Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Ad Ahiwa

Vol. 62, No. 81

MORGAN TO STEP IN
Shepherd Resigning;
Effective March 21

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd announced
Thursday that he would be
resigning his office on March 21,
upon graduation from law
school.
He said Walter Morgan,
student body vice president,
would serve the remainder of the
k
CHARLES SHEPHERD
... graduating from law school

Reverse Education
'Butchery-Stennis

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Warning the North that its turn
was next, Sen. John Stennis,
D-Miss., urged the Senate
Thursday to reverse the
educational butchery of
massive federally ordered school
integration.
Stennis and 16 Southern
co-sponsors urged that a
four-year, $35-billion school aid
bill be amended to outlaw
federally ordered busing of
students, and to legalize
freedom of choice school
assignment plans. The Supreme
Court has ruled that such plans
frequently preserve segregation.
To draw attention to their
contention that the government
winks at Northern segregation
while cracking down on the
DORM INSPECTIONS taking
place three times daily in an
effort to keep hallways and
living areas clean page 2
Classifieds 11-12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 14
FSU News 4
Letters 8-9
Movies 12
Orange and Blue rlO
Small Society -6
Sports .16
Whats Happening 5

The
Florida Alligator

I want to wind it up by March 15.
-Charles Shepherd

presidential term until the spring
general elections.
No date has been set for these
elections, but they will be some
time in April.
Shepherd said he had no
comment on his future plans
other than he would be working.
He said the job offer he is
considering has not been
finalized yet, but would be
announced as soon as they were
definite.
The remainder of his term will
be spent on completing the
Student Government budget for
the coming year and revising all
existing legislation and
regulations on football seating.
We want to structure it so
that students know who is
responsible for all aspects of
football seating, Shepherd said.
He also said he would try to
finish the programs he outlined

South, Stennis and his colleagues
modeled their amendment after
a New York State law passed last
year.
Sen. Sam J. Ervin, D-N.C.,
said the New York legislature
passed the law to block a
statewide busing plan proposed
by James E. Allen, then New
York education commissioner
and now commissioner of
education for the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
It was signed into law by
that great champion of civil
rights, the governor of the
Empire State, Nelson A.
Rockefeller! Ervin thundered.
Stennis said the South no
longer was fighting integration.
But he said recent Supreme
Court orders, and rulings by
HEW, were ruining Southern
schools by busing students miles
each day to racially balance
each school in a district.
... We already know that
this massive integration is not
acceptable to the people of the
South or the North, Stennis
said. Now, he said, The. North
ignores the plain language of the
Civil Rights Act by preserving
schools segregated according to
residential patterns.
But he predicted their
immunity would not last. The
people of the North their turn
is next! Stennis said.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

in his state of the campus
address to the Student Senate
Jan. 20. These areas include
additional student services,
programs to bring about racial
harmony, and campus
development.
I want to wind it up by
March 15, Shepherd said.
He said Morgan will have to
make all remaining decisions on
the SG budget and will be
responsible for SG during its
worst time the elections.
Shepherd is the first student
body president ever to be
elected for two terms at UF. His
first term was in 1967-68, and
he was attributed with bringing
the independent voice to the
fore in SG.
His first administration made
noticeable strides in the areas of
student rights and he left office
at the peak of his popularity
among UF students.
Shepherds second term,
following the administration of
Clyde Taylor in 1968-69, has
handed him many setbacks and
brought him to the verge of
resigning from office on at least
two occassions.
The most recent setback was
Wednesdays defeat of the
proposed University Activities
Center referendum which he and
his administration strongly
backed.

PHIL COPE
ALL HELLS BREAKING LOOSE!
. * i

So it appears but it's actually just some more
remodeling outside of the Arts and Sciences
Building. This astute passer-by noticing the

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PHIL BANNISTER
ACCENT WEEK AHEAD
".. i>A
Walter E. Murphree, mayor of Gainesville, presents Accent
Chairman Joe Hilliard with a proclamation that next week is Accent
Week for the city. Accent 70s theme, or 'Tomorrow in Perspective,"
is taking form with 34 speakers on the roster for February 9*13. The
program this year will be focused on environment, transportation and
cities.
- -

irregularity in the sidewalk quickly made a detour
and saved himself some rough walking.

t AflWlrtr/Q6\
\ /
v jjpr#y

Friday, February 6, 1970



Page 2

Florida Alligator, Friday, February 6,1970

Anti Referendum
Organizations
List Expenses

TO KEEP HALLS CLEAN
Nightly Dorm Inspection Begins

By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF housing officials have
begun inspecting campus
dormitories three times daily in
an effort to clean up hallways
and living areas on the UF
campus.
The action followed the first

Other Nations May Borrow
Proposed Space Shuttle

CAPE CANAVERAL (UPI)
A Space agency official said
Thursday the day may come
when America will loan its
proposed space shuttle to
foreign nations.
A great involvement is
expected internationally because
of the flexibility and utility of
the space shuttle, said Charles
W. Mathews, deputy associate
administrator for manned
spaceflight of the National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA).
Other nations might utilize
the United States space shuttle
to carry and deploy their own
payloads, or to carry
personnel... up to a space
station.
Mathews, who made his
remarks to a meeting of the
American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics,
said, Ultimately, we envision
that some nations, or a
consortium of nations, might
actually operate their own
shuttles very much like foreign
nations now operate
U.S.-developed commercial

Good Food at
Reasonable Prices...
Breakfast Anytime!
OPEN 24 HOURS
Carry Out Closed:
Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
Coffee House
Home of the Happy Cup of-Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
Millhopper Rd. & University Ave. 372-9133
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspapet of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to 'un
several times. Notices tor correction must be given before the next
insertion.

r^rmyrm l -
By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
All the organizations who opposed the passage of the
University Activities Center referendum released financial
statements Thursday showing where they obtained their funds
and how they were spent.
Dave Lottier, vice-chairman of the Committee to Defeat the
Proposed University Activities Center (CDPUAC), released the
following figures:
The CDPUAC lists its financial statement as follows:
Donations from faculty, staff and students $30.00
Donations from Phi Delta Kappa Education Fraternity
$50.00
Contributions from the Committee itself $53.00
Lottier said $50.00 of this went to pay for radio time
(WGGG) and the remainder was used for the three information
_

meeting of the newly-formed
Council on Minority Affairs.
Administrative Assistant to
Housing Director Harold C.
Riker, David Decoster, called the
program necessary due to
present conditions.
In the mornings and
afternoons our custodial

aircraft.
The shuttle, now targeted for
operational flights in 1978, is
expected to be able to ferry a
dozen men or up to 50,000
pounds of supplies to and from
orbiting space stations.
NASA expects the space
shuttle to be the key to
American spaceflight in the next
two decades.

USF Prof Protesting Dismissal

TAMPA (UPI) University of
South Florida professor Robert
M. Stevenson filed civil suit in
federal court here Wednesday
against university President John
S. Allen, Chancellor Robert
Mautz and the State Board of
Regents.
Stevenson, who was told last
June 20 his contract would not
be continued, after June 30 of
this year, asked his contract be
continued, and that he be
granted $150,000 in punitive
damages.
Stevenson also asked the

personnel will look at each of
the residence areas, and in the
evenings the resident advisors
will make this inspection,
Decoster said.
Riker said the program was
being initiated to improve
relations.
We want to improve

Mathews said NASA studies
showed that 50 flights of the
shuttle could be conducted a
year at an annual operating
cost, including amortization of
these vehicles, at less than for
one flight of the Saturn 5. The
Saturn 5 moon rocket costs
SIBO million to build and is
thrown away after one
10-minute flight.

defendants pledge that
university employes can express
controversial views without
fear of reprisals, and the
defendants be enjoined from
denying university employes the
right of due process of law under

Hume Tennis Courts Delayed
Action on the proposed tennis courts for Hume Field has been
deferred for a year or more by the Planning and Building Land Use
Committee, said L. Worth Crow Wednesday.
Crow, an architectural planner in the department of Physical
Planning, &ud the committee was reluctant to suggest a location in
that area for the courts because of the unsettled nature of future
traffic patterns in the area.

I Candy 9 f
1 Valentine Cards I
I Jewelry I
i Cosmetics 1
I Registered I
| ph o a N -Jt3BSlE&Q\ I
1 , S., 8:30 ,0:08 f DUO SIQBES |
% SU l 1:00 TO 10 p.m. 1006 S.W. 13th SMt |

sheets distributed by the committee.
We have announced our total cost for the campaign at
$133.00, he said. We hope that the Florida Foundation will
also make public the financial statement for their part in the
referendum campaign.
Steve Uhlfelder, chairman of the Florida Blue Key executive
committee, listed that organizations expenditures as $45 for an
ad in the Alligator. An additional $25 for the ad was
contributed by law students, he said.
Tom Ball, chairman of the Mayors Council, listed the
councils expenses as $216.45, all which he contributed to
oppose the referendum. He said the four individual Villages later
reimbursed him in part $210.00 -for his expenses, but that
this money did not come from the Mayors Councils Student
Government-contributed funds. The Mayors Council only lent
its name to the effort, he said.

residence hall conditions and
insure courteous relations
between student residents and
the custodial staff, Riker said.
Riker also said plans were
being studied to have students
share the reponsibility for the
upkeep of bathrooms and study
lounges.
Decoster said enforcement of
the system will be simple.
When floor conditions are
beyond the condition which
would be considered normal
usage, the residents will be asked
to clean up the questionable
area, Decoster said.
Reports on all dormitory
incidents will be filed and kept
on hand for future use.
The program stems from a
Dec. 8 meeting between black
students and the Committee on
Student Housing.

the 14th Amendment.
Stevenson was notified of his
pending termination in a letter
from President Allen. But the
letter did not give a reason for
the action, and Allen has never
given the reason.

DIP YOU MAKE A
STATE GOVERNMENT
DIRTY TODAY?
2 o
Barge Canal
New Issue
The UF Environmental
Action Group has found another
issue: for this week DDT is out
and the barge canal is in.
In the wake of growing
concern about the Cross-Florida
Barge Canal, EAG has organized
a one day orientation on the
canal.
Beginning Saturday morning
at 9:30 in Walker Auditorium a
background briefing will be
conducted to look into
economic and biological factors
affecting the canal. The briefing
has been designed to answer
most of the questions
surrounding the barge canal,
including the history of the
project.
At 11 a.m. the briefing will be
concluded and participants will
leave for the Rodman Dam,
which is thirty miles from
Gainesville. During the
afternoon a representative from
the Corps of Engineers will
discuss the project and attempt
to asnwer some of the criticism
which has arisen recently.



