulder harness,
only $499. Call 372-6740.
(G-85-st-p).
. as
1961 Bulck Electra; radio, white with
blue interior, good condition, a fine
town car; S3OO or best offer, call Bill
378-9087 after 4 PM. (G-85-st-p).
1967 MUSTANG, 6 cyl., standard
transmission, excellent condition,
Call 376-6906, weekdays anytime
after 3 PM. (G-85-3t-p).
1968 VW Bug. 30,000 miles. Radio
and heater. BEST OFFER. Will be
shown on weekend. Call 376-7670 to
leave your name and phone.
(G-84-st-p>.
Volvo, 1963. Excellent student car.
Easy parking, 28 MPG. 378-1268.
Also, 2 snow tires for sale.
(G-83-st-p).
1967 Chevrolet pickup. 283
Automatic, radio & heater, mud grip
tires, lew mileage. $1,500. 376-9204,
Archey. (G-4t-81-p)
Austin Healy Sprite 6B. Perfect
condition, economical, radio, heater
only 14,500 miles. 51,350 Call
376-0741, '2O32Vi N.W. 3rd Ave.
(G-st-82-p)
1967 Cougar V 8 Auto, trans. Radio
$ heater. Good condition. Must sell;
will take best cash offer. Call
376-0329 after 5 p.m. Ask for Ron.
(G-st*B2*p)
PERSONAL I
Fly to Fort Myers. Leave Friday, 13
Feb., noon, return Sun, 5 Feb. Call
Abbott Kagan, 378-4859 or drop a
note to Box 428, Health Center.
(J-4t-82-p)
UNIVERSAL ENLIGHTMENT For
the Price of a dinner. I will only
provoke your thinking and am not a
minister. You may reach one who is
pure at heart from 7-8 PM, M-F,
Randall Lance, 373-2821.
(J-83-st-p),
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS.
Whilst on cutoff at S. w. 13 th st,
;(J-75-3t-p). M
Theta Chi's: Woman was created
from the rib of man. She was not
made from his head to top him, nor
out of his feet to be trampled
on ... but out of his side, to be equal
to him; under his arm, to be
protected; and near his heart to be
Woman. P.S. sbss!
(J*Bl-st-p).
BOYSHI Nhed your pad rleensd or a
party hosted? The bunnies of last
quarter have turned Into Bears and
37S * >



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ViV#V.%ViVvvvw.v.v.M. 'vriv,'
f PERSONAL
near Sigma Nus Won't you be our
valentines? Cause youre the
greatest. We love you. Your little
sisters. (J-85-2t-p).
FAYE: Thank you for a great six
weeks Its nicer the second time. All
my love and luck to you. Nice
Guy. (J-85-2t-p).
Right On Freshmen Track team.
Remember, Rudy, no guerilla war
tactics! Lake City * Gator-bait.
Bobbie Jo. (J-85-2t-p).
Free introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-10t-p).
S6O a month, room & board.
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
DIRECT FROM LONDON
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress, Wedding Dress, Sportswear &
Bikinis by your English Dressmaker,
KATHLEEN, Phone 3 7 8-0320.
(J-84-st-p).
Sailors in Vietnam wish to write to
Fla. coeds. Write sn Jay Bader, sn J.
A. Laden, sn J. Grabusky, sn Jim
Black, at AFDL 23 Box 37, NSA,
FPO, San Fran. Calif, 96695.
(J-84-2t-p).
WERE ONLY IN IT FOR THE
MONEY. Come In and see our new
junk, Its really groovy lts toooo
freaking much. Parisian underground
jewelry, European antiques, and
Indian Kurtas. WOWI Tb top It off
we have Susies snazzy pillows, left
over from Christmas, but best of all
you get a FREE paper flower with
any purchase. You ask why? Because
we want to get rid of this stuff. The
Spanish Main, 1642 W. Univ. Ave.
Free flowers Mon. Thurs. Open
sometime and 10-10. (J-4t-82-p)
| LOST & FOUND |
FOUND: HS Class Ring In Tolbert
area. Milton HS. Call 392-8704, Joe.
(L-85-3t-nc).
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

