Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
WERE STIil IN THE CIO SET*
'UF Needs A True Art Museum Craven Says

1 1
TWO OF THE WORKS PHIL BANNISTER
... in the faculty art show are admired by an unidentified coed

-AS j\mKmn

Vol 62, No. 78

ft . ¥
life-i'.,
S
' -11 H|Al ft
'
I. DOUGLAS TURNER
... director of financial aid

Volusia Officials
Busing Students
TALLAHASSEE (UPI> Gov. Claude Kirk indicated to Volusia
county officials Monday he will not suspend them for cross-busing
students to achieve racial balance in their schools if they appeal the
order that requires it to a higher court.
You were elected by the people to run their school system, and I
want to help you in this philosophical battle. I would bend over
backwards to help you maintain your sovereignty/' Kirk told the
Volusia County school board and Superintendent Ray Dunne after a
90-minute meeting here.
Kirk has issued an executive order prohibiting Volusia from
force-busing children, implying the board would be suspended from
office if it goes ahead with forced busing when children return to
Wednesday. But Attorney General Earl Faircloth advised
school officials earlier Monday they'd better obey the federal courts
instead of Kirk.
Faircloth said federal court orders are of superior rank to
executive orders, apparently giving the officials a choice between
suspension by Kirk or being jailed for defying the courts.
Volusia school board attorney John Mattingly said the board would
make its decision on the appeal at a meeting either Monday night or
Tuesday morning. But he said unless some relief is given by
Wednesday, the board must go ahead with cross-busing of some 1,800
children Wednesday.
At issue is the order that Volusia implement Feb. 1 a plan that
requires forced busing, involving an average of 4 or 5 miles per child.
The longest any chfld would be bussed is seven miles.
The issue, Kirk said, is how to stop in America today the illegal
and immoral forced busing of children. He insisted it had nothing to
do with destroying desegregation, and that Volusia County just
happened to be the only one presently involved in the skirmish.
Kirk was notified shortly before the meeting that Federal Judge
Charles Scott in Jacksonville had denied his plea for an emergency
hearing in the Vohisia case with the comment it is the opinion of this
court that the mutters peemetoi m the petition for emergency hearing
are without merit

The
Florida Alligator

FOR STUDENT AID
HEW Gives UF
$1.5 Million

Approximately $1.5 million
designated for student financial
aid has been awarded to UF by
the U. S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, it was
announced Monday.
This follows in the wake of
HEWs report stating that this
university is in the process of
changing its image from an

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesvilie

all-white to an integrated
institution.
I. Douglas Turner, director of
student financial aid, said these
new funds will enable
approximately 3,500 Florida
students to attend the UF in
1970-71.
Increased enrollment
requires a continual increase in
financial aid dollars to keep
abreast of the need, he said.
The final release, which awaits
Congressional appropriation, will
be distributed among the
National Defense Student Loan
(NDEA). College Work-Study
Program, and the Education
Opportunity Grant. Each of
these programs is designed to
assist a different income bracket,
Turner said.
Individual awards are
calculated according to family
income, number of children in
the family, and number of
dependents in college, he said.
The Student Financial Aid
Office, which began taking
applications Nov. 1, 1969, will
start apportioning the HEW
funds early in March.
Applications for the academic
year, 1970-71, will be accepted
through February 28.
illi
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accused of biasing,
withholding and misreporting
UAC news page 2
Classifieds 10,11
Editorials 8
FSU News 3
Letters .9
Movies 10
Orange and Blue 12
Small Society .6
Sports 13

By DWIGHT GODWIN
Alligator Correspondent
From all practical points of view, were stiH in the closes, said
Director Roy C. Craven, Jr., as he looked around the University
at the 87 works of sculpture, painting, ceramics, plastics and
photography which make up the sth Annual UF Art Faculty
Exhibition. The exhibit runs through Feb. 15.
Craven explained that for a number of years before the opening of
the present gallery in die College of Architecture and Fine Arts, the
works of two faculty artists were displayed for a month or so on a
rotating and fairly continuous basis in confined and badly lighted
space in a closet, one of the old temporary wooden buildings.
As fine as this one-room gallery is, its exceedingly inadequate for
a university of this size, Craven said. All we have is a hall where we
can show changing exhibits. We need a true art museum so we can
take our place with all the other universities that have, and have had
for some time, a true art museum.
Craven speaks from long experience in the art world. He had a
photograph chosen for hanging in a Smithsonian Institution exhibit
when he was only 14. He has exhibited paintings in numerous
(SEE 'ANNUAL PAGE 2)