Carswell Accused Of' Criminal Conspiracy

WASHINGTON (UPI) A civil rights attorney
suggested Tuesday that Judge G. Harold Carswell
might have engaged in a criminal conspiracy by
helping organize a segregated golf club at
Tallahassee.
Senate liberals forced a delay in Judiciary
Committee consideration of the Supreme Court
nominee G. Harrold Carswell Thursday, hoping to
use the time to dig out more critical material against
him.
Carswell has said he subscribed SIOO to a private
organization formed to take over a Tallahassee
municipal golf course. But he said he was unaware

OConnell Clarifies Point

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Thursday clarified
facts in a story in Mondays
Alligator about possible UF
appointees.
The story concerned reports
that U.S. Sen. Spessard Holland
was being offered a teaching
position at UF, and Appeals
Judge David Mann was being
considered as a replacement for
Law School Dean Frank
Maloney.
The Alligator reporter, after
calling OConnell for comments,
said in the story, Jimmey
ROTC Pro!
Retires Today
Lt. Colonel Clayton A. Bird,
who has served in the UF Army
ROTC program since 1966, will
retire today.
Col. Robert M. Atkins,
professor of military science,
will present Col. Bird with the
Armys Meritorious Service
Medal at an award ceremony at
12:45 at the Military Building
Quadrangle, and a dinner party
in his honor will begin at 7 p.m.
in the Arredondo Room of the
Reitz Union.

sUM D7|B
f/Ak 'CTa(?SUS c : |
f/JfiT SOUTHAMPTON! |j
students at Southampton College are HI
encouraged to actively support and participate J
IL In any positive new effort which seeks to improve |
things in this wobbly world. I
Of course, Southampton, with its delightful summer fk
climate, offers countless opportunities for
lighter types of involvement, too ... like Jp
beaches... boating ... g01f... theatres ... #
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Southampton a synonym for what summer gjj
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wLyil This summer... be where it is. IPilNsi
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FIVf-WKK SESSIONS TWO FOUi-KHIK WORKSHOPS j
% JuM 22 Julv 24 IN SCULPTURE, CERAMICS,
J une 22 July 24 PAINTING AND FILMS
JP July 27 August 28 Concerts and lectures will %
m ACCREDITED UNDERGRADUATE be given by resident musi- ||
COURSES IN HUMANITIES SCIENCE c j a ns and visiting experts. §|
M social SCIENCE MARINE SCI- Dormitory accommodations 1
f ENCE EDUCATION plus limited grad- are available for students in i
m uate offerings. Courses are open to aca demic courses and work- i
1 visiting students who are in good acaoem.o |*
standing at their own college. snopa. Ij
Director of the Summer Program,
COLLEGE j
long island university!
Southampton. N.Y. 11968 (516) AT3-4000
Please send me Summer Program bulletin.
lam interested in Ist session 2nd session
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BY CIVIL RIGHTS ATTORNEY TUESDAY

Bailey, who was answering
OConnells phone Sunday, said
OConnell was not taking any
calls.
OConnell said Thursday the
story seemed to imply that
Bailey was employed by him to
answer calls at the presidents
home.
For almost a year we have
had an answer phone service for
our home telephones, the
purpose being to enable callers
to reach us in emergencies when

'Newlook For Guard

Gator Guard will have a new
look when it participates in
Mardi Gras this weekend.
The new parade dress uniform
consists of army line greens
worn with white gloves, white
ascots and white Military Police
service caps. The MP service cap
is trimmed in patent leather.
Gator Guard is the precision
drill team of UFs ROTC
program.
Members are volunteers from
the regular program.
They will be marching in the
King Rex Parade Mardi Gras
day.
At night, they will participate
in the Krewes of Rex Ball which

racial factors were involved in the purchase.
Joseph L. Rauh of Washington, a representative
of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, said
there is a serious question Whether converting a
public golf course to a private, segregated facility
was against federal law.
Rauh was one of the final witnesses to testify at
Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Carswells
nomination to the Supreme Court.
Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, D-Md., invoked a rule
which automatically permitted a one-time,
one-week delay. But since the Senate will be in its
i nav rprp nevt week. Chairman James O.

my wife and I are not at home
and also enable callers to leave
their numbers so that 1 may
return their call, he said. The
answer phone service is Alert
Telephone Answering Service
Inc., and apparently they
employed among others Mr.
Bailey.
He said the reason he was not
taking any calls was because he
was in Tallahassee for meetings
related to Mondays Board of
Regents meeting.

at midnight will unite with the
Krewe of Comas.
These two Krewes highlight
the entire season of Mardi Gras.

_ ml Mmm H M Deliver The Herald and the Gift Indicated above, inclosed is my check MNi mm Wm j
| to pay for daily and Sunday delivery of The Herald to my residence:
516.90 for 6 Months $8.45 for 3 Months.
| (Name) j
| (Address) I
j (Apartment Number) (Telephone) J
I (City or Town) I

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Eastland, D-Miss., said the next meeting would be
either Feb. 16 or 17. He predicted easy approval of
Carswell.
The committee had intended to go into executive
session after the public testimony to vote almost
certain approval of Carswell, but a last minute
parliamentary maneuver by Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind.,
threatened to delay the vote for several days.
Bayh insisted that his proposed constitutional
amendment to provide for direct election of the
president be considered first.

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Were nothing without your love.
OAINESVUIE MALI

' Friday Fati&aryA. 197 b,' Tfcip torici A irffWr"

Page 3



Page 4

. iW Florida Alligator, Friday, February ft*

Accent '7O! Schedule Os Events

Accent 7O gets underway
Monday with a full day of
speakers keynoting the theme of
Tomorrow in Perspective.
During the week, such figures
as David Brinidey, Henry
Gibson, Los Angeles Mayor Sam
Yorty, Jeanne Dixon and former
Secretary of the Interior Stewart
Udall will speak on aspects of
the theme topics
encompassing environment, city
planning, and even The State of
the Nation.
As a guide for attending
Accent programs, the Alligator is
publishing a schedule of all
events planned for the week.
Monday
10 am Films, Reitz Union
Auditorium
2:30 pm Films, Reitz Union
Auditorium
8 pm Speakers, University
Auditorium
UF Stephen C. O'Connell,
President,
Claude R. Kirk, govenor, State
of Florida, Keynote speaker
Dr. E. T. York, provost,
Institute of Food and

Mekas Film
Next Sunday
Diaries, Notes and
Sketches, Jonas Mekas
underground cinematic diary,
will be shown free of charge at
3:00 p.m. this Sunday in the
Reitz Union Auditorium.
The film, actually the first of
two parts composing the entire
film, is Mekas' effort to utilize
the cinema to record his own
life. It centers around New York
City: year to year, the seasons,
the people. The film illustrates a
number of different modem film
techniques and approaches.
Mekas will speak before the
film about modem cinema and
Its different forms. After the
film he will answer questions
about the avant-garde film and
cinema in general. A reception
will follow on the second floor
gallery of the Union.
Fish Story
Biologists estimate that there
are 25,000 species of fish.

\ world's
! *1 chicken
H / days a week\
jjLjMi

Agriculture Sciences, U.F.
David Brower, Friends of the
Earth
Reception following in the
Rathskeller.
Tuesday
10 am Films, Union Auditorium
2:30 pm Films, Union Auditorium
8 pm Speakers, University
Auditorium
William Scott, Attorney
General, State of Illinois
Ernie Dickerman, Director of
Field Operations, Wilderness
Society
Loring Lovell, Conservation
7os
Arthur Godfrey, Entertainer
and Conservationist
Reception following in the
Rathskeller.
Wednesday
10 am Films, Union Auditorium
2 pm Jeane Dixon, University
Auditorium
3:30 pm Time Capsule Dedication,
Plaza of the Americas
4 pm Mayors Panel on the Future of
Cities
Stephen P. Clark, mayor of
Miami,
Dick Greco, mayor of Tampa
Walter Murphree, mayor of
Gainesville
Hans Tanzler, mayor of
Jacksonville
Dr. Earnest Bartley, U. F.,
Moderator

news iisfe,..
from mMBWEsu
ELECTIONS: Despite the long lines in cold temperatures, 4,550
students registered their votes yesterday in the Student Government
primaries.
In the top race for president Wayne Rubinas of Action party will
face Chuck Sherman of the Independent Student party in next
Mondays runoff.
The results were closer than any election since the newly-formed
Action party defeated the incumbent University party four years ago
BLACK STUDENTS: FSU got a pat on the back for its treatment
of black students in a HEW report received yesterday, but was warned
that it needs to increase desegregation efforts in at least six areas.
Possible new problems are in the areas of black participation in
student organizations, recruitment of, black faculty, records of the
number of blacks on campus, integration of Florida high schools, and
recruitment of black students. /
?.- V /
Kirk Wants Reversal
WASHINGTON (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk Thursday discussed with
House Republican Leader Gerald R. Ford the mechanics of
impeaching a federal judge for ordering busing of school children.
Kirk said Judge Charles Scott of Jacksonville violated the intent of
Congress in ordering busing in a Volusia County case and he will seek
impeachment if the order is not reversed on appeal.

7:30 pm Mixed Media Presentation,
Richard Oman, University
Auditorium
8 pm Speakers, University
Auditorium
Sam Yorty, mayor of Los
Angeles
Dr. Leonardo Ricci, University
of Florence Authority on
Urban Design and
Development
Carl L. Klein, Asst. Secretary
of Interior, U.S.
Reception following in the
Rathskeller.
Thursday
10 am Franklin P. Huddle, Union
Auditorium (sponsored by
College of Engineering)
Dr. Harvey Cox, University
Auditorium (sponsored by
College of Arts and Sciences)
Charles Wurster, Bless
Auditorium (sponsored by
School of Forestry)
10:30 am Dr. C. E. Bishop, McCarty
Auditorium (sponsored by
1.F.A.5.)
11 am Dr. Arthur C. Beal, Medical
Sciences Bldg. Auditorium
(sponsored by Medical Center)
12 noon Barbecue, Plaza of the
Americas
1 pm Dr. W. G. Eden, U.F. Dept, of
Entomology
Major General Koisch, U. S.
Army Corps of Engineers

II Plus
El Nate John
a Membership Card ; -' /
$1,25 for Non Members m
wm today 2-6
19 Pr/ces
I Week:
i. IKKFTS available NOW \
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2:30 pm fcnvironmental Defense
Fund
Rod Cameron. Executive
Director
Charles Wurster
3 pm Delegate Registration.
University Inn
8 pm Speakers, Florida Gym
Dr. Rene Dubos, Author of So
Human an Animal
Walter L. Mazen, Asst.
Secretary of Transportation,
U.S.
St ewart Udall,. Former
Secretary of Interior, U.S.
Reception following in the Gym,
lower level.
Friday
10 am Films, Union Auditorium
1 pm Speakers, Plaza of the Americas
Anthony Mazzochi, Labor
Union Leader
Marguerite Mood, Candidate
for U.S. Presidency in 1972
3 pm Campus Tour for Delegates
5:30 pm Delegate Banquet, Senator
Lawton Chiles, Speaking,
Union Ballroom
8 pm Speakers, Florida Gym
David Brinkley, N.B.C. News
Commentator
Alvin Toffler, Author of
Future Shock
Henry Gibson, Entertainer and
Conservationist.
Reception following in the Florida
Gym, lower level.

WEEKEND
EL Jf% RELAXER
ITW Sunday, Feb. 8
||V 1:30 to 5:30
|\ FROSTED GLASS and
y\ THE RUMBLE
I \\\ Union Terrace

VALENTINES DAY
Why squeeze a lot of love
into just one day. Save your
memories; theres no better
way than a portrait of you &
yours.
11l JOHNSTON
II PHOTOGRAPHY
1915 N.W. 13th St.
PHONE 372-2512



)
Cardboard
'Armada'
Sails Pond
I
' Dining-In
Hosts Fisher
An Air Force Medal of Honor
winner will visit the UF campus
this weekend.
He is Lt. Col. Bernard F.
Fisher, famed for his dramatic
rescue of a downed comrade,
during the fighting in the A Shau
Valley of Vietnam in March,
1966.
Fisher will speak Saturday at
the Sixth Annual Dining-In,
sponsored jointly by 1 the 150th
Air Force ROTC Cadet Training
Wing and the Dale Mabry
Squadron of the Arnold Air
Society.
A graduate of Air Force
ROTC at the University of Utah,
Fisher went to basic pilot school
and then to day fighter school.
Except for his eventful 12
month tour in Vietnam he has
been involved in air defense.
Fisher won his first Air Medal
for landing a crippled F-104 at
Homestead AFB, Florida.
During his tour in Southeast

I The ~
cheap
I I Offer good only with this coupon at I
I I Burger King, BNW 16th Ave. I
I L I

The Armadais coming is an ominous sign which
has been seen around the Art and Architecture
building lately.
What it means is that 20 brave students will
attempt to cross the Reitz Union duck pond
Monday in cardboard boats.
The even which starts at 12:30 p.m., is a lab
project for a materials course in the College of Fine
Arts and Architecture. Cardboard, string, and
waterproofing such as paint, varish, or wax are the
only materilas allowed for the boat or its
propulsion. The vessel must also be portable, and
small enough to fit in the back seat of a car when
folded.
Crew members, may or may not wear lifejackets,
but they must stay in the boat during the crossing,
graduate assistant, Oscar Larrauri, said.
For instance, it doesnt count if the crew stick
their legs through the bottom and paddle their way
across, he said.

il^B
fl
HB
BERNARD F. FISHER
... Medal of Honor winner
Asia he flew one of the
propeller-driven A-l Es. He
earned the Distinguished Flying
Cross, six oak leaf clusters to his
Air Medal, the Silver Star and
finally the Medal of Honor.
Second Best
Louisiana ranks second to
Texas in natural gas and
petroleum production.

