Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Wrhar 1
Gov. Claude Kirk Monday night shrugged off catcalls, boos and
hisses during opening moments of Accent *7O by casually leaning on
the lectern and quietly lamenting the problems of the environment.
An introduction by UF President Stephen C. OConnell reduced the
level of hostility of the audience when he told the 400 students and
faculty present that the university will not be held accountable for
what happens to you (Kirk) tonight, but individuals, only individuals,
will be held responsible.
You have not always been well-received here, and you may not be
this evening, but common courtesy is a personal matter that should be
left up to the individual."
OConnell went on to ask students not to hide behind a crowd in
the actions you take."
Kirk set the mood by suggesting that we all relax. He added, I
dont bruise very quickly and I'm quick to heal. 01 Claude Jr. gets
by."

Pottl
AttAmw*

Vol 62, No. 83

MM ; -, ."
wmm
I f
\
CHARGE!
The College of Fine Arts and Architecture turned out en masse
Monday to watch students race cardboard boats across the Reitz
Union pond.
Autopsy Requested
In UF Coeds Death
An autopsy was ordered on the body of a 21-year-old UF
sophomore who died late Sunday afternoon in Hume Hall from an
apparent overdose of sleeping pills, according to University Police
Chief Investigator G.E. Watson.
Diane Gottesman, a transfer student from Maryland, was
pronounced dead on arrival at Shands Teaching Hospital at 3:15 pan.
Sunday. Doctors said she died of cardiac arrest due to causes
unknown,** according to Dean for Student Development Frank T.
Adams.
Mias Gottesman was discovered in her room in Hume at
approximately 3 pan. Watson said empty pOl bottles were also found
in the room.
Miss Gottesmans roommate was out of town for the weekend.
Adam said Miss Gottesman came to UF from Bethesda, Maryland.
She had attended school here since September, 1969.
Her parents have been notified and should arrive from Greece
where her father is employed sometime this morning, Adams said.
An inquest was held at Alachua General Monday morning. The
State Attorney General's office has been notified and requested an
autopsy, Watson said.
'This is general procedure," he said.
Johnson-Hayes Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements,
Watson said.

Meet Challenge. Kirk Tells UF

The
Florida Alligator

*
He told the audience that the challenge of youth today, in this
decade, is one of ecology overpopulation causing pollution of die
planet.
We have recklessly destroyed our unrenewable resources. We are
just seconds away from an impact with disaster. Pollution knows no
boundaries."
However, Kirk said that man can master his destiny. He referred to
one of the causes of the problem being that of politicians not having
the courage to tell it like it is."
Im tired of hearing from politicians who wont produce.
Government must face up to its responsibilities. If the cities wont
face up to the problem, the state will have to."
The decisions made in this decade, according to Kirk, will
determine whether man survives on eirth.
During the question and answer period at the end of the program, a
student asked Kirk what his motives were for going to the West Palm
Beach Rock Festival last December.
My purpose in going there was to execute my oath of office as the
chief magistrate of the state."

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

IN TOLBERT INCIDENT
Charges Against Blacks
Dropped By Committee

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Committee on Student
Conduct dropped charges of
disorderly conduct against three
UF black students Monday
afternoon when the key
witnesses in the case refused to
testify.
Attorney David West, a
member of the student affairs
staff, made a statement to the
committee withdrawing the
charges against Ron Jackson,
Earl Wilcox and Joseph
McCloud.
Four white students who had
been summoned to testify
submitted a written statement to
West stating their refusal to
testify. Summoned were Bruce.
Schwack and Robert Wessells,
who originally signed complaints
against the students, and David
Uhlfekler and David Goodwin.
The charges of disorderly
conduct stemmed from an
incident in Tolbert Hall last
month when Schwack and
Wessells claimed a group of
black students forced them to
clean a messy hallway at
gunpoint.
Both students have since tried
to withdraw their complaints,
but the states attorney has not
dropped charges. Jackson,
Wilcox and McCloud are
currently under $2,000 bond
each.
' \
llljllMl
HlHiiMillill
FSU FLAMBEAUS vanished
early Monday morning
election day on the
Tallahassee campus .. .page 3
Classifieds 10,11
Editorials 8
Letters .. : 9
Movies 10,11
Orange and Blue 12
Sma Society 6
Sports .-. 14,15,16

Wessells said he refused to
testify because too big of a deal
was made about it (the Tolbert
incident). I felt that the people
involved have already been
punished more than they deserve
to be. If they even went through
half of what I went through,
thats too much." He said he has
had to drop a course and is
behind academically because of
the time involved in the case.
The Student Conduct
Committee seemed like a farce
to me, he said. They need
some kind of system of
counselors instead of putting
somebody on trial when the
decision of the committee could
make a large difference in their
life as to whether they get an
education or not.
I was disenchanted with
some of the attitudes displayed
by the police and by the
university. They were already
tried and convicted before the
committee had its hearing."
He added that he felt West

YSA Battling
For Recognition
See Editorial Page 8
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writar
The Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) is being categorized by the
Office for Student Affairs as being potentially ideologically similar to
the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) A fomentor of
disturbance on university campuses/' Bill Cross, Student
Organizations Committee Secretary, said Monday.
And until the Board of Regents say differently, according to Cross,
they won't get recognition.''
Organizations seeking access to university facilities are required to
notify Cross of their intent, after which they are given the
opportunity to meet on campus for a period of 30 days.
Following the 30 day period, organizations are required to submit
to the Student Organizations Committee for approval a constitution
and other papers stating the club's intent.
YSA has been denied an opportunity to participate in the 30-day
(SEE 'YSA' PAGE 2)

jgnpir
GOV. CLAUDE R. KIRK
... speaks at Accent *7O

V foil f x'

Tuesday, February 10, 1970

and Capt. Ron Stanley of the
Alachua County Sheriffs Office
were fair.
He said he is now friends with
the black students involved and
said the incident has shown me
a lot of unfair things going
on ... Im glad I'm not a black
student here.
Schwack said by refusing to
testify I was in no way denying
the authenticity of the incident.
I just think there were other
methods in which this could be
handled. I think the students
involved were already punished
enough.
He praised West for his
fairness.
I dont think it (the
incident) has been any hardship
on me academically," Schwack
said. He added it had caused a lot
of tension.
Wlicox called dropping the
charges only a victory in the
entire war. Its just one step.
I wont be happy until after
the case downtown is settled,
he said.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Fabraory 10,1970

TOMORROW IN PERSPECTIVE:
Voice Raised Demanding Clean Environment
iu.it fnmner Secretary of the Interior

By ED CROWELL
Alligator oiait nriwr
Gainesvilles Thought Police stood guard today as
The Partys Accent B4 officials dug up a
14-year-old time capsule buried in Big Brother
Plaza. The microfilm messages were unintelligible as
the language was not Newspeak.
The tomorrow that UFs Accent *7O is focusing
upon may not be the same tomorrow that George
Orwell envisioned in 1984. But the future
outlook could be as dismal as Orwells in another
way.
Pollution and over-population are the major
concerns of today for those who can see past
Vietnam. Hopefully, the speakers of Accent *7O wiD
raise their voices on these issues to join in the
coming roar of those demanding a liveable
environment.
Tomorrow in Perspective is the theme of this
year's Accent program. The perspective is man's
scientific progress through the last decade and how
he will use this knowledge and experience to make
the world of the 70's a better place to live.
Accent '7O planners have expressed the theme:
By v looking at man's ideas for tomorrow in
perspective of this decade we can make a
meaningful contribution to understanding where
our nation and the world is headed. In order to
provide a good basis for making this contribution,
we have invited noted experts to speak on the
theme. We are selecting speakers based on their
relevancy and expertise to the theme.
Accent '7o's science and society theme, rather
than the usual political topic, will be significant in a
most social sense. Its purpose is to bring together
ideas of great men through dialogue and discussion
in an attempt to air the most pressing issues of our
time.
Many of the speakers are either government
officials or closely connected to government. The
role of local, state and national governments in the
fight to save our environment is now unmistakable.
Industry and corporations have shown a reluctance

YSA Being Linked To SDS
PACE OME^I
waiting period, which has caused members of the organization to seek
legal council concerning their rights.
John Sugg, a YSA national committee member and UF graduate
student, doesnt deny the fact that YSA has been involved in campus
disturbances on other campuses.
Were not an everyday run of the mill tea dub; however, so far we
have shown that we are not violent.
Members of YSA claim they have made application to the
university every other day for the past two weeks in their bid for
recognition as a campus organization, but have been turned away
because their political views dont agree with administrators.
I don't think we should be restircted from the campus because we
disagree with the administration, Sugg said. A great university
would want to incorporate as many dissident, varying points of view
as possible.
Sugg claims that, Every political group not in power advocates
disruption. Labor unions were given recognition because they went
through the throes of a militant struggle against management.
Cross claims that until the Board of Regents interpret their policy
to either include or not indude the YSA under the heading of a
disruptive organization, then his committees hands are tied in
recommending acceptance of the club.,
There wouldnt be any question about a ping pong club being
chartered by the university as a student organization, but when you
have been indentified on other campuses as causing dkmptkm, then
you raise an issue.
Official Board of Regents policy, as related by D. Burke Kibler in a
statement on March 1,1969, states that student organizations which
advocate the disruption or overthrow of government by
force,... which may result in interruption or destruction of the
education process... cannot therefore be recognized by any
university for which the board has responsibility.
Also, the question as to the political objectives and recognition of
the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC) is expected to be resolved
on Feb. 24 when members vote on the issue, according to Cross.
We should be able to resolve both the YSA and SMC questions at
that time, Cross said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Pbst Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of ail advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled fro run
several times. Notices for correction mu>t be given before the next
insertion.

ACCENT'7O...
... to bring together ideas of great men
through dialogue and discussion in an
attempt to air the most pressing issues of
our time."
to stop polluting voluntarily, so it is up to
government.
Speakers exemplifying this role indude Attorney
General William Scott, Jr. of Illinois. He will talk
about the role of state governments in the control
of pollution and environment,
Conservation '7o's Inc. is an organization of
conservation leaders and prominent members of
Florida's executive and legislative branches. The
former dfrector of this organization, Lorring Lowell,
is an Accent speaker. He will discuss the concepts
and goals of Conservation 7os Inc. and explain the
legislative packet that is being introduced by the
organization.
Cities are at the core of the nations population
and pollution problems. The Accent 7O staff has
invited Mayor Sam Yorty of Los Angeles to speak
on the problems of the large tity in this decade. The
future of cities will also be discussed by a panel of
Florida mayors from Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa,
Miami and Gainesville.
Assistant Secretary of the Interior Carl Klein will
speak on Water Pollution Quality of Our Life.
The transportation crisis of the future will be
discussed by Assistant Secretary of Transportation
Walter Mazan.

Free Courses
Endorsed
A resolution strongly
supporting the privilege of state
university employes to take up
to six free course hours goes
before the student senate
tonight.
The state department of
Administrative Personnel
Division recently cancelled the
privilege, but it has been
vigorously protested by UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell,
UF employees, and University
chancellor Robert Mautz.
The second reading of an
amendment to the election laws
will be voted on also. It specifies
that wording on student ballots
be published in the Florida
Alligator on the Monday before,
and on the same day as, the
election.
Up for the first reading, is a
bill appropriating S4OO from the
Special Request Fund to pay for
Flavet 111 policemen. The bill
comes out of the Budget and
Finance Committee.
The senate meeting begins at
9 pm.