j|||Sjta > Hl*
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"*m A a
| JOHNNY RIVERS AND SWEETWATER j
Johnny Rivers and "Sweetwater" are slated to appear for j
1 Winter Frolics along with the "Celebration/' a Florida-based j
| rock band. Rivers, whose first big album "Johnny Rivers at j
| the Whiskey AGo Go" came out in 1963, is famous for such j
| hit singles as "Seventh Son," and "Mountain of ]
3; Love." "Sweetwater," which made its debut at the Whiskey A ]
% Go Go in 1967, is a group of eight musicians. Their music has j
% been described as a "synthesis of classical, rock, jazz and folk i
| with all playing an equal part." Frolics will be Friday March 6, ;
iS at 7:30 and 10:30 pm in the Florida Gym. Tickets will coat i
ijj $6.50 per couple and go on sale Feb. 18 at the Union Box i
i : Office and the Record Bar. Profits will go to the IFC Loan j

\? faHT*

Tuesday, February 3, 1970



Page 2

f.

Alligator Under Fire For UAC Reporting

A complaint charging the Alligator
with bias, lies and a vested interest in
the proposed University Activities
Center has been filed with the Board of
Student Publications by Jim Clark,
chairman of the Committee to Defeat
the Proposed UAC.
In a letter received Monday, Clark
said he was initiating a petition to
dismiss Alligator Managing Editor
Davis(sic) Doucette, Executive Editor
Carol Sanger, News Editor Vike (sic)
VanEopoel (sic), and staff writer Don
Yokel.

Annual Faculty Exhibit
Now At The Gallery

on%
museums and galleries ever since,
including the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York and
the Ringling Museum in
Sarasota.
The largest work in the
current exhibition is Skinned
Chorus Line, Two Skinned
Tables, a Skinned Plate, Saws
and Hammer by Hiram D.
Williams. It extends almost from
the floor to the ceiling, and covers
about IS< feet of wall space.
Cutout canvas legs, painted in
vivid shades of red and pink,
form the chorus line, which is
flanked on either side by more
cutout canvas painted in the
same tones.

Henry Gibson Slated
To Speak At Accent
Henry Gibson of Laugh-In fame has been added to the slate of
speakers for Accent *7O, according to Accent Chairman Joe Hilliard.
Gibson is scheduled to speak on Conservation** and will share the
platform with NBC newscaster David Brinkley and Alvin Toffier,
social critic and author of the book on high speed change, Future
Shock.
The Accent theme Tomorrow in Perspective* will cover such
topics as Conservation to the State of the Union, hosting
speakers from various parts of the nation.
Stewart Udall, former secretary of interior and author of 1976:
Agenda for Tomorrow, will discuss items from this book concerning
the problems of race, urban decay and the environment.
Other speakers for the Feb. 9-14 week include Jeanne Dixon, a
prophet, and Rene Dubos, world-renowned microbiologist and
experimental pathologist.
Tickets for Accent lectures go on sale today, from 10 a.m. to 3
pjn.
Ticket booths will be in front of Walker Auditorium and the
College Library, at the Service Booth across from the Hub and in the
Reitz Union box office.
Tickets for the Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evening lectures
cost 25 cents for persons with a University 1.D., and 50 cents for the
general public.
Tickets for the Jeanne Dixon lecture Wednesday afternoon are 50
cents for University li>., and $1 for the general public, as are tickets
for the David Brinkley and Henry Gibson lectures Friday.
Time Capsule predictions will also be on sale at the ticket stations
which will be operating today through Accent week. Accent runs
from Feb. 8-13.

Mother
Earth
FEB 10,1970
. J

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida'326ol. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors-or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction mut be given before the next
,nSert,on - - -

He also accused the Alligator of
withholding and misreporting stories
dealing with Hie UAC controversy.
This is untrue to the point of being
ridiculous, Miss Sanger said. If we had
desired to slant the news it certainly
would have carried over to the editorial
pages, but it has not. Letters to the
editor have been printed three to one
against the UAC.
Ralph Glatfelter, chairman of the
student UAC Committee, called Clarks
charges desperate and paranoid.