Library Bus Ends
Evening bus service to the library was temporarily discontinued
Thursday, according to Traffic and Parking Coordinator Lee
Burrows.
The coed Special was originally introduced for security reasons,
Burrows said. Several large universities already have them and 1 feel
that we need the service.
SIGN OF THE TIME: Aquarius gathers at midnight tonight at 1823
N.W. 2nd Ave. Everyone is welcome.
FIDDLE FADDLE: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Professional Music
Fraternity for men, will have a rush smoker tonight at 8. The smoker
will be held at 904-B S.W. 4th Ave. All males in or interested in music
are invited.
PLAZA PICNIC: Aquarius invites everyone to come to their picnic
to be held in the Plaza at noon on Sunday. Bring food for yourself
and a friend.
WHAT- AN ACT: At their meeting on Sunday, the College Life
Players will be appearing. The program begins at 9:13 p.m. at the Chi
Omega house.
SUBTERRANEAN FLICKS: Jonas Mekas, renowned film critic
and director, will speak on Underground Film in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on Sunday afternoon aj 3.

This project has never been done before at UF
Larrauri said, and he expressed a dampened
optimism, if not outright pessimism of the boats
making it across the total length of the pond.
We may have to grade on the curve, he said.
Criteria for the race include: Imaginative use of
materials, the weight of the vessel in proportion to
the crew members, the expense involved and size of
the boat when folded, and of course, the time it
takes to get across the pond.
The first four criteria will still be used if none
gets across, and the winners will get some kind of
prize, Larrauri said.
Reitz Union pond was chosen for the testing
across treacherous waters because it would attract
more spectators, and because it has no alligators,
Larrauri said.
Some of the vessels have already been named,
including one called The Sink.

Friday, Fabryary 6, J 970. Th# Florida Afmtmr,

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Adjacent Kinds Food Host
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Charms soldered
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Florida crest jewelry r
Lavaliers lt=*
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FMAipiIES I
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Page 5



the Ffc&e Alligator, Frfcttv. tWbnury
Page 6

MITCHELL REGRETS
Press Subpoenas
WASHINGTON (UPI) Attorney General John N. Mitchell
expressed regret Thursday that subpoenas were served on certain news
organizations by the Justice Department without prior consultation.
Mitchell issued a statement denying there was any implication
that the Department of Justice is interfering in the traditional
freedom and independence of the press.
The subpoenas were issued for files and films of various news media
in connection with government investigation of radical groups such as
the Blade Panthers.

Mitchell said it had been
government policy in the past to
issue subpoenas to obtain
information from news
organizations on a cooperative
basis but only after previous
consultation on such questions.
He said that in recent
instances, unfortunately this
policy was not followed and the
subpoenas were served without
any prior negotiations.
I regret that recent actions
by the Department of Justice
involving subpoenas for
members of the press and
property of the press may have
been the subject of any
misunderstanding and of any
implication that the Department
of Justice is interfering in the
traditional freedom and
independence of the press,
Mitchell said.
The subpoenas made broad
demands for reporters notes,
memoranda, unused television
film and tape recordings for use
in grand jury investigations
involving the Black Panthers and
the Weatherman faction of
Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS).
Mitchell said that when the
failure to conduct negotiations
prior to actual service of the
subpoenas was brought to our
attention, we promptly ordered
our attorneys to enter into
negotiations in an attempt to
reach an acceptable
compromise.
A Justice Department
spokesman said there apparently
was a communications
breakdown within the
department. He said the
department did not intend to
demand all the broad
information requested in the
language of the subpoenas.
The Justice spokesman said it
had long been the policy of the
department to negotiate with
reporters when the government
felt it necessary to subpoena
some of their information in an
investigation. He said this policy
h|d continued to be followed
under Attorney General John N.
Mitchell.
The spokesman explained that
normal policy involved prior
agreement between the
department and parties to be
served subpoenas with regard to
information requested.
UF In Top 40
The U. S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
lists the UF among 40
institutions awarding more than
200 doctorate degrees each year.
11 Just right for Lovers II
and Likers Jj
Vl Seepage 11 Jj

mm wJtimmmimliiiiH 'Mill
_____
Venture: Seven minutes to save a life.

The problem: lifesaving clinical
tests of blood, urine and spinal
fluid may take technicians hours to
perform using traditional methods.
The possible solution: design a
virtually complete chemical labora laboratory
tory laboratory in a desk-sized cabinet that
will perform a variety of clinical tests
automatically, accurately, quickly.
The result: Du Ponts Automatic
Clinical Analyzer, the end-product
of years of cooperation and problem
solving among engineering physi physicists,
cists, physicists, biochemists, electromechan electromechanical
ical electromechanical designers, computer specialists
and many, many others.
The heart of the instrument is a
transparent, postcard-sized reagent
packet that functions as a reaction
chamber and optical cell for a
computer-controlled analysis of
specimens.

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JlteT £M<3IJ6H To TIPE Ds cVeP
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WeeblHfe tw ."+. bc. *>**>

Separate packsmade of a chem chemically
ically chemically inert, optically clear plastic plasticare
are plasticare designed for a variety of tests.
And each pack is supplied with a
binary code to instruct the analyzer.
Packs for certain tests also contain
individual disposable chroma chromatographic
tographic chromatographic columns to isolate spe specific
cific specific constituents or molecular
weight fractions on the sample.
In operation, the analyzer auto automatically
matically automatically injects the sample and
diluent into each pack, mixes the
reagents, waits a preset time for
the reaction, then forms a precise
optical cell within the walls of the
transparent pack and measures the
reaction photometrically.
A built-in solid-state computer
monitors the operation, calculates
the concentration value for each
test and prints out a report sheet

Du Pont Company, Room 7894, Wilmington, DE 19898~~
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1

for each sample. The Instrument is
capable of handling 30 different
tests, the chemistry procedures for
ten of which have already been
developed. The first test result is
ready in about seven minutes. And
in continuous operation, successive
test results are obtained every 35
to 70 seconds,, depending on the
type of test.
Innovationapplying the known
to discover the unknown, inventing
new materials and putting them to
work, using research and engineer engineering
ing engineering to create the ideas and products
of the futurethis is the venture
Du Pont people are engaged in.
For a variety of career opportu opportunities,
nities, opportunities, and a chance to advance
through many fields, talk to your
Du Pont Recruiter. Or send the
coupon.

mil PONT)
Ventures for better living.



IN CHICAGO TRIAL
Hoffman Insulted
CHICAGO (UPI) Defendants in the trial of the Chicago Seven
upbraided U. S. District Judge Julius J. Hoffman with shouted insults
Thursday for refusing to free one of them who had shouted an
obscenity in court.
The judge did not act immediately to revoke bail, as he did
Wednesday in the case of one of the defendants, David Dellinger.
But he refused defense motions to restore Dellingers bail and
release him from custody. And lie set off a storm of shouts from die
defense table with the words, Ill hear no more arguments... I deny
die motion.
It was the beginning of another wild and angry day in the marathon
trial of seven men charged with conspiring to incite riots during the
1968 Democratic National Convention.
Abbie Hoffman, one of the defendants, yelled, You schtunk
(Jewish idiomatic insult) your idea of justice is the only obscenity
in this room Julie, hows your war stock?
Jerry Rubin, another defendant, stormed, Youre the laughing
stock of the whole world. Every kid in the world hates you. Youre
synonymous with the name Adolf Hitler.
Abbie Hoffman added a barb at Assistant U. S. Attorney Richard
Schultz: You know you aint got no case.
Dellinger began the latest round of testimony Wednesday when he
interrupted a prosecution rebuttal witness to shout, Oh, bull.
Defense attorney Leonard T. Weinglass protested today that a
defendants bail could be revoked only when there was a danger that
he might flee from the jurisdiction of the court.
Judge Hoffman retorted, I was dealing with an emergency here. If
any court in the land after hearing the record of this case wishes to
admit Dellinger to bail, and if that court has a higher jurisdiction, I
shall gladly accept its ruling.
He then ordered that the arguments cease and the jury be brought
into the courtroom
In ordering Dellinger taken into custody Wednesday, Hoffman said,
I propose to try to end the use of such language and such conduct by
terminating the bail of the defendant.
Agnew To Remain
As 'Comic Character 9

NEW YORK (UPI) Comic
strip artist Walt Kelly said
Thursday a new animal character
in Pogo resembling Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew will be
around for a while as a heavy.
Hell be doing that sort of
work, said Kelly, referring to a
hyena-like character that made
its appearance in Pogo Monday.
Kelly refused to discuss the
hyenas resemblance to Agnew.
Hes probably going to
develop into something, Kelly
said. But he wont develop
right away. Itll take about a
month. Hes a trial balloon and
well see how soon he gets
slapped down.
Kelly said the hyena probably
wont be too lovable because
none of my characters are too
loveable.
SMC To Plan
Future Action
Student Mobilization
Committee will hold an
important meeting Sunday, 8
p.m, room 361, Reitz Union, to
discuss future antiwar actions
and demonstrations against
General Electric recruiters.

CIVIL ENGINEERING
SENIORS!
YOUR FUTURE CAN BE IN TRANSPORTATION!
Our expanding transportation engineering program includes
an annual % billion dollars in highway construction.
'"} i
No Exam Tuition refunds for Graduate Study.
See our recruiter on Friday, February 13,1970. Visit your
Placement Office Now for brochures and SIGN UP to hear the
full story, or write to:
Personal Bureau
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
State Campus Building 5, Albany, New York 12226
*, A*.**<*< *'- * **-*'*'*--' V ? ..* f, .**#

In his third appearance in the
strip on Wednesday, the hyena
informs the turtle that he can
sit mighty, mighty hard when
annoyed.
tou&Med dAeib
Because
of vaginal odors.
Smart women are using
MY
OWN.
Deodorant
Spray made
for the outer
vaginal area.
wTmt Available also
M in clean sine
mil towelettes.

\ < Jgvnoi <§hof&- jl
Bnk GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
'r- i mm 1
I BUCKLES, BUCKLES I
mm 1
I '" y i
B I I
T * n *v, v *- : 'i : . jHhBf 1,
Yr y~*' '/i'
"'':*#'**s ,ir. )f; U
BB Who has the Buckles? Lemer Shops has on their new
H kip-rider skirts. Skirts are in Linen or Rayon Blends .
H leather or self belted. Shirley is wearing a cotton knit body
shirt with her navy hip-rider
H Skirts 5.00-6.99
Body Shirt 4.99 Bi
,sis ;

Friday,. Fffaruary 6,1970, Thf Florids AMoatpr,

Page 7



I, The Florida AHgtior, Friday, February 6,1970

Page 8

tcntoriai
Its Ud To The Students

February is a peculiar month to have the school kids
underfoot.
And the students probably will agree February is an
odd time for a school holiday. But Alachua County
youth had their holiday this week anyway, in the wake
of court orders, legal appeals, hectic decision making,
and even violence.
The enforced holiday enabled a court-ordered
switch-over of a dual black-white school system into a
unitary system. It has been 16 years in the making, and
Alachua County is just getting around to it.
Logisticany speaking, integration means the
reassignment of 300 teachers and 2,500 pupils at a cost
of $60,000, not to mention some SIO,OOO spent in
fruitless legal appeals.
The same thing, in varying degrees, is happening all
over Florida. Unfortunately, the confusion has been
magnified by a bevy of political scavengers led by
Governor Claude Kirk, who has been braying like a
donkey fresh out of oats.
By word and deed, in defying court orders,
Governor Kirk has set a deplorable example of
lawrand-order.
Governor Kirk was in Gainesville last Thursday. And
while he was in town, black students were throwing
rocks and vandalizing Lincoln High in anger at the
phasing out of their school. These were atrocious acts
which reflect unfairly on the fine black people of
Gainesville. .
But, as Governor Kirk whiffed the tear gas, did it
cross his mind that he was the spiritual godfather of
this minor rebellion?
Alachua Countys integration hohday ended
Thursday and the school doors opened today and
dawn breaks on a new historical era for all of us. As for
the future, we turn not to Governor Kirk but to the
kids who are living this experience.
And the signs are good.
We have before us a special edition of Gainesville
HighB newspaper, the Hurricane Herald, put out by