A
book for
all seasons

LOST & FOUND f
LOST: l black billfold. If conscious
bothers, please return to Paul Otis at
*** *-4 Mancha, No questions
will be asked. (L-85-lt-p).
LOST: brown cord, coat, yellow pile
lining, taken from union dance on
f b 6 M reward, no questions
asked. Call Nan 2-8509, 125 Graham.
(L-85-3t-p).
Go to Bahamas over break only SB9.
From Miami for four day cruise to
Nassau from Miami. Call Roger
Bowers. 378-6050. (M-85-st-p).
LOST: Mans Cocoa high ring. Blue
stone. Initials: MBW near Rat. Call
Nancy. 392-7739 after 5. (L-34-2t-p).
FOUND: Ladies watch in Peabody
hall. Gome by room 8 Peabody or
call 392-0243 to IDENTIFY
(L-3t-nc).

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA' 1
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
FRIED CHICKEN
All You Care To Eat 99 i
FRIDAY v
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato f f y
GAINESVILLE MALL

Thursday, February 12, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

e m mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm
X-V.*.V.\\v.-.v."XVX-X*XvX-X-X.X.:.V.vX-Xv%
I LOST & FOUND |
-x-x-x-x-x.x-x-x.x-x-x'x-x-x.x.:.: vx-:*&
LOST: Female Welmaraner. Limps
on right hind leg. Needs operation or
she will die. Reward. Please call
376-8600 or 376-9119. (L-st-82-p)
SERVICES
Valentines special. Color portraits:
Formal or candid. Portable studio.
All types of photography. Posters,
parties, groups. For more info, call
Ron 376-6042. (M-84-3t-p).
Recordsville in the Mall now has
Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Nicky
Hopkins, Noel Redding and John
Bonham on the same Heavy LP.
(M-84-3t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).

Good things happen as the
seasons change.
Things like a carpet of multi multicolored
colored multicolored leaves. A still cold
night. A flower in bloom.
And the Florida Quarterly.
We'll see you through the
seasons, from the Harvest
Moon to the first dandilion
and beyond..
As long as you remember.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.

Page 15

*Vrrrrr* <
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-tf-57<)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed'
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
XEROX COPIES: specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).

ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks.
Meals & J^andwiches
TV & BILLIARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I On The Gold Coast I
ibbi ACT v-|iimBfl n
IHJ f T BUTCH CASSIDY AND a
1 ?T"~: V DAYS THE SUNDANCE KID
nUnRYI COLOR BY DELUXE Kj&j
WBNfflKtl the rain
imMy EDF PEOPLE"
IN.W. 13lh St. *i 23rd RDI 1 I r.UKSrUt.
I Telephone 378-2434 fc| |
xdil Sos
y 1
MBgMaSMi jifififf
wfl>
4o>
(WINNERBESTFILM" CANNES FILM FESTIVAL)
LADKS NOME JOURNAL RJI El IJM I
SBSOUI WdIOWELL CHRBTWE NOOMWRCHWD VWHWCK DWP WOP HOBBff SWWi I
UME6W MCERSON MOWL AHOERSOW |

>*# !* T.S -. ~ -
| SERVICES §
X-VSSSW'W-r-W.NS^-ivX'X-X-M-V-SvWi'WXX
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes from postage stamp to
24" x 44", 8" x 10" certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-24t-P).
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).