Other works include a collage
with billiard balls, named Two,
Four, Six, Eight by Stuart R.
Purser, and an unnamed curled,
peppermint-colored strip of
plastic by Hollis R. Holbrook.
Holbrook has also continued his
artistic exploration of the female
nude which he began in last
years exhibit. This year he
shows a chair with an:
upside-down nude on the back,
complete with legs stretching
into the air.
Jack Nicholsen has
contributed two three threedimensional
dimensional threedimensional works, one in the
shape of a doghouse and named
Defense Contract No.
849305638 and the other a
piece of chocolate layer cake
called Its a Piece of Cake,

VOTE
YES
FEBRUARY 4

CLARK FILES COMPLAINT

Baby. The cake is hollow and
contains a baby suggesting the
Baby Jesus, but his crib is a
cutout shell casing.
Twenty-two of the 25 faculty
members of the art department
have contributed one or more
works. The wide variety of
technique, style, color, and even
texture has already attracted
many more viewers than the
regular exhibits, Craven said.
Irak'' '* %
-A I M
RODNEY MARGOL
... won't limit to football

Students Deny Threat Rumors
Following Filing Os Charges

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Bruce Schwack denied rumors
Sunday that he and another
white student were threatened
following their charges that
three black students held them
at gunpoint and forced them to
clean a dormitory hallway.
Robert Wessells, the other
white, was reportedly out of
town for the weekend and could
not be contacted for comment.
The rumors came after
Schwack and Wessells said they
wanted to withdraw their
complaints against the blacks.
But Assistant State Atty.
Gene Whitworth said Friday that
this doesn't mean that their

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
I Awfces 1
M 376-6472 K
114 S.W. 34th St. ~
K A 372-3649 M
I Efl dinner QQa I
| wmma box |
Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 K
I and Gravy m
ljr~~ d pRING CQUPjqm I

I dont understand how he can make
those charges. The facts simply dont
support them, he said.
Glatfelter said he had been disturbed
at the news coverage but had refrained
from complaining that it was slanted
against his side because I will not drag
my committee down into the political

mire.
I feel this charge is the last desperate
gasp of those who feel the whole world
is against their stand, Glatfelter said.
We have tried to present the facts, not

Zoology Prof. Killed
UF professor Dr. Kent E. Chemetski was killed in an early
morning auto accident Monday.
The 34-year-old assistant professor of zoology died when his
car going north on US 41 veered to the left of the center line
and collided head on with a south bound vehicle. The accident
occurred about 9 miles south of Lake City at 12:35 on a wet
slippery road, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Chemetski came to the UF in 1964 after receiving his PhD in
zoology from the University of California. He obtained his BA
in zoology from the University of Michigan where he graduated
Phi Beta Kappa.
A bachelor, his closest relatives were his parents in Wisconsin.
His body will be shipped there for services.

Margol Chairman
For Spirit Committee

Rodney Margol, 2UC, was
appointed the new chairman of
the UF Spirit Committee, by
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd.
The committee, created by
Student Government, must be
credited with much of the
enthusiasm and spirit that has
been displayed at UFs football
games for the past two years.
The activities of the Spirit

complaints will automatically be
withdrawn.
Schwack said last week he
wanted to get out of the case
and let campus authorities
handle the matter instead of the
state.
Wessells said what he thought
was a gun may not have been.
He said the blacks had
something that looked like a
gun.
Asked whether hed spoken to
any black students since the
incident in Tolbert Hall Schwack
would not comment.
He did say, however, that he
and Wessels had both come to
the decision to withdraw their
complaints, but said they hadnt
decided jointly or discussed it
together.

deal in the assassination of credibility of
people and organizations on this
campus.
Clarks letter can only be placed on
the agenda for the Feb. 6 BSP meeting
by special action of the boards
chairman, Professor Hugh Cunningham
of the College of Journalism and
Communications. There has been no
indication as to what Cunningham will
do.
Clark was unavailable for comment at
press time.

