Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Students Be Alert To Possible Suicides

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
Two suicides in Gainesville, one on the UF
campus, since the first of the year, have prompted
urgings from the Suicide and Crisis Intervention
Center for students to be aware of potential suicide
situations.
Ninty per cent of the people committing suicide
have given some warning, said Miss Joyce
Beueilein, Associate Director of the Center. People
who do talk about suicide actually do kill
themselves.
Warnings, she said, are usually found in

fill
fall
1 II I I
1 m at
: >' v. J||
H
1 w
> "Hi iSSf ', ."*-i* v -.'"; V *v
SWi wm
;:>4 : :141i If v 1*
"W n
jijMgj-ia-Miii j '*'"' f
X '.>/; 1
' IP ,>
'1
.?* C sXv v ; v .*
IS IT GETTING THERE FIRST OR ALIVE?
Slaughter on the highways, the major killer in America today is
Patricia Zirin's theme for her art collage. In this era of fantastic
scientific accomplishments people and even rabbits aren't safe on the
highways as Patricia has sadly depicted.
I *' * II
I Schedule
IS |§ v
II 10 ajn. Films, Reitz Union Auditorium
|| 2 p.m. SPEAKER, University Auditorium, Vicki Fagan,
ACCENT 7O Hostess, JEANE DIXON, Acclaimed for her
extraordinarily accurate forecasts.
II 3:30 pm. Time Capsule Dedication, Plaza of the Americas, Joe
; Baron, ACCENT 70 Host, DR. ROBERT B. GAITHER,
. Professor of Mechanical Engineering, JEANE DIXON,
j f Dedication
U 4 pm. Panel Discussion, The Future of Cities?, Bill Modlin,
ACCENT 70 Host, DR. ERNEST R. BARTLEY, UF
H political science professor, Moderator, STEPHEN P. CLARK,
Mayor of Miami, DICK GRECO, Mayor of Tampa, CARL
LANGFORD, Mayor of Orlando, DR. WALTER
MURPHREE, Mayor of Gainesville, HANS TANZLER,
Mayor of Jacksonville
7:30 pm. Mixed Media Presentation, Richard Oman, University
11 Auditorium
8 pm. SPEAKERS, University Auditorium, Robert D. Martin,
ACCENT 70 Host, SAM YORTY, Mayor of Los'Angeles,
l Todays Solutions for Todays Headaches, DR.
LEONARDO RJCCI, University of Florence, authority on
Urban Design and Development, Methodology in the City,
| CARL L. KLEIN, Assistant Secretary of Interior, U.S.,
Water Pollution: Quality of Our Life. Introductions:
Robert D. Martin, Dean Fred Cantrell, Dr. Walter Murphree,
1 John Toppe. Reception following in the Rathskeller.

CRISIS CENTER URGES

statements such as I cant go on like this or I
dont want to live anymore.
Referring to file recent death of a UF coed from
an overdose of pills, Miss Beuerlein said, We
definitely could have done something had some one
thought about calling us. Friends or roommates can
call about another person.
The Suicide and Crisis Intervention Center
operates a 24-hour, seven day a week telephone
service to aid in halting suicide attempts or
alleviation a crisis situation. Callers are transferred
to agencies suited to their problems and all records
are confidential.
UF housing has asked for 3,000 cards from the

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 84

AIRLINES AFFECTED?
Gainesville May Soon
Lose All Train Service

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writar
The Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company has
applied to the Interstate Commerce Commission
(ICC) for authority to discontinue the operation of
two trains which load passengers and freight in
Gainesville.
SG Secretary of Consumer Affairs Ralph
Glatfelter said if rail service is discontinued, future
jet facilities may be affected.
Glatfelter said a feeder effect works in airlines.
Airlines like to service areas which serve as
feeders to other services, he said.
If jet service is implemented, local air commuter
service probably would be discontinued, according
to John McKenna, Gainesville's attorney in
Washington.
If Seaboard is allowed to discontinue their service,
and jet service is started but somehow doesnt work
out, Gainesville will be left without any major
transportation other than bus service, Glatfelter
said.
Director of University Physical Planning, Walter
Matherly said UF has been asked by the City of
Gainesville to back the citys plea against removal of
this service at the Feb. 20 ICC hearing.
To be well-served, a community must have a
good mixture of carriers air, rad and bus. We
would like to prepare a case, but first we want to

Shepherd Going Before Legislature

UF student body President
Charles Shepherd has been asked
to appear before the state
Legislative Select Committee on
Campus Unrest and Drug Abuse
Feb. 13. to answer five questions
for the committee.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has been invited to
appear before the committee
also.
i Committee chairman Mallory
Horne will ask for Shepherd's
opinions on the following
questions:
i What is the primary cause
of student unrest?
t What steps have been, and

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

center which will be supplied to each dorm room,
Miss Beueilein said. She urges students to keep and
use the card and the emergency line.
Among the situations that might precipitate a
suicide attempt, Miss Beuerlein listed loss of a boy
or girlfriend, an unwanted pregnancy, failure in
grades, conflict with parents, financial difficulties,
peer group problems or a feeling that no one cares.
It could be a *what the hell attituded, she added.
With suicide ranking as the third largest killer
among college students, Miss Beurlein stressed that
alertness to a cry for help and a call to the Suicide
and Crisis Intervention Center by a friend,
roommate or spouse can save a life.

need to be taken, to alleviate the
causes of unrest?
What administration
policies are unsatisfactory to the
general student?
To what extent is the
general student involved in
administration policies?
How does the
administration view the
University Security Police
system, and what should their
role be on campus?
Shepherd strongly urged
anyone who has an opinion, or
view to offer on any of the
above questions to call him, or

know the opinions of students, faculty,
administrators and anyone else whether
connected with the University or not.
Matherly said he thought the removal of this rail
service would adversely affect recruitment of
students, faculty and staff.
The two trains in question constitute the last
passenger rail service between Jacksonville and St.
Petersburg, with the exception of Ocala. About
36,000 passengers utilized the services of these
trains during 1968.
A similar request to the Florida Public Service
Commission for discontinuance of this service was
denied Oct. 17, 1969. The courts said carriers such
as trains and planes are more than private businesses
in that they must operate in the public interest.
According to the order issued by the commission
at that time the benefit the public receives from
this service outweighs the loss of the railroad.
The order also said passengers might be forced to
spend as much as three additional hours of travel travelon
on travelon a bus if train service were discontinued.
Seaboard says patronage on the trains has
declined, thereby causing a substantial annual
deficit in the iperation of the trains.
Matherly said he would like to determine whether
there is sentiment on this issue and how strong it is.
All people interested in continuance of the rail
service should contact Glatfelter or Matherly as
soon as possible.

Wednesday, February 11, 1970

come to his office in the Reitz
Union.
Inside
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYES,
but not spouses, still
allowed free courses
until June page 3
Classifieds ....10
Dropouts ; 4
Editorial .6
Entertainment 13
FSU News 3
Letters . 7
Movies .; .10
Sports 14



Page 2

r Tfci Rondrf

... model city planner
.v.-.v.v.-.v.v.v.v.v.^^
jWorld Population!
| Concerns UF
: Academic concern over world population problems has come :j
: to the UF campus. :
j: This spring a biology seminar, CBS 294, concerning the ij
: population crisis, will be offered to any University College ji
: student beyond the first-quarter freshman level. :
The fields of biology, sociology, history and anthropology j:
will be studied for a general background to problems associated :
with population growth in man and other organisms. *
:j Consideration of population control and methods that j:
: maintain it will also be studied. Special emphasis will be placed |j;
j: on current environmental problems. £
j Guest speakers from other departments and possibly one or :
j: more nationally known speakers will participate in the Monday, ij
j: Wednesday and Friday, during sixth period class meetings. :
j: Participation and individual presentations will determine ij
* most of the students grades for the course. But there will also
be a final exam. :
Enrollment for the class of 15 is by permission of the £
instructor only. Interested students should see the Department ij:
§ of Biological Sciences Office (Flint Hall, Room 108) or Pr. §
§ Thomas C. Emmel (Flint, Room 12), before Thursday. $
I 1
yVi%%ViV%yViyijV.v*ViV.v. v.v.v.v.v.vA .M.. ..............

FIRST IN GAINESVILLE
Mother Earth: Health Store And Art Gallery Opens

By LYNNE KAY JOHNSON
Alligator Correspondent
Gainesvilles first health food
store officially opened its doors
Monday.
The store, named Mother
Earth, is run by four former UF
students who share in
ownership, work and profit.
Upon inspection, Mother
Earth at 604 N.W. 13 St., yields

Famed Writer Speaks
Dr. Rene Dubos, 1969 Pulitzer Prize winner, will speak to the EGC
300 dan, Technology, Civilization and Man,** during its regular
meeting at 1:25 pin. Thursday.
Dr. Seymour Block, professor of chemical engineering, is inviting
students and<£|culty to join his class for this session to be held in the
Engineering Annex Auditorium, room 270. There will be 100 extra
seats for the pubnc.
Dubos won the Pulitzer Prize for his book, So Human an Animal.**
He it a microbiologist and professor at Rockefeller University, New
York City.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and diiring student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Al.ligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is' given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for must be given before the. next
;s§|mrtion. ~ --- v. a. a xt

teas, grains, dried fruits,
vitamins, juices, flours and
candies. All are natural organic
products without preservative or
artificial flavors and colorings.
Upstairs at Mother Earth is a
small art gallery. Currently, the
works of Paul Oliver, an
advertising student at UF are
being featured. A new artist will
be featured every three weeks.
Health foods are for anyone

DR. LEONARDO RICCI
Tonights Accent Speaker

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Urban Design program is in the front
ranks, a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development official told Accent Speaker Dr.
Leonardo Ricci on a visit here Friday.
Ricci, a UF visiting professor in Urban Design is
Director of Italys Urban Institute at the University
of Florence, and is speaking tonight for Accent.
He is directing a class of graduate and fifth year
students in the design of a model city.
Reviewing the project, Special Assistant for
Urban Design Ralph Warburton of HUD said the UF
was one of the few schools looking at the
problem of urban design from such an overall view,