To arms! To arms!*
Alligator Staff
j an j e Gould Karon Enj
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
.
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor. Reitz Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,87,
88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83. or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinion, expreaxrf ini the Florida Alligator .re those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

editor Roberta Berner and her staff. Its *££
notable that the State Department of Education
jns,. a. ""sa, 5 ?
students from Lincoln High with 2,500 air y
G Lincoln High and GHS student body officers
share their duties jointly for the remainder of<*eyear_
The music groups plan fresh sudihons The honor
societies and special interest clubs are getting
membership blanks ready. And the sports program*
beine worked out to the best mterest of Lincoln
athletes, with the open admission that GHS jslookmg
forward to contributions by such as Eddie McAshan,
Richard Williams, Johnny Foreman, and Arnett Hall.
The Hurricanes editorial viewed integration as an
exciting situation to liven up a dull part of the school
year ..a way to meet 600 additiona
individuals ... an educational experience in
itself... 1969-70 could be considered the most
valuable year in the history of Gainesville High
School.
And its ending: It is up to us students from both
Lincoln High and Gainesville High School to make
unification work. We can do it.
We wish Governor Kirk had said that.
-GAINESVILLE SUN

Another View =====l
Crime
Os Silence
End It Now
- Ry Wiliam E. Joyner ==

An open letter to persons who are among the
students, faculty, and administrators of UF:
Are you, as an individual, appalled and angered
that the country of which you are a citizen is
responsible for the deaths of fifty thousand
American youth and five hundred thousand
Vietnamese men, women, and children, not to
mention untold personal misery caused to perhaps
several million more?
Are you in agreement with the decisions of the
Nuremberg Tribunal (World Court) which convicted
men for the crime of obeying their government and
laid heavy blame on citizens of Germany who stood
silently by while atrocities against men were being
committed?
Have you heretofore thought of yourself as being
impotent as an individual in trying to bring about an
immediate end to the war in Vietnam?
Here is a chance for you to avow yourself on
permanent record to be a person not of Nixons
*Silent Majority and to promptly influence the
course our country takes in Vietnam. Silence makes
you a member of this Silent Majority since silence
is tacit endorsement of our countys policy.
The below form, if filled out by yourself and
mailed to 1.A.C.5., will be entered in the official log
of the United Nations. Records of the number of
signatures will be forwarded by Individuals Against

Courses In Jewish Studies
Offered At UF Next Quarter

MR. EDITOR:
We would like to inform the campus
community that serious and important steps
actually have been taken toward the creation of
courses in Jewish studies here at UF. Several
students have already petitioned for a course in
the Hebrew language, and efforts are being made
to bring it about.
Next quarter, for the first time, a course will
be offered by the Department of Religion in the
History of the Jewish People. Next year a course
will be offered in Medieval Jewish Thought.
Recent history has shown that student
~ activism has l^n.inrtruinental. l in bringing about

the Crime of Silence to officials of the U.S.
Government in order to influence them to end this
W3i now.
(The I.A.C.S. is an organization of concerned
American citizens who fed that die war in Vietnam
is immoral and should be stopped immediately, and
who are organizing a campaign for signatures to
show our Administration that many Americans are
of this opinion.)
Several hundred thousand Americans have signed
the following declaration, as I urge you to do also.
I wish to declare my name to the office of the
Secretary General of the United Nations, both
as permanent witness to my opposition to the
war in Vietnam and as a demonstration that the
conscience of America is not dead.
Signature (print afterwards!
Address
Zip
Mail to 1.A.C.5., P.O. Box 69960, Los Angeles,
Calif. 90069. (Should you also wish to support
publications and advertisements representing this
cause, also enclose SI or more as you are able.) You
CAN influence the policies of your country!

needed courses in new areas. It is interesting to
note that last year a well-developed prosam of
Jewish studies at Brandeis University was used in
justifying students* demands for a Black Studies
program there.
We only hope that the Jewish students here at
UF would express a like pride and concern for
their heritage.
PROFESSOR BARRY MESCH
DEPARTMENT OF religion
RABBI MICHAEL MONSON
HILLEL FOUNDATION
* *.. .* *. m n _ .* ; %
4

The |
Florida
Alligator
The price offrAom
is the exerciee of responsibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel I
News Editor
I



Revolution? No, A Return To Darker Ages
MR FniTHR- ~

mrv. cuuuk.
In this, the Age of the Bromide,
perhaps the most hackneyed is: the
youth of today are the leaders of
tomorrow. Moreover, the dissatisfaction
of youth has never been more general
and total than that of todays young
nor has it been more vociferous, nor had
a better press.
* Very well. What then is the outlook
for tomorrow? Just what are the
values of todays youth, who so like to
characterize themselves as
revolutionary, who are so
contemptuous of the establishment?
The UF campus is not an
inappropriate place to look for an
answer. The students have their own
government; they have their own
newspaper; and the campus abounds
with all the variations from the slick
buttoned-down junior bureaucrat of
Student Government, smoothly
hawking the UF Activities Center, to
the pathetic WOuld-be individualist
creeping around campus in full costume,
the weight of the world on his
shoulders, evident from his chronic
tragic expression of suffering and
resignation.
Consider first the area of education.
The student activist is not reluctant
to criticize the university, particularly
curricula and course content. The
criticism and proposed solution contain
many uses of the term, relevant, not
to say the concept, relevant.
The use takes the conceptually
vacuous form, A is (or is not)
relevant, instead of the form, A is (or
is not) relevant to B. With sufficient
patience you may learn that the
relevance in question is to his life.
If you perservere, insisting on greater
clarity and specificity, you will be told
of unstructured courses and
sensitivity groups, i.e., bull sessions
with credit.
Ultimately, you will learn that the
educational goal of the activist is to
transform the university into a very
large playpen, in which he can float

Mans Only Hope Lies In The Living God

MR. EDITOR:
As I read your section on the 70s a few weeks
back and as I daily read different evaluations of the
world situation, I feel there is one viewpoint that is
being left out. Freud stated that the basic
psychology of man has always remained the same.
This I would interpret to mean that while
methods have changed and the extent of mans
power over nature has grown, his ability to control
his inner self is unchanged.
I mean the 70s will be an extension of the 60s
which were an extension of the 50s which were an
extension of history. History seems to be a series of
noble efforts and total failures. Men have sought to
creat just societies and though they have come up
with many beautiful systems when these systems are
applied to a human situation they fail.
Today we have the United Nations, yet since
World War II (the second war to end all wars) we
have had 52 major and minor wars. We have only to
look to the songs of Dylan, and Simon and
Garfiinkel, movies like The Graduate and Chariy
to see that man still knows the questions but not
the answers.

Relevance:
A New
Meaning

MR. EDITpR:
In response to an article on the front page of Jan. 21s Alligator, I
would like to state my reaction to the apparent end of Sigma Chis
derby, as this campus has known it, and describe what seems to be the
emergence of a new and more relevent program.
There was, in the mythical past, an enlightened era of fraternities
and sororities with their old rebel yells or such, hell-weeks,
ice-water teas with ice-water smiles, etc., etc.
May they be good or bad, this generation views them in a light
becoming eclipsed by new perspectives. And viewed with eyes
different from the past, slowly and surely more and more new eyes
are focusing out of blind tradition into the clarity of realization.
Not to condemn the past, you understand, for I fed that is only
wasted effort we cannot change the past, but only look upon it to
better the future..

effortlessly through his days, freed of
the burden of the responsibility of
consciousness.
In other words, the young rebel
wants to do to the university precisely
what his Deweyan elders of the
Establishment have done to elementary
and secondary public education: delete
the concepts reality, consciousness, and
individual.
Wherein lies the rebellion?
The proposed means to this
educational revolution is Student
Power which brings up the area of
politics. Student Power is the
application of the political theory of
guild socialism to the university, and so
is as revolutionary as Mussolinis
Fascism.

Ain itt There is no hope for the complacent man
&

x..-
...today's youth
defines the future.

The problems are clear, the answer is just as clear.
War, hatred, racism, poverty, and meaninglessness
are symptoms, Jesus Christ is the cure. Not the
institutional church, not religion, but a personal
relationship with a man who claimed to be from
The problems are clear, the answer is just
as clear. War, hatred, racism, poverty, and
meaninglessness are symptoms, Jesus Christ
is the cure
immwimmiiiMiiimiiiiitiiminimiwMiiiiiiiwwMMWUMinnwiHiniiwiiimtMiwii
God, who claimed the power to bring man to God.
Jesus Christ claimed that God was a reality
external to the experience of the natural man. The
result of the separation was that man could not live
in peace with his fellow man.
The great French physicist described the effects
of this separation as a God shaped vacuum within
the heart of every man which can only be filled by
God. Though men try fame, wealth and power,
they find no true peace.
St. Augustine said, Thou has created us for
thyself O Lord and our hearts are restless until they

The demand for Student Power is
based on the obedient worship of
democracy as the unquestioned
standard of political value just as
prescribed by the Establishment
through public school inculcation.
Wherein lies the revolution?
One may conclude that the outlook
for tomorrow is: more of the same
the same gooey grey mixture of
cynicism and empty sloganeering which
presently pollutes the atmosphere.
It is only when one considers the
more fundamental area, philosophy,
that one may find any important
difference. The elders are
philosophically mystical (altruits,
chiefly Christian), but prudently
moderate their mysticism with

Definitely we see old institutions stretch new limbs to tackle the
future; not with the tactics and moves of their forebearers, but with
the gusto of brandished relevancy.
It is pleasant indeed to awake with a surge of positive reality, and
shortly after discover people who have either woken up before you or
wake up right after also with decent and ideal motives in their minds
(if we could only keep the clouds of distraction from dropping).
I praise you, Miss Baron and the Panhellenic organization, for
taking the step to make beautiful people* more than just skin deep. 1
am confident, with the knowledge I have of the fraternities on this
campus, that the r in interfratemity is changing from the
myopic reddened eye of the past to the relevant organization in
which youll find support.
HOWARD L. CARR
PAST PRES. TAU EPSILON PHI

Triday, February 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator, I

hypocrisy in order to survive and
prosper.
The youth are also philosophically
mystical, but they full accept the
consequences The revolutionaries are
not content with the half-measures of
their elders: mixtures of self-sacrifice
and self-interest, revelation and reason,
religion and science, prayer and
production.
Their view of production is
exemplified by their sneers for, initially,
our materialistic society, and now,
our technological society.
Unlike their elders, they want to live
literally like the Tillies of the field.
Their view of science is that it is
impossible. Reason is considered
impotent; besides, it requires effort.
The Now Generation has no use
for concepts; their dedication to the
immediate present is the reduction of
the functioning of consciousness to the
perceptual level suitable to a cat. This
contempt for the intellect and
resentment of the effort of
consciousness, this revolt against reason,
has indeed brought them to. full
self-sacrifice, i.e., mind-sacrifice.
The prevalence and degree of the
profound irrationality of the new
generation is exemplified by the Accent
7O program: the featured speaker is an
avowed mystic, an astrologer, Jeanne
Dixon. Try to keep in mind that this is
the 20th century and that Accent '7O is
not the name of a side show of a
carnival, but a university function.
A strange picture of UF greatness
emerges: the necessity of the UAC
playpen, and the sponsorship of
undisguised supematuralism.
From the hatred for technology, the
contempt for reason, and the open
advocacy of mysticism, the destination
of the revolution becomes clear: it is a
return to the Dark Ages.
If there is any among you who does
not want to return, the least you can do
is boycott Jeanne Dixon, if not protest
by picketing her appearance.
R. E. OSTEEN, 7EG

find their rest in thee. Jesus Christ in his life,
death, and resurrection, came to meet this need
within man.
He offered a peace which would give man the
ability to love his fellow man. He claimed to be the
way, the truth, and the life, he came to set man
free from himself. In his own words he stated that
he came that men might experience meaningful
lives.
What were the credentials of the man who
claimed to be the only hope for this world or the
next? When Jesus Christ physically walked this
earth he based his claims on what he said and did.
He operates on the same principle today.
Jesus Christ commanded his followers to love
their fellow man. Jesus Christ never gave a
command that he would not fulfill in the lives of
those who put their trust in him.
The powers that be may rise and fall, the names
of those running the systems may change, but I
contend that the only hope for man in the seventies
is that we as individuals turn back to the living God
on the basis of his son Jesus Christ.
VINCE STRAWBRIDGE, 3AS

Page 9



Page 10

t Tho Florida AHigstOr, Friday, February ;

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
or the Elementary Blocks.
ENGLISH and SPEECH
MAJORS do not take the test, as
Speech 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124, Norman Hall.
- * /
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
CBS 264 MID-TERM TEST
will be given on Monday, Fab. 9,
in Leigh Auditorium.
CHN 252 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb.
11, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A report
to Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Litde 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 221, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13,14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 106, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given on Tuesday, Feb.
10, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 10 at
7 p.m in Little 101, 109,113,
121 and 125.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Feb. 9: Sea-Land Service,
Inc.; United Aircraft Corp.;
County of Los Angeles;
Tennessee Copper Corp.;
Atlantic National Bank of
Jacksonville; Motorola
Semiconductor Products, Inc.
Feb. 9-10: Haskins & Sells,
U. S. Naval Ordnance Lab.;
Ernst & Ernst
Feb. 9-12: E. I. Du Pont de
Nemours & Co.