GOOD ONLY f
1 K"tiitfki Fried thickenl
M 214 N.W. 13th St. ** #
K 376-6472 m
V 114 S.W. 34tti St. 1
'''' ' ' *'* i 372-3649
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IBn box 03VI
I 3 Pc. Chicken M
Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 m
I end Gravy 1% IM k. i I
bring coupon I

Stewart Udall, former Secretary of the Interior,
fits well in Accent '7os theme. He has written
1976: Agenda for Tomorrow, in which he calls
for revamped priorities and political structures to
ond the increasing ugliness of our environment.
On theother side of the fence from the
government, Accent will present attorney Rod
Cameron. Cameron is the executive director of the
Environmental Defense Fund which has brought
suit against the Army Corp of Engineers to
block construction of the Cross Florida Barge Canal.
Also representing the Environments Defense
Fund will be Dr. Charles Wurster, Jr., chairman of
the scientific advisory committee. Wurster is one of
the nations top authorities on DDT and its effects
on reproduction in birds.
Transplantation: Past, Present and Future will
be discussed by Dr. Arthur Beall, a leading heart and
lung transplant surgeon from Houston, Tex.
A National Environmental Teach-In will be held
on many college campuses this April. One major
participant will be Dr. Rene Dubos, microbiologist
at Rockefeller University. At Accent 70 Dubos will
speak on Population Size and Disposable Income.
Dubos won the Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for So
Human An Animal in which he says, Most of us
spend our days in a confusion of concrete and steel,
trapped in the midst of noise, dirt, ugliness and
absurdity. Dubos believes the environment we live
in can greatly enhance, or severely limit, the
development of human potential and that the
environment endlessly evolves in response to
changing human needs and dreams.
Another Accent speaker has a new theory on
what the future may hold shock. Alvin Toffler is
author of Future Shock, in which he says a new
society superindustrial, fast-paced, fragmented,
filled with bizarre styles, customs and choices is
erupting in our midst. Society is running too fast for
its own good and man will be pushed beyond his
adaptive tolerances.
Toffler says the result in a few decades will be
severe confusion, anxiety, hostility, senseless
violence and self-destructive apathy.

Godfrey Wages War
Against Commercials

Tonights Accent '7O speaker,
Arthur Godfrey, has taken a big
step in his personal battle against
pollution. He recently
announced he will do no more
radio or telivision commercials
for Axion, the enzyme laundry
pre-soak, unless the
manufacturer allows him to say
that it is a pollutant.
They told me it was an
enzyme, he said, and that
enzymes dont pollute anything;
they just eat the dirt out. Now I
find that its not only a
detergent but has more
phosphates than any other
detergent. How can I preach
ecology and sell this stuff?
Phosphates have been cited as
one of the chief elements that
promote the excess growth of
algae that can kill off other life
in lakes and streams.
A recent report indicated that
Axion contains 43.7 per cent
phosphate, the highest among 22
leading detergents.

During his career Godfrey
maintained a policy of refusing
to advertise any product with
which he is in disagreement, for
whatever the reason.
It's reported that his present
contract with the
Colgate-Palmolive Co. for Axion
commercials, is one of the
largest in the advertising
industry.
Godfrey will speak tonight at
8 p. m, in University
Auditorium, in connection with
Accent 70.
Beall Speech
Dr. Arthur C. Beall, a
transplant surgeon form
Houston, Tex., will speak at 11
a. m. Thursday in the second
floor auditorium of the Health
Center, not at 10 a. m. as was
listed in the schedule of events
in Monday's Alligator.
Beall's topic is
Transplantation: Past, Present
and Future.



GRAND LARCENY CHARGED
15,000 Flambeaus Vanish

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) An estimated 12,000 to
15,000 copies of Florida State Universitys student
newspaper, the Flambeau, vanished within minutes
of hitting the campus news racks Monday morning.
Campus security officer Deltert McGarvey said it
was being treated as a grand larceny case, although
the newspaper is distributed free of charge.
Were assuming somebody's got all of them.
Then it would be grand larceny, McGarvey said.
The papfer will have to reimburse about S4OO
worth of advertising and they figure printing costs

Philadelphia Project Extended

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Labor Secretary George P.
Shultz announced Monday the
Philadelphia Plan would be
extended to 19 more
metropolitan areas unless they
come up with acceptable
formulas of their own to open
up more construction jobs to
Negroes.

Professionals Accept

AFL-ClOs Proposals
WASHINGTON (UPI) Professional staff members at the national
AFL-CIO headquarters accepted the big labor organizations
arbitration proposal on a new contract Monday, averting a walkout.
The decision by the 74 employes was made at a morning meeting,
after which they went home to rest and arranged to officially notify
the AFL-CIO of the agreement later.
A spokesman for the labor federation said the employes, members
of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, local 35 of the
American Newspaper Guild, would return to work at 9 a.m.
Tuesday.
Earlier, a spokesman for the guild said machinery for a possible
walkout had been set in motion Sunday night after negotiators failed
to agree on arbitration procedures.
But at todays meeting the employes went along with the
AFL-ClO's proposal that the arbitrator be chosen by its executive
council from among officers of one of the federations member unions
the traditional practice
The guild unit represents newsmen, lobbyists and other staff
members at AFL-CIO headquarters one block from the White House.
The most recent guild contract with the federation expired Jan. 1.
It provided a top minimum of $295 a week for fully experienced
employes.
The guild has proposed a salary increase of 27 per cent in the new
contract and the federation has offered a 7 per cent increase.
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The Philadelphia Plan
stipulates that bidders on
construction contracts of
$500,000 or more involving
federal funds must offer
affirmative action plans to set
specific goals within federal
guidelines for recruiting and
hiring minority workers.
Shultz said if they did not

at another $300.
He said there was no motive established, although
most of the campus community assumed the theft
was connected with the student government runoff
election.
One of the campus political parties, the Action
party, offered a SIOO reward for recovery of the
papers.
McGarvey said one witness saw the newspapers
being loaded into a car about 7 a. m.

devise their own similar plans,
that concept would be imposed
in Atlanta, Boston, Buffalo,
Cincinnati, Denver, Detroit,
Houston, Indianapolis, Kansas
City, Los Angeles, Miami,
Milwaukee, Newark, New
Orleans, New York, Pittsburgh,
San *Frandsco, Seattle and St.
Louis.
Os the 19 cities, Shultz put a
priority classification on six
Boston, Detroit, Atlanta, Los
Angeles, Seattle and Newark.


CAMERA SHOPS
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376-7657
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on the
lights lightsevery
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Ro-Mo
CAMERA SHOPS

1232 W Univ.
376-7657

I \
+' 1 J V 1 *" m I p W V c', ip I }-T -, yy V* t~ 1| HL ,4
PHIL COPE
NATURE BATS LAST
UF's chapter of the Environmental Action Group (EAG) hat tat up
a booth on the Reitz Union Colonnade to distribute information
about the group and Zero Population Growth (ZPG). Here Jerry
Harmanton tellt turvival buttont and tellt etudents "dean air smellt
funny."
WE HAVE JUST
ONE WORD FOR
ENGMEERMG
GRADUATES.
pportunity.'
)pportunity to become deeply
earth's last frontier, the ocean.
Opportunity to apply all your abilities to
a wide range of challenging assignments in
shipbuilding, nuclear propulsion, nuclear power
generation, and heavy industrial equipment.
Opportunity for advanced degree or
research work with leading research centers
and universities.
And opportunity to enjoy one of the
country's most pleasant living and vacation
areas.
Find out about immediate career opportunities for:
Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuclear Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
See our representative on Tuesday, Feb. 10.
He'll be interviewing at the Placement
Office and will answer your questions about:
THE OPPORTUNITY COMPANY
NEWPORT NEWS SHIPBUILDING
AND DRY DOCK COMPANY
NEWF*ORT NEWS. VIRGINIA 23607
A MAJOR COMPONENT Os mm TfNNtCO MC.
An nquol opportunity mploynr. U. S. Citizenship requited.

Tuesday

Page 3



Page 4

; T hi Florida'Attfbfoir, February 10,1970

STAFF JUDGE TESTIFIES
Calley Wasn't Persecuted By Authorities

FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI) The staff judge
advocate of the U.S. Army Infantry Training Center
here testified Monday that he received no
instructions from higher military authorities in
Washington to recommend that Lt. William L.
Calley be court-martialed on charges of murdering
civilians in Vietnam.
Col. Robert M. Lathrop, the judge advocate for
Ft. Benning, was the first witness called by the
Army prosecution in its pre-trial attmept to rebut
the defense contention that proceedings against
Calley were influenced by directions cm high,
including the White House.
No date for the Calley court-martial has been set.
Monday's pretrial hearing considered a defense
motion to dismiss the charges on grounds unlawful
command influence prevented his getting a fair
trial in any military court.
Calley, 26, a diminutive first lieutenant of

Loyalty Oath Appeal
Going To High Court
The Committee Against Loyalty Oaths will appeal its case to the
Supreme Court after an Orlando federal court upheld the right of the
state to require its employes to sign the loyalty oath Jan. 28.
The committee hopes further litigation will have the loyalty oath
declared unconstitutional and reinstate fired employes Leroy
Lambom, assistant professor of law; Evan Suits, interim instructor in
psychology; Jerome Miller, instructor of architecture; and Ann
Bardsley, a clerk in the journalism library.
The Orlando panel of three judges ruled that employes must sign
the provisions requiring loyalty to the Constitution and belief in not
overthrowing the government by violence.
The court upheld a previous ruling that privisions of the oath
dealing with association with organizations advocating the overthrow
of the government interfered with constitutional rights to freedom of
association.
In other court action, UF was assessed a portion of the court costs
for the case.
Prof. Robert B. Sherman, co-chairman of the committee, said, We
were fully aware that the court in Orlando would rule against the
appeal.
He called the action a legal maneuver to enable the case to be
appealed to the Supreme Court.
The committees lawyer will prepare a brief of the case to be
presented to the Supreme Court to convince them that the case
warrants the appeal.

Sleep Stutty
Needs Males
As Volunteers
Twelve healthy male
volunteers between 50-60 years
of age are needed for a study in
sleep patterns.
Dr. Ismet Karacan, associate
professor of psychiatry at the
College of Medicine, is
conducting the study with
support from the National
Institutes of Mental Health.
Volunteers will be paid for
their cooperation as a control
group in studies seeking
information on normal sleep
patterns and sleep patterns
characterized by various
diseases. Volunteers will be
required to sleep three
consecutive nights in the
University's Sleep Laboratory at
the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center. Each volunteer will
undergo a routine physical
before being accepted in the
research study.
All interested persons should
contact Dr. Karacan
immediately at 392-3681.
I j Support your local lovAj
Vv See page 10 Jl

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infantry, is accused of the premeditated murder of
102 Vietnamese cilivians during his company s
sweep of the village of My Lai 4 March 16,1968.
The military rule of law is that when the defense
alleges improper command influence, the
prosecution must try to rebut the charge.
Lathrop was the first of a series of witnesses the
Army to call in an effort to show that those
who processed the court-martial here did so
independently of high brass influence.
The prosecutor, Capt. Aubrey M. Daniel, asked
Lathrop, At any time did you act on instructions
from higher authorities in Washington?
I did not, the colonel replied.
Lathrop testified that after a formal investigation
of the Calley case conducted here, including
questioning of Paul Meadlow, a Vietnam veteran
who had been a member of CaDey's company, he

NO STRIKES ALLOWED
Collective Bargaining OKd

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
House subcommittee Monday
approved an intricate collective
bargaining system for public
employes which allows state
workers to organize but not
strike.
Reps. Jim Robinson, R-St.
Petersburg, and George
Baumgartner, D-North Miami
Beach, approved the 40-page bill
with subcommittee Chairman
Charles E. Davis, R-Vero Beach,

IFC Chairman Named
The Interfratemity Council (IFC) announced its new committee
chairmen recently.
The new heads are: Richard Erickson, academics; Don Ostergard,
service; Allen Levi, intramurals; Lee Sasser Jr., social; Jay Howell,
blood drive; John Cosgrove, Greek Week and Mark Kamen; public
relations.
Other new chairmen are Buzzy Underhill, IFC Productions; Michael
Ross, speakers bureau; Jack Dicks, Gator Greek; Frank Amato, rush;
and Mike Crews, administrative assistant.

advised the Ft. Benning commanding general to go
ahead with trial.
I advised the general (Maj. Gen. Erwin C.
Talbott) that in my opinion the testimony was
sufficient to warrant referral to trial and I so
recommended, Lathrop said.
Lathrop said he based his recommendation
entirely on my evaluation of the investigation.
Did you at any time receive instruction as to the
disposition of this case? Daniel asked.
I did not.
And you passed none along?
I passed none along, Lathrop replied.
A major witness scheduled for the hearing is
Talbott. The defense contends he received direct
word from Army Chief of Staff William C.
Westmoreland that President Nixon had given the
go-ahead to Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird in
the Calley case.

absent. The bill next goes to the
full Labor and Industry
Committee.
It looks very good, said
Baumgartner. Ive been asked if
its pro-labor or anti-labor that
depends on which page youre
reading.
The bill would create an
11-member council to advise on
all matters which generally
pertain to collective bargaining.
The bill also includes a
right-to-work provision

making union membership
voluntary.
Although the bill outlaws
strikes by public employes, it
permits the employe
organizations to threaten a
strike.