Cancer Seminar Begins

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Hilary Koprowski,
Director of the Wistar Institute
of Research at Philadelphia, will
be the first in a series of speakers
participation in a Frontiers in
Cancer Research seminar to be
I
MINI-POSTER
if |)
imn
o

who is interested in their
health,** said Sherri Prigger, one
of the owners. If you are
concerned and have respect for
your body, you wont put
yourself in a situation that is
detrimental to your body.*
Witness fire cydamate flap,
for example, said Jerry
Thornton, a partner, and the
fact that is is becoming
dangerous for mothers to breast
feed their babies because of high
levels of DDT in mothers milk,
a danger that can be lessened by
eating organic and natural
foods.
Explaining more of the
rationale behind health food
i

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
( |sntiickif fried f/kiiken j
K 376-6472 1
m 114 S.W. 34th St.
M -'w J 372-3649 M
fSWI d| nner QQA
I m iaM box vuV I
M 3 Pc. Chicken M
Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 A
iff'"*"* BRING COUPON I

held here for the next live
weeks.
The seminar is sponsored by
Florida division of the American
Cancer Society.
Koprowski is recognized for
his discoveries of vacines for
rabies, hog cholera, and polio
myelitis, and for his research in
the area of viruses.
Cell Relationships as they
relate to cancer research, is the
announced topic of Koprowski*s
presentation which will be given
at noon today in Room M-623
of the Medical Sciences Building.
The following is a list of
speakers for the following
three Wednesdays at the same
time and place:
Dr. Herbert Taylor,
professor of biology at Louisiana
State University, will speak on
The Regulation of DNA
Replecation in Mammalian
Cells on Feb. 18.
On March 4 Dr. Edward A.
Boyse, from the Sloan-Kettering
Institute in New York, will talk

diets, Miss Prigger said man has
unnecessarily been a secondary
consumer, receiving from meat
only what the animal hasnt
used. It is far more beneficial for
man to receive his nourishment
from a balanced diet of natural
foods, she further said.
We are advocating peace
through health foods because we
believe that what you eat gives a
foundation to your whole
being, Miss Prigger said.
Your environment is shaped
from within and how you look
upon life is how life really is,
how you think is how you
create, she continued. A

from the state scale down to such specifics as air
conditioning.
Your model city is a good beginning to a very
complex problem. It is a very comprehensive
program, he told Ricci and his students.
Constantly advancing the art of urban design is
the purpose of HUD, Warburton said, but added
that unless its budget is enlarged for research, such
model cities and new ideas would remain at the
academic level.
However, there is a good possibility the UF might
be able to get research funds from HUD if it kept
growing in the direction it has taken, he said.
The total budget allocated to HUD is $2 billion.
Riccis methodology is flexible, so that his model
city could work in rural areas and small towns as
well as big cities, Warburton said.

on Immuno Genitics in Relation
to Cancer.
Dr. Howard Green,
chairman of the UF Department
of Cell Biology, on March 11
will speak on Cellular Genes and
Susceptibility to Virus in Hybrid
Mamalian Cells.
March 18 Dr. Joseph H.
Burchenal, vice president of the
Sloan-Kettering Institute, will
talk on Experimental and
Clinical Studies Suggesting the
Curability of Leukemia and
Lymphoma.
Dr. Paul Byvoet, program
chairman and vice president of
the Aluacha County Chapter of
the American Cancer Society,
said the purpose of the seminar
is to build up more interest in
cancer research.
We would like to stimulate
students interest in the cancer
problem. We need every man we
can get in this field.
Byvoet claims that if people
would get-interested in research,
then we could solve the
problem more rapidly.

happy person doesnt kill or
rob.
Miss Prigger said the idea for
the store began as a dream
between herself and Dorothy
Nicholson, another owner,
during their stay in California
last summer.
When we returned to
Gainesville we started making
plans with Doug Bonebrake, the
organizer and big promoter, and
Jerry, our financial wizard, she
said. And now, we are planning
an expansion which will include
books on health food cooking,
macrobiotic diets, mysticism,
occult studies and the arts.



Free Course
Decision
Reversed

Classes Will Be Held
The schedule of events for ACCENT week published in
Mondays Alligator stated that classes would be called off
Thursday afternoon. That report was incorrect.
Classes will be held as usual on Thursday.

news 'lhiiw..
from...JBMIP^SU

ELECTIONS: Presidential
canditate Chuck Sherman of
Indian Harbor Beach, heading
the insurgent Independent party
led his party to a clean sweep of
student runoff elections at FSU.
Sherman defeated his Action
party opponent Wayne Rubinas
of Lake Alfred by a vote of
3,212 to 2,551.
The successful ISP candidacy of
black student John Burt of Fort
Wayne, Ind., for mens
vice-president marked the
highest elective post yet won by
a northern state black student.
Voter turnouts of 5,826 was
the highest election total in
recent years.
GRIPES: A group of
Republican legislators, members
of a campus task force, will be
touring FSU today collecting
'Number
Contest
Hume Hall cafeteria has
initiated anew contest to
provide something new and
different for the students, said
Bob Murphy, cafeteria manager.
Dubbed the magic number
contest, the game is very simple.
Each day, Murphy said, we
pre-select a number and specify
aun. or pun. This is a customer
count number. The customer
who comes through the line with
that number receives his tray of
food free.
Michael Ann Imhoff, lUC,
one winner of the contest said,
Its terrific and good for the
budget!

mii mm
( Teddy Bear Nursery
( y'jcri Divided into seven age groups. OPEN 7
a.m. to 6 pm atl a,so Niflht
Babysitting 6 to 12 p.m. FREE pick up
T\ and delivery to ail schools.
1214 N.W. 4th Street
Ph. 376-0917 for further information

SOMETIMES ADVERTISING IS THE ONLY WAY TO GET PUBLISHED

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
Jay McGlon, Director of Personnel for the State Department of
Administration, in a statement released Monday, has reversed the
decision that state university employes would not be able to take free
courses but only till June.
McGlons statement said the 20-year-old policy of allowing staff
employes to take, six hours of courses free would be continued
through the end of the spring quarter.
No explanation was made as to why the two previous statements
which said only professors could continue to take free courses and
only until the end of this academic term were reversed.
The announced policy of not allowing free courses had met
opposition from employes at UF. More than 3,000 signed a petition
objecting to die change which was sent last week to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and on to the Board of Regents.
The petition said it was necessary for professors to take courses to
keep up with technological advances. It also said wives who had to
work should be aided to be able to keep up with their educations.

gripes of suggestions from the
students. The gripe-in will be
held in Moore Auditorium from
10 a.m. to 5 pjn. Various
legislators of the task force will
be on hand at that time to field
complaints and students will be
provided with an open
microphone for that purpose.
wFbodHosU
Excellence in Food
piritirrsityT^
Adjacent Kings Food Host
9 X-TRA quick watch repair /Tj
Diamond Setting Jrw'
§ Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs IsT
Charms soldered l/X
Trophies plaques
Florida crest jewelry (
Lavaliers
§ Class rings
Engraving
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub
CAMP COUNSELOR
Boy's camp, Lenox, Maw.
(42nd yr.) has opening for coming
summer. Campus Interviews.
Unusual staff from all parts of
U.S. and Europe. Openings for
swimming, sailing, canoeing, also
openings in archery, riUery,
tennis, fine arts, ceramics,
yearbook. Write fully to camp
Mah-Kee-Nac, 137 Thacher Lane,
South Orange, NJ. 07079

IRREVERSIBLE, LAIRD SAYS
1
i
Withdrawal Necessary

SAIGON (UPI) Secretary of Defense Melvin R.
Laird arrived in Saigon Tuesday on a fact-finding
mission for President Nixon and said the process of
giving Southeast Asian nations a greater role in their
own security is irreversible.
Laird flew in from Washington with Gen. Earle G.
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to
survey progress in Vietnamization.
He said the policy of turning over greater
responsibility to Southeast Asian nations is a policy
which will be steadfastly adhered to and could be
called irreversible.
Laird said the continued accelerated withdrawal
of U.S. combat froces was dependent on three
things: progress in the Paris peace talks, the level of
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong military activities
in South Vietnam, and the moves toward
Vietnamization.

Other state employes received their own benefits, the petition said,
and that this policy was one of the few benefits at UF.
OConnell also objected to the policy change, saying: Further
education on the part of employes of the state and at the university
ultimately benefits and state and university by improved quality of
service. The cost is minimal compared to the advantages."
University Chancellor Robert Mantz said he will take the issue to
the legislature, contending the free courses are traditional in
universities throughout the nation and are part of the woof and warp
of that society."
However, the decision to allow state employes' spouses to take free
courses has not been reversed.
The issue was first brought up by McGlon and Samuel Tucker,
Secretary of the Department of Administration six months ago. They
said no state employe should enjoy benefits not available to all other
employes, and so the policy of allowing free courses would have to be
stopped.
A later statement amended this decision to allow all employes to
continue taking courses until the end of the year. Any attempt to
change the policy will have to go to the state legislature.

Panhellenic Ball
February 20

a,wp, t* f *mmmt

Under the Vietnamization program, the South
Vietnamese will take over the major burden of the
war against the Communists. About 60,000
American troops have been withdrawn from South
Vietnam since last summer.
Laird was met at Tan Son Nhut Airport by U.S.
Ambassador Ellsworth C. Bunker and Gen.
Creighton W. Abrams, the American military
commander in Vietnam.
Laird is on a 10-day Asian trip for what was
called a top-to-bottom look at how well South
Vietnam is taking over the wat effort and how
quickly the United States can extricate itself.
He was under instructions from Nixon to follow
up and go thoroughly into the areas of
Vietnamization even more thoroughly than on
his last visit to Vietnam last March.

Page 3



L The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 11,1970

Page 4

AGAINST POLLUTION
Nixon To Mobilize
Washington (UPI) President Nixon called Tuesday for a total
mobilization of all Americans in a concentrated campaign to clean
the air and purify the nations polluted waters.
In a special message to Congress following up his State of the Union
pledge to make cleaning the environment the primary effort of the
70s, Nixon outlined a lengthy plan for the rescue of our natural
habitat.
The program includes a $lO billion project for cleaning up waters
and rail* for rigid regulations to deal with air and water polluters.
The time has come when we can wait no longer to repair the
damage already done and to establish new criteria to guide us in the
future, Nixon said.
The task of cleaning up our environment calls for a total
mobilization by all of us. It involves government at every level; it
requires the help of every citizen.
The main feature of the so-called Environmental Quality Program
proposes a clean waters act through which $4 billion would be
authorized to help state and local communities build sewage
treatment facilities.
The $4 billion would have to be matched by $6 billion in
contributions from state and local governments. A special federal
group called the Environmental Financing Authority would be set up
to help hard-pressed municipalities raise the money to meet their
share of the cost.
The President said that would be sufficient to construct about
1,500 new treatment facilities and to expand and upgrade 2,500 other
plants.
He asked for a $4 billion authorization over a four-year period at
a rate of $1 billion per year starting in the year beginning July 1. A
reassessment would be made in 1973 to determine future needs.
The Presidents message called for establishment of federal water
and air quality standards, with fines of up to SIO,OOO a day for
violations.
Federal enforcement procedures would be revised to permit swifter
court action against violators and the interior secretary would be
empowered to seek immediate injunctions where severe pollution
existed.