NEXT LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Ch I
sth Avinut at th HoursjhOOo.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

Feb. 10: Newport News
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.;
Texaco,lnc.
Feb. 10-11: National Security
Agency; Tennessee Valley
Authority
Feb. 10-12: The Bell System
Tech.
Feb. 11-12: General Electric
Co
Feb. 11-13: Coming Glass
Works
Feb. 12: American Electric
Power System
Feb. 12-13: American Oil Co.
& Amoco Chemicals Corp.
Feb. 13: Del Monte Sales Co.;
Burdinas; Blue Bell, Inc.;
Alexander Grant 8t Co.; New
York State Dept, of
Transportation; The Coca-Cola
Co.; General Foods Corp.;
Owens-IHinois, Inc.; Hercules,
Inc.; Avco Electronics Division;
Crum & Forster; TRW Systems
Ross Gear Division
CANCELLATIONS
Feb. 9: J. C. Penny Co., Inc.
Feb. 12: American Oil Co.
Atlanta, Ga.

A book for
all seasons

Good things happen as the
seasons change.
Things like a carpet of multi multicolored
colored multicolored leaves. A still cold
night. A flower in bloom.
And the Florida Quarterly.
We'll see you through the
seasons, from the Harvest

BLUE BULLETIN

Notices
GENERAL NOTICES
INDIVIDUAL needed to
translate a 40-page article
written in UKRAINIAN. Will
Pay. Please call Dr. Levy,
392-2007.
INDIA CLUB presents an
'lndian Film/ "YE Raste Hain
Pyaar Ke" (These are the Paths
of Love) with English subtitles
and music by Ravi. This movie
will be screened in the Union
Auditorium on Sat., Feb. 7, at 2
p.m Admission is 50 cents.
CRICKET TEAM will have
special practice at 2 p.m on
Sunday, Feb. 8, on ROTC Drill
Field west of Stadium Building.
All interested persons are urged
to participate as a team is being
built.
WAUBURG COMMITTEE
MEETING will be held Friday,
Feb. 6, at 3 p.m in the Board
Room, President's Office, 226
Tigert Hall.

Moon to the first dandilion
and beyond..
As long as you remember.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday, February 6
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Gateway Green Gator Fencing
Festival, Reception &
Information, 346 Union,
3:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Valley of the
Dolts," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.,
Israeli Dancing Afterwards.
Muslim Students Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, 'The Celebration,"
Continuous show from 8:30
p.m.
Union Dance, "Styrophoam
Soule," Union Ballroom,
9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie,
"Shenandoah," 9:00 and
'Terror Feature," at 11:30
p.m. Southhall Rec. Room.
Saturday, February 7
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 am,
Lunch served afterwards.
Women's Golf Match, University
Golf Course, 11:00 a.m.
India Club Movie, "Yeh Raste
Hain Pyar VE," Union Aud.,
2:00 p.m.
Gateway Green Gator Fencing
Festival, Reception, 349
Union, 3:00 pm
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Auburn, Florida Gym.
Union Movie, "Valley of the
Dolls," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 8i 10:30 p.m.
Rathskeller, "The Celebration,"
Continuous show from 8:30
p.m
Tolbert Area Movie,
"Shenandoah," 9:00 p.m.
and 'Terror Feature," at
11:30 p.m, Southhall Rec.
Room.
Sunday, February 8
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.. Volleyball
Afterwards.
Reitz Union Lecture, Jonas
Mekas, Union Aud., 3:00
p.m.

Campus
Calendar

Collegiate Civitan Club Meeting,
118 Union, 7:00 p.m
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:00 p.m
Campus Crusade for Christ
College Life Meeting, Chi
Omega Sorority House, 9:13
p.m
Monday, February 9
Accent 70 Films, Union Aud.,
10:00 a.m 4:00 p.m
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m
Sigma Xi Lecture, Dr. Per Olov
Lowdin, and Dr. Robert
Isaacsanv McCarty Aud.,
7:30 p.m
AIESEC Meeting, 357 Union,
7:30 p.m
Food Science Club Lecture,
Food Science Bldg., 7:30
PJA
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Vanderbilt, Florida Gym,
7:30 pm
Accent 70 Speakers: Gov.
Claude Kirk, President
Stephen O'Connell, Dr. E. T.
York, and David Brower,
University Aud., 8:00 p.m
Audubon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer, Walter H. Berlet,
"Hawaii, Paradise of the
Pacific" Union Aud., 8:00
p.m
Tuesday, February 10
Accent 70 Filip, Union Aud.,
10:00 am 4:00 p.m
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 pm
Collegiate Civitan Club of the
Univ. of Fla. Chartering Night
Banquet, Union Ballroom,
7:00 pm
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
pm
Air Force Dames Meeting, Mrs.
O. L. Butner's Home, 1215
N.W. 36th Terrace, 7:30 p.m
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
_ Union, 7:30 p.m
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 pm
Accent 70, Speakers: Arthur
Godfrey, William Scott, Ernie
Dickerman, and Loring
Lovell, University Aud., 8:00
pm
UNION BOX OFFICE: Accent
70 Tickets, $.25, $.50 and
SI.OO. Audubon Wildlife
Films, U. of F. Students,
SI.OO, GP, $1.50, HS
Students, $.50.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

|T |
condition, includes helmet SBO. Call
3 76-2013, French Quarter 16.
(A-8 l-2t-p).
THE proven carpet cleaner Blue
Lustre is easy on the budget.
Restores forgotten colors. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-81-c).
Triumph 650 cc completely rebuilt
and painted perfect condition
SSOO. 1962 Thunderbhrd all power
- air, heat, S4OO, after 5:00 call Bob
372-6062. (A-80-3t-p).
1960 Chevy STANDARD 6, needs
battery, uses oil, dependable
transportation at a minimum cost.
$35 or best offer. CaH-378-0078
evenings. 1016 US. W. 4th Ave.
(A-80-3t-p).
SALE: Honda Model CA 95; Asking
$260.00 or best Offer. CALL
372-9367 ask for David or leave
message. (A-80-10t-p).
OLD FASHIONED AUCTION,
New-used-antique merchandise,
Saturday, Feb, 7th 7:30 P.M. C. & J.
Auction House, Archer, Florida
(A-80-2t-p).
For Sale: 1967 Yamaha 60cc Like
new. Helmet Included. $150.00 Call
Ken 392-1760. 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
(A-80-3t-p).
BLK Doberman pups AKC, 7 wks.
old, Call after 4:30 PM. 378-4665.
(A-80-st-p).
Color TV, 21". Zenith Console mdl.
remote control. Good picture. Color
and audio* $195.00 firm. Call
376-0528 after 5 PM. (A-80-st-p).
Bell helmet almost new. Call
372-9757 after 5 PM make offer.
(A-80-st-p).
Wedding dress $ veil, bought new,
worn once, size 10, A-line, short
sleeves w/ chapel train. New $250.
Sell for SBS. Call 378-1951 after
4:30. (A-80-3t-p).
STEREO COMPONENTS. 2 AR-3a
spkrs. $250. Garrard SL 65 turntable
w/pickerlng V-15 ctg. SBS. Sony 250
tape deck S9O. Call 378-1998.
(A-80-3t-p).
Super Reverb amplifier. Fabulous
condition. Need cash for school.
Only 200 dollars. Call Fred Fey at
SAE house. 372-6471 evening.
(A-77-10t-p).
63 VALIENT CONV. Good
condition. Excellent mechanical
shape. $275. Call 373-2923.
(A-80-2t-p).
80cc Suzuki 1966 Sports Model. In
excellent condition recently
overhauled. Call Chuck. 378-9653.
(A-78-st-p).
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY.
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624.. (A-61-3t-C).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/c, full carpet, washer/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, partially furnished. 1
Immediate occupancy.ss, 9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p}.
650 Triumph Bonneville Customize
O, very fast, dean. Call Tom after
3:30 378-5523. (A-st-77-p)
Antiques and used furniture. Wide
assortment. 1511 N.W. 6th Street.
378-6060. (A-st-77-p)
TENNIS BALLS. Pennsylvania
Center Court heavy duty or regular
$2.07 per CAN. B&B SPORTS
CENTER. 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1461. COLOR TV 1969 RCA. Retailed for
8469, will take S2OO or BEST
OFFER. CaU 372-0920 after 6:00
PM and ask for John Riblno.
(A-St-77-p)
l i j, ,
New 3 bdrm. home In N. W. section
wood paneled, heat, air, den, all
electric kitchen. Unfurnished
150.00/mo. Call 372-6062 after 5.
(B-80-3t-p).
SWAP!! Leases on dean S9O two
bedroom apt. for pad permitting dog,
or buy German Shepard pup cheap!
Call 378-7511 evenings. (B-80-St-p).
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
3 games SI.OO
w3y Sat. 9am- 6pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

FOR RENT f
Sublet now or in March : l bdrm
- furnished central air & heat carpet i
block behind Norman $120.00
376-3154. (B-81-4t-p).
Several 1 hr. apts.. 1 bath, kitchen,'
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo.. Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-cL
2 Bedroom central heat and air con.
New, sunny, $lO7 mo/plus utilities.
Call 376-6160. (B-79-4t-p).
One bedroom furnished apt. Central
air & heat, with carpeting,
dishwasher, disposal, 150 per month.
Call 376-4521 before 6 PM,
376-1482 after 6. (B-78-st-c).
Male roommate needed: Private
bdrm., cen. A/C.&H. pool, furnished,
close to campus. S7O/Mo. Incl. all
utility. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224 (B-st-81-p).
Female roommate need: Prvt. Bdrm.
cen. A/C.&H, pool, furnished, close
to campus. S7O/mo. indu. all
utilities. Opening for 1,2,3, or 4. Call
378-7224. (B-81-st-p).
New way of living! Private
bedroom, cen. A/C &H, pool,
furnished, close to campus. All
utilities furnished. La Mancha Apts.
378-7224. (B-81-20t-p).
WANTED |
TWO MONTHS RENT FREE! Help!
I Bombed Out! Need one female to
take my place at Landmark 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-81-6t-p).
Summit House One male
roommate needed for 2 bdr. apt.
Feb. rent free, central air and heat,
pool, etc. $43.50/mo. Call 376-6361
(C-81-st-p).
1 female roommate wanted Spring
qtr. To share 2 bedroom Tanglewood
apt. No Deposits. March rent paid.
Call 373-2711. (C-81-4t-p).
Male roommate wanted to share
Williamsburg apt. Call 373-1151,
anytime. C-81-3t-p).
Female roommate for La Bonne Vie,
rest of Wtr. & Spg.: Rent negotiable,
call 373-1368 after 5 p.m.
(C-St-77-p)
One female roommate needed for 2
bdr apt. at Hawaiian Village. $55 a
month. Close to campus. 372-2949.
(C-st-77-p)
Wanted: Male roommate Graduate
student to share townhouse two
bedroom apt. (Williamsburg). Call
btw 5-5:30 p.m. 378-8638.
(C-st-77-p)
Male roommate. Summit House
Apt. A-l Luxury at premium Only
46.75 plus utilities per month
Lease runs tH June Cable TV
378-9924. (C-79-st-p).