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IN 4 PAY VIET BATTLE
Green Berets Lead Clash

SAIGON (UPI) South Vietnamese troops led
by UJS. Green Berets clashed with North
Vietnamese regulars Monday in the fourth day of a
battle 60 miles west of Saigon. Other U.S. troops
found a Communist arsenal containing 3,000 rifles
and tons of ammunition.
Field reports said the four-day battle on the
marshy Plain of Reeds six miles from the
Cambodian border had cost the North Vietnamese
117 men killed. Allied losses were placed at 22
killed and 25 wounded with the brunt of the
fighting borne by South Vietnamese forces.
Military sources said a North Vietnamese soldier
captured on the Plain said his outfit, the 88th
Regiment, was trying to move on the Dinh Tuong
capital of My Tho, 34 miles southwest of Saigon. It
is a major Mekong Delta river city and the
headquarters for the 7th Division of the South
Vietnamese army
At least 12,000 North Vietnamese troops are
known to be stationed in the delta along with others
across the border in Cambodia, the sources said.
Some intelligence reports have indicated that Hanoi
is planning a major offensive in the delta ricebowl to

Linguistic Program
'New Thing For UF
Research and advanced study on the structure and relationships of
languages soon will be the new thing at the UF.
The latest in languages at the UF comes under the category 6f
linguistics recently authorized for degree programs on masters
and doctoral levels.
Feb. 2, when the Board of Regents gave the UF permission to
proceed with advanced programs in linguistics, it placed the university
in an unique position.
As Dr. Herman Spivey, acting dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, said: Only 38 other major U.S. universities offer a doctoral
program in linguistics.
The new degrees will be offered through the College of Arts and
Sciences, effective next September.
Dr. John Algeo, assistant dean of the Graduate School and associate
professor of English, is responsible for developing the new degree
program.
Spivey said, The new program represents an endeavor of the
university to develop interdisciplinary programs because of the
growing interdependence and complexity of subjects and department.
Since linguistics as now studied in the major universities is
concerned with mans behavior as related to language, it is truly an
international, interdisciplinary subject.
Moreover, since World War n, there have been major advances in
the science oflariguage study both as to how languages are produced
and how they are perceived, said Spivey, who was professor of
English prior to his appointment as acting dean last month.
At least five departments of the College of Arts and Sciences will
contribute to the hew program, the concept being that the expertise
in the disciplines is very important and assures strength from the
beginning with it costing not nearly as much as a program would if
new faculty had to be added.
The five departments involved at the beginning are English,
Romance languages, Germanic and Slavic languages, speech and
anthropology, Spivey said.
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test the ability of South Vietnamese troops who
have replaced American ground forces in the
sprawling area.
The huge store of Communist rifles and
ammunition was found by American Green Beret
jungle fighters poking through a complex of bunkers
45 miles northeast of Saigon in Long Khanh
province along the Cambodian frontiers.
Reports from the scene said the cache, first
discovered last week, included more than 4,000
mortar and rocket rounds, scores of
rocket-propelled grenades and a variety of other
weapons.
Elsewhere, the UJS. command said an Army
OVIO Bronco spotter plane was shot down Sunday
about 50 miles northwest of Saigon. The two
crewmen aboard escaped without injury but the
twin-engine plane was destroyed.
A separate announcement reported that a UJS.
Navy river patrol boat strayed into Cambodian
waters last Thursday and was seized by Cambodian
forces who are holding the vessel and its six-man
crew.

r:/
DR. HERMAN SPIVEY
.an interdisciplinary subject"

Engineers,
Math and
Science
Majors
i'

I Correctional Gym j
| Envy Os UF: Nease
ijj TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A legislator complained Monday |
:j; that the Sumter Correctional Institution at BushneU was j
5 over-planned and includes a gymnasium which would be the |
:j: envy of the University of Florida. j
p Whoever planned it didnt have to pay the bill, Rep. Wertz j
£ Nease, R-JacksonvQle, told the House State Institutions \
£ Committee. It was not planned by anyone concerned with {
£ saving the taxpayer's money.
Corrections Director Louis Wainwright agreed with Neaaes \
contention that some areas especially the dining area and the j
kitchen were larger than necessary, but said federal officials
v recommended it when state officials questioned the need.
£: He urged the committee to compare the per-bed cost of the <
£: Sumter institution with other prisons constructed in the nation
jij: in recent years.
iij: It's about half, Wainwright said, emphasizing much of the
;ij: work done by convict labor and served the additional purposes
of teaching the convicts vocational skills and keeping them
| busy.
Bax, Wainwrights immediate superior, also told the
committee his department was working with the Florida '<
Medical Association and the Florida Hospital Association on a J
§ master plan for providing health care at institutions.
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Page 5



Page 6

i. TMFto>Me Afiipttor, Tuwky, February 10.1070

HOUSE APPROVAL
Bingo Law Wins

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
Who gave it, who got it law
for bingo won the unanimous
backing of the House Commerce
Committee Monday.
It gives the old folks
something to look forward to,
Rep. Elvin L. Martinez,
D-Tampa, said.
Black Ckarches
Receive $30,000
ANAHEIM, Calif. (UPI)
The Episcopal Diocese of Los
Angeles approved donating
$30,000 to a black economic
development group during a
weekend convention and elected
three Negroes to key positions.
After a four-hour debate, the
diocese voted, 412-341, to give
the money to the National
Committee of Black Churchmen.
Those opposing the gift, to be
composed of voluntary
donations, said the committee'
supported a group which
followed the black manifesto, a
statement which condemns
America as a racist society and
has demanded millions of dollars
in reparations.
The $30,000 is part of a
$200,000 sum pledged to
Negroes at a National Episcopal
meeting in South Bend, Ind.
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It pretty much assures that
the net proceeds go toward the
nonprofit charities conducting
the games as intended by the
1967 law, he added. It closes
the loopholes in raking off the
profits.
Before winning endorsement,
the bill was amended to allow
bingo players to have a cocktail
along With the game.
But an effort to allow bingo
games on Sunday was soundly
defeated.
Rep. Leonard V. Wood,
R-Oiiando, said nowhere in
Florida is Sunday parimutuel
wagering on horses, dogs or.
jakriai allowed and here were
talking about allowing bingo and
drinking of whisky on Sunday.
Rep. George Firestone,
D-Miami, was author of the bill
which is aimed at tightening
loopholes in the 1967 law that
for the first time legalized bingo
by charitable and religious
organizations by exempting
them from the anti-lottery laws.
The law has been declared
unconstitutional and an appeal is
pending in the state supreme
court for a hearing next month.

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Allows Inspection Os Utilities
House Committee Clears Bill;

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
bill to permit inspection of the
books and records of utilities
seeking rate increases oleared a
House committee Monday but
the sponsor said an amendment
by Rep. Tom GaUen of
Bradenton gutted it.
HaUens amendment requires
utilities to open their books only
upon a showing of good cause
with the State Public Service
Commission to determine
whether the cause is good.
The GaUen amendment puts
it right back in the hands of the
Public Service Commission

complained Rep. Don H.
Stafford, R-Laigo. It gutted
it.
But Stafford said we still
have hopes of amending it on
the floor to remove the
amendment.
Opponents, led by Rep. James
Sweeney, D-Deland, said the
legislature should not try to pass
a law every time it disagrees with
a Supreme Court ruling.
Sweeny and Rep. William
Janies, R-Debay Beach, said the
bn was triggered by the court
decision which backed up a PSC

order refusing to allow the city
of Miami to inspect records of
the Florida Power & Light Co.
We are eroding the
confidence of the people in our
elected officials/ James said. If
the people disagree with the
public service commissioners,
they can defeat them. Let's not
try to reform the commission by
passing a law.
But die committee refused by
a close 8-7 vote to reconsider
adoption of the Gallen
amendment and the bill was sent
to the calendar by a vote of 9-6.



Ribicoff Calls For Integration Os North

M WASHINGTON (UPI) Accusing the North of
monumental hypocrisy, Sen. Abraham Ribicoff,
D-Conn., called Monday for both government and
buaneK to work to integrate Northern suburbs.
If Sen. John Stennis wants to make honest men
of us Northern liberals, I think we should help
him, Ribicoff told the Senate.
He promised to support the Mississippi
pcppoml under which schools segregated
because of residential patterns would be considered
in violation of civil rights laws the same as those
segregated by law or local custom.
Ribicoff, onetime secretary of Health, Education
and Welfare, (HEW) was the first Northern senator

Senate Delays Vote On Federal
School Desegration Guidelines

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Heavy Senate absenteeism
threatened Monday to delay for
at least a week any showdown
voting on Southern moves to
ease federal school desegregation
policies.
A cloakroom count showed
19 or 20 Republicans and 9 or
10 Democrats had already left
Washington prior to a Lincoln
Birthday recess starting after
Tuesdays session and lasting
until next Monday. More
senators made plans to leave
later Monday.
Senate Democratic Leader
Mike Mansfield expressed hope a
vote might be reaches soon on
one of two Southern-backed
amendments to a $35 billion
school aid authorization bill.
But Sen. John Stennis,
D-Miss., sponsor of the
amendments, and Sen. Claiborne
Pell, D-RJ., floor manager of the
legislation, declined to commit
themselves to a voting deadline
until they could study the
absenteeism situation.
As debate resumed on the
measure, Sen. Allen J. Ellender,
D-La., cited the school situation
in Washington, D.C., in support
With a John Roberts

class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

of the Stennis amendments.
As the Negro proportion of
the citys population has risen,
Stennis charged, Washington has
become a cesspool of our
nation.
He told the Senate: The
tragedy of all of this is that in
attempting to lift the black
socially, it has caused the

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'END MONUMENTAL HYPOCRISY

to openly support Stennis proposal, one of at least
nine amendments offered by Southerners to a
four-year, $35 billion school aid authorization bill
pending before the Senate.
Stennis and other Southerners have accused HEW
of ignoring Northern segregation while clamping
down on Southern school segregation.
Just before Ribicoffs speech, Stennis recited
HEW statistics which showed hundreds of all-white
and all-black schools in the North.
HEW has acknowledged that it distinguishes
between the Souths de jure segregation
separate white and Negro school systems and the

schools, die educational systems,
to break down. And the further
tragedy is die Negroes are the
ones to suffer.
Stennis* first amendment,
copied from a New Yoik State
law, would legalize freedom of
choice school assignment plans,
and forbid any federally
imposed **busing plans.

Norths de facto segregation which results from
distinct white and Negro neighborhood patterns.
Stennis amendment is designed to eliminate the
distinction.
We must be honest with ourselves, Ribicoff
said. Our problem is not only the dual systems of
education... the more fundamental problem is die
dual society that society that musts in every
metropolitan area the blade society of the central
city and the white society of the suburb.
Massive school segregation does not exist
because we have segregated our schools, but because
we have segregated our society and our
neighborhoods, he said.