IN ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT
Dayans Son Escapes Unhurt

MUNICH, Germany (UPI)
An Arab terrorist Tuesday
hurled a hand grenade into a
passenger bus at Munichs Riem
Airport in an apparent attempt
to assassinate the only son of
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, Munich Police Chief
Manfred Schreiber said.
Assaf Dayan, actor son of the
Israeli war hero, escaped unhurt
in the blast. But another
passenger was killed and several
others wounded.
The Arab bomb-thrower also
fought a running gun battle with
police and two suspected
accomplices set off two
explosives in the airports transit
passenger waiting room.
Police said at least one person
was killed and 11 others
wounded in the attack. All three
Arabs also were injured and were
captured by police.
Everything points to Moshe
Dayans son as the object of an
assassination attempt,
Schreiber said.
The attack at the busy
international airport followed
the crash Monday night of a
United Arab Airlines jetliner

Oils Flour
Honey Tea
Grains Juices
Natural Vitamins
Hoffman Products
Books Art
604 NW 13th St. 378-5224

shortly after takeoff from the
same field. All 23 persons
aboard the British-made Comet
jetliner survived the crash.
A government spokesman said
there was no suggestion of
sabotage in the plane crash. Two
crewmen were injured and a
women passenger hospitalized
for shock.
The airport spokesman said
Tuesdays attacks began when a
small, thin Arab suddenly
appeared at the door of the bus
carrying passengers to an Israeli
El A1 airliner and a Syrian Arab
Airlines plane.
One passenger was killed in
the explosion of the hand
grenade, the spokesman said, but
el

L ii w by Brickman
the small society l
: | A PoU-AK &XTY &XTY**+
**+ &XTY**+ NNSAfeUP?
aSLPGU r 1 o£tte=k
pgSS\i \

Joggers
Cautioned
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Jogging is a popular form of
exercise with many healthful
advantages but an orthopedic
surgeon offers a word of
warning.
Dr. James M. Morris of the
University of California Medical
Center says jogging should be
undertaken gradually. Time and
length should be increased over a
period of two to three weeks.
If an individual were to go all
out and try to jog several miles
on the first weekend, he might
suffer fatigue fracture, which
occurs when a bone is subjected
to a series of stresses it is unable
to withstand.
These fractures take place in
the forefoot, heel of ankle
region and occasionally even in
the leg or hip, said Morris.

the others escaped unharmed.
He said the Arab then dodged
behind the bus and opened fire
on Bavarian Border Police
guarding the airport. The
policemen returned the fire but
the man was able to reach the
waiting room for transit
passengers.
As he entered the door, there
were two explosions, one after
the other, the spokesman said.
The Arab was injured in the
blast as were 10 other persons in
the room.
The spokesman said an initial
investigation indicated the other
two Arabs, also injured,
apparently set off the explosions
in the waiting room.

m %r>d) ar)6 Sap

11222 West University

Army Law Officer Testifies
Calley Charges Prejudiced

FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
- The chief law officer of the
Army infantry center here
testified Tuesday he was told
that before charges were
brought against Lt. William L.
Calley Jr. the matter had
gone to the West Coast and
back.
President Nixon was in his
West Coast White House at
San Clemente, Calif., at the
time.
The testimony was given at
a pretrial hearing in which the
defense is contending that
Calley, 26, cannot get a fair
court-martial because of
improper high command
influence, including that of
the White House.
Calley is charged with the
premeditated murder of 102
Vietnamese civilians while
leading his platoon on a
sweep of My Lai villages on

Good Food of
Reasonable Prices^.
Breakfast Anytimol
OPEN 24 HOURS
Carry Out Closed:
Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
II MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133

YOU ARE INVITED
This evening, February 11, 1970, you are
cordially invited to share with us the music of MR.
JOHN ABATE.
JOHN ABATE, direct from performances with
Andy Williams, Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra,
and Totie Fields.
The Bench and Bar is proud to present for your
pleasure this special evening with JOHN ABATE.
Won't you join us?

March 16,1968.
Col. Robert M. Lathrop,
staff judge advocate for Ft.
Benning, testified he had
been told the Calley matter
had been sent to the West
Coast but that he personally
never received any kind of
instructions from Nixon.
I was told that the matter
had gone to the West Coast
and back and that the
President was in San
Clemente at the time,
Lathrop told the Army
prosecutor, Capt. Aubrey M.
Daniel.
On cross-examination,
Lathrop testified his
informant was either Col.
William J. Chilcoat, chief of
the Military Justice Division
of the Judge Advocates
Office in Washington, or Lt.
Col. Matthew B. ODonnell
Jr. of that office.

11:30 AM to 2:00 Ato
except Sunday*



Go ahead and gloat
You deserve it.
jUn\, Roihskll*r //
Membership Card II

Why shouldn't you feel a little smug and proud, stepping up
to the ticket window and getting fifty cents knocked off each
Rathskeller ticket you buy. It's really funny when that same
guy is always behind you putting out an extra dollar, show
after show!
You would have thought that by now he'd wise up. After
all, this is the third big show he's gone to at the Rat and for
each show he's paid fifty cents extra per ticket. Three shows,
six tickets, that's an extra three dollars! Pretty amusing since a
Rathskeller Membership Card only costs two dollars.
Besides the discounts on shows he could also save
twenty-five cents at the Film Festival each Wednesday and get
in on the big savings for food and drinks that are always being

f y Mail to: Rathskeller, University of Florida *1
UA Enclosed is $2.00 for my Rathskeller Membership Card. |
Jn | Name Age |
| BIRTHDATE. |
>< iV? ; iMu&zttflfftfx- frr tiftflSlfr' '* 4 'v*'- **'& ' &*&*'>*j**^-*)**-***&" ')o*<&*&.

announced.
Poor guy. It's a good thing for him that it's not too late. He
can still get a Rathskeller Membership Card and enjoy the
discounts at Dion, Pacific Gas & Electric, and the Rotary
Connection.
Give him a break. Tell that guy behind you to wise up today
and get a Rathskeller Membership Card before he has to spend
any more extra money. Nobody's that rich, or that foolish, to
pass up a chance like this.
Either mail in the coupon below, or stop by the Rat or
Reitz Union Box Office.
It's great to gloat with money in your pocket.
P.S.: You don't have to be 21 to get a membership card.

Wadnaadey, Fabtuary 11,1970, Tha Florida AJSfator,

Page 5



Page 6

Ffjbruyy tl, J 970

Dean Maloney
Not In Disfavor
MR. EDITOR:
In your editorial, Nows The Time, Alligator January 27th,
the statement was made that:
It has been no secret that Frank Maloney, Dean of the
College of Law, has been in disfavor with the administration
for a long time.
A newspaper has a right to express its opinions in its editorial
page, but it has an obligation to be fair, and above all, factual in
the premises upon which it opines. In making the above
statement you were neither.
There are many persons in the administration. To my
knowledge Dean Maloney has not been in disfavor with any
of them. All whom I have heard express themselves, and I, have
the greatest respect for him, and particularly for his tireless
efforts on behalf of his college, its students and faculty.
Insofar as I know, he was not in disfavor with the
administration. He was not with me. To suggest that he
retired because he was is not only inaccurate, it is an
unwarranted reflection upon him that needs correction. Such is
the purpose of this letter. Please publish at your earliest
convenience.
STEPHEN C. OCONNELL
PRESIDENT

|hH
PMH PPPM BBj

-Speaking Out
Nixons Budget: A Reordering Os Priorities?
By Larry Tropp

A great deal has been said about the
accomplishments (or lack of them) of the Nixon
administration during its first year. The time has
now come to look at the future of the Nixon
administration rather than its past.
One way to analyze the future of the Nixon
administration in solving the problems of the nation
is to describe the problems, describe the goals set
forth by the administration concerning these
problems, and to describe the means set forth by
the administration to achieve these goals.
In describing his budget to Congress, President
Nixon said, This anti-inflationary budget begins
the necessary process of reordering our national
priorities. For the first time in two full decades, the
Federal government will spend more money on
human resource programs than on defense... 1
It seems that President Nixons major goal is to
slow down inflation. He hopes to accomplish this
through a budget surplus. There have been surpluses
in die last two budgets as well as rigid monetary
controls yet inflation continues.
The only effective way to slow down inflation is
to slow down increases in wages and profits,
especially the latter. In order to accomplish this
there is a need for government action either in the
form of direct wage and price controls or voluntary
guide lines. Such action will not be taken by the
administration because it is politically dangerous.
The most important national issue is probably the
pollution of the environment. In the fight against
water pollution the President proposed a five year,
ten billion dollar program. Os this 10 billion dollar
program four billion is to come from the federal

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-I n-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