Committee must be extended
throughout the year for other
athletic events, and not
terminated at the conclusion of
football season as they have in
the past,'* Margol said.
Since the creation of the
committee, over 26,000 orange
and blue spirit shakers have been
distributed at no charge. These
were financed by SG, the
Athletic Association, UF

President Stephen C. OConnell,
the cheerleaders, Interhall
Council and fraternities and
sororities.
Anyone interested in working
on the committee contact
Margol in the SG office.
MIMI*OSTa
m
DEFOLIATE THE
JOLLY fiREIN GIANT
o 4



Supreme Court
Approves Merge
Os 5 Railroads

GETAWAY DRIVER DRUNK
Yablonski Murder Rehearsed

CLEVELAND (UPI) A
carefully rehearsed escape after
mine union official Joseph A.
Jock Yablonski and his wife
and daughter were murdered was
nearly disrupted because the
driver of the getaway car got
drunk, it was learned Thursday.
FBI agents told a federal
grand jury the getaway driver sat
in the auto outside the
Yablonski's Clarksville, Pa.,

Florida Attorneys Charge
Carswell With Hostility

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
subpoenaed Justice Department
lawyer testified Monday he and
another attorney were treated
with hostility by Supreme Court
nominee G. Harrold Carswell
when they represented a group
of civil rights workers in his
Florida court.
Both Norman Knopf of the
Justice Department and Ernst
Rosenberger, a New York civil
rights lawyer, used the term
extremely hostile to describe
Carswells attitude toward them
in the 1964 case.
Both appeared at the Senate
Judiciary Committees hearing
on Carswells nomination. Critics
content that as a federal district
and appeals judge, Carswell has
been hostile to the cause of
integration and civil rights*
Knopf, emphasizing that he
was not a volunteer witness, said
he was present in Carswell's
chambers when Rosenberger
received a lecture from the
judge.
He lectured him for a long
time in a high voice, he said.
It was a long, strict lecture

I n formal
Winter Rush Sign-Up
February 2-6
10am s pm
Panhellenic Office
, <
3rd Floor J.W.R.Union

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court stamped
unanimous approval Monday on a merger of five northern and
western railroads which will create the longest rail empire in the
United States.
The system, to be known as the Burlington Northern, will
operate 26,500 miles of track in 17 states and two Canadian
provinces. It will provide service from the Great Lakes to the
Pacific and from Canada to the Mexican border. Its assets are
estimated at more than $2 billion*
The 7-0 decision by Chief justice Warren E. Burger rejected
antimonopoly arguments by the Justice Departinent and upheld
the right of the Interstate Commerce Commission (IFC) to okay
the controversial merger.
Brought under one tent by the merger were three major
carriers the Great Northern Railway Co., the Northern Pacific
Railway Co. Northern Lines and their jointly owned subsidiaries

home drinking beer and tossing
empty beer cans on the lawn.^
They said fingerprints found
on the beer cans helped lead to
the arrest of three suspects.
The agents said v after
Yablonski, 59, his wife,
Margaret, 57, and his daughter,
Charlotte, 25, were shot, the
getaway driver, his reflexes
slowed by alcohol, sideswiped
two guardrails near the home as

about northern lawyers coming
down and meddling and arousing
local people.
Rosenberger said he was
seeking the release of seven
Negro voter registration
volunteers whose lives, he said,
were in jeopardy as long as they
remained in the Gadsden County
Jail.
Knopf said Cafswell made it
dear he was going to deny us all
the relief we requested
regardless of the argument that
the seven had been illegally
convicted.
What kind of a reputation
did Carswell have in regard to
dvil rights cases? Sen. Hiram
Fong, R-Hawaii, asked
Rosenberger.
His reputation was bad, the
lawyer said. He was considered
an obstructionist.
In other testimony prepared
for the hearing, Rep. John
Conyers, D-Mich., on behalf of
the nine Negro members of the
House, urged the committee to
reject Carswell.
There are 320,250 attorneys,
439 federal judges and

he drove away.
James C. Phillips, 22, who
allegedly backed out of the plot
to kill Yablonski and then told
the story to the FBI, was
reported to have told the grand
jury how the slayings were
rehearsed.
The rehearsal included the
tossing of dummy weapons into

thousands of state court judges
in the United States, Conyers
said. Why does President Nixon
have to nominate someone with
a racist background?
| FSU news |
By FSU Flambeau
VICE PRESIDENT: Robert
B. Peirce, 44-year-old controller
at Southern Methodist
University, was appointed vice
president for administration.
President J. Stanley Marshall
said, Mr. Peirce is a man of
outstanding qualifications who
can provide leadership to the
university in both management
and student affairs.
BLACKS: The Faculty Senate
accepted Monday afternoon a
list of comprehensive proposals
by the Black Student Union and
charged the senate steering
committee to investigate the
proposals.