Capitol Fire Drill
Causes Confusion
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) If this building had really been on
fire, a lot of people would have been trapped,* one observer
said when a surprise fire drill was held Monday in the Florida
Capitol.
The building has been called a fire trap** by some, including
Insurance Commissioner Broward Williams.
The drill befl rang out loud in committee rooms where
legislators were studying proposed new laws.
The lawmakers, lobbyists and press filed out slowly but
only a few actually left the building. Most hung around the halls
talking.

Fstonwr IQ*wo. Tlt Florid* AMptfor, I

Page 7



Page 8

i,Th Florida AWaatdr, TtMMhy, February 10,1070

The Florida Alligator ,j

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- Credit LNS
Prowl car 39 thinks he just seen a suspected Black
Panther carry in what he imagines could be a concealed
lethal weapon!"

Ankara: A Mixture Os Mini-Skirts And Village Garb

I sit at my fifth-floor window on one
of Ankaras main boulevards.
Car horns and the undefinable buzz
of city traffic center my office, bounce
off the floors and walls, off the the
desks and chain they bounce off of
each other, dash with each other. All
day long the hum bounces off of
everything in the small office. Including
me.
I spent a year in a small town where
the only hum was the hum of silence,
interrupted occasionally by flies buzzing
or roosters crowing or minarets calling
the Moslems to prayer. Basically,
though, it was a quiet year, a simple
year filled with simple sounds and a
slow existence. It was a happy year.
It was a time when the main stimulus
for activity had to come from within
myself or from the people around me.
There was little to do and no one was in
a hurry to go anywhere. For lack of
anything dse, a lot of time was spent
with people talking with people,
laughing with people, getting to know
people. And getting to appreciate
people.
It was a people year.
Os course, it was lonely at times.
Being the only English-speaking person
there, wasnt easy. Yet it wasnt all that
difficult. Sometimes an American song
coming over the radio could ruin a
whole day it would bring back
nostalgic memories of a once-a-time
world with once-a-time people. Old
friends, old thoughts, and old world
which had nothing to do with the world
I was then living in.
So I tried not to think of old worlds.
I concentrated my energy on my
Turfciah world, on toe minaretod world
which surrounded me, on the veiled
world which enveloped me.
But now Pm in Ankara and have been

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-in-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

for the past eight weeks. And I'm
discovering a new kind of Turkey, a new
kind of Turk.
While in the small town, I was a Peace
Corps Volunteer. But few people knew
about or understood the idea of a Peace
Corps. I was an English teacher that's
how I was accepted into the
community, that was my position. Os
course I was a foreigner that was
impossible to escape. But I was THEIR
foreigner, and they took care of me as if
I was part of them (as indeed I felt I
was). For weeks at a time, even I forgot
that I was in the Peace Corps. I was
along there was no Big Daddy
watching over me. Like the other
teachers, I was responsible to the school
and its principal. For me, the Peace
Corps was secondary.
There was no hot water in my home;
I had to go outside to the toilet; there
were few can and little excitement" in
the way of a night life or other
activities. Life was very simple, very
basic. It was a direct contrast to toe
hurly-burly, run-around life I had been
used to in toe States. Yet this was toe
easiest part of it.
It's very easy to accept the fact that
there was no television, no drive-ins, no
ready-made pizza mixes, no night dubs,
no English-speaking people. The Land
of Instant Coffee and Push-Button
Appliances was half a world away and
(for the most part) remained so. It was a
basic life, but it was a happy life.
Now I'm still a Peace Corps
Volunteer but for the next year IH be
in Ankara. I miss the village life with its
village lives and would like to return
for another year but not to teach,
like the students, I too realized that
there's Httle need to speak English in a
place where there are no tourists, where
most of its people will never leave the

EDITOMAt #
Quit Harassing Left

The reasons listed by William Cross,
secretary of the committee on student
organizations, for not allowing the Young
Socialist Alliance (YSA) to apply for
recognition are at best unsubstantial.
Cross says he concurs with Vice President
for Student Affairs fester Hales decision
not to accept YSAs application until the
Board of Regents decides whether the
organization is in the same category as
SSOC and SDS.

The Regents last year banned SDS, SSOC
and other organizations which supposedly
advocate the disruption or overthrow of
government by force from all Florida
campuses.
Cross and Hale believe YSA is potentially
in this category.
They claim that if YSAs application is
accepted and the organization given the
routine 30-day organizational period during
which they can make use of university
facilities the UF might be violating the
Regents ruling.
For, they believe, YSA could eventually
be deemed to be a subversive organization
by the Regents.
We find their reasoning to be highly
objectionable:
First of all, the 30-day organizational
period is nothing but a myth at this point.
YSA has made it clear that it has completed

* Yes' that's right. We are not accepting applications from
YSA .. You know how these things are, we may never get
an answer. #/££, CROSS
One really becomes weary, after a time, of the
Hdfninistration denying basic constitutional rights to
members of the university community. Let us not forget,
just a short time ago, Hale was denying the right to
distribute literature on campus because, in his opinion,
anti-establishment papers were obscene.
JOHN SUGG

village, let alone the country. Teaching
there was difficult. Relationships with
students outside the classroom were
most rewarding, but being in the
classroom wasnt.
So now Im in Ankara, and Im
finding it much more difficult to live
here physically conditions are much
easier; but psychologically and
emotionally they arent. Ankara is a
modern city and it carries a flavor of the
West; yet being so dose and so far (at
The Adventures Os
Joe Torchia
Peace Corps
Volunteer
the same time) is not so easy. Its much
easier to accept a simple, basic life,
when you must.
But even more important, Ankara has
a different kind of Turk.
Ankara is a huge, modem edifice
' booming out of the barenness of the
Anatolian Plateau. Coming in by plane,
you cant help but wonder where it
came from. Its big. Its beautiful. Its
taxi and dolmus-lined boulevards are
stacked with tall buildings and modem
shops.
Yet at the same time there are
horse-drawn carriages mingling with its
multi-colored can; there are the sounds
of street-sellers mingling with its
mechanical heartbeat; there are market
(daces Hke those found in towns;

all organizational arrangements and is now
ready to present its case for recognition.
Secondly, we view Hales position as
that of a child whos afraid to fall in his
elders disfavor and to be slapped hard.
He is in effect circumventing all normal
procedural avenues for recognizing
organizations and going straight to the top
to ask for big daddy Regents approval before
even reviewing YSAs case.
And his actions would seem to render

administration appeals to students to work
through the normal channels as an idle
Pharisaism.
Frankly, were tired of seeing leftist
groups harassed, questioned, investigated
and put through bureaucratic mills time and
again.
And only for the reason that they are left
of center.
If freedom of expression is to be
something more than a farce, then it must be
extended to both sides left and right.
One-way channels are not channels at all.
And Hale can still keep the backwash from
further tarnishing this institutions
reputation.
He can begin, today, by allowing the
committee on student organizations to justly
consider YSAs bid for recognition. Or he
should abandon all facades of collective
decision-making and disband the committee.

and all around there are small towns and
villages like the one I was in. Erin
mini-skirts are mixed with the long,
flowing dress of village garb.
And the Turks in Ankara are as
mixed as the city itself.
Ankara is filled with transitional
Turks Turks torn between the
modernity of the West and traditions of
the past; between religious ties and
secular ideas; they live between ancient
ruins and modem buddings; they must
face the prospects of things like joining
the Europian Common Market; they
must lunge forward and take their place
in an expanding world and at the same
time cling to the treasures of the past.
And for these Turks, the idea of a
Peace Corps is a slap in the face... and
justifiably so.
But now Ive left the village; Ive left
the small town with its poetic
simplicity. Yet to keep things in
context, we must realize that Turkey is
growing and expanding and, at the same
time, suffering growing pains. The
contrast between Ankara and the town I
was living in is so amazing! Even the
contrasts within Ankara itself are
amazing!
So I sit here at my fifth-floor
window. Its late-aftemoon. Soon the
rush-hour traffic will crowd its city
streets. And now Im part of it.
Somewhere in my left-behind but
not-forgotten town a rooster is probably
crowing, or a donkey is calling out for
its evening meal. Maybe even the
minaret is calling the Moslems to prayer.
Maybe two villagers are playing tavla in
a small coffee-house; maybe two small
shopkeepers are sitting outside in the
quiet street talking.
A car horn has just beeped outside
my window. The village has
disappeared.



Tolbert Blacks Treated Unfairly

MR. EDITOR:
The incident which occured in Tolbert Hall took
place on UF property, furthermore, the incident
involved members of the university community and
could be said to be a direct result of this
communitys failure to take action on previous
grievances expressed by black students here.
In 1966 when a student discharged (unlawfully) a
firearm in his dormitory room and wounded
another student, no criminal charges were brought
against him.
In fact, the university kept the incident within its
own jurisdiction. Why, in the present case, was a
strong effort not made on the part of the university
to handle the matter internally?
Should not the university at least have
investigated the charges in an effort to determine if,
indeed, a gun was used before handing the students
involved over to the State.
As president of this university, you have the
responsibility of serving the interests of all its

xll^x
A Look At The Issues
News For OConnell
MR. EDITOR:
Your hypocrisy is sickening.
Your stupidity is vile.
You tried to tell us that the road to greatness is building a 17.5
million dollar monstrosity.
Well, Ive got news for you.
You dont become great by having a place for the Rascals to
perform.
You dont become great by providing a nice place for
commencement exercises.
You dont become great by having an indoor swimming pool.
And Ive got news for you, Mr. OConnell!
You dont be come-great by firing professors and employees for not
signing your loyalty oath.
A great institution is built in the classroom.
A great institution is built in the research labs.
If you want this institution to be truly great why dont you pay
professors a decent salary And Ive got news for you, Mr. Taxpayer:
If you want a great university why dont you spend 3 million
dollars and have a decent math building, or 2 million dollars and have
a decent political science budding.
This may be truly heresy, but how about lowering tuition so that
intelligent people from lower income families can attend college.
No, Mr. OConnell, Mr. Editor, and Mr. Taxpayer, we dont believe
your hogwash about greatness. (As evidenced by the 2-1 vote
February 4, the credibility gap is alive and well in Gainesville.)
JACK MILLER, 7BA

Pro-UAC Groups Used Tigert Facilities~Why Not SMC?