A
/W V

government, the remaining six billion from the cities
involved.
This 800 million dollar program is less than a
water pollution control program proposed by
Congress in the 19605. The Democratic program
proposed by Congress in the 19605. The
Democratic program called for $1.25 billion in fiscal
1971. The President has proposed $104.2 million
for air pollution control, arlatively insignificant sum
for a problem of extremely large proportions.
Furthermore, the industries that cause pollution
should pay to fight it, not the private citizen.
However, this is also politically dangerous.
President Nixon has emphasized an increase in
spending for human resources. Out of an increase
of slightly more than $8 billion in human resource
spending, $6 billion will go towards an increase in
Social Security benefits, leaving $2 billion for other
programs.
The President has appropriated SSOO million for
his Family Assistance program. Based on an
estimated 30 million poor this averages out to
$16.66 per person, an incredibly small amount.
Earlier this year the President vetoed a
health-education and welfare bill. He also cut funds
for medical research. The President has also
de-emphasized the Model Cities programs.
Although the defense cuts are needed, they are a
continuation of a trend begun in 1954 and
interrupted for the Vietnamese war. Since 1954
defense spending has been less than fifty percent of
the budget.
While the President has been talking about
reordering priorities, he has been proposing

editorial
A Pull-Out
Ridden in a Pullman sleeper recently?
Chances are you havent, because the Pullman car is
symptomatic of the modem railroad business. Pullman
hasnt built a sleeper since 1956.
Many other things are wrong with American railroads,
and most of us have little occasion to notice. We must face
the fact that automobiles have grabbed 85 per cent of
intercity traffic, the airlines 10 per cent, and railroads run
nip-and-tuck with buses in dividing the remaining five per
cent.
Gainesville has a stake in this matter for the simple reason
that the Seaboard Coast Line wants to abandon Gainesvilles
only passenger train, which pauses here on its run between
St. Petersburg and Jacksonville.
Tragic this is to a community of 80,000 souls with a
University of Florida complex of 22,000 students and
assorted technical and medical facilities.
Well get a chance to be heard Wednesday, February 18,
when the Interstate Commerce Commission holds a hearing
in the Federal Building.
Meanwhile, bone up on a few facts.
Under the organizational genius of President W. Thomas
Rice, the Seaboard is making money. The railroads net
income in 1969 was a cool $38.5 million, an increase of 185
per cent over $13.5 million in 1968.
Another thing to ponder is Seaboards claim that its
losing $263,000 a year on Gainesvilles passenger trains.
Railroads like to compute loss figures with a full deficit
system which credits passenger trains with such expenses as
track maintenance although the track has to be
maintained anyway for freight traffic.
Its a rotten way of computing costs, according to
transportation expert Stanley Berge of Northwestern
University. He recommends a solely related method, in
which costs are related only to the passenger service itself.
And Seaboard needs to be asked about poor service,
including obsolete equipment and tardy schedules. And
while Seaboard budgets $350,000 a year on passenger
advertising, you can bet your boots it is spent in New York
and Miami not on our train which Seaboard wants to
abandon.
Note also that Seaboard avoids travel agents like the
plague. If it followed the airline example, it would grant
commissions up to seven per cent to travel agents for the
sole purpose of promoting the service.
The Gainesville Sun

increases in programs such as the ABM and the
MIRV. If the Nixon administration continues to
support such projects and neglects domestic needs,
what will there be to defend? A nation with a
polluted environment? Dying cities? Poverty in the
midst of affluence?
The administration is not entirely to blame for
the current state of affairs. The American people are
also to blame. They are poorly informed. They are
apathetic. Even when informed of the problems of
the nation, they refuse to pay to correct them.
Perhaps President Nixon isnt to blame for
refusing to take action to fight domestic problems.
Maybe its the fault of his supporters, the very
appropriately named silent majority.
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392*1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681. 82. 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392*1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
_l e d,tors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



Questions
On Canney
Case

i Sinkejjj]Jm
- ft I
Ksu. tin mt :
, WmSSmmMma mi, *ft Him
<"* !*<* ui *., .* # |** Jr
L <.a V ~! w/#r*^
If M Efcs,
lk. mim m^bv
JJiUn ifw iwiw|
tM"\ JHKf 1^ L


The Movement i " i " l ,11,,l, "^^^^^^^^
-; .. \. .;" ~. ij;
CE Off Campus!

In the midst of the U. S. government* war
against the Vietnamese people, 147,000 workers
struck the General Electric Company and have
called for a nationwide boycott of all GE
products.
The strike was precipitated by the refusal of
GE to grant a raise in wages equalling the rise in
the cost of living due to inflation.
SMC finds this strike of special interest to
students and everyone opposed to the war in
Vietnam.
GE is the second largest military contractor in
the US. GE's military contracts from the
Department of Defense alone totaled
$1,480,000,000 in 1968.
Twenty percent of the business done by GE is
in the military sector.
In 1968, GE was the fifth largest contractor
with NASA (191 million). These contracts were
primarily for Atomic Energy Commission
facilities rivaling with the production of nuclear
weapons.
In other words, GE is making a gigantic profit
(357 million in 1968) in large part from the
military machine. They are directly involved in
manufacturing military materials for the war in
Vietnam.
Meanwhile, the war is causing an ever
escalating inflation in this country (the cause is
NOT workers demands for decent living wages).
While big companies take millions off of the
war, the wages of working people are being
eroded by inflation. The inflation is directly
owed by the war which is costing $1,000.a
second, as well as countless Vietnamese and
American lives.
The fight against GE is an indication that the
American people are not interested in financing
the war in Vietnam.
GE, through its directors, has its hands
directly on 12 major universities and colleges. GE
men control the faculty and curriculum to see
that potential GE stagehands in the form of
brainwashed company-loving engineers,
technicians and managers are turned out with

MR. EDITOR:
I am writing to correct some inaccuracies which appear in the
Alligators report of my son Michaels arrest for an alleged narcotics
violation, and to comment on the arrest.
First, the report states that Michael was suspended from GHS in
October, 1968, because the length of his hair was said to be
disruptive of the educational process, whatever that may be.
The fact is that the length of his hair was considered to be unusual
or bizarre according to somebodys interpretation of the Alachua
County School Boards policy on student dress and behavior, although
it was much shorter then than many hair lengths are now at GHS.
Second, the report refers to me as president of the local chapter of
the American Civil Liberties Union. The fact is that I have never held
that office, though I once was chairman of the Brevard chapter and
was the 1968 state chairman of the Florida affiliate.
The office of chairman of the Gainesville chapter is held presently,
I might add, by a very competent and beautiful person, Mrs. Norma
Munn.
As for Michaels arrest, several questions might be raised: Why have
law enforcement people attempted to entrap Michael when they can
arrest countless others on drug charges at any time without such
duplicity?

Student Mobilization Committee

every graduating class.
The connection of GE with the military is
grotesque in its obviousness. GE directors include
two former Secretaries of Defense, one former
Secretary of the Army, a member of the Defense
Advisory Council, a former member of the board
of visitors of the US. Military Academy and a
member of the Army Science Advisory Board.
GEs power to make national policy pays the
company well. GE was stagnating in 1964, with
profits scarcely higher than in 1960. Then came
the 1965 escalation of the war that GE helped
plan, and GE's balance sheet took a great leap
forward. Average profits since 1965 have been 43
percent higher than five years before.
GE makes weapons and communications
devices to maintain the empire and to shoot
down people when they rise up, as in Vietnam.
Most GE branch plants are in countries run by
military dictatorships that depend on military aid
from the US. Much of this equipment is made
byGE.
GE recruiters constantly invade our campuses.
Much heavy equipment bought by college
administrations (including UF), mounting in the
millions not just light bulbs comes from GE.
SMC is calling a demonstration against the GE
recruiters scheduled to be here today and
tomorrow. We urge all antiwar activists,
American Federation of Teachers, and other
unionists, all Black and Third World people and
the university and Gainesville community to join
in this mas, peaceful demonstration.
There will be picketing and discussion from 10
a.m. on today and tomorrow with major
speeches and activities scheduled at noon at the
Reitz Union first floor colonade.
SMC's demands are:
t UF BOYCOTT ALL GE PRODUCTS!
NO GE RECRUITERS ON CAMPUS; SMC
BE ALLOWED TO DEBATE ALL
RECRUITERS!
UF SEVER ALL TIES WITH GE!
t UF END ALL COMPLICITY WITH THE
WAR MACHINE.

It is interesting that this arrest came just when we were expecting a
court decision, the results of which might enable Michael to return to
school. Now, however, since he is being charged with a felony, he
cannot return to school regardless of the decision.
Could it be that Michael has been arrested because he has long hair?
Or because he is known to have been suspended from CHS? Or
because local law enforcement needs a scapegoat? Or because he is
considered by some power freaks to be a source of embarrassment to
the local school board?
It is dear to us that his arrest is in the tradition of the Jim Fine and
Ed Freeman arrests: Drug laws serve conveniently to harass or
discredit those whose beliefs or activities are unpopular.
They are especially convenient when the evidence can easily be
planted on one so that he can then be charged with the crime of
possession.
Needless to say, we intend to fight this with all available means, and
we solidt the support of those who are similarly outraged by such
selective, repressive, and cynical enforcement of highly questionable
laws.
ROBERT CANNEY
| Train Service §
(EDITORS NOTE: The following form was submitted by |
Walter Mathexty, Director of Physical Planning in regard to the
jjj: removal of Seaboard Coast Lines* train service through $
£ Gainesville.)
x S:
$ i
$ To: Department of Physical Planning, Tigert Hall $:
| AsaUF I
§ I
| I IStudent
In Faculty member h
11 Employe 3
I would Idee to go on record as protesting the removal j
of passenger/freight existing train service,which will be i
subject to hearing Feb. 20, before the Interstate j
Commerce Commision.
I have the following specific comments to make:
Signature i j
UAC Defeat:
Whos Confused?
MR. EDITOR:
President OConnell has indicated in THE ALLIGATOR (Feb. 5)
that confusion of irrelevant issues and lack of understanding were
the major causes of the defeat of the UAC proposal.
There is a certain irony in this, as a glance at the voting results show
that the proposal was supported by the Dorm areas (Freshmen and
Sophomores) and by Sorority and Fraternity, whfle it was rejected by
the married housing areas better than four to one and rejected by
Graduate Library and Law Center by nearly equal margins.
If all students were required to join sororities or fraternities and
forced to leave school upon completion of UC, OConnell could be
confident that his future proposals would be accepted by students
capable of understanding the issues, and with sufficient maturity not
to be misled by irrelevancy.
Education is a dangerous thing and should be limited accordingly.
B. E. SHETTERLY, ILW
Gators Were Traitors
MR. EDITOR:
As a Gator fan, I would like to voice my feelings about the behavior
of the persons watching the Florida-L.S.U. basketball game.
I never thought I would see the Gator fans rooting for the opposing
team, but this they were doing on Wednesday night in the Florida
Gymnasium.
It's bad enough that most of the people were these to see Pete
Maravich rather than the UF team, but think how the team members
fed on hearing the students whom they represent and for whom they
ate playing yelling for the opposing team to make points.
Admittedly, Pete can shoot baskets, and his scoring ability should
be recognized but not at the expense of the Gators. It would be nice
to see the UF teams supported whether winning or losing, but this has
not happened since I entered UF in 1966 and became one of their
supporters.
ifiOSl i,). r ;-OO o rfj mat
(MISS) KIM SMALLWOOD

Wedneeday

Page 7



Page 8

.T9*nmi+Amw*w t m+H+i,F*mmmy 11,f70 v

m
fl - >4l 9y i
K m >
''- ,f.v^^- ..< .sal -.i iiirt g3ppm
vr? f 1 j, Mms- : 'i \'% ,&L
x |||

s>}?& ;v>sgjg
'" MB % *£iiil!t if i
f 'fiSHn fey -*-~ W-
*s * :' JbHRxHIIIbIMHK' & x '/-s(&,
yX^jE^..: .^ tafc*c &ss&&'% sssVi '' -4*- >v
-Twy/.v.-.'. ... ,x- y? :v ;
.x~ .* ijMimiiriilMi 'ill : x& vn^-,*Cv^
-,% V^ 7 Mw 5 fJ w-^-*^
.;£.*? MRP' fIH pppg'-'.-< ;,% : \ /ff^MIHIPIIB
'*/*.*> -x 'f. &&- _.-< t -yflfeft -yflfeft
- -yflfeft "* ft
' ilifit JHHik fg
.... ;,|
I
--' ...., y : *i zM vm?