thurs-sun
OPEN H
W jflHk
I Did you ever wonder what it would be like
I to try everything?
I 'THIN GS 00 I
|"UHMnsnEir |

Friday, February 6,1970, The Florida Alligator,

----- - > m
n n in^rmropoocq
I V WANTED
!x.vxtw-x*x-x-x-vxs!wwoW'&*S'Xs
ROOMMATE Furnished house,
$32 per month, private bedroom, 4
miles from campus. Call 378-3875 or
373-1233, (C-79-4t-p).
Girl wanted to cook for 3 graduate
students. Call 378-2281 between 6
and 7 PM for details. (C-79-3t-p).
! hh.p wanted""!
Wanted: GO-GO DANCERS. Up to
$l5O per week. No Experience
Necessary. Must be good dancer. Call
376-9175 for audition. (E-lOt-77-c)
Cocktail Waitress. Part or Full Time.
No Experience Necessary. Call
376-9175 After 4:00. DUB'S STEER
ROOM. (E-10t-77-c)
Experienced, well-qualified
bookkeeper for construction
company. Top salary, excellent
company benefits. Send resume to P.
O. Box 312, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-80-10t-p).
Male Sales Help Wanted. Are you 21
years old and can work 20 hours per
week? Call for appt. 378-6236 or
373-1635. (E-80-st-p).
Qualified, competent yoga instructor
to teach yoga next quarter. Call
392-1655 or come by room 310,
J.W.R. Union. (E-79-3t-p).
Receptionist, Typing, Phone Work,
opening day or evening shift,
Full-time. Apply Mr. Ray 2929 N. W.
13th St. no. 3. Gainesville, Fla.
(E-81-7t-p).
Bookkeeping machine operator
experienced persons only apply. Call
392-0393 Mrs. Decker for appt.
(E-81-st-c).
if AUTOS 1
9 V
Y 1967 Chevrolet pick-up 283
automatic, radio, & heater, Mud Grip
Tires low mileage, $1,500, 376-9024,
Archery. (G-81-4t-p).
1964 Triumph TR 4, Excellent
condition physically and
Mechanically. $1,250. Call 392-0706
or 376-3352 after 5:00. (G-81-3t-p).
1965 Sunbeam Alpine, radio, heater,
air-conditioned. 42,000 miles, S9OO
or best offer. Will consider trade for
big cycle. 378-9162 evenings,
weekends. (G-81-3t-p).
Pontiac Catalina 2 + 2, 4 speed, 421
cubic Inch, new tires and paint, full
power, stereo black vinyl interior,
cream puff. Call 392-7450. Pontiac
GTO 4 speed, black vinyl top, new
engine, radio and heater, good shape.
Must sell. Call 392-7450. (G-78-4t-p).
1962 Dodge V-8 Good condition,
automatic transmission, radio, heater,
new battery and engine parts. Must
sell. $325. Call 378-7537.
fG-79-st-P).
1959 VW excellent shape. $250.
373-1135. (G-80-3t-p).

Page 11

sx*>;*x-s:w*x*x-x*x*x-x.?xs<*x-x*xx<:
| AUTOS
V V
1960 Renault Caravelle sports car.
Removable hard top. Very good
condition. $225. Call 373-2901.
(G-st-77-p)
1966 MGB excellent condition.
Goodyear radial tires, rebuilt head
and generator new paint. Radio and
heater wire wheels, $1,400.
378-3000. (G-80-2t-p).

f i Valentine's Classified ll
Tr I I SI.OO for 4 lines |
V 11 Room 330 JWRU II
use classified coupon (campus mail) J i
Deadline: Feb. 11th mm
*Be sure and Indicate
Classified
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. FiH in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline >3OO pm. 2 days prior to denting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
>
* /
* w to n
il1 r~i r ] £
- - imm?? 1
1111 | o
! J Z
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______ 2- & & &|
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TO
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:::: [ I?
H

PERSONAL |
Jan Well have Crystal Blue
Together this weekend. Say youll be
mine forever. Take the big step for
the fall quarter LOVE, A.H.
(J-81-lt-p).
Miguel te quiero desear un fellz 23
cumpleanos y que prosperes durante
tu edad de Aquario. Carinos Marci.
(J-81-lt-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
:
W*V.V.*A"iW?
Summer Charter Flight. Tampa to
Amsterdam. $220 & 10 admin. Fee
Roundtrip. Call 373-2590 or write
AIESEC, Roo'm 300, Reitz Union.
(J-80-st-p).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gis wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wllllston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
WHERES YOUR HEAD? The
Spanish Main knows where its head
Is: A good place. We have some far
out candles you wouldnt believe and
a variety of posters, clothes and other
things that are out of this world.
Open Mon. Sat. 10-10, 1642 W.
Unlv. Ave. (J-79-3t-p).
SIPIN. The place the singles meet
every Friday from 5:30 to 7:30. Join
the Slppers at the Lamplighter this
week. Drinks 50 cents. Cover charge
25 cents. Also plan now for the
Friday the 13th SIPIN. (J-79-3t-p).
263-96-7931, I want you. (J-ai-3t-p).

I MORRISON S CAFETERIA 1 1
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I
Iroast tom turkey!
I Dressing, Cranberry Sauce I

I Seminole 7O I
I Deadline I
I TODAY I
I $6.00 Room 330 I
I JWRU I
fill 1

Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 6,1970

| PERSONAL |
Igor the puppy looking for happy
home. Wants someone to play with
and love. Call 392-7714 ask for
Bonnie. (J-79-2t-p).
SON OF ROADWORM everyone is
waiting to hear your fantastic sound
at 9:30 & 11:00 Fri. & Sat. at the
Bent Card Coffee House 372-3225.
(J-81-lt-p).
Congratulations Ron Rico on
becoming a brother! Our loss, Kappa
Sigmas gain. Love, Beth and Gall.
(J-79-3t-p).
Dog lover: my puppies are ready to
love you. Call 372-3225 and I will
arrange for you to meet. I will also
describe details., Yours, Buffee.
(J-81-3t-p).
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress, Wedding Dress & Sportswear
by your English Dressmaker,
KATHLEEN OF YORKSHIRE.
Phone 378-0320. (J-st-77-p)
GAINESVILLE SINGLES CLUB
PARTY & DANCE TOMORROW
NIGHT! Byob Ironwood Golf &
Country Club, 9:00 PM, < on.
(J-81-lt-p).

PBISONAI I
Gay is good people come together
love is you and me and everyone now
all together now love is gay love gay
peace happiness love peace, gay.
(J-81-2t-p)
Theta Chis: Woman was created
from the rib of man. She was not
made from his head to top him, nor
out of his feet to be trampled
on . but out of his side, to be equal
to him; under his arm, to be
protected; and near his heart to be
loved. Sincerely, a Woman. P.S. sbss!
(J-81-st-p).
SILLY BUNNY RABBIT, its been a
wonderful year. Im glad Ive got
you. I love you my Darling. ARF
SNARF (J-81-lt-p).
NARF and DRAHCIR, Hope
tomorrow is a happy 7th of the Age
of Aquarius. Love the Pisces twins.
(J-81-lt-p).
I need a ride to New Orleans for
Mardi Gras this weekend. Call MIKE
at 373-2254. (J-81-lt-p).
| LOST & FOUND I
A V
Found: Mostly BLACK Persian cat in
vicinity of the I Bldg. Call Maria
Perez: 378-4388. (L-81-3t-nc).
Found: On HWY 441 1 pair mens
shoes. Phone 372-4509. (L-80-3t-nc).
~>vxxx*x*x-x.x.x*v.x.ns%ss*xsv*a
SERVICES |
' :Co>B B
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Opticians at 519 S. W.
4th Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
Color Portraits. You get 1 Bxlo, 1
5x7 & 6 wallets for only $lO. Choice
of 6 proofs, 4 textures. Portable
studio. Call Ron at 376-6042.
(M-81-lt-p).
Posterman: A gent in Gainesville will
take your picture & have it made into
a permanent 2x3 poster for only
$5.00. Call Ron 376-6042.
(M-81-lt-p).
FOREIGN CAR OWNERS Minor
tune-ups and repairs at half the price!
Specializing in VW, Porsche,
Mercedes. Call 378-1713.
(M-80-st-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Cad
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-p).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrotoglst. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-i2t-57-p)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested And
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)

REITZ UNION THEATRE
SPONSORED BY JWRU
5:30,8:00,1030 PM
50< ADMISSION
FRI.&SAT. FE8.6,7
***********^
y 1 /85^ / ,* |
Sneak Preview Tomorrow Night
Ml* The 'MIDNIGHT
|Q COWBOY" pA|i
Again!

*************************
.;' y. v<*. v. -j t . >
| CANNES FILM
1 a********************^*
****************
WygCT "wwnresow
T 1 everything.
5 s v * *-<***
y | yy y y



A DEBATABLE QUESTION

Is UF State Supported?

Is UF a state-supported
institution?
Its debatable. According to
Jim Patterson, director of
publications, 55.8 per cent of
total current fund revenues for
1968-69 came from state
appropriations with federal and
private funds accounting for the
balance.
The situation is summed up in
a quote from an article by
Florida alumnus Cliff Cormier in
the winter edition of Pattersons
publication, The University of
Florida Magazine.
In its 64th year in
Gainesville, UF appears to be
sidetracked into a purgatory of
mediocrity, Cormier said. A
massive infusion of money is
needed and it appears almost
hopeless to expect help of that
kind from the state.
But the private sector has
been almost as barren despite
the efforts of OConnell and his
aides. Despite the many
millionaires in the state and
thousands of influential alumni
the lode has not been struck,
Cormier wrote.
In June 1969 OConnell asked
a group of advisers, including
Patterson, just how that lode
of private endowment might be
exploited. Initially the idea of a
one-shot annual booklet
promoting the university seemed
to be favored. Patterson, on the
other hand, preferred the
concept of a quarterly magazine;
he said a yearly booklet would
lack flexibility in portraying a
rapidly changing institution and
thus be rendered less credible.
Why not transform the
Florida Alumnus, official
publication of the UF Alumni
Association, into a vehicle that
would interpret the university
on a continuing basis?
A sample presentation jointly
produced by Patterson and La
Rue Boyd, assistant director of
alumni services, convinced
OConnell and the alumni
association With funds provided
by the latter the University of
Florida Magazine came to be.
Unlike the elder Florida
Alumnus characterized by
Patterson as an alumni
magazine in the strictest sense
the University of Florida
Magazine endeavors to reach
the total audience of those who
might be expected to express
interest in the UF by
contributing financially. It is
mailed to the parents of all
current students, all major
|t£b AYE* J
l/J 1 J 11/rf

elected and appointed public
officials, executives in
philanthropic organizations, the
state media and regional and
national education editors.
With a circulation of over
60,000 it is the largest magazine
published in the state.
As co-editors, Patterson and
Boyd formulated an editorial
policy which would lean
heavily upon interpreting the
institution through individuals.
Rather than tell the story of a
new building or program per se
this approach focuses upon the
people who are involved. They
hope this personal bent will
bring about a genuine
understanding of what the
university if all about. For
example, the fall issue cover
story undertakes to portray the
day-to-day life of the so-called
average student. Its title: I
am nobody. Who are you?
To facilitate assimilation
Patterson and Boyd have
designed their magazine to be
readable. A variety of headline
type faces and generous use of

I Lrll I
PS*!*.....; m~..
happiness, w
she 4
married.
In
search
'of
commitment
she
became
pregnant.
yf.
At
that r |
rwx% ustw* t^ ment
IThTriFY KNIGHT-JAMES CAAN failed

large pictures grasp the readers
attention. These improvements
seem to have succeeded. A panel
of judges from the American
Alumni Council meeting in
Williamsburg, Va., two weeks
ago awarded them the Time-Life
Magazine Improvement Award
on the basis of the fall edition.
Thus far, Patterson and Boyd
have constituted the magazines
entire staff. They are desperately
in need of student editorial
assistance and encourage student
writers and photographers to
contribute. They suggest those
so inclined contact either of the
co-editors.
Patterson expressed the
concern that many students may
assume the magazine to be
nothing more than a puff job
for the administration.
Admittedly, it is promotional,
but not in the exaggerating,
super-slick, sugar-coating sense
of the word. Rather it is a bona
fide attempt at proliferating an
understanding of the UF as it is:
its needs, shortcomings and
potential greatness.