MR. EDITOR:
At the risk of seeming redundant, I would like to
focus not on the UACs merits, or lack of them, but
instead on some of the methods used in the recent
referendum.
The committees for and against the proposal did
considerable propagandizing for their respective
positions on the issue. At least two special groups
w ere formed, working in favor of the center.
The UAC Student Committee (UACSC),
presumably a student group, and the UF Activities
Center Committee (UFACC), with Dr. E. T. York,
Jr., Head of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, as its Chairman. %
The source of the working capital for the

Negro vs. Black
MR. EDITOR:
Can you imagine what would happen if President OConnell were
assassinated by a Negro, rather by a black. What would be the issue
then? Would it be that OConnell was a dirty racist? Perhaps, just
perhaps, people would view it as one man shooting another, that is the
issue.
VINCE GALLOGHER, lUC

Stick To The Issues
Instead Os Self-Pity

MR. EDITOR:
See the righteous black student.
See him write another letter to the Alligator.
See the vitriol.
See the venom.
See the nonsense.
Consider Cheryl Rap Browns effort of February
2.
The initial two-thirds of her comments are
devoted to a catalogue of the indignities suffered by
the Negro in this country. All thinking Americans
are ashamed of this record, with the possible
exception of Willie Taylor of Tampa, and are
attempting to alleviate these conditions, and to
provide equality for Americans of all races.
But are White-Colored signs posted above

Powers Misunderstood Letter

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is an attempt to remedy certain
misunderstandings between Dean Powers and
certain law students.
In his letter of January 30th he interprets our
letter of January 28th to be referring to his written
statement of January 22nd. This is unfortunate
because it was not our purpose to distort his letter
of January 22nd.
We were referring to his oral statements quoted in
the press on January 20th. The Gainesville Sun
quotes Dean Powers as saying that Prof. Lambom
was released effective June I, 1970, for
incompetency.
The St. Petersburg Times quotes Dean Powers as

pro-UAC groups (at the time of this writing) has not
been published.
Both UFACC and UACSC mailed out literature
supporting the center, using the postage permit of
the UF Alumni Association and machine printed
name and address labels printed in Tigert Hall.
Part, if not ah, of the letters from the UFACC
were prepared for mailing by UF staff who are
under the supervision of Dr. E. E. York and who
were being paid with state funds.
Would it be reasonable to assume that the Tigert
Hall facilities and state personnel would have been
available for use by anti-UAC groups? Would other
groups, say, The Student Peace Union, SDS, or SMC
be allowed to take advantage of the machine printed
mailing convenience of Tigert and the reduced

members equally; I charge you with the failure to
do all within your power to serve the interests of
the black members of this university, not only now,
but since your term of office began.
I know Ron Jackson and Joe McCloud
personally; they are fine young men and good
students. They would have been a credit to the UF
had this university fulfilled its responsibilities to
them.
I must agree with the Black Student Union that
this is just another incident of racial injustice, and
that you Mr. OConnell, seem bent upon eradicating
this race from our university.
When die largest university in the State of Florida
can boast only some 190 blade students with an
enrollment of over 20,000, the obvious conclusion
is that UF is indeed a racist institution with a racist
administration.
CAROL REILLY
LAB ASSISTANT
CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Tufay, FaboMry 10,1070, Ttm Florida Allifotor,

water fountains in some nameless town a searing
commentary on the capability of President
O'Connell? Or can aggravated assault be reasonably
described as ... (an) attempt to defend
themselves and their freedom of expression?"
Hardly.
It may be that President OConnell is
incapable," or that those who have been charged
with assault are entirely innocent. But why not
direct yourself to the issues? Why not present some
relevant facts to substantiate the inevitable closing
harangue, instead of relying on yet another study in
self pity.
Letters such as Miss Browns which have begun to
appear so frequently, will never engender support
only a brief yawn.
RICHARD GRONER

The Gainesville Sun quotes Dean Powers
as saying that Prof. Lambom was released
effective June 1,1970, for incompetency
saying in reference to Prof. Lamboms motives that
It might look better on a job application to say
you had been fired for refusing to sign an oath than
to admit you had been denied tenure.
We sincerely regret our mistake in stating that
these statements were made on January 21 when
they were actually made on January 20th. We
extend our apologies to Dean Powers for our error.
KAY ELLIS, 3LW
WILLIAM MANIKAS, 4LW
JAMES G. DARRAGH, 4LW

mailing rate of the UF Alumni Association?
Should groups be officially sanctioned by the
university (none of the center committees were)
before being allowed to use UF facilities or is a
stand on a particular issue similar to that of the
administration the only necessary prerequisite?
By looking at the role which the administration x
assumed in the student referendum, and placing it in
a historical perspective, we can see that this was just
another example of the philosopher kings (and
princes) attempting to play games with the lives of
students for reasons of political expediency.
richard m. McCulloch, 4as

There is no hope
for the complacent man.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE
SALE: Honda Model CA 95; Asking
$260.00 or best offer. CALL
372-9367 ask for David or leave
message. (A-80-10t-p).
Color TV, 21". Zenith Console mdl.
remote control. Good picture. Color
and audio. $195.00 firm. Call
376-0528 after 5 PM. (A-80-st-p).
BLK Doberman pups AKC, 7 wks.
old. Call after 4:30 PM. 378-4665.
(A-80-st-p).
Bell helmet almost new. Call
372- after 5 PM make offer.
(A-80-st-p).
Super Reverb amplifier. Fabulous
condition. Need cash for school.
Only 200 dollars. Call Fred Fey at
SAE house. 372-6471 evening.
(A-77-10t-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORO. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-C).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/C, full carpet, washer/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, partially furnished.
Immediate occupancy.ss,9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p).
Bank note due. Must sell Model 6548
Channel-Master 3 speed tape
recorder, $125. Contact Bob Morris
at the Law Center JMBA Office.
ASAP. 392-0498. (A-2t-82-p)
1968 HONDA 50 SIOO. Excellent
condition. Call 787-6128, Leesburg
after 5:30 p.m. Will bring to
Gainesville for Inspection any
Monday, 4 p.m. (A-3t-82-p)
Univox Bass amp. Great condition,
worth $400.00, only $150.00. New.
Shure Mixer worth $150.00, only)
$50.00. 55SW Shure Mlc $40.00.
373- Sacrifice. (A-2t-82-p)
Wollensak stereo tape unit recently
serviced, bell cycle helmet SZ. 7 5/8,
Phllco 19" portable tv all Items In
great condition. Call 378-6277.
(A-83-st-p).
MjM e fl B
I FOR RENT
Xxeeeeeex.vx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.x.Nx.v.v.'*:
1 male, Immediately, private rm.
mod. townhouse, $65 or 1-3 ,to
occupy end mo or quarter $165/mo.
1020 D N. W. 38th Ave. Buddy
373-2353 or 8-6580. (B-83-st-p).
Sublet (as of Mar. 1) big bedroom
garage apt. 3 blox from campus.
Come see or call 378-6796 at 301 N.
W. 19th St. (off 3rd Ave.) SIOO per
month. (B-73-st-p).
Male roommate needed: Private
bdrm., cen. A/C.&H. pool, furnished,
close to campus. S7O/Mo. incl. all
utility. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224 (B-st-81-p).
Female roommate need: Prvt. Bdrm.
cen. A/C.&H, pool, furnished, close
to campus. S7O/mo. inclu. all
utilities. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224. (B-81-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
Jlvlngroom, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c).
Sublease 2 bedroom apt. Furnished
or unfurnished. Immediately or at
quarter break to August. Call
378-4339 ANYTIME, Day or Night.
(B-83-st-p).
SWAP!! Leases on clean S9O two
bedroom apt. for pad permjtting dog,
or buy German Shepard p|up cheap!
Call 378-7511 evenings. (9-80-st-p).

f § Valentine's Classified ll
VI I SI.OO for 4 lines 11
I, m%* r USe c ass,^'ec cou P n l cam P u s mail)
Deadline: Feb. 11th
Last day to mail-in
B sure and indicate fjf
Classified

/x-x-x-x-x-v-v.v.v.x.-.v.v.-x-xvx-x-x-x-x-;-
FOR RENT
%V.-.-.-.v.-X-:-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-I-*
Sublet now or in March : 1 bdrm.
furnished central air & heat carpet 1
block behind Norman $120.00
376-3154. (B-81-4t-p).
£f>>:-x->x-x-x;srw*>>>x->x-xwv:*:*>>x-xxs
WANTED |
**
w-x-nv.sx.-:-x-x-x-x-x.x.sxx-x-x->x-x-nx>i-
Need 1 or 2 female roommates. $55 a
month Includes RENT & UTIL. La
Bonne Vie. Call 373-1029 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-82-p)
1 female roommate wanted Spring
qtr. To share 2 bedroom Tanglewood
apt. No Deposits. March rent paid.
Call 373-2711. (C-81-4t-p).
Male roommate wanted to share
Williamsburg apt. Call 373-1151,
anytime. C-81-3t-p).
Male roommate wanted, immediate
occupancy, central AC/Heat, v? mile
from campus. Call 373-1951 for
details. (C-83-3t-p).
Male roommate. Summit House
Apt. A-l Luxury at premium Only
46.75 plus utilities per month
Lease runs tH June Cable TV
378-9924. (C-79-st-p).
Engineering Fair Committee needs
pictures of last years Eng. Fair for
publication in the Fla. Eng. Mag.,
Call Ira Blacker 392-1455.
(C-3t-82-p)
COED roommate for luxurious
Tanglewood townhouse.
DISHWASHER, 3 NICE ROOMIES,
only SSO a month. Call 376-1015.
(C-83-st-p).
TWO MONTHS RENT FREE! Help!
I Bombed Out! Need one female to
take my place at Landmark 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-81-6t-p).
Summit House One male
roommate needed for 2 bdr. apt.
Feb. rent free, central air and heat,
pool, etc. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361
(C-81-st-p).
| HELP WANTED jj
Wanted: GO-GO DANCERS. Up to
$l5O per week. No Experience
Necessary. Must be good dancer. Call
376-9175 for audition. (E-10t-77-c)
Receptionist, Typing, Phone Work,
opening day or evening shift,
Full-time. Apply Mr. Ray 2929 N. W.
13th St. no. 3. Gainesville, Fla.
(E-81-7t-p).
Bookkeeping machine operator
experienced persons only apply. Call
392-0393 Mrs. Decker for appt.
(E-81-st-c).
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p).
Male Sales Help Wanted. Are you 21
years old and can work 20 hours per
week? Call for appt. 378-6236 or
373-1635. (E-80-st-p).
Cocktail Waitress. Part or Full Time.
No Experience Necessary. Cali
376-9175 After 4:00. DUBS STEER
ROOM. (E-10t-77-c)
AUTOS
v
1967 Chevrolet pickup. 283
Automatic, radio & heater, mud grip
tires, low mileage. $1,500. 376-9204,
Archey. (G-4t-81-p)
1965 Sunbeam Alpine, radio, heater,
air-conditioned. 42,000 miles, S9OO
or best offer. Will consider trade for
big cycle. 378-9162 evenings,
weekends. (G-81-3t-p).

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 10,1970

vX-X-X.X.*Wi<"XvX-X*X-!-X-X-X-X-X-%'-Nvv
AUTOS
X £
;vx-x<-:-x-x-x-x-x-x-xx-x-x-x-v.vx:-x-x-Xj
1962 Dodge V-8 Good condition,
automatic transmission, radio, heater,
new battery and engine parts. Must
sell. $325. Call 378-7537.
(G-79-st-p).
Austin Healy Sprite 6B. Perfect
condition, economical, radio, heater
only 14,500 miles. 51,350 Call
376-0741, 2032V2 N.W. 3rd Ave.
(G-st-82-p)
1963 Chevy Convertible 327V8 red
w& new white top. No rust on car. If
you see It youll buy it. Stereo tape
too. Call 378-8771 evenings.
(G-3t-82-p)
1967 Cougar V 8 Auto, trans. Radio
& heater. Good condition. Must sell;
will take best cash offer. Call
376-0329 after 5 p.m. Ask for Ron.
(G-st-82-p)
VW 1968 Bug. 21,000 miles still
some warranty left. Radio, other
extras. $1395. Phone 378-3605.
(G-3t-82-p)
u
1967 FIAT 850 COUPE. Excellent
Condition, 23,000 miles. Some
Abarth equipment. SBSO. Call
376-7571 ask for Ronnie.
(G-83-lt-p).
1969 VW. Must sell to meet financial
obligations. Almost new. S3OO plus
take over payments. Call Kemmle.
392-7532. After 6. (G-83-lt-p).
Volvo, 1963. Excellent student car.
Easy parking, 28 MPG. 378-1268.
Also, 2 snow tires for sale.
(G-83-st-p).
1964 Triumph TR 4, Excellent
condition physically and
Mechanically. $1,250. Call 392-0706
or 376-3352 after 5:00. (G-81-3t-p).
£.X-X-XT.v.*.v.\-.-.-x-;-x-X-X-X-X-X.".v-v. .v.;.
PERSONAL
>: x
>x-x-x-v.-.w.v.-x->x-:-x-x-x-x-x.v..v.-.xx-v
Fly to Fort Myers. Leave Friday, 13
Feb., noon, return Sun, 5 Feb. Call
Abbott Kagan, 378-4859 or drop a
note to Box 428, Health Center.
(J-4t-82-p)
Harold, I love you & Ralph more
than one times one, happy 20th,
happy lifetime Together! L.G. N. &
H. Kisses, Margaret. (J-83-lt-p).
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Little Sweety.
(J-83-lt-p).
Free Introductory flight 8 Hours
Dual Instruction SIOO, Cessna 150,
$lO Per Hour. Phillips Flying Service
495-2124. (J-83-10t-p).
Congratulations to DLW and WJB on
their upcoming marriage in June.
Love, the other woman. (I am still in
love with WJB. (J-83-2t-p).
To John and Barbara: Kathy and I
are really glad you tied the knot. See
you after the honeymoon. Court and
Kathy. (J-83-lt-p).
GAINESVILLE SINGLES CLUB
MIXER TONIGHT all area adult
singles are cordially invited,
winjammer, 8:00 p.m. on.
(J-83-lt-p).
LARRY Happy Anniversary
darling. I am so very lucky to have
you. I love you, Janie. (J-83-lt-p).