SUSAN SCOTT
Tunic jumpers you can
wear anywhere. Mix and
match them with our
selection of pants. Do your
own thing! The black tunic
is of 100% nylon by
Switchmates. Pants are of
100% cotton by H.I.S. A
perfect pair. Modeled by
Carole.
MAAS BROTHERS
No more worrying about
Spring showers! This shortie
raincoat solves those
problems. A smart idea for
all pants outfits. Modeled
by Cyndi.

353 I

M
,rs" /sy^B'\':>^-.' : '' : :--'-''.--.... ; -
*4 : v I. z' l a a *jf. .^g^-yv !^it -| ) /^^^BW^BrT^affi^BwnWllWWMWM^M^^M^
%sskk *s B x/N^/v'?, v
v<-- .Ipiv'- ; PVj^v p^
1
l M ./:.>4 M/A a
\ f -/V > a?^-4t~v 1>--%,. k '-
o '. x zzSm. ''** 4.!* Mf* < A ifi 4BHHM^||Bl|^^v-

jT
P FIGURE FAIR
Be a perfect angel in a
delicate shortie peignoir set
with the look of dotted
swiss in polyester cotton.
The gown has a bib-type
front with rows of lace and
tied with ribbon. The robe
has a self-drawn string
neckline that can be
adjusted to any size. Color
is pink with white lace.
Price about $23.00 set.
Modeled by Kathy.
v
1 ¥
SILVERMANS
Bright and bold,
Tootique is showing lots
of apple pie-mom-and
country colors of red,
white, and blue. Shown is a
hip-slung, pleated and
scarfed version in washable
polyester. Modeled by
Penny. y


I
F ~sm w JSk tB
p Wr £?
Jgt*' *s v "* ,£
§ M
jjjjj
W f m m l K^
' fl
j/&tM K
,
nfffff. _^^^ ; .s*-
jmM M W: Mat B*ttHHtt§
ylf
..., --SHF
v J '* ,^ ", f V g v ? %, 't e§ \
|k I
ili I i:r
;s y '.y §ng|||
J Jp'
jfcl.
x *f|
' tv*^



-- 9 w
BM|js w ;
. BHHfI!.

p!^-
< \
mmmr
fashion layout by... joycegehrke
I photography by... case and cope

Sgg>
S&tRS
Little brothers knit shirt
look was borrowed for this
tunic. Cotton casual...
Carol is ready to swing into
the carefree summer ahead.
Sears Junior Bazaar.
TWIG
Buttons ... buttons are
the thing on this Country
Set suit in blue denim. The
long jacket belts over pants
or a scooter skirt to give a
tailored look. The outfit has
a matching jumper. City
Sandals by John Romain.
Modeled by Caroline.

Rm? 0* 0 lom
m *
* in -Jfc
m nW
- r"""
1 R s



*11? i .*-*
Ball mm%mm
'I Hp # * ft *B

** m m
i zJBBr WP, ' lll -l
fiPiPPfc* -MMMyM *. U
' vtwM .-wa /.nxfmb >. - * * l WWI

! v \2^afl||||[^^^^^B
.f*' f *s£"s3* 14
./*v, £USimsts
*mkS9^H^^F. : ./ :|4^^^^^^B^^H|Ko^^jSMs&/sJ£s£|sgEsjis2||2^9L!jHHP£|jFp
<,.- v gE|| & :
i
lp*3|
|| fl
-- % mmmm #
SSjsp
- ,4-- ,J
9
p 9
|
I
y~ jpssp
jjj^pi^jpppp^^

rrr r*rty H. W7o.ThHovMi AM|Mr,

STAG AND DRAG
Pam strikes a catchy look
in this outfit by Arpeja. The
outfit features black jersey
pants with a tunic top of
black and gold striped
jersey featuring long sleeves
and an attached
hood . shows the
European influence.
COLONY SHOP
Red, white, and navy
accent this acetate knit
pantsuit. The tunic top is
worn over slightly flared
legs, and all together adds
up to a new look in nautical
styling. The high heeled
platform sandals finish the
ensemble. Modeled by
Patty.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

j [ FOR SALE j
SALE: Honda Model CA 95; Asking
$260.00 or best offer. CALL
372-9367 ask for David or leave
message. (A-80-10t-p).

I f Valentine's Classified 11
V 11 SI.OO for 4 lines
A\l Room 330 JWRU II
Deadline: TODAY li
* Be sure and indicate
* j^^^^^len tines Classifle^^^^^^^
Classified
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end bf
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Doodfina -300 pun. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
*WM n
| I f"| r| riOODDODODD 5
- - h* is fin I
- - j[ [!
I z
to
w P ;
p I "j 3 to
2:9 ii I JO
ii| ft £
§ § § 2
'
Q ect
_ 1 Q > 3 Z
aHO r >
5 g § 2
R 1 F
14
111 X §
_ z r
iq ei
V

r for'sale "J
Color TV, 21". Zenith Console mdl.
remote control. Good picture. Color
and audio. $195.00 firm. Call
376-0528 after 5 PM. (A-80-st-p).

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 11,1970

[ FOR SALE |
64 Corvalr Conv. 4 speed, bkt. seats,
radio, htr., engine & trans. rebuilt.
Excellent transportation fun to drive.
Call Dan Roach 378-5154.
(A-84-lt-p).
Nearly new white 9' x 12' nylon
carpet & pad. V*" pile, dust needs
shampoo. Best offer over $25. Call
378-2121. Moving. Must sell.
(A-84-3t-p).
305 HONDA SCRAMBLER 68 8300
miles. Runs well. Many extras. $425.
Call 376-5133. (A-84-st-p).
BLK Doberman pups AKC, 7 wks.
old, Call after 4:30 PM. 378-4665.
(A-80-st-p).
Bell helmet almost new. Call
372-9757 after 5 PM make offer.
(A-80-st*p).
Super Reverb amplifier. Fabulous
* condition. Need cash for school.
Only 200 dollars. Call Fred Fey at
SAE house. 372-6471 evening.
(A-77-lOt-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BV
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/C, 1 full carpet, washer/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, partially furnished. 1
Immediate occupancy.ss,9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p).
1968 HONDA 50 SIOO. Excellent
condition. Call 787-6128, Leesburg
after 5:30 p.m. Will bring to
Gainesville for inspection any
Monday, 4 p.m. (A-3t*B2-p)
Wotlensak stereo tape unit recently
serviced, bell cycle helmet SZ. 7 5/8,
Phllco 19" portable tv all items In
great condition. Call 378-6277.
(A-83-st-p),
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376:0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
-' v 376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HBELS
15 mins 5 mins

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
TO3T S. Main Phone 376-7771
IMuilhSi!!!i2srXi nnnMNn
- Ttl.phone 371-2434 .j | ! (l
Sgjjtte&Y A Jp&
j)iii .. IMWiiii
(WINNER BEST FILM CANNES FILM FESTIVAL)
GO! FOR THE FURY, \
FORCE AND FUN OF r Stfdfl
U.~. LOOK jLyy
ANGRY, TOUGH AND #A Ffr f
FULL OF STINGP -un I V M
A PICTURE YOU MUST || ttft [ |\ \
SEE THIS YEAR IS ILT j ft Up
-LADtes home journal £3o m M
Introducing
MALCOLM McDOWELL CHRISTINE NOONAN RICHARD WARWICK DAW WOOO ROBERT SWANN
Sawtoil. fl-fewt* Muctffc
DAVID SHERWIN LINDSAY ANDERSON MICHAEL MEDWOMSAYANDERSON COLOR
E PERSONS UNDER 17 WOT ADMITTED A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

FOR RENT I
1 male. Immediately, private rm.
mod. townhouse, $65 or 1-3 to
occupy end mo or quarter $165/mo.
1020 D N. W. 38th Ave. Buddy
373-2353 or 8-6580. (B-83-st-p).
Sublet (as of Mar. l) big bedroom
garage apt. 3 blox from campus.
Come see or call 378-6796 at 301 N.
W. 19th St. (off 3rd Ave.) SIOO per
month. (B-73-st-p).
LANDMARK APT. to sublet Spring
qtr., 2 bdrm. Call 378-9489 for info.
(B-84-St-p).
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. For both one $ two students,
ww carpet, AC Cable TV utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
terrace apts. 1225 S. W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221 or 372-7111.
(B-84-ts-c).
Sin city, 2 bdrm. apt., furnished,
central A/C,' very groovy location.
But quiet nevertheless^-Available
March 21 or 22. Call 373-1936
anytime. (B-84-st-p).
single rooms, central heat, linen &
maid, $ 150/quarter, utilities Inti.,
renting also -for 3rd quarter. Call
378-7222. Tom Ford. 115 N. W.
10th St. no. 10. (S-84-3t-p)i
Male roommate needed: Private
bdrm., can. A/C, AH. pool, furnished,
close to campus. S7O/Mo. Incl. all
uthity. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224 (B-st-81-p).
Female roommate need: Prvt. Bdrm.
can. A/C.&H, pool, furnished, close
to campus. S7O/mo. Inclu. alt
utilities. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224. (B-81-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, can. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utHities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (8-81-20 t-p).
Sublease 2 bedroom apt. Furnished
or unfurnished. Immediately or at
quarter break to August. Call
378-4339 ANYTIME, Day or Night.
(A-83-St-p).
.
SWAPIi Leases on clean S9O two
bedroom apt. for pad permitting dog,
or buy German Shepard pup cheap!
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
ilvingroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, 8120 mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-^l-c).