Page 16

t. THo AWgwtor, TTwiwdWr. Fabniary 12, WO

COMPARE! 'ZT.f-?r COMPARE! W** r n A
P.D.Q. Chocolate Beads 45c ss* 10* Cut Sweet Potatoes ,A S£cr" 4 $131.1.9 i* I I*/ IFiC 60 IH I
Pream Coffee Creamer 77c sus 3 s< white Potatoes -- 8/$l-i * AM NAN AC I
Evaporated Milk *sr~ 10c m3* California Tomatoes i'SLss 4/$l 31.19 19 < I
Carnation Coffee Mate 99 c* Mushrooms .*,.. 4/$l 3m 3* / i\\V I
Frozen Waffles nr.sr 10/$1 si. 45* Libby Pork & Beans
Frozen French Toast Tsr,K" 38c 39* i* Hormel Chili .* 3/$l su 7 i 7 I ImBC /
Morton Frozen Pies stfifSK 3/89c 31.00 n* Lykes Beef Stew - 3sl *1.17 17*
Pet Ritz Pie Shells 79c 99*20* cornedeef Tors?" 49c 59* 10* u.s. no. 1 white wumo
Banquet Cream Pies £& 4/$l 31.34 34* Biltmore Luncheon Loaf 3/$l 1.17 17* DOT ATOES m 59%
Birdseye Puddings 43 c * 2* Lykes Potted Meat 10 c 2/25* 5*
Richs Puddings 3 B c 39* u Tuna Fish * 5 si. 35 35* /a m m.m . A
Coffee Rich 4s c 5* chocolate Jumbo Pies 3/$l 31.17 17* I |Af|C R W f
Spoon & Serve 25 c 33 Spoon & Serve skts? 39c 59* 20* Vanilla Wafers . 4sl $132 32* / TVIWATWES I
Frozen Coffee Rich 24c 25* 1* Sandwich Cookies 39c 49* 10* I fresh
Frozen Orange Juice mrs 3/99< 31.19 20* Streaning y* Zonkers tsa 3/Slsm 17* firm ililf
Libby Orange Juice s??s c 4100 n< Adams Cheese Pins 49c 55* 6* {#, 1 * tRj
Frozen Orange Juice 'iT 6 99c $1.19 20* ORB Ar y
Libby Drinks LEMONADE OR LIMEADE 10/$1 $1.25 25*
Frozen Vegetables Mixa veghttaiu* oz. 10c 13* 3* ALL PURPOSE EATING OR COOKING
Frozen Vegetables WifffST 4/$l $1.34 344 APPLES.: js 11. 45^
mbiiviim ppHHpHpHiERpHBk BEVHTVTVBIBTVWfVfBVK iim|MMRRPEVVPIRM BEIV9V9TVBPBBVB9Mk
fffTyiWBEM tBBBM ppMfl|d |BSBBBSEDEj*J
BBBBm

KBBBPBPBPVVVI!I!9V9RIA KffJlVFWlVTfffWfffffTfk impiembwmpperk
whhwnbmbw I*l
g§@l
COMPARE! WST COMPARE! WjST / ctisr pascal \
Fiddle Faddle 3/$l 3117 17* Southland Greens 3/45c 55* 10* I B mip I
Potato Sticks -*>* 3/$l $1.17 17* French Fries 3/$l $1.17 17* I B Rp
Cat Litter 79c *9* 10* Frozen Hash Browns 3 sl*i 17 17* I I
Dog Food h ssr m 6/$l 3105 5* Shoestring Potatoes M r/..T c 4/$l i 39* I HMM I
Pantry Pride Dog Food u n 6/49c s** 5* Frozen Flench Fries - 10/sl 3i.s * I MB uw BM|% I
Ken-L-Biscuits -* $2 33.19 20* Frozen Deviled Crabs tsst 89c 99* 10* I /
FriddesDog Food $2 Fish Sticks e ,o " 3/$l 31.17 17* v V
fIBRBBBBBBRBBBA IBRPPVVEnFPBnfIM IBVlPPlinPlVPymk
BBmmJtifflmlmlmm