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Vi BROILED CHICKEN
Ytllow Ricm $1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN

I PERSONAL
:'x-:-x-x-x.x..v.-: :-:-x->x-x-x-x-v-v-v.*.v ; : fl*:->
You wouldnt believe what you
missed! Last Friday was the Friday
that was! Those SIPPERS really
SIPPED-IN and out too! Dont
miss tWs Friday Luv. (J-lt-82-p)
Janet Bladders, English,
Doughnuts, Nose Still love Paul.
(J-83-lt-p).
UNIVERSAL ENLIGHTMENT For
the price of a dinner. .1 will only
provoke your thinking and am not a
minister. You may reach one who is
pure at heart from 7-8 PM, M-F,
Randall Lance, 373-2821.
(J-83-st-p).
Summer Charter Flight. Tampa to
Amsterdam. $220 $ 10 admin. Fee
Roundtrip. Call 373-2590 or write
AIESEC, Room 300, Reitz Union.
(J-80-st-p).
Theta Chis: Woman was created
from the rib of man. She was not
made from his head to top him, nor
out of his feet to be trampled
on . but out of his side, to be equal
to him; under his arm, to be
protected; and near his heart to be
loved. Sincerely, a Woman. P.S. sbss!
(J-81-st-p). ~
Dog lover: my puppies are ready to
love you. Call 372-3225 and I will
arrange for you to meet. I will also
describe details., Yours, Buffee.
(J-81-3t-p).
Til AUL
NOW
winner
SAN SEBASTIAN
w
Hgjit:

PE* SON At
263-96-7931, I want you. (J-81-3t-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
Jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
Congratulations Phi Sigma Sigma for
being Number 1 scholastically.
Youre the greatest and I am very
proud of you all. Your advisor,' Bev*.
(J-2t-82-p)
THE "FIFTH FLOOR of Tolbert
has given Ralf away. RALF, WE
MISS YOU, (J-83-lt-Pl.
YID lt can work, here and
everywhere. Come back. JCT.
(J-3t-82-p)
Cont
1 I From
l 1015 H.w.im st. V Iy\
Some boys
hove everything..
THE MIDNIGHT COWBOY
RIDES AGAINI
pjirfeT Sim
iem*a; O I cont.
riSrfffiw. "j 1
ONE OF
THE YEARS
iO^BEST
- mm* Jmmm
PETER FONDA
v DENNIS HOPPER
PICTURES J
| Pewefew Geltviie |
| m W.UZStr 4v
N Nomr rvE seem
EVERYTHING.
-Beverly Nile Courier
EJr w ~
vei
YES!"



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
v
. v .v;.;%*;c*x-x-x-:-v%w.v.
we-re only ,n ,t for the
money. Come In and see our new
lunk, Its really groovy lts toooo
freaking much. Parisian underground
iflwelry. European antiques, and
Indian Kurtas. WOW! TO top It off
we have Susies snazzy pillows, left
over from Christmas, but best of all
vou get a FREE paper flower with
anv purchase. You ask why? Because
we want to get rid of this stuff. The
Spanish Main. 1642 W. Unlv. Ave.
Free flowers Mon. Thurs. Open
sometime and 10-10. (J-4t-82-p)
BOYS!!! Nbed your pad cleaned or a
party hosted? The bunnies of last
auarter have turned Into tigers and
have multiplied. So hire a TIDY
TIGER now! Call 373-2760.
(J-st-82-p)
.......v.sy.v.v.vWWWX-X-X-X-X'X-X-X-VX;.;
f LOST & FOUND §
'
Found: Mostly BLACK Persian cat in
vicinity of the I Bldg. Call Maria
Perez: 378-4388. (L-81-3t-nc).
FOUND: Ladies watch In Peabody
hall. Come by room 8 Peabody or
call 392-0243 to IDENTIFY.
(L-3t-nc).
LOST! Q Iris brown suede jacket.
Probably week of Jan. 26. Only coat
I own! Help, Its cold. Call Lori
Pfeece, 392-7640. REWARD.
(L-3t-82-p)
LOST: Female Welmaraner. Limps
on right hind leg. Needs operation or
she will die. Reward. Please call
376-8600 or 376-9119. (L-st-82-p)
CAMP COUNSELOR
Boy's camp, Lenox, Mass.
(42nd yr.) has opening for coming
summer. Campus Interviews.
Unusual staff from all parts of
U.S. and Europe. Openings for
swimming, sailing, canoeing, also
openings in archery, riflery,
tennis, fine arts, ceramics,
yearbook. Write fully to camp
Mah-Kee-Nac, 137 Thacher Lane,
South Orange, NJ. 07079
HH
pWH v

SERVICES
LIFETIME PLAQUING. Protect
your valuable certificates, diploma,
and photographs. Beautiful walnut
border. Sizes from postage stamp to
24 x 44, 8 x 10 certificate only
$11.15. Two week delivery.
Gainesville Printing Co. 1817
Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313
(M-83-24t-p).
XEROX COPIES: specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Gainesville Printing Co
1817 Hawthorne Rd. Call 372-4313
(M-83-14t-p).
MARTHAS VINEYARD Summer
1970 Student EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES. Hundreds of
Jobs! Detailed descriptions including
restaurants, hotels, shops. Send $2.00
APPLIED RESEARCH
ASSOCIATES, Dept. 5, P.O. Box
3903, New Haven, CONN. 06525.
(M-83-2t-c).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)

PETER PAUL & MARY
CROSBY STILLS & NASH
STEVIE WONDER
s th DIMENSION
JUDY COLLINS
THE BEATLES
MAMA CASS A
LETTERMEN % B
SUPREMES f
NILSSON
" ,f* >i r-l
YES 7 Trim Youll L0VE......
wiiwu RADIO j
MOST OF THE ABOVE HIT RECORDS AND ARTISTS WERE PLAYED
FIRST IN GAINESVILLE ON WUWU RADIO. IF YOU'RE TIRED OF \J | f\\_ \ OC/U
THE BUBBLE GUM MUSIC AND THE SCREAMERS THEN
TAKE AN ENTERTAINMENT BREAK

Tuesday, February 14$, 1970, The Florida Alligator.
. .

f ~ SIRVICES j
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main SL
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electroiogist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)

'J§||| DUSTIN HOFFMAN
HI ufflfc midnight W
L urMMMo cowboy ff
SHOWING II ifllftDkJ >lvl UM : 1
w at rated x
7:00 AND 9:45 VmM I USIIIJiIMIJ
PLUS CO-HIT H
sinful 1

Page 11

| SERVICES |
:?.Nsrxs-x*x*x-x-%rx*:*x-:*x*x-x.%v.v;*:*:*:*x*X':;
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and
up. Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount. 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-83-20t-p).
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)

..WW >XvXvX*>XA%y'W ; WVAV.v.w.v.
SERVICES |
* ^ftfrfrf-X : : : *'*X*X*******-******* p **** M **** l ****** I ****** i^<
Rubys ALTERATIONS. 1958 N.W.
4th St. 376-8506. Mrs. Ruby Mills.
(M-3t-82-p)
FOREIGN CAR OWNERS Minor
tune-ups and repairs at half the price!
Specializing in VW, Porsche,
Mercedes. Call 378-1 713.
(M-80-st-p).



Page 12

\ftlM Florida AlHgfctofr,' Tutsdiy,

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

1
Administrative Notices

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless off college
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
or the Elementary Blocks.
ENGLISH and SPEECH
MAJORS do not take the test, as
Speech 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124, Norman Hall.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT TESTS in French,
German, Latin and Spanish will
be given at 7 p.m., Thursday,
Feb. 12 in Little 121.
MIDTERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given on Tuesday, Feb.
10, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 10 at
7 p.m. in Little 101, 109,113,
121 and 125.
CHN 252 MID-TERM TEST
Will be given Wednesday, Feb.
11, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A report
to Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 221,225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13,14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101, 102 110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium. ¥
CBS 261 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 17,
at 7 pjn. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;,

1 jtl GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FERERAL CREDIT UNION
, .7^^ o\UJ3 ? TAXES? DEBTS? ||
/"[jTfl f It's Income Tax time again and this year is even worse!
f, v lfttt // Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
LB| / A- /Y enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces-
*" jl \ ufinHiflf d /A sities of life! CONSOLIDATE all of those bills, pay
l \ your taxes anc enc up w tJl ,ess * a rnont l, V output.
y x, m J Come in to talk it over...we're specialist at solving
AMIL 7/ u tho kind! of probl ms!

N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 17,
at 7 pjm. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101,102,112,
or 114.
CLC 142 and CLC 145
MID-TERM Test will be given
Wednesday, Feb. 18, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A report to Floyd 104 or
106; B to Little 101 or 109; C to
Leigh 207; D-E to Little 113,
121, op 125; F to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; G to Little
213, 215, 217, or 219; H to
Little 221; 223, 225, 227, 233,
235, or 239; l-L to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; N-O to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; P-Q to Floyd 108
or 109; R to Flint 101, 102,
110, or 112; S to Walker
Auditorium, T-V to Anderson 2,
4,5, 7,18, or 20; W-Z to Walker
Auditorium.
CLC 141 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb.
18, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A-L report
to Peabody 1, 2,4,7,10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101,102,112,
or 114.

A book for
all seasons
Good things happen as the Moon to the first dandilion
seasons change. and beyond..
Things like a carpet of multi- As long as you remember,
colored leaves. A still cold ft j
night. A flower in bloom. rlOTlstt
And the Florida Quarterly. /y#/ ivtpf'tit
We'll see you through the J
seasons, from the Harvest We only did it for you.