I percar J JQSe^K JQSe^KII
II JQSe^KII 6 | I
|B§te3te£3 MARTINI
"die ttau*
THE
I PANAVISION* COlO BY DELUXE MAITESE BIRPT I
THERES GOnA BE ONE FOR YOU j
CAN 17 I
1611 S.m. 13 i St. I
THE sound in Gainesville I
as only RUDland the I
Lights can doitl I
BUT!
IF YOURE NOT READY I
THE TRY THE I
f 1 N.W. 10th Ww. I
offers a relaxed mood
where you can dance I
or listen to the HAMILTONS I
THEY PLAY OLDIES AND I
UPBEAT six nights a week I
(BEST SINGLES CLUB IN TOWN) I
OF COURSE
IF YOURE IN THE SING-ALONG I
MOOD I
3334 W. Univ. Aw.
THE LOUNGE FOR YOUI I
with RICHARD PARKER on I
the ORGAN and/or PIANO. I
Gives you a chance to participate. I
He can Sing & Play anything. I
(Relaxed Neighborhood Atmosphere ) I
YOU CANT GO WRONG I
THEYRE ALL I
Q ifniied I
Liquors lounges |

Friday, February 6,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



The j
Florida j
Alligator i

if Here's Whats j!
* At The Movies
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE-KID- Paul Newman and
Robert Redford star in a fun flick about cops and robbers that also
features Katherine Ross. It is real good. Now playing (as they say in
the movies ) at the Plaza One.
THE RAIN PEOPLE This is a story about, as the adssay r **agiil
who's pregnant and married (now theres a cinematic switch) gets
tired of die whole scene and leaves to find something. Its at die Plaza
Two.
MARCY Marcy does the things maybe you wouldnt do but
would like to do! With that helpful note, We can see that it must be
about a girl who swims nude with Jane Fonda in a vat of guava jelly.
Thats what I always wanted to do, anyway. It plays, at the Dragon
Drive-in, with The Unsatisfied.
VALLEY OF THE DOLLS Dolls, in this case, are pep pills. It
stars several good looking women including Sharon Tate who since
her murder has been moved up to top billing. Again, we thank the
marvelous men of the business world who have made this country
what it is today. The flick, and its not bad at all (well some, I guess)
is at the Reitz Union
DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST This is another in the series of
fine things the Film Classics Board is bringing to campus. It is in
French with English subtitles* at the Reitz Union Sunday.
HANG EM HIGH The music is good, Clint Eastwood is good,
the directing is superb. Its directed by a Japanese director who
watched American westerns and came up with his own. Its a super
western. Its showing on the big screen at the Suburbia with two other
Eastwood flicks The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, and A
Fistful of Dollars.
LION IN WINTER A movie of kings and regalia. It stars Peter
OToole and is playing in the Penthouse Two at the Suburbia.
GONE WITH THE WIND Among many other things, the movie
uses a shot taken from a camera boom that was, at the time of
shooting, the highest ever made. It also features more dead people
than anything before it. You probably frankly dont give a damn, do
you? Its in the Penthouse Three at the Suburbia.
OUT OF IT Jon Voight, the star of Midnight Cowboy, has the
supporting role in this new flick. It is about two young men vying for
one young ladys attention. A backseat of a 62 Buick also is involved.
The Center One opens it today.
YES! Okay! All right! Yeah! Its either about two lesbians with a
boy friend between them or the similarly disgusting converse -two
boys with one girl. One of the reviewers said, Now Ive seen
everything. He probably has. It replaces, The Libertine, (which
wasnt your average film) at the downtown Florida.
THE UNDEFEATED John Wayne stars in this. Its about just
exactly what you must know it is about and it probably is just as good
as you figure it will be. It plays with The Maltese Bippy, with
Laugh-ln stars Rowan and Martin, At the Gainesville Drive-in.
EASY RIDER This is one of the best films to come along in the
last several years. It isnt particularly brilliant in the script, in the
music score, or in the acting, or in the photography, but somehow it
comes across with feelings of what fear is. It is so strong and pure and
beautiful that it may well be the most moving and important film Ive
ever seen. Its playing at Center Two.
jJmiyk W. Univ.
i 376-7657
Cant afford a \
new camera cameraj
j cameraj cant buy a new
j projector!
|V A'
J You can rent
\
them both at Ro-Mo!

m flHkX' M' HP mSI St Bl i'HVS' .-

Filmmaker Here Sunday

Jonas Mekas, one of the
country's top film directors and
critics, will talk at 3 p.m.
Sunday in Hie Reitz Union
Auditorium
The discussion on
underground films and
filmmakers is sponsored within
the Performing Arts Series of the
Union Board and admission is
free.
Mekas has made some of the
most innovative and influential
films in the underground film
movement. He will show
excerpts of his own film work
Sunday in addition to a
lecture-type of discussion.
The young filmmaker also has
gained considerable distinction
as a film critic, working for the
past several years as the major
film critic for The Village Voice.
In the style of most of the
young filmmakers classified as
Prison Narcotics
BALTIMORE One-fourth
of all persons sentenced to
Maryland prisons for convictions
of narcotics offenses continue to
use narcotics regularly while in
prison, according to a study by
the Maryland Commission to
Study Drug Addiction.
GOIF PAR to
A I DRIVING RANGE
GOLF CLUBS RENTED
CLUBHOUSE
mme ELECTRIC CARTS
IMP LESSONS AVAILABLE
WpKtROPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
N6WSIRRY RD. 373-2721

In 1870, Jules Verne, the author, created a submarine
I $n his Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Jj
In 1970, Jules Verne, the sandwich-maker, created a jj
submarine in his sandwich shop. ft
I GRAND OPENING TODAY i {
JULES VERNES
jj Submarine Sandwiches j
| -Feature Sub-imported cold cuts 4 cheeses |
a -Sub of Beef-U.S. Choice Choice top round jj
X -Sub of of Veal Cutlet A
| -Sub of Italian Sausage jj
[ Reg. Sub 12 long -for hearty eaters jj
I Mini Sub for non-hearty eaters
2003 S.W. 13th St. (South on U.S. 441)

Page 14

underground, Mekas has done using a hand-held, highly mobile
the majority of his film work camera.
T ~ STflK T SHAKE !
Student Special 1
| (With The Coupon) |
|Uiil Our Regular 93< Steakburger >
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Q | W P' * |
i Steak n Shake .. 1
\J6IQ JGaimesvi/le^
DIARY OF
A CQ^gJT
} ,^U|B^K9^l
A A a BbC
W H Xzrza y a ? ~J|
- < vHlwnKAr r '/ HHffi KJBM
' <">' vN^AK2r ? 1
H
fl
: P
V m BvT* %t 1
CLASSIC SERIES
THIS FILM WILL BE SHOWN SUN., FEB. 8 AT 7:00 &
9:30 P.M. IN THE REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM. A
DISCUSSION LED BY DR. C. CARNELL WILL BE HELD
AT 9:00 P.M. IN UNION LNG. 123.
SPONSORED BY J.W.R.U.
t* r

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

The Florida Alligator, Friday, February , IS7O



L m I
ir:
K,
IF*"

/ .**.
h : s; SH&
ingam BKh^ifilii
PHIL COPE
BLACK DANCERS
... a show full of soul
Celebration Bill Os Fare
At Rathskeller This Weekend

Celebration, a Miami-based
rock group, will be appearing at
the Rathskeller tonight and
Saturday night. Also appearing
will be Nate and John, a folk
duo from California.
Admission price for members
of the Rathskeller is sl.
Non-members get in for $1.25.
The rock group performed in
the Miami Pop Festival and on a
show in Miami with the Three
Dog Night. The group now is

W Serving the best steaks in town.
g ~ Charcoal broiled just the way you
m 1 like it, served in an inviting Western
cf 1 V atmosphere and at prices you cant
afford to miss. A buck something for
V A our tender Rib-Eye, under two dol-
M I La V lars for our Sirloin Strip. Less than
v H I f $3 for the best T-BOne you can find.
Try a bite ol tenderness. Tonignir
1 1 v { Served with a steaming-hot, buttery baked potato, |
'Mb Texas toast and a cool, crisp, green salad. I
1 Sirloin strip. Strip Steak. 8 % oz. bone-
i less or 11 oz. bone-in I* W i Jk *
!#2Rib Eye.Rib-eye.eoz. 1.591 \ the Head Wranglers
Hand.T-Bone Steak. 15oz 2.99 /£&**** o#OrflS 'the OWfISTS*
|#4Bunkhoute Special. Chopped steak. M M
S 8 oz. French fries, toast, cole slaw | # Z9 W WT|7 ff
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51* 4 oz.. french fries, cole slaw, lettuce, onion, / SSz79L
. gnaomni
I#6 1.59 NO. 1053
#7ZX^ P *r*. ,rtM 1.59 2445 SW 13th St.
#8 afMSTi i,r P c,^ 2 .r. Q ftoopM ftoopMu,..',
u,..', ftoopMu,..', Cw r r V. '- aT | 7 DAYS A WEEK
Jf O Lil Wrangler. 3 Drummettes or beef 00 R
** patty, french fries, toast, Jello "7 fe

considering some recording
contract offers.
Nate and John have been
appearing at the Rat for the past
three weekends and have been
received well. The pair of singers
include flute and guitar in their
act.
Dion, an always popular act at
the Rathskeller, will be
appearing at the club next
weekend. Tickets now are
available.

Soul Fest Tonite
* v--. '. '. .*- ''*
Features Dance,
Singing Groups

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Editor
Freedom is body movements
- worked into original
jazz-dance routines.
Freedom is sound soul
dragged out of brass and guitars
and drums wailing away at will,
in unison or alone.
. Freedom is the reason for
getting all kinds of people and
music and dance under one roof
for a Kutana at 8 p.m. tonight
in the auditorium of Santa Fe
Junior College, west campus.
Kutana means lets get
together.
Folk-singer Mike Hayden is
flying in from Boston for the
show which also will feature
several local soul blue, and
rock groups and the Chordettes,
the singing group which was
featured in Gainesville Highs
musical festival last year.
Modem dance routines using
the Martha Graham technique
will be performed to songs
including Aquarius,
Watermelon Man, People
Gotta Be Free, Wonderful
World, Beautiful People, Elis
Coming, and others.
Months of rehearsal by the
Center Dance Group, made up
of 20 area high school and junior
college students and one
instructing dancer, have gone
into preparation for tonights
show.
Choreographer for the show
is Mrs. Mary Webb, a UF M.A.

recipient, who volunteers several
hours each week working with
two dance groups, ages 11-14,
and 15-20.
Admission is 50 cents.
Proceeds go to the Lincoln High
School Defense Fund to help
pay legal costs of students
arrested during disturbances at
Lincoln.
Art Faculty
Exhibition
Continues
The annual art faculty
exhibition, which has been
attracting an unusually large
number of viewers, will continue
at the University Gallery
through February 15.
On display are paintings,
prints, sculpture, photographs,
and ceramics by twenty-two
faculty artists constituting one
of the largest presentations of
contemporary art seen in the
gallery to date.
Following the close of the
show, the gallery will present its
major exhibition of the year,
The Maya, which opens
February 26.
The Gallery is open free to
the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday and
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on
Sunday. It is closed Saturdays.
Clover Honored
The state flower of Vermont
is the red clover.