BQ4 QJ Wi I jJll GAINESVILLES
InUHeI LOWEST
I I -1 JJ\ ] -f J FOOD
i!iimigj l w j ii j BBS prices!
D a 1 r
i 1 I I 1 *927 North Main at Cornor 10th St.
WTT\ k m a I w 3 Wi'i*
MMMMHMHHHMEIIIMiIRREr' R| y j A Hold* Ma y
TJI fsROUND 1S 1 - Iff!
j" z I STEAKS 1 MCSSS*"- 2
Peanut Butter srsx; 99c $1.09 ,<* I I Aluminum Foil 4/$l *M is*
Halo Hair Spray 49c 99* so* I Alcoa Aluminum Foil " $1 J sM9 10*
Holsum Peanut Butter if 69c 79* 10* I I Plastic Sandwich Bags vxs 25c 33* *<
Hunts Catsup 3/sl*u7 17* V uiiiUP JK Pantry Maid Lunch Bags 2sc 29* 4*
Libbys Tomato Catsup its 19c 20* 1* Plastic Trash Bags ss. 49c 59* 10*
Pantry Pride Catsup 27 c 29* 2* /^ aa a Plastic Shelf Liner 55c 59* 4*
NiceN Easy By Clairol $l 5, oo 4,* f SIRLOIN E j Scott Place Mats 35c m**
Frenchs Mustard 32 c 35* 3* I M mm I Charcoal Lighter Fluid 01 3/sl*i.i7 17*
Loving Care By Clairol SI 3 **** 36* | VTiJAIf S Cling Peaches sar.-ars.- 3/79c >9* 10*
Kosher Dill Pickles -?aur 79c * 10* I I Georgia Peaches 4/slm *
flrrid Extra Dry tes? 99c $1.79 so* I Jggg CvQQ I Libbys Peaches wear 3/89c*i." 22*
5-Day Deodorant *s* 2/$l S2.issi.is | I Bartlett Pears 3/$l *1.17 17*
Right Guard m * i r c r o " T 99c 70* y *mmr a j Fmjt Cocktail 'irssr 5/sl*i. as*
Secret Spray "T 2 $l w s2.is $1.09 Del Monte Fruit Cocktail 4/sl*i.is is*
Secret Antiperspirant ?nx 2 sl s2l s $1.09 Rosedale Limas 6/$l si-a 2** Libby Fruit Cocktail 4/$l u is*
Dial Spray Deodorant 4or " 2 sl $2.1 s $1.09 King Cole Limas n c,n 5/$l $1.25 25* Fruit Cocktail PANTRY PRIM Jf 01 CAN 3/$l *1.17 17*
Muellers Macaroni .wt 2/25c 33* s* Libbys Beets > * 10c i 2 < 2* Grapefruit Sections 'r%ss 4/sl*u* <*
Jergens Lotion 99c $1.35 3s* Pantry Pride Kraut 17 OZ.CAN jgc 2u u Mandarin Oranges ~oic* 4/slsi.u i6*
|hppmmviimha PRMNPHMjVMVPMMMt EfVfFWDPDFWVWPERK
yVWnjJ fWTHwjj AMDEVEMju DEIBEPRER^'J
191188
EVERYDAY LOW FRICIS GOOD SCVKN DAYS A WEEK. BONUS BUYS GOOD THRU WEDNESDAY, FED ISth. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.
IDVfDiDVDVTPiVVTPnk EWiWmFWWIfnVk BRlIRin KtIfPIWQMTWW!EffI9k HIRITVIHPHRRn^
SI li/Tli'ifli fSB iwSwP[|
81188
as ni | a OUREvfRY fon- SA E
COMPARE! a p B ay Y / QUICK FROZEN GRADEA* LARGE MEATY A A
Motts Apple Sauce 35c 37* 2* | TURKEY f beef chuck )
Apple Sauce . < 45c 47* 2* 1 B yMwmwfc I If i
Gatorade .-**-- 3/sl*>>7 17* I DRUMSTICKS f | KUAST
CircusFrwtDrinks 4/$l *' * | save Heinz Tomato Soup J5 CI/W w I m
Libby Garden Peas u f 5/95c*<< I ArrnM y I QS|fOii /
Green Giant Peas 4/95 c 0 5< >
DEMPPOPPMJOTEIWQPIDPD^
|Mpm|wb[bi MEBHHHKji £BOSBBS3 £E(ltlfKm

thunm. Fibhkry 12, WO,TI FlorMi AMptar.