BLUE BULLETIN

PLACEMENT NOTICES
Feb. 9-10: Haskins & Sells,
U. S. Naval Ordnance Lab.;
Ernst & Ernst
Feb. 9-12: E. I. Du Pont de
Nemours & Co.
Feb. 10: Newport News
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.;
Texaco, Inc.
Feb. 10-11: National Security
Agency; Tennessee Valley
Authority
Feb. 10-12: The Bell System
Tech.
Feb. 11-12: General Electric
Co
Feb. 11-13: Corning Glass
Works
Feb. 12: American Electric
Power System
Feb. 12-13: American Oil Co.
& Amoco Chemicals Corp.
Feb. 13: Del Monte Sales Co.;
Burdines; Blue Bell, Inc.;
Alexander Grant & Co.; New
York State Dept, of
Transportation; The Coca-Cola
Co.; General Foods Corp.;
Owens-Illinois, Inc.; Hercules,
Inc.; Avco Electronics Division;
Crum & Forster; TRW Systems
Ross Gear Division
CANCELLATIONS
Feb. 12: American Oil Co.
Atlanta, Ga.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday, February 10
Accent *7O Films, Union Aud.,
10:00 ajn. 4:00 p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Collegiate Civitan Club of the
Univ. of Fla. Chartering Night
Banquet, Union Ballroom,
7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Mrs.
O.L. Burner's Home, 1215
N.W. 36th Terrace, 7:30 pan.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 pan.
Accent *7O, Arthur Godfrey,
William Scott, Jr. and Loring
Lovell, University Aud., 8:00
pjn.
Wednesday, February 11
Accent *7O Films, Union Aud.,
10 a.m. 11:00 ajn.
Accent '7O, Jeane Dixon,
University Aud., 2:00 p.m.
Plaza of Americas, 3:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 pjn.
Basketball, University of Fla. vs.
LSU, Baton Rouge
Lang. 8t Lit. Lecture, Prof.
Gordon Bigelow, "Thoreeu's
Melting Snowbank," Room 303
Aerospace Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
Accent TO: Mayor Sam Yorty,
Dr. Leonard Ricci and Carl L.
Klein, University Aud., 7:30
pjn.
Pharmacy Dames Meeting, Home
of Mrs. Charles Haupt, 810
S.W. 21st Avenue, Speaker:
Mrs. Tari Kazaros from Maas
Brothers, 8:00 pjn.
Business Administration Dames
Meeting, Home of Mrs. Wm.
Beaton, 4914 N.W. 18th
" Place, 8:00 pjn.
Mensa Meeting, Winn jammer,
8:30 pjn.
Young Republicans Meeting,
349 Union, 9:00 pjn.
Thursday, February 12
Accent TO Films, Union Aud.,
8:00 a.m. -12:00 noon
Accent TO, Franklin P. Huddle,
Union Aud., 10:00 ajn.; Dr.
Arthur C. Beall, Health
Center Aud., 10:00 a.m.. Dr.
Charles Wurster, Jr., Bless

Campus
Calendar

Aud., 10:00 ajn.
College of Journalism,
Advertising Day, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 ajn.
Accent TO, Rod Cameron, Dr.
Charles Wurster, Jr., William
G. Eden and Maj. Gen. F.P.
Koisch, Plaza of the
Americas, 1:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, Speaker: Frank
Huddle, "Problems Congress
has in Making Technical
Decisions," 150 D Union,
7:00 pjn.
History Dept. Panel, 'The
Changing History Major," All
History Majors required to
attend. 362 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Accent TO, Dr. Rene Dubos,
Stewart Udall and Walter L.
Mazen, Florida Gym, 8:00
pjn.
Friday, February 13
Accent TO Films, 10:00 a.m.
11:30 ajn.. Union Aud.
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
pjn.
Accent TO, Anthony Mazzochi
and Mrs. Marguerite Mood,
Plaza of the Americas, 1:30
pjn.
Union Movie, "Blue Max,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 pjn.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 pjn.
Muslim Student Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
pjn.
Accent TO, David Brinkley,
Alvin Toffler and Henry
Gibson, Florida Gym, 8:00
pjn.
Hillel Foundation Reception,
121 Union, 8:30 pjn.
Jennings Community Valentine's
Day Dance, "Nation Rocking
Shadows," Jennings Rec.
Room, 9:00 pjn.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Accent
TO tickets: $.25, $.50 and
SI.OO. Audubon Wildlife
FMms, U. of Fla. Students,
SI.OO, GP. $1.50, HS
Students, $.50. Royal
Winnepeg Ballet, $3.00,
$2.00 and $1.50. Dion, $2.00
and $1.50.



Student Development Consolidated

By SUSAN SELMAN
Alligator Conwpondent
Office of Student
Development? Whats that? -a
typical student comment.
Many students still are not
aware that this office exists
said Asst. Dean Donald D. Mott.
The former offices of dean of
men and dean of women
consolidated last fall to form the
Office of Student Development,
located in 129 Tigert Hall and
headed by Dean Frank T.
Adams.
As the name suggests, the five
full-time deans and interns in the
Office of Student Development

AT COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
14 Participate In Pilot Program

A pilot program through the
Alachua County School System
is giving 14 senior business
education majors in the College
of Education a first hand look at
the daily challenges of school
administration and operation.
The program, begun in
January with the cooperation of
School Supt. W. S. Tiny
Talbot and his staff, is
coordinated by Dr. Glenna Carr
and Dr. James Crews of the
Department of Vocational,
Technical and Adult Education.
At selected times during the
quarter students visit a different
administrator or supervisor and
see in detail the functions and
operations of that particular
office.
Visits to central purchasing.

Engineering Honorary
Taps New Members
The Florida Alpha Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national engineering
honorary association, initiated 55 new members last quarter according
to president Tom Wade.
The 35 undergraduates initiated were D. W. Allemeier, R. F.
Beutlich, H. G. Britton, Jr., 0. B. Call, Jr., M. G. Clay, H. E. Cooper,
Jr., J. L. Cooper, J. E. Cunningham, J. A. Devore, J. D. Durham, W. C.
Fort, HI, R. J. Hasko, L. M. Hawthorne, L. G. Housefield, D. H.
Jackson, R. G. Kinsey, R. D. Lamb, R. E. Leon, M. S. Leonard, R. E.
Machado, B. E. Miller, G. J. Miller, D. M. Mocda, B. S. Murphy, A.
Muklebust, D. Prieve, J. P. Rubinstein, J. Sanchez, W. M. Schikorr,
B. W. Sessions, T. H. Smith, R. E. Smith, T. G. Tomaseflo, G. G. Wise,
111, and A. Yezzi.
Two graduate students, D. P. Jordan and J. E. Raetz, were also
initiated along with alumnus members including H. A. Be vis, R. X.
hey, J. A. Marban, Mrs. G. E. Mullings, V. P. Roan, Jr., H. B. Smith,
and R. Yii.
Those initiated as eminent engineers, the highest honor the
association can bestow upon its members were Wayne H. Chen,
electrical engineering department head; Marie H. Clarkson, aerospace
engineering department head; Robert T. Dehoff, John W. Hoover,
Ralph W. Kluge, Robert E. Reed-Hill, Frederick N. Rhines,
netallurgical engineering department head; Richard T. Schneider,
Herbert E. Schweyer, Delbert Tesar, and Julius T. Tou.
William P. Sokeland served as pledgemaster for this class.
{ STEAK HOUSE j
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

INTO ONE TIGPPt OFFICE

ft nctio n as an advfcory emit
supplement anything huhviduai
co e 8 e cannot offer ahidenfa.
They compare themselves to
general practitioners. None
being specialized, they can talk
to a student, sense his problems
and refer him to other help such
as the Counseling Center, his
professors or the infirmary.
All disciplinary problems
formerly referred to the deans of
men or women are now handled
by UF attorney Tom Biggs in
the Office of Student Conduct.
By removing even the small
amount of disciplinary functions
we were formerly involved with,
there has been an increase in

the personnel office, school
board meetings, and even the
bus warehouse, are included on
the schedule. Additionally,
students spend about two weeks
in various classrooms acting as
assistants and aides to the
regular teachers.
Using the visit to central
purchasing as an example, Carr
explained the advantages of
actually visiting such an office.
They can see the things that
affect them directly in
teaching, she said. It is
important that teachers know
how equipment is purchased and
maintained. This is where much
of the taxpayers money is
spent. All future teachers should
see this aspect prior to
employment because its usually

students coming to us for
academic counseling, Mott said.
One of the most important
functions of his office, Mott
feds, is the service it fulfills on
the Petitions Committee. AO
students who petition to
withdraw from school must go
through this office.
Students withdraw either
because they are mad about
something or they dont know
where theyre going. We are in
the position to advise them
concerning their individual
problems or vocations.
Students suspended from
school and seeking readmission
also receive aid from the Office

too late afterward.
Following a day of visits to
the various offices, the students
discuss the functions and share
their observations in seminars.
Our aim not only is to
these students better teachers
through this program, but to

I GATORS I
| in the Mall |

of Student Development.
Aside from the role of
academic counselors, advisors
for fraternities, sororities and
undergraduates are located here.
The Office of Student
Development is also authorized
to interview and approve
short-term loans for students for
up to S2OO.
Should a student be involved
in an accident, a dean from this
office, who is on emergency
duty 24 hours a day, may be
called upon to notify the
students parents.
Yes. This is the purpose of the
Office of Student Development
- to help students who need it.

make them better citizens, said
Carr. After taking this program,
the participants should be

well-versed in the working of the
school system and, in turn,
likely will be more cautious
when spending tax money.

Tuad*, Foamy to. 197 Q. The Florida Alligator, I

ORANGES
$2 bushel
U-Pk-tn
MODEL HOMES
Orang Lako Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phono: 591-1143
join the fun!
THESWIMGS
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TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Nfl&B Waldo Road
Cwtlr _^^

Page 13



The i
Florida
Alligator <

STRATEGY PAYS OFF
UF Upsets Vandy, 81-79, In Overtime

By KEN McKINNON
Awifnt Sports Editor
Coach Tommy Bartletts last
second strategy paid off last
night as the Gator basketballers,
playing without the services of
top scorer Andy Owens for the
last 12:03 of the game, pulled
off their second upset in three
days by slipping by the

PHIL COPE
DAN BOE MOVES IN FOR 2
... made dutch foul shot
Gator Rifle Team
Places In Tourneys

UFs Gator Rifle team took a
first and a second placing in two
days of competition in the
Florida Handicap at Florida
Southern College on Friday and
in the All-Services Match in
Pats To Sign
Yale Player
BOSTON (UPI) The Boston
Patriots said Monday they have
sent a contract to Brian
Dowling, the quarterback who
with running back Calvin Hill
led Yale to 16 wins in 18 games
during the 1967 and 1968
seasons.
Dowling, of Shaker Heights,
Ohio, has been teaching at
Cheshire Academy and played
for Bridgeport in the Atlantic
Coast Football League last fall
after being cut by the Minnesota
Vikings.

ROBBIES
The Best In Steaks.
TV I 1718 W University Ave. I
Lj^iTlieGd^oa^^J

GATOR SPORTS

Vanderbilt Commodores, 81-79,
in overtime.
We knew they would throw
the ball into Wallace
(Commodore captain Perry, who
scored 21 points, 18 of them in
the second half and overtime)
with three seconds left, so we
put Findley on him and he came
up with a big steal, Bartlett
said.

Tampa on Saturday.
In Fridays meet, freshman
John Atkins fired a 233/290 to
give the UF a victory over
Florida Southern College,
Stetson and Florida A&M.
Gator Wayne Pretschold
placed second individually with
a 261/289.5.
High winds, making shooting
very difficult, marked the
Saturday match in Tampa. The
Gators placed high individually,
but the team effort fell short as
Florida Southern outshot UF
riflers 988 x to 962 x.
Joel Dobson shot a 262/300
to receive high individual honors
and the ROTC Shooter Award.
Gator captain Dean Ettinger
placed fourth individually
scoring a 253/300. The Gators,
defending state champions, will
host the All-Florida
Intercollegiate Rifle
Championships on March 7.