Sublet now or In March : 1 bdrm.
furnished central air & heat carpet 1
block behind Norman $120.00
376*3154. (B-81-4t-p). V
| WANTED
WANTED: Need a ride to Pensacola
and back. Leave anytime Friday 13.
Return Sunday 15. Urgent need. Call
Dave 392-7360. (C-84-3t-p).
Two good guys need third roommate
Immediately. Private room, close- to
campus, stores, really -nice. Call
Rusty- or Robbie at 378-8946
anytime. (C-84-3t-p).
Female roommate Landmark Apts.
We have everything but you. Color
TV, dishwasher, pool, klnkajoo. No
deposit. $46.25 a month. 378-3515.
(C-84-3t-p). r :
Need 1 or 2 female roommates. $65 a
month Includes RENT & UTIL. La
Bonne Vie. Cali 373-1029 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-82-p)
1 female roommate wanted Spring
qtr. To share 2 bedroom Tangiewood
apt. No Deposits. March rent paid.
Call 373-2711. (C-81-4t-p).,
Male roommate wanted. Immediate
occupancy, central AC/Heat, Vt mile
from campus. Call 373-1951 for
details. (C-83-3t-p).
Engineering Fair Committee needs
pictures of last year's Eng. Fair for
publication in the Fla. Eng. Mag.,
Call Ira Blacker 392-1455.
(C-3t-82-p)
COED roommate for luxurious
Tangiewood town house.
DISHWASHER, 3 NICE ROOMIES,
only SSO a month. Call 376-1015.
(C-83-st-p).
TWO MONTHS RENT FREE! Help!
I Bombed Out! Need one female to
take my place at Landmark 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-81-6t-p).
Summit House One male
roommate needed for 2 bdr. apt.
Feb. rent free, central air and heat,
pool, etc. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361
(C-81-st-p).
'. v / V J V
| 00 'MaP' WANTH>.' I, |
NEED Three young ladles to work
full or -part-time in plesantdowntown
Gainesville office. 1.60 to 2.20 to
start. No experience necessary.
373-1006. (E-84-3t-p).
Wanted: GO-GO DANCERS. Up to
$l5O per week. No Experience
Necessary. Must be good dancer. Call
376-9175 for audition. (E-10t-77-c)
Receptionist, Typing, Phone Work,
Opening day or evening shift,
Full-time. Apply Mr. Ray 2929 N. W.
13th St. no. 3. Gainesville, Fla.
(E-81-7t-p).
Bookkeeping machine operator
experienced persons only apply. Call
392-0393 Mrs. Decker for appt.
(E-81-St-c).
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p). ..
Male Sales Help Wanted. Are you 21
years old and can work 20 hours per
week? Call for appt. 378-6236 or
373-1635. (E-80-st-p).
Cocktail Waitress. Rart or Full Time.
No Experience Necessary. Call
376-9175 After 4:00. DUB'S STEER
ROOM. (E-10t-7?-c)
ffivSKAM
w
_ (WNHAVtSHKJOOCTIOW
Starts Fri.
I *,T]
BISBSa 11
i m *. w. tm i vmA
Wk. Days 7:oQ_and 9:15



CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, February 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

f| AUTOS j|
1968 VW Bug. 30,000 miles. Radio
and heater. BEST OFFER, will be
shown on weekend. Call 376-7670 to
leave your name and phone.
(G-84-St-p).
1969 VW. Must sell to meet financial
obligations. Almost new. S3OO plus
take over payments. Call Kemmle.
392-7532. After 6. (G-83-lt-p).
Volvo, 1963. Excellent student car.
Easy parking, 28 MPG. 378-1268.
Also, 2 snow tires for sale.
(G-83-st-p).
1967 Chevrolet pickup. * Automatic, radio & heater, mud grip
tires, lew mileage. $1,500. 376-9204,
Archey. (G-4t-81-p)
Austin Healy Sprite *6B. Perfect
condition, economical, radio, heater
only 14,500 miles. 51,350 Call
376-0741, 2032% N.W. 3rd Ave.
(G-st-82-p)
1963 Chevy Convertible 327V8 red
w& new white top. No rust on car. If
you see It you'll buy It. Stereo tape
too. Call 378-8771 evenings.
(G-3t-82-p)
1967 Cougar V 8 Auto, trans. Radio
& heater. Good condition. Must sell*
will take best cash offer. Call
376-0329 after 5 p.m. Ask for Ron.
(G-st-82-p)
VW 1968 Bug. 21,000 miles still
some warranty left. Radio, other
extras. $1395. Phone 378-3605.
(G-3t-82-p)
PERSONAL
Â¥
Fly to Fort Myers. Leave Friday, 13
Feb., noon, return Sun, 5 Feb. Call
Abbott Kagan, 378-4859 or drop a
note to Box 428, Health Center.
(J-4t-82-p)
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Little Sweety.
(J-83-lt-p).
Free Introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-10t-p).
Congratulations to DLW and WJB on
their upcoming marriage In June.
Love, the other woman. (I am stilt in
love with WJB. (J-83-2t-p).
Congratulations to Larry Freedman
on becoming a new TEP brother.
Love, your secret admirer. Same goes
for Taft & Elnhom. (J-84-lt-p).
Groggy Youve made me the
happiest girt in the world. Ill always
love you. Youve got a beautiful
Love, the one and only, Aunt Deenie.
(J-84-lt-p).
S6O a month, room & board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St. Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J-84-ts-p).
DIRECT FROM LONDON
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress, Wedding Dress, Sportswear &
Bikinis by your English Dressmaker,
KATHLEEN, Phone 378-0320.
(J-84-st-p).
Sailors' In Vietnam wish to write to
Fla. coeds. Write sn Jay Bader, sn J.
A. Laden, sn J. Grabusky, sn Jim
Black, at AFDL 23 Box 37, NSA,
FPO, San Fran. Calif, 96695.
(J-84-2t-p).
UNIVERSAL ENLIGHTMENT For
the price of a dinner. I will only
provoke your thinking and am not a
minister. You may reach one who is
pure at heart from 7-8 PM, M-F,
Randall Lance, 373-2821.
(J-83-st-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wllliston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
Theta Chis: Woman was created
from the rib of man. She was not
made from his head to top him, nor
out of his feet to be trampled
on ... but out of his side, to be equal
to him; under his arm, to be
protected; and near his heart to be
loved. Sincerely, a Woman. P.S. sbss!
(J-81-st-p).
Summer Charter Flight. Tampa to
Amsterdam. $220 & 10 admin. Fee
Roundtrlp. Call 373-2590 or write
AIESEC, Room 300, Reitz Union.
(J-80-st-p).
YID it can work, here and
fyjrywhere. Come back. JCT.
(J-3t-82-p)
)**;RE ONLY IN IT FOR THE
money. Come In and sea our new
JJJpk. tt 1 really groovy lts toooo
TT*nlng much. Parisian underground
{wwy, European antiques, and
Indian Kurtas. WOW! Tb top It off
we have Susie's snazzy pillows, left
* FREE paper flower with
yv Purchase. You ask why? Because
we want to get rid of this stuff. The
-Mam. 1642 W. Unlv. Ave.
f!! 1 flowers Mon. Thurs. Open
and 10-10. (J-4t-82-p)

I PERSONAL *]i
BOYS!!! Nbed your pad cleaned ora
party hosted? The bunnies of last
quarter have turned Into tigers and
have multiplied. So hire a TIDY
JIGER now! Call 373-2760.
(J-st-82-p)
Its a-groove to do the ducks in the
early morning. Come at three
sometime probably on a Tuesday.
love. (J-84-lt-p),
CHI PHIS: Just the new ones. Tho
late, the thought is there.
Congratulations! Isht It great to be a
CHI PHI! The Little Sisters.
(J-84-lt-p).
I LOST & FOUND g
J ;
LOST: Mans Cocoa high ring. Blue
stone. Initials: MBW near Rat. Call
Nancy. 392-7739 after 5. (L-84-2t-p).
FOUND: Ladles watch in Peabody
hall. Gome by room 8 Peabody or
call 392-0243 to IDENTIFY.
(L-3t-nc).
LOSTI Girls brown suede jacket.
Probably week of Jan. 26. Only coat
I own! Help, Its cold. Call Lori
Preece, 392-7640. REWARD.
(L-3t-82-p)
LOST: Female Weimaraner. Limps
on right hind leg. Needs operation or
she will die. Reward. Please call
376-8600 or 376-9119. (L-st-82-p)
SERVICES I
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists Who
can type your manuscripts
professionally and in good form. We
also nave a XEROX machine. Call
Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160.
(M-7t-25-p).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Opticians at 519 S. W.
4th Ave., across from Greyhound Bus
station. 378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
Valentines special. Oolor portraits:
Formal or candid. Portable studio.
All types of photography. Posters,
parties, groups. For more Info, call
Ron 376-6042. (M-84-3t-p).
Recordsville in the Mall now has
Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Nicky
Hopkins, Noel Redding and John
Bonham on the same Heavy LP.
(M-84-3t-p).
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
FOREIGN CAR OWNERS Minor
tune-ups and repairs at half the price!
Specializing In VW, Porsche,
Mercedes. Call 378-1 713.
(M-80-st-p).
'INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-p).
'COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removea
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-pJ
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes from postage stamp to
24" x 44", 8" x 10 certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-24t-p).
XEROX COPIES: specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co.
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313.
(M-83-14t-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Rubys ALTERATIONS. 1958 N.W.
4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby Mills.
(M-3t-82-p)

Y fenanSTv^^^l^^^^^Hl
3 A y ?// t*^3
a w aM
n A- DUSTIN HOFFMAN '-3§ JK
ills m,dnight jy w
showing f COWBOY
w at RATED X k /|l j IT.TJ
7:00 AND 9:45 UaJI I fIMULtI j"! a I
PLUS CO-hi i ! ADM
BCftHiltWli SINFUL DAVEYJk ~so
*.? ' *