Page 17



The Florida Alligator

ERRORS, FOULS PROVE COSTLY
Pete Stopped, But Gators Lose

OWENS HAD FOUL TROUBLE
... but leads Gators with 30
WON WHEELS
I 1
I Funny Cars Enter |
808 THOMAS >W*

Over 20 funny cars have
entered this weekends
Gatomationals.
These plastic bodied replicas
of production passenger cars are
mounted on special racing
chassis. With a total weight of
only 1600 pounds and engines
producing over 1,000 h.p., the
funnies are capable of elapsed
times around the seven-second
mark and top speeds of 200
miles-per-hour..
Scotty Scott of Atlanta, has
entered his new Barracuda in the
funny car category. Scott ran
his famous Funny Jeep at
Gainesville Dragway on several
occasions last fall, turning top
speeds over 200 m.pJi.
Also among the field of
funnies is the well-known
team of Candies and Hughes.
Leonard Hughes of Houma, La.
handles the driving of the
super-sanitary Barracuda.
Former fuel dragster star,
Connie Kalitta from Mt.
Clemons, Mich, will drive a
factory-backed Mustang. Kalitta
made it to the final round of the
American Hot Rod Association
(AHRA) World Point Finals in
Tulsa, Olda. last year before an
ailing engine lost him the title.
Because he listed his rivals on
the side of his car and crossed
them off as he defeated them,
Kalitta was nicknamed the
GOtF*PM M
Jj, DRIVING RANGE
SM GOLF CLUBS RENTED
HE*, CLUBHOUSE
ELECTRIC CARTS
l|UgjK LESSONS AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
,* V 3*i Ml. WEST OEI-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

i ** +

Bounty Hunter by his fans..
Hubert Platt has also entered
a Mustang Funny and is
considered a top-rated
competitor.
Della Woods, one of two
licensed woman Funny Car
drivers entered her Funny
Honey Dodge in this extremely
competitive category. The
attractive female from Pontiac,
Mich, is highly respected by the
other drivers.
Only eight Funny Cars will
remain after Friday and
Saturdays qualifying. Those
eight will compete Sunday for
the Funny Car Eliminator title.

THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE
j MINI-SKIRT CONTEST \
Never a Loser Ks"
I 9:3 U o-W: n 3o rmk "THE HAMMER |
h I 12:00-12:30 Back for 2 More Weeks 5
| DUB'S LOUNGE
GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THESODOMAND II

Page 18

An inspired UF basketball
team held Pistol Pete
Maravich to his third lowest
point production of the season,
but bad turnovers and foul
trouble midway in the second
half cost the Gators a victory
over LSU, 95-85, in Baton
Rouge, La., last night.
Maravich, a one-man show in
the first half, scored only 15
points in the second half and
wound up with only 38 points,
well below his 48-plus average.
But, the others of the Bengal
Tiger team well made up for
Maravich. Big Dan Hester got 16,
14 of those in the late stages of
the game, Bill Newton scored
17, and Apple A1 Sanders
finished with 15.
Gator Captain Andy Owens,
third in the SEC in scoring,
improved his average with a
30-point night.
Leading 4342 at halftime,

This spring, jet to London and pick up I
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Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, February 12,1970

because of a 51 per cent
shooting effort from the floor
and beating the league-leading
rebounders 25-21 on the boards,
the Gators played
swap-the4ead for the first
several minutes of the second
half, but after a continuous
string of turnovers, the Gators
gave the Tigers a lead of as much
as 11 points and found it
insurmountable.
Owens, Hoover, Dan Boe and
Earl Findley played most of the
second half with four fouls. Boe
and Findley finally fouled out
and both had ten points before
leaving the game.
Earlier in the season,
Tennessee held Maravich to 29
and later Yale cooled him down
to a 34-point evening. The
Gators can now claim that they
held him to his third lowest
scoring production of the
season.