Earl Findley was just one of
the many heroes in last nights
game.
Jerry The Mover Hoover
brought his team from behind
time and again and collected top
scoring honors for the first time
this season with 19 points.
Owens,who fouled out with 7:03
left in regulation, had 17,
Findley, 14, and Cliff Cox, 13.
Down by as much as nine
points in the early going of the
first half, the Gators overcame
poor shooting, behind the
hot-shot playmaking of Hoover,
to pull even at 33-all at halftime.
It was nip-and-tuck
throughout the second half
before Cox missed a shot on the

PHIL BANNISTER
HOOVER THE MOVER
... leads Gators with 19

WE NEED SOME MORE MONEY
SO HERE GOES
TUESDAY AGAIN
LONDON BROIL
With F.F. And Salad Bowl 9
BLACK ANGUS STEAK £f GO
With F. F. And Salad Bowl W V
' I .Jo, ... -*;**..
i VjA T* : v Th:, ; j. ; :
I rfflU ORM FROM 6:30 AM
Z Til 300 AM
r 1225 W UNIV. AVI

I. Th* Florida AHigator, Tuesday, February 10,1970

Page 14

buzzer that would have repeated
Jeff Millers last second shot that
beat Auburn last Saturday.
Clutch foul shots by Cox,
Miller and Dan Boe in the
overtime period insured the
victory for the Gators.
But, after Boe missed the
second shot of a 1-and-l,
Vanderbilt called time-out and
planned its strategy.
Commodore sophomore Tom
Amholt brought the ball down
court and set up a shot for
Wallace with three seconds left.
Wallace missed the shot and it
appeared that the Gators
Findley had the ball, but he lost
it out of bounds.
Vanderbilt Coach Roy

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

Skinner called for another time
out. Again the strategy was to
get the ball to Wallace under the
basket, but Findley was ready
and stepped in front of the
high-jumping Wallace to
intercept the inbounds pass. He
then threw the ball to Hoover,
who just held it as time ran out.
When Owens found himself in
trouble with fouls in the first
half, Bartlett sent in big Bob
Agee, who brought the crowd to
its feet time and again with his
hustle and scrappy rebounding.
He pulled down eight important
rebounds in the first half,
outscoring 7-foot-4 Commodore
center Steve Turner, and wound
up with individual honors with
12.
Florida now stands 7-12
overall and 4-7 in SEC (day.
Vanderbilt dropped to 9-10 and
5-6.
In the freshman contest
proceeding the varsity game, the
Baby Gators downed the
Vanderbilt freshmen 90-77
behind the 22 points of Roger
Peace.
GOLf PAR 60
.J? DRIVING RANGE
ami GOLF CLUBS RENTED
IIIL, CLUB HOUSE
|j# ELECTRIC CARTS
nUuKr LESSONS AVAILABLE
'fi*E*OPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3 Vj Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721
RED PM Q A
NIGHT jV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



gr Hi w* i. W? *£. x
ISk .4 M s'JlhHb ;: '"^ v
'
k. -> >igf|||g||ES||siffiH^^B^K£|j^^^B||BH|H|j^M^^^^Kgsfr : §p?
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TOM CROSSFIELD
FLORIDA MAN MOVES IN FOR SCORE
... during Green Gator Fencing Tournament
IN UPI RATINGS
--
UCLA Number One-Yawn

NEW YORK (UPI) UCLA
retained its position as the no. 1
team in the country Monday in
the weekly ratings of the United
Press International major college
basketball coaches.
The Bruins, the only major
unbeaten team in the nation,
received 34 of a possible 35 first
place votes and 349 of a possible
350 points for the second
straight week in voting by the 35
coaches who make up the UPI
board.
It was the sixth straight week
UCLA, which stretched its
season winning streak to 17
straight games with a 66-56
victory over Washington last
Saturday, won the no. 1 ranking.
The Bruins have won 21
consecutive games over a
two-year period and have lost
only two games in the last four
seasons.
South Carolina (I'M) was
voted the no. 2 team this week
a
NEW YORK (UPI) The
United Press International top
20 college basketball teams with
won-lost records and first-place
votes in parentheses. (10th
week)
TEAM points
1. UCLA (34) (17-0) 349
2. South Carolina (17-1) 294
3. Kentucky (1) (17-1) 274
4. St. Bonaventure (15-1) 237
5 New Mexico St. (18-2) 178
6. N.C. State (17-1) 124
7. Jacksonville (17-1) 92
8. North Carolina (14-4) 65
9. Pennsylvania (19-1) 55
10. Drake (164) 38
11- (Tie) lowa (114) 22

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with 294 points followed by
Kentucky (17-1) with 274, St.
Bonaventure (15-1) with 237
and New Mexico State (18-2)
with 178.
Next came North Carolina
State with 124 points,
Jacksonville with 92, North
Carolina with 65, Pennsylvania
with 55 and Drake with 38.
The top 20 was rounded out
by lowa, Davidson, Houston,
Wyoming, Marquette, Notre
Dame, Santa Clara, Western
Kentucky, Florida State, Ohio
University, and Illinois.
South Carolina received 19
second-place votes, 11
third-place votes and five
fourth-place votes to shade
Kentucky, which received the
first-place vote which did not go
to UCLA. A different coach has
given Kentucky his first-place
vote in each of the last two
weeks.
The Wildcats also got 13

13. Houston (15-3) 19
14. Wyoming (154) 17
15. (Tie) Marquette (14-3) 16
(Tie) Notre Dame (14-5) 16
17. Santa Clara (15-3) 13
18. (Tie) West. Ky. (15-2) 11
(Tie) Florida State (18-2) 11
20. (Tie) Ohio Univ. (15-3) 9
(Tie) Illinois (12-5) 9
Others receiving votes with
points in parentheses: Utah,
Columbia, Georgia, University of
Texas at El Paso and Southern
California (6 each), Pacific U.
and Villanova (5 each), Kansas
State and Utah State (3 each),
Wake Forest and Creighton (2
each) and Duquesne, Niagara
and Cincinnati (1 each).

second-place votes, 12
third-place votes, six
fourth-place votes and one vote
each for fifth and eigth places.
The one-through-five ratings
remained the same for a second
straight week.
The biggest jumps in this
weeks rating were made by
Pennsylvania, the Ivy League
leader, and lowa, the Big 10
leader. Pennsylvania moved from
14th in last weeks rating to its
no. 9 spot and lowa, which
received just one lOth-place vote
a week ago, tied for the 11th
spot with Davidson, each with
22 points.
The UPI Board of Coaches is
composed of five coaches from
each of the seven geographical
sections of the country. They
vote each week of the season
with points awarded on a
10-9-8-7-6-54-3-2-1 Basis from
first through lOth-place votes.
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Gators Sasek Paces
Green Gator Tourney
Jose Sasek became the first Florida fencer ever to take first place in
any weapon in the annual Green Gator Fencing Tournament by
defeating favored, and previously endefeated, Steve Hintlian of the
U.S. Navy in the foil competition Sunday night in Florida Gym.
Sasek also captured second (dace in the epee as he was defeated in
the finals by Ron Brown of FSU. John Spinning of France took the
third spot.
UFs Carol Honse finished third in the womens foil with Sophia
Trett of Spain and Jessica Robbins finishing fust and second,
respectively.
Undefeated Fred Sharfstein of Miami swept past Dean Alexander
(Miami) and Manny Forrest (Miami) to capture first place in the sabre.
All Star Baseball
Set For March 28

NEW YORK (UPI) The
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference, with sanction form
baseball Commissioner Bowie
Kuhn and the 24 major league
teams, will sponsor an East-West
All-Star Exhibition game March
28 at Los Angeles Dodger
Stadium.
Proceeds from the pre-season
game, which will pit stars from
the Eastern Divisions of both
leagues against stars from the
two Western Divisions, are

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TiMsday, February 10,1970. Tha Florida AHigator,

earmarked for die programs of
SCLC foundation and the Dr.
Martin Luther King Memorial
Center being established in
Atlanta.
The squads will be made up of
two players form each of the 24
major league dubs and the
starting lineups will be selected
by members of the Los
Angeles-Anaheim chapter of the
baseball writers Association of
America and the Southern
California Soortscasters
Association.

Page 15



Page 16

I tin tarawy 10,1970

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SOX AND MARTIN HEMI-POWERED BARRACUDA
... one of 30 pro Stockers entered in Gatomationals

GATORNATIONALS
mmmmmmmmtmmm^mmmmmmmmmm^mammmmmmmmm^mmmmm^rnmmm^m^
How Cars Are Classified

By JOHN SIBENTHALER
Alligator Writer
The subject of todays column
is class breakdown, the system
by which cars are classified.
Because there are over 100
classes in which cars are placed,
this is perhaps the most
confusing aspect of drag racing.
There are two basic factors in
classification the body and the
chassis configuration, and engine
size and drivetrain.
Classes are alphabetically
arranged, ranging from A to
whatever letter the last class
conies under. The first letter
appearing on the car rates which
part of the class the car is to
compete in, with A being the
top of the line.
The last letters determine
which class the car is to compete
in, with one exception.
In the Super Stock class, the
class letters precede which
division the car runs in (SS/A,
SS/B, etc.). Otherwise, the
letters appear as A/A the top
of the Altered class, or A/G
the top of the Gas class.
National Hot Rod Association
classes include fuel dragsters
/F, dragsters /D, competition
cars -* /C, altered /A or fuel
NFL Honors
Top Players
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (UPI)
Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles
Rams quarterback, and defensive
end Carl Eller of Minnesota
Monday were named the
National Football Leagues
offensive and defensive players
of the year by the Kansas City
Chiefs club Committee of
101.
Gabriel and Eller will be
honored at a banquet here next
Monday night, billed as Kansas
Citys first annual salute to
professional football.
Gabriel guided the Rams to
the Coastal Division title with an
11-3 record, throwing an NFL
high 24 touchdown passes. Eller
was instrumental in the Vikings
leading the NFL in 12 defensive
categories.

altered /FA, funny cars
/FC, supercharged gas coupes
/GS, gas coupes /G, street
roadsters /SR, modified
production /MP, sports cars
/SP, super stock SS/, and
stock-/S.
Some of the classes offer only
a few categories, while others are
more prolific as in the stock
class, whose letters run from A
through V. The funny car class is
easy to identify, and provides
for only two breakdowns,
AA/FC (supercharged) and
A/FC (non-supercharged).
In the stock classes, if the car
is equipped with an automatic
transmission, the letter A will
follow the last letter in the cars
class (B/SA) as opposed to a
stick shift transmission (B/S).
Although many of the cars
appear similar, there are rigid
requirements in order to make
the class. In the modified classes,
such items as engine setback, car
weight and type and what the
car is intended to be used for
determine what class it will be
placed in.

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An example would be in
comparing the funny car class to
the gas coupe class. Although
both cars may be made of
fiberglass and the engines built
up in the same manner, they are
classed differently.
Gas class requires the use of
some type of headlight, limited
engine setback, pump gasoline,
basically stock body
configuration, and several other
items. The funny car is virtually
unrestricted.
Although this is only a
glossover of the classification
system, the basics are there to
muddle over. The classes provide
the basis for the fairest method
of competition between
different make cars.
The cars compete for eight
different titles, or categories, in
addition to the individual class
title. These titles are top fuel,
top gas, funny car, professional
stock, competition, modified,
super stock and stock. How they
compete will be the subject for
tomorrows column.

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only $1.25

j ON WHEELS
" ;
' ...
Jenkins Enfers
808 THOMAS
Bill Grumpy Jenkins, legendary super stock builder and driver
from Malvern, Pa., has entered his Toy Camaro in this weekends
Gatomationals.
t Running in National Hot Rod Associations (NHRA) Pro Stock
class, Jenkins won the Wintemationals Championship two weeks ago
in Pomona, Calif.
The new Pro Stock class is for production passerger vehicles which
may be modified with factory parts. The original body shell must be
retained, but light-weight components, such as fiberglass hoods and
fenders, are allowed.
Engines must run on pump gas, but may be extensively modified.
Some of the Pro Stock cars are capable of elapsed times in the
nine-second bracket and top speeds of 140 miles per hour.
In Stock and Super Stock categories calculated head starts are given
to the car in the lower class. Pro Stock has only one class and all cars
are started heads-up.
Jenkins, who won the 1969 Super Stock Nationals, fit perfectly
into this new class. he had been running in an
experimental class. He will be after his second consecutive
championship win.
Out to spoil his bid are Plymouth aces Sox and Martin, and Don
Growtheer, both with Hemi-powered Barracudas. Hubert Platt and
Dick Leohr have entered a pair of factory-supported Mustangs.
Bo Laws, a Gainesville Dragway regular from Orlando, has entered a
69 Camaro. Laws was successful last year in Stock class with a
Corvette.

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