Page 11

ftHttl fIHELDOviS
| T W^'^aL,, ILJl 'VIDONT MISS IT! f
Hu:.;; j
|||pp
ok
\y -
agar
PAUL NEWMAN S
ROBERT REDFORD KATHARINE ROSS
"BUTCH OISSPyfINDTHESUWOfIWCE HP*
| Rain
P dont
any
answers.
*MK BMi
I
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
I Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti 99 c
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER I
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I

fPlMlJutis I
H 3ook and Supply H
tt 1712 O
1 TEXTBOOKS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES I
ART SUPPLIES
E ENGINEERING fl
IQ t ustqmer parking irjj
Sal Cont Contllffsltltf
llffsltltf Contllffsltltf 1 I From
iniinll II 1:30
Some boys
hove everything..
THE MIDNIGHT COWBOY
RIDES AGAIN!
" npTJm^
I ion w, w. im . \WI
ONE OF
THE YEAR'S
10 BEST I
PETER FONDA
DENNIS HOPPER y
\ R ~****' [ \
|2W. IMwr^ibin
"NOW IVE SEEN
EVERYTHING
Bcvarty HMa Courier
l||
Vt* n
YES!"



l. Th Plorhte AMiptor. Wwlnwhy, Hbnmy 11,1970

Page 12

have something to say?
... then say it!
the UF Board of Student Publications is now accepting applications for
s
f /v . ...
1971 Seminole Editor
(NOTE: Applications for Seminole Editor will be accepted until 4 p.m., February 16.)
*
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
\
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
1971 Seminole Managing Editor
(NOTE: Applications for Editor and Managing Editor of the Florida
Alligator and 1971 Seminole Managing Editor must be returned prior
to 4 p.m., Friday, February 13.)
y > *
- General Instructions
All applications are to be picked up and returned to Rm # 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union.
i ..
Each applicant must return an original plus two copies of his application.
Applicants should be prepared to appear before the Board of Student Publications
for a personal interview.
Watch the Florida Alligator for the announcement of B.S.P. interview meetings.
For Further Information Call Mr. Norm Qoing, 392-1680.



Wwfawuduy, Penury 11,1970, The Florida Alligator,

The
Florida
Alligator

SSKIEBfcI
MM ; HBfini
-$ -'
." $ x XV wK
y? yig
KAREN ENG
CARDBOARD CATAMARAN SURGES ON
... only the pilots nerves were steel

Boats Os Paper
Cross Duck Pond

For a week or so there were
signs all over campus: The
Armada is coming!"
Monday the Armada came. It
was an armada of cardboard and
string ships and some of it sank
as the whole affair attempted to
cross the duck pond at the Reitz
Union.
There were five heats across
the pond. The winners of each
heat then competed in a final
soggy dash across the pond.
Overall winners were Bill
Nunez and Robert Bell, two
second level architectural
students.
Originator of the idea for the
cardboard boat races was Oscar
Larrauri, 7AR, an instructor in
an architectural design course.
Another major figure in the
planning behind the Armada was
John Mcae, an architecture
instructor who turned over to
his students the problem of
building a boat from paper and
string.
According to Mcae, there
are some plans to make the races
an annual event on campus. We
want competition open to the
:
f
CENTRA! AUTO
SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RINGS & VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS
FRONT END WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
BRAKE JOBS
Mon.-Sat, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Frae pick up A Delivery in City
1027 S. MAIN.
Buy a gator ad.
Wt'll flt you in.
j>:n fcAttrti* iii i h i ifinflrtl- 1 i nft"

Liii Liiii iiinrii i
S Hss Aa HI nfi* s- .flHlif K
Fll I r II I Hlillll riE m

whole campus next time, too,"
Mcae said.

IF TOD HEARD
MERLE HAGGARD Sum
OKIE FROM MUSKOGEE*
AND HATED 1T...
MAM TOO OHII GOT HALF THE STOHI
Merle Haggard saya the things hes got to say.lts not always what youd say;
but he speaks his mind. Thats country: simple, directup front Merle Haggards music
is country. His album. Okie from Muskogee is a collection of Merles biggest hits
(WorkinMan Blues, Mama Tried...) recorded down home in Muskogee, Oklahoma.
(Youll enjoy the enthusiasm of the audience.) Haggards voice, his songs,
his music are just about the best there is.
NTnuiOTulim:
. -V ; < 7sm&] £ *a **
umgfiun
ft
Marie Haggard brings it home on record and tape.

Page 13

Actress Picked
For Cannes Fest
HOLLYWOOD (UPI)
-Universals Sweet Charity,"
starring Shirley MacLaine, has
been selected as an
out-of-competition Hollywood
entry in this years Cannes Film
Festival.

Ifc, HIGH-DRY
">:. PLACE TO BE
HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
APTS 378-5905
ONLY
5 APTS LEFT
." OH I ~H a29 SO I T
ISO 00 'ill
i / >.o* ri 1 1 i v S I !> >
Hi 1 ) 00 FUH *vS > |
( E. c; HA! I (< >1 )i
I AUIMDHY KI [ H 111 | l l ini
M AID SI R V If t
H, ) i fOl N T A PPi l I

TV Dumb Blonde
Is A Redhead

HOLLYWOOD (UPI)
Pamela Rodgers is the newest
dumb blonde on Rowan and
Martin's Laugh-In except
that she is a redhead.
Like most dumb" females,
Pam possesses an IQ in the
genius category.
But she persists in making
flluminating remarks:
I wanted to change my first

DRIVE AND I
SAVE! I
raidwin_^^a
I I STARKE. FLORIDA j
- SOONER OR EATER YOtJR FA VORITE DEALER M If
I HOURS I
I WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
I SATURDAY BAM IPM I
|gainesvil^phon^72^io^n^im^yappointmewt|

name to Zsa Zsa but it was
already taken."
I used to be 5 feet 10 but
now Im only 5 feet 8. I
shrunk.
A native of Houston, Tex.,
Pamela has been married for
almost four years to Jere
Henshaw, a studio film
executive. They have no
children.



The Florida Alligator

PLAY LSU TONIGHT
y "I '
Its Maravich Time For The Gators

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
The Gators will see Pete
Maravich in action for the last
time tonight much to their
relief, as they invade Baton
Rouge for their second
encounter with the LSU Bengals
at 8 p jn. CST.
Florida, fresh off a 81-79
triumph over Vanderbilt
Monday night, will seek its fifth
conference victory in 12 games.
The Gators are now 7-12 overall.
The Tigers, who collected

. x InTil flP^-
f Jp
L k Kbl yF b 9 r4flLj Bjk 2# -jk
£ 4 MmgWgmg JK*7 k9Bik
X ./Jfc sB
# >*r |ggig|fe j|
- H| JK g||: JH B fIHPw B
PHIL BANNISTER
MARAVICH FAKES PAST HOOVER
... during last encounter with LSU
UF Rugby Team Takes
Third In Tournament

HAMMOND, La. The UF
Rugby team behind the kicking
of John Geiger and the forward
play of Phil Whyatt, place third
in the annual Mardi Gras
Tournament held here over the
weekend.
Florida won two of their
three matches in placing at the
University of Southern Louisana
hosted tournament. 1
In their first match, the
Gators dropped a close 6-5
decision to Rice University,
which later went on to win the
overall championship.
Charles Savio led the team,
scoring three points on a try,
while teammate John Geiger
kicked a two point conversion.
Florida came back strong in
its second game. John Geiger
kicked a field goal (three points)
to drop Spring Hill College, 3-0.
The third contest was a
carbon copy of the second as the
Gators topped the University of
Missouri at Ralla, 3-0. This time
Mark McEvers scored Floridas
three points on a try.
GOU PAR 60
Si DRIVING RANGE
>Xt GOLF CLUBS RENTED
HE*, CLUBHOUSE
; ELECTRIC CARTS
LESSONS AVAILABLE
I M*i*OPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3V< MI.WESTOFI.7SON
NEWBEIMY HP. 373-2721

their 100th victory over Tulane,
127-114, are now 6-3 in
conference play and still have an
outside chance to take the SEC
crown.
LSU still has to play
Kentucky and Georgia, first and
second in the conference, at
home. Victories in both of those
contests could clinch a tie for
first place for the Tigers.
Maravich continues to lead
LSU as he scored a record 69
points against Alabama on
Saturday and then 49 against

The Gators get back into
action Feb. 21-22, when they
compete in the Von Kreks
Invitational Tournament in
Birmingham, Alabama.
11 Love &V. D* IJ
\\ See page 10 If
Valert tinea Day J^r
IP YOU LIKED
VOLKSWAGEN VOLKSWAGENYOU'LL
YOU'LL VOLKSWAGENYOU'LL LOVE
DATSUN
.; : 1- i )
Station WsfOn s2^BB s2^BB
- s2^BB A CLARK
115 B.E. 2ND ST. |
378-2311 Til 7PM Mon-Set
P.O.E., plus tax, tag, local freight,
am.

\, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 11,1970

Page 14

Tulane on Monday. His career
total now stands at a 3,206
points.
Against Tulane, LSU pulled
down a record 72 rebounds.
Their rebounding strength was a

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
I Kttitiiku Fried thicken j
S 214 N.W. 13th St. K
B
B 376-647 Z 372-3649 M
m '"'"^'4 gjawri ja m b
i L nm n 7gi DINNER DDp I
IIBH BOX wY 1
I 3 Pc. Chicken 1 Reg. 1.25 E
B Mashed Potatoes B
I iT s Z v d BRING COUPON I
B Roils
I Assistant Managers I
I LP SALE I
UK W Top '20 1 Albums limited
I The Biggest Names... I
I Most Wanted Albums such as I
I PUZZLE PEOPLE I
I BLOOD,SWEATJEARS I
I HH| THREE DOG NIGHT I
I #SAN QUENTIN Johnny Cash I
I the lettermen T races/Memories I
K|KK9K THE BEST OF CHARLIE PRIDE I
I CREAM by Gears I
* make your own kind of music I
- Temptations Mamma Cass I
I SIMON AGARFUNKLEoLED zbpeun|
I GRAND FUNK RAILROAD BALLAD OF I
I EASY YD VOLUNTEERS I
I SANTANA MONSTER PIUS I
BUY NOW AND SAVE!! many,many more not usted I
I Re9U P^ ervDav 4* $0 87 I
I $ 3 97 to *4 97 / I
I N. W. 6th St & University Ave. I
Short walk from Campus |

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

key factor in their 97-75 win
over the Gators in the two
team's last meeting.
The game will be broadcast
over WRUF at 9 pin. due to the
time change.