* Gun* Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
I Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith, w
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* 466-3340.

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376-7657



vj^'-SX'iyAv^y^ySxjx&KjiijaKaK-i^yyt'r'-^y.i^

OVER 20 FUNNY CARS ENTERED IN GATORNATIONALS
... can weigh only 1600-pounds and produce over 1000 h.p.
;£?:: GAT O RNA TI O NA LS > :,
>.
!v
Racing Categories
:;: i
JOHN SIEBENTHALERmi

In drag racing there are two
divisions that participants
compete for, class and
eliminator. A class win means
that the winning car is better
than all the other cars of that
particular group. An eliminator
win means that the winning car
is the best of several different
groups of cars.
The top fuel, top gas and
professional stock eliminator
wins are run on a heads up basis,
that is, with no handicap starts
in effect. In top fuel, only AA/F
compete, in top gas, only AA/D
run, and in professional stock,
only those cars entered in that
category compete.
Porsche Meet
Set Sunday
The Central Florida Region of
the Porsche Qub of America will
hold its first rally and meeting of
the year Sunday, Feb .15.
The club will hold an
observation rally beginning at
1:30 pm. from the commuter
parking lot on North-South
Drive on the UF campus.
No prior experience or special
racing equipment is needed,
however the rally is open only to
Porsche cars.

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In the other eliminator
categories, several different
groupings are allowed to
compete for that particular title.
Super eliminator includes classes
from the altered, fuel altered,
funny car, gas coupe and the
lower fuel and gas dragster
classes.
Competition eliminator
includes the lower altered and
gas dragster classes. Street
eliminator is made up of the
lower gas classes, modified
production, street roadster and
sports car classes. The remaining
eliminator categories, super
stock and stock, are made up of
cars in the stock and super stock
classes only.
When a handicap start is
needed in order to allow two
cars from different classes to run
on an even basis, the handicap is
taken fromthe existing national
record and dialed into the
Christmas tree. If, in the street
eliminator grouping, an A/G
machine and a D/MP car face
each other, the A/G machine
will leave last.
If the national record for A/G
is 10.30 seconds, and the D/MP
record is 12.0 seconds, the D/MP
car will get a 1.70 second head
start.

Although the handicap
method of eliminations is the
fairest yet devised, it does have
its drawbacks. One is the
breakout rule. If a car is running
on a national record of 11
seconds, and if it breaks out of
the record by more than a tenth
of a second (10.89 seconds or
lower) then that car is
disqualified. A car is allowed to
go up to a tenth of a second
under the record anymore and
the car breaks out.
This rule often leads to
sandbagging among the faster
cars. If a driver knows he has
beaten another car, he might put
on his brakes to avoid any
possibility of breaking out. This
is noticeable when the car
approaches the end of the
quarter and his brake lights
come on before the finish line is
crossed.
In drag racing, a round-robin
style of racing is used. This
means that the winners of each
round continue to return and
face the winners of other rounds
until only one winner is left.
In many instances, there will
be an odd number of cars
entered. Then, a bye run is used
to make things come out even.

INTRAMURALS
-
AEPi Edges Betas
AEPi captured the bracket m championship, whipping league
leading Beta Theta Pi, 29-25 in overtime. The AEKs had a 14-7 lead at
the half but the Betas were able to slowly narrow the margin and tie it
up at the end of the game. Rich Harrow led all scorers with 12 points.
In bracket IV Phi Tau assured itself of a semifinal berth by topping
the Delts 45-34. The Phi Taus won the Blue League basketball
championship last year and with Paul Register and Ken Fowle leading
the way, could upset the ATOs in the semifinals.
In the Blue League, Chi Phi continued merrily on its way stomping
the AGRs 46-31. The combination of Bruce Weeks, Steve Kaufman,
and Bob Wattles is not expected to be beat this year.
Second place DU suffered its second loss in basketball getting
walloped by the Kappa Sigs, 50-35. In the only other game played,
Theta Chi stopped Delta Sigma Phi, 39-27.
j FINAL 1
| WINTER 1
CLEARANCE! |
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GATOH SHOP