Friday, February 6,1970, Tha Florida AMpftor,

TOYTIME
Complete line of
TOYS, HOBBIES, WHEEL
GOODS, PLAYGROUND
EQUIPT., JUVENILE FURN.
Bank Amerlcard
Master Charge
Central Charge
1315 N. W. 16th Ave.
376-4576
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
MUG SPECIALTIES FW
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS RING SIZING
DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-8585
II Just right for Lovers If
Y% and Likers Ii
Seepage 11 //

Page 15



The Florida Alligator

BATTLE OF SCORERS
Gators Play Auburn Saturday

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
Auburn Universitys Tigers, in
the heat of the race for the SEC
crown with a 7-3 mark, will be
in Florida Gym Saturday at 7:45
pm to take on the Gators,
losers of their last five games in a
row.
The Tigers will bring with
them the SECs number four
scorer in 6-foot-2 junior guard
John Mengelt. Mengelt is
averaging 25.6 points a game,
right behind the Gators Andy

L |
GATOR SCORER ANDY OWENS
... will be counted on against Auburn

Gators Open Next Season
Against Duke University

The Gators will open their 1970 football season
with a night game against Duke University, it was
announced Wednesday night.
Florida, which had been negotiating an 11th
game with-Syracuse, signed a contract, with the first
contest taking place at the Gator Bowl in
Jacksonville, on Sept. 12.
The Gator Bowl was picked as the site because of
Dukes request for a night game.

"SK
CHARTER TOUR
SEE A YCUTHFUL EUROPE
WITH BRITISH STUDENT ESCORTS.
VARIED PROGRAMS. LEISURE
TIME WITH PERSONAL FREEDOM
ON A S.T.O.P. TOUR
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND BROCHURE
WORLD TRAVEL SERVICE, INC.
927 N. VV. 13th St.
376-4502

Owens who is sporting a 26.6
average after a 33 point effort
against LSU Wednesday night.
Other probable starters for
the Tigers are: Senior guard Carl
Shetler, 6-0. Forwards: Henry
Harris, 6-2 sophomore; Ron
Jackson, 6-5 senior and center
Bill Alexander, 6-7.
Alexander is the conferences
fifth best rebounder, averaging
12.6 rebounds a game. He is also
16th in scoring with a 14.5
average per game.
The Gators are now in eighth
place iif the conference with a

*The city of Jacksonvilles spending $185,000
on a lighting system to handle night color telecasts
was an important consideration, Graves said. The
lighting at Florida Field is inadequate.
Graves also denied reports that the Gators had
signed a five year contract with Duke. We are,
however, still trying to negotiate a contract for
three more games with the university.

Page 16

2-7 record. Overall they are
5-12.
One interesting aspect of the
game is that the Tigers Jackson,
who played his high school ball
with Owens at Tampa
Hillsborough, will be seeing his
old teammate for the last time
on a college basketball court.
Both are seniors.
Earlier in the season the
Tigers downed the Gators in
Auburn, 91-75. Florida trails in
the series, 55-33.
Monday night the Gators will
end the four-game home stand
when they face the Commodores
of Vanderbilt in another SEC
meeting. The Gators lost to
Vanderbilt in Tennessee earlier
Dolphins
Wanted
The Bear
MIAMI (UPI) The Miami
Dolphins almost had the bear
for a coach, Miami Herald Sports
Editor Edwin Pope reported
Thursday.
Pope said Alabama coach Paul
Bear Bryant was offered a
fabulous contract to become
coach of the Dolphins, but
Bryant finally backed out at the
last minute in a dispute with the
University of Alabama
administration.
Dolphins managing partner
Joe Robbie was unavailable to
comment on the report and
other Dolphins officials declined
to either confirm or deny the
report.

Underground Film /TA
Jonas Mekas Ai
# V/: V 'v' .

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 6,1970

in the year. Game time is 7:45
p.m.
Big player for the
Commodores is 74 center Steve
Turner.
Wednesday night the Gators
will again see the expertise of
college basketballs number one
scorer, Pete Maravich. This time
they will play before some
11,000 pro*LSU fans in Baton
Rouge. Game time is 7 p.m.
EST.

GOT A SICK CAR
BRING IT TO US, OUR 5 SKILLED MECHANICS
HAVE OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Youll drive safer with our brake and
tune-up service, too.
Were the students friend, so stop in
and save money.
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALIST
1031 So. Moil Phom 376-7771
I FREEDELIVERY ]
| with sl/order min. |
f Mon Fri 4 lo p.m. i
I Sat.&Sun. 11:00a.m. 10:00p.m.|
ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks^^^^
Meals & _^MolLga nd wiches
TV & BILLIARDS^!
I 1718 W University Are I
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join the fun!
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Wrestlers Vie For Sixth Win Today

Floridas undefeated wrestling
team faces a stem test this
weekend when the Florida State
Seminoles invade UF today in
what has been termed as the
most important wrestling match
ever held in Florida Gym.
The important meeting
between the two state rival
matmen is set for 7 pm The
Gators defeated the Seminoles
earlier this season in Tallahassee
by the score of 31-7.
Coach Keith Tennant's
wrestlers are 5-0 for the season
with victories over Florida State,
Pensacola Navy, Florida A&M
and two over Tampa. The Gators
have been surprise winners
because no member of the
Florida wrestling team is getting
scholarship aid.
Every school weve faced
this season has had scholarship
aid, said Tennant. Next season
we will be able to give
scholarship aid and have been

:WM
RUGBY RESUMES PH L BANN,STER
The UF Rugby Club will be spending the weekend in Hammond,
Louisiana, to take part in the annual Mardi Gras Rugby Tournament.
Over 24 teams from all over the nation are slated to compete in the
event
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combing the nation looking for
wrestling talent.
The 1970 wrestling squad has
been built around an
outstanding crop of freshmen
and two strong veterans. The
two veterans, Steve Shomion
and Jeff Shaffner have been
impressive all season.
Our boys have been doing a
great job, actually they have
been wrestling over their heads
on sheer desire and
determination, added Tennant.
Although the Southeastern
Conference matches will be
tough, we hope to challenge a
few teams.
The Gator lineup for the
Florida State match will include
Phil Lund (118); Shomion
(126); Bill Read (134); Jonathan
Barres (142); Tom Derrough
(150); Shaffner (158); David
Glantz (167); Dean Tibbetts
(177); Gary Duven (190); and

TAKE ON FLORIDA STATE

Phil Deberard in the unlimited
class.
Shaffner leads the Gators with
a perfect 5-0 mark, while
Derrough is 9-1 and Barres is
6-1. Shaffner, a former Florida
State Wrestling Champion, has
won all five decisions on pins.
Shaffner has been having an
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outstanding season, added
Tennant. I feel he can place
near the top in the SEC meet in
March.
Although Florida defeated the
Seminole matmen earlier this
season, Fridays meet still should
be exciting.
We had never defeated
Mother
Earth
FEB 10,1970

Friday, February 6, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Florida State in wrestling until
this! season, commented
Tennant. I think they took us
too lightly in Tallahassee and
Im sure they will be at their
best on Friday.*
The match is open to the
public, with no admission
charge.
I I U 1
W/Mm jgnpMHBV"
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Clint
color hits, Good, Bad & Ugly/
"A Fistful of Dollars/ A Few
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SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN. ENDS
SAT.

Page 17



Page 18

l. Th# MHM AHigMWv PrtctV, February &. 1970

lv J *XP a 'pf Ft 895 -*\ llfj
DON GARLITS RECORDS SEVEN SECOND RUN
... dragway king returns for next week's Gatornationals
gmwwON WHEELS
S .** _ i B
Garlits At Dragway |
I i
808 THOMAS fass&

With Florida's first
championship drag meet, the
Gatornationals, only a week
away Big Daddy Don Garlits
has officially announced that he
is entered.
During his 15-year career, the
Tampa resident has won nearly
every honor the sport of drag
racing has to offer. He won the
National Hot Rod Association
(NHRA) Nationals
Championship three times, the
NHRA Wintemationals and
Springnationals once, and was
named Car Craft Magazines
Driver of the Year twice.
One of Garlits most
renowned accomplishments was
breaking the 200 m.p.h. barrier.
In 1963, engineers had set this as
the absolute top speed attainable
in the quarter mile. But Garlits
took their predictions in stride
and in July 1964 he went
201.99 m.ph. as the world
watched in disbelief.
Garlits is the type of driver
you can never count out of the
competition. In 1967, after
failing to even qualify for the
Winterna tion al s or
Springnationals, he returned to
Tampa to build a new car. In a
72-hour stretch, he built the new
machine from the ground up. It
was the longest dragster ever
built, 185 inches in length.
The unshaven Garlits then
vowed not to shave his beard
until he had broken the 7-second
barrier, another magical limit
predicted by experts. After a
long string of match race
victories Garlits journeyed to the
NHRA Nationals at Indianapolis
with his new car and a six-month
beard. Not only did he win top
wr
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Big Clint Eastwood show at
Suburbia Drive-In Theatre.

fuel eliminator, but on his final
round he turned in an elapsed
time of 6.77 seconds.
Garlits was swarmed by
cheering fans, and then in front
of the Wide World of Sports
television camera, Big Daddy
shaved his famous beard.
In addition to being one of
the most respected drivers
around, Garlits is also a
first-class builder. The fact that
he builds all his own cars
illustrates this. Many of his
original inventions are widely
used today by his competitors.
Garlits has raced at Gainesville
Dragway only twice before, and
has gone home a winner on both
occasions. Next week he will
come to Gainesville for a third

Fencing Tournament
Begins On Saturday
The Florida Fencers will host the annual Green Gator Fencing
Festival tomorrow and Sunday, with epee competition beginning
Saturday at 9 am in the basement of the Florida Gym.
Among the favorites are UFs Carol Honse and Jose Sasek. Honse,
who is the North Florida womens fencing champion, is favored over
1968 winner Sophia Trett from Poland in the womens foil. U.S.
Olympic Alternate Sasek is favored in the mens foil and epee.
Sabre competition will begin tomorrow afternoon at 2 p.m. in the
P.K. Yonge Gym. The men and womens foil competition will be
decided on Sunday with the womens competition beginning at 9
am, followed by the mens foil at 12:30 pm

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time, with more at stake than
money and trophies. Garlits will
be running against Californias
best drivers in his home state.
* * *
Hart Rallye Team will
sponsor a rally Sunday for the
benefit of local sports car
enthusiasts.
The name of the rally is
Road Trek and no special
equipment is necessary.
Registration is at noon in the
Commercial Bank parking lot.
Drivers meeting is at 12:30 and
first car leaves at 1 pm Entry
fee is $1.50 per person
(driver/navigator) and 25 cents
for passengers.

SAVE THIS WEEK
REBEL
DISCOUNT
376-7430
AT 1227 W. UNIV. AVE. ACROSS FROM FLAG. INN

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SPECIALS GOOD THRU SUNDAY QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

Ron Jourdan To Miss
Baltimore Suns Meet
Members of the Gator Track Team will be present at the Baltimore
Suns Invitational Track Meet in Baltimore, Md., representing the UF,
Saturday.
The nation's most consistent 7-foot high jumper, Gator Ron
Jourdan, and the two-mile relay team, fifth in the nation, will miss the
event.
Jourdan hurt his knee when he hit a hurdle at die Ohio State Dual
in Columbus last week. Frank Saier of the Florida Track Club will
replace Jourdan.
We had to withdraw the two-mile team from the meet because
Jack Stewart has been sick and John Parker has missed a lot of work,
Jimmy Cames, UF head track coach, said.
Eamonn OKeeffe will be running in the 1,000-yard and 880-yard
events.

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Fast attention to insurance
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238 W. University Ave. Phone 376-5371

Friday, Fabruary 6,1970, Tha Florida Aliiftor,

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 6,1970

C" H "*" Mm BONANZA
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I COMPLIMENTS ? Jeff Shaffner
This week's Player of the Week Award goes to
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/> ]y Gators' recent match with Pensacola.
<& I pi Jeff, who is undefeated in all his matches this year, I
~** upsat former National Champion Dean Harris of the
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