Guns Guns Guns
m Inventory over 450. Buy +
I Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom
reloading. Harry Beckwith,
* gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters
MUG SPECIALTIES j.
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS RING SIZING
§ DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
24 Hr. SERVICE
CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-SSSS



gatornationals
More Fuelers Enter Meet

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Racing Writer
World Champion Steve
Carbone of Manhattan Beach,
Calif., has entered the
Gatornationals championship
drag meet in Gainesville this
weekend.
Carbone, who won the
National Hot Rod Association
(NHRA) World Finals in Dallas
last fall, will drive Larry Huffs
Soapy Sales AA fuel dragster
(AA/FD). The 24-year old driver
will be after the same Top Fuel
Eliminator title that Don Garlits
is seeking.
With engines burning
nitromethane and putting out
1,500 h.p., AA/FDs are the
ultimate category in drag racing.
They are capable of covering the
quarter mile from a standing
start in less than seven seconds,
attaining speeds in the vicinity
of 240 miles per hour.
Tom Raley, current elapsed
time record holder at 6.64
seconds, will also drive a AA/FD
in this weekends competition.
Victory has eluded Raley in the

ABA Star Doesnt Mind
Jumping Over To NBA

INDIANAPOUS, Ind. (UPI)
- Roger Brown, all-star forward
with the Indiana Pacers of the
American Basketball
Association, is not opposed to
jumping to the National
Basketball Association -if the
price and team are right.
Brown said if his $1.5 million
federal court suit against the
rival NBA results in an overture
from the right team, he might
accept.
Money is what I play this
game for and I'm not against
putting myself in the money
market between the two
leagues, Brown said.
Brown compared his position
to that of NBA star Connie
Hawkins, Who just happened to
grow up playing on the same
sandlots in Brooklyn, N.Y. as
Brown. Hawkins sued the NBA
for $6 million last year while
with the Pittsburgh Pipers in the
ABA.
Both suits alleged the NBA
denied the two players the
opportunity of making a living
by not allowing them to play
with a team in the senior
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
AH over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some lust for the tun
l it. others because their business bene bene*'ts
*'ts bene*'ts from (aster (lying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 hat's all it costs for our Speciall
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
JpQQJ Waldo Road

past but he is always a top
qualifier.
Pete Robinson, who drives
one of the few Ford-powered
AA/FDs, is also among those out
to upset Garlits. Robinson

xis 4 v
i \ * v flv SHF
Wf mKm&,
v r~ i, l S ~ L 1 f u i. ; v
AA FUEL DRAGSTER ENGINE
... produces up to 1500 h.p.

basketball loop.
The NBA banned the players
for allegedly associating with
known gamblers while college
athletes.
Brown played at the
University of Dayton and
Hawkins at the University of
lowa. Both lost their college
eligibility, but never faced court
action.
Brown said he likes Indiana
and the ABA which has provided
the butter for his table the last
three years. However, he said he
has a lot of money-making time
to make up because of the five
years he spent beating the

GIRLS!
Beer in the Balcony
10* spm to 7pm
Mon. thru Sat.
11611 S.W. 13th Si.
lift era alia salaam
Bat only Girls Bat 10* Bear
Another
Qifniied
Liquors lounge

earned his nickname, Sneaky
Pete, in 1961 when as an
unknown, he captured the
NHRA Nationals Championship.
He builds his own engines and
chassis.

backcourts in AAU basketball.
The experience he gained in
the ABA helped him, Brown
added, but the shortage of
greenbacks didnt. His ability,
coupled with the fact he is
playing for one of the
money-making teams in the
league, makes Brown one of the
ABAs top-paid players.
Right now, he said he is only
about 50 per cent effective
because he is hobbled with a
knee injury. Before the injury,
Pacer coach Bobby Leonard
would call clear out and let
Brown operate.

INTRAMURALS
Showdown Ahead
I STEVE ROHAN *

BASKETBALL: Chi Phi and
Kappa Alpha continue to win in
Blue League basketball as both
frats head toward a final
showdown.
KA blasted Phi Kappa Psi,
80-10, as Ody Ortega pumped in
22 points to lead the way. Bruce
Weeks and Steve Kaufman led
Chi Phi to a 59-17 win over
Delta Sigma Phi.
In other Blue action, AGR
topped Pi Kappa Phi behind the
shooting of Pistol Pete
Marovich who scored 13 points
for the plainsmen. DU tromped
Tau Kappa Epsilon, 51-31.
In Orange action, third place
SAE built up a 23-11 halftime
lead and held on to stop the
league leading Betas, 41-36.
Although there is little
likelihood that anyone will
overtake the Betas in basketball,
the loss served to considerably
tighten up the league race.
In Law League, John Parker

I STCAK* SHAKE
I Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger 1
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90C plus tax |
1 Steak n Shake 1
I 1610 S. IV. 13th St. __ _ __ __ Gainesville |
' CvotKtwoN or me.
. V; .. , g- V W . \V'"'' 'i: i ?
.vX; : 5; ; £'. v
Volkswagen
Medi-car:
4 free check-ups for every member of the family.
! i
l
'" v :
;- : :' : : : V : : ' .: -:' r ;
: 7 j
1
When you bring home a-new baby, you take him
back for a series of check-ups: To spot any prob problems
lems problems before they can become big problems.
Same with a new Volkswagen.
Except our check-ups are free.
And the special diagnostic equipment we use is
designed for VWs. Not babies.
We call our plan Medi-car.
And you get automatic coverage in it the minute
you buy a new Volkswagen.
When a check-up itself comes due, you can get
it wherever you happen to be.
Because every Volkswagen Dealer has the spe special
cial special equipment.
After all, the idea is the same wherever Volks Volkswagens
wagens Volkswagens are sold: To spot trouble early and help
extend your cars life.
You've probably heard of cars that died unex unexpectedly
pectedly unexpectedly after 30 or 40,000 miles.
But now there's Medi-car.
Taken as directed, it can help your VW live to
100,000.
V*£ 1
Miller-Brown Motors, Inc.
AUTNOmt*

WadnMday, February 11,1970, Tha Florida AMgator,

and Paul Newell led the B Team
to a 51-39 rout of The Team.
Parker and Newell each tallied
18 while Stan Morris scored 16
and Roger Bolling 15 for The
Team.
CORRECTION: In an earlier
article it was reported that the
Sigma Nus had quit in a
basketball game with the Phi
Kappa Taus. This was not the
case. Actually the game was
forfeited by the referees.
AUTO GIASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. Sth St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

Page 15



Page 16

I, Thffi Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, February 11.1970

McGuire Vies For Third NCAA Final

ATLANTA (UPI) Frank McGuire, never
faltering in his belief that the road to success leads
past the sidewalks of New York, may break his own
record next month.
As though it werent honor enough to be the only
basketball coach to direct teams from two different
schools to the NCAA finals, the Irishman is now
enroute with a third.
McGuire, coach of the 2nd-ranked South Carolina
Gamecocks, was at St. Johns helm when the
Redmen lost to Kansas in the 1952 finals and was
North Carolinas coach when the Tarheels beat
Kansas and W3t Chamberlain to win the 1957
NCAA crown.
The idea of going to the finals this year certainly
intrigues me, McGuire said in a telephone
interview. But, forgive the cliche, right now weve

The Finest Built
The Safest Built
The Best Luxury Car
In The World
. \ :* * -j. '' ; . , 4*'*3Vy.?* ij \,\. J -.. ** i-.V ..'-V. ... _i 4 *v 1 ... *.
Padded front nt backs for protection of ChiU-prooT door lock*, fitted lor- Reverve fuel twitch. When tank u empty, reserve tank Ribbon type speedomeler sos quick reading xr at far at possible from
rear passengers. ward on rear doors near ears of front ha* about 114 gab. of gas trapped" which it made drivers eyes to reduce distance adjustment necessary when driver re re\.
\. re\. occupants make loud CKck. Do available by pulling out knob-in case driver does focuses (ram road to instrument. (Most people have difficulty refocusing
Cage-like construction provides high \ not open with door handle. not notice gas gunge. rapidly.) Speedometer mounted high up. dose to drivers Hne of vision. ..... lml
degree of safety for occupants. V \ "T*
V T -| j J Warning foe tnefo fbud leveL Word BRAKE*
Padded arm rests-no sharp interior \ doom as do those in engineas fobe a very important safety feature.
Disc brakes on ell four wheele- S l '' iTfOTTSTefTpori / f fofaise control leversatew kusnnr \ Ispee eren if defonantiou \ j2S|gdS*M*l!i2a
cooling! oTsfoe. / Diagonal seat \inuu rahrof haekat best antfete drive* Hand brake is mechanical dhMfeec awns fend ire- \
****-.
vide inqwoved handbag, precision. poor adjrefeator eremee eoreroi 1 *cnn be rend, safe* by hretrl
and steering response, reduce dip mittaat cutting ia of high haunt,
angles on cornering, and offer batter Lights can also be held on bi^ibaren
sdhesicn an wet facts, run coolsr. by baud Works even with lights
and last rearh longer nwyhe3thnee sssUehed of. Lew rendDv u> hand
"d" driving. (Ad- by meeting whed.f4shUfer mriech.
372-4373 N i W^*^ Ir VP
NOW AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
i' mmwmt ,

BASKETBALL IN THE SOUTH

got to play em one at a time. Ive got to keep the
boys loose.
McGuires biggest concern, just as when he was
turning out conference champions at North Carolina
more than a decade ago, is the Atlantic Coast
Tournament coming up the first weekend in March.
I've never been popular among conference
officials for my stand on die tournament, McGuire
said. But it simply isn't fair.
I have always felt, when I was at the bottom as
well as at the top, that the basketball team with the
best record in conference play during the regular
season should be our champion.
Sure, the tournament is great for the fans and
for the conference treasury (it nets the ACC some
$200,000 for its conference expenses), but it really
puts the top-seeded team on the spot.

One slip and you're through.
McGuire also feels that the
three-game s-in-three-days tournament grind hurts
the ACC champions chances in the NCAA playoffs.
North Carolina was a physically tired team last
year when it went from our tournament into the
NCAA regionals, McGuire said.
Ive always felt that if the conference must have
a basketball tournament for financial reasons, it
should be held during the Christinas holidays and
then let us pick our champion by our regular season
play.
McGuire feels that his present team, which has an
18-1 record with the lone loss by one point (55-54)
to Tennessee two months ago, is physically
stronger than his 1957 North Carolina champions.