Thursday, February 12,1070, The Florida AHfaDor,

Page 19



l. The Florida AlUgMor, Thursday, February 12,1970

Page 20

'IT'S THE PRINCIPLE OF THE THING*
Yale In Power Struggle With NCAA

NEW YORK (UPI) Lets
have no more jokes about the
Ivy League especially about
Yale University. In view of
recent developments, that
wouldnt be very kosher.
Thanks to Jack Langer, a

Two Kentucky Players
Dismissed From Team

LEXINGTON, Ky. (UPI)
Coach Adolph Rupp Tuesday
dismissed junior guard Bob
McGowan and Senior forward
Randy Pool from the nationally
third-ranked Kentucky
basketball team for violating
training rules a second time.
The veteran Kentucky coach
said the dismissals would be
permanent and added that it
would be up to the universitys
Scholarship Committee whether
their grants-in-aid should be
revoked. Both were suspended
for a week earlier this season for
infractions of the team curfew.
A spokesman for the
university said McCowan, Pool,
and four other reserves on the
Kentucky squad visited a tavern
on the eve of Kentuckys
basketball game with Mississippi
State at Starkville, Miss.,
Monday night. Rupp kicked
McCowan and Pool off the team
before the game.
McCowan, who comes from
Dayton, Ohio, was a starter
earlier this season and was
named the most valuable player
of the University of Kentucky
Invitational Tournament in
December.
The university spokesman said
Rupp talked with two of the
other players Tuesday and was
satisfied that they did not
wilfully violate his training rules.
He identified them as
QfaccM
a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
&& 1
;
l > 8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

6 Toot-8 substitute center on the
varsity basketball team, the
image of Yale is no longer one of
the stodgy, well-to-do, epitome
of establishment. It has become
a part of the now generation
a rebellious, idealistic

COACH ADOLPH RUPP
... suspends two more
sophomores Kent Hollenbeck
and Randy Noll 5
Rupp plans to meet with the
other two, junior Clint Wheeler
and senior Art Laib, Wednesday
before deciding what action, if
any, he will take against them.

TAMPA NON-STOPS
And all other Trallways Services at Gainesville
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institution willing to suffer
greatly for what it believes is
right.
For the past six months Yale
has become involved in a war
with the big daddy of
collegiate establishments the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association. It began when the
university allowed Langer, a
member of the Jewish faith, to
play on the United States
basketball team in the
Maccabiah Games at Tel Aviv
last summer.
The NCAA, which has been in
a power struggle with the
Amateur Athletic Union over
control of international athletic
competition, had declared the
Maccabiah Games basketball
competition off-limits to college
players, even though it had
sanctioned other events at the
games. Yale, however, claimed
the NCAA was infringing on the
religious freedom of athletes and
openly defied the order by
allowing Langer to participate <
Yales argument was based on
principle. Langer is no Pete
Maravich. He has averaged only
5.4 points and 5.2 rebounds per
game this season as a backup
center, and his value to the Yale
team is negligible. But his value
as a player wasnt the point. It
was his worth as an individual
that Yale was concerned about.
The NCAA, angered by Yales
insurrection, took its wrath out
on Langer by declaring him
ineligible for further collegiate
basketball competition. But,

when Yale remained defiant by
allowing Langer to continue
playing varsity basketball, the
NCAA punished the university
by placing it on a two-year

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Beer in the Baleeef :
10* s *" fo 7 *"
Mon. thru Sat.
11611 S.W. IMi St.
Btft art alto mlaaaia
Bat aalf Girls Bat 10* Boar
(Another
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Liquors lounge

probation. That meant none of
Yales teams or athletes oould
take part in NCAA
championship events during that
time. 1