- the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway and the Pacific
Coast Railroad Co.
The ICC approved the consolidation in 1967 and a special
three-judge federal court approved the action in November
1968. The Justice Department filed suit on grounds that the
commission had not established that the advantages of the
merger outweighed its competitive effects.
But Burger said in his ruling that the court found
substantial evidence to support the ICC finding that the
concidions agreed to by the five lines and service improvements
to shippers and the public outweighed the loss of competition
between the northern lines.
While the northern lines merger means fewer railroads in the
long run, he said, the objective is to have them strong.
Justice William 0. Douglas did not participate in the opinion.

the Monongahela River about
five miles from the Yablonski
home. An Ml rifle and a .38
caliber revolver have been
recovered from the river.

JUL STEAK HOUgg*
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378*3320
Buskens'l
THE NEW LOOK I
IN CRINKLE PATENT I
I

I *15 00 ; I
IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL [
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UPI

Page 3



?nrt FMiii

Page 4

MONEY IS THE PROBLEM:
UAC Debate Rages As Vote Nears

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Assignments Editor
The $17.75 million University Activities Center
still merely an artist's conception confined to paper
and ink has generated more controversy than
most issues which hit this campus.
One reason is obvious. The UAC referendum hits
the student where it hurts the most in the
pocketbook. But there are other factors besides the
extra $lB a student would pay each year for the
UAC.
Questions of priorities ls the UAC needed more
than pure academic facilities? of control What
voice will the students have in its governance? and
of financing Is the UF guaranteed local, state and
private support? are at the root of the
controversy.
Leading the fight for the UAC are UF President
Stephen C. O'Connell and Student Body President
Charles Shepherd,
OConnell has assured students they will be
represented on the UACs governing board. On Jan.
14 he said their voice in the UAC would be in
direct relationship to their percentage of total
contributions.
Later he went further in his promise to students
with the statement that regardless of how much
other students contribute, No group.. shall have
a greater voice than that of the students of this
university.
An outspoken proponent of the UAC, OConnell,
during the first stage of planning, said:
Any university of the 20th century cannot hope
to attain status as an institution of the first class
without facilities of the caliber of the proposed
UAC. Our challenge is bold, and it is to this end that
we must dedicate ourselves, our time and our
energy.
Shepherd has backed OConnells stand, as have

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PHIL COPE
FLORIDA GYMNASIUM
.. complaints about size and condition prompted UAC
UAC Debates Tonight
On WUFT, WRUF
Two open debates will be held this evening on the proposed UF
Activities Center.
The first, on WUFT-TV channel 5, takes place at 10. UF President
Stephen C. OConnell; Jim Clark, head of the Committee to Defeat
the Proposed Activities Center, Ralph Glatfelter, chairman of the
UAC Student Committee, and Tom Ball, Mayors Council president
wiD discuss the issues.
At 11, WRUFs Dialogue will feature Glatfelter, Clark and Director
of Physical Planning Walter Matherly. The showis an dpen-phone
*>£ifndb mi isoi iquuiy itoiiwtdtnoa

Nobody is disagreeing with the need
for an activities center, but the priorities
and the means are what we are
questioning.
-Steve Uhlfelder
Chairman FBK Executive Committee
the Benton and Florida Engineering Societies,
Interhall, PanheDenic Council, the Freshman
Council and the Student Agricultural Society.
The UAC Committee, chaired by Ralph
Glatfelter, has led the fight for passage of
Wednesday's referendum. He has held that the only
way the UAC will become reality is through a
tuition hike.
Students shouldnt have to pay for something
that is the responsibility of the state legislature, but
the state has to build academic buildings in the 70s,
and will not raise taxes to pay for a socially and
culturally oriented center.
An alternative to the plan proposed by the
administration, according to Glatfelter, doesnt
exist, and if it does, it would be only fair to the
students to present it before we have the
referendum vote.
Opposition to the plan has centered around
Florida Blue Key, a men's leadership fraternity,
which backs the idea of a UAC but differs with the
method for financing it using student funds from
a tuition hike. Steve Uhlfelder, chairman of Blue
Keys executive committee, is in charge of
coordinating the campaign to defeat the
referendum.

Athletic Dept. In Debt;
No Available Funds

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
Assistant Athletic Director Norm Carlson
Monday dted payment of incurred debts and famine
to balance the current budget as reasons for the
Athletic Association's inability to pledge funds for
file proposed University Activity Center (UAC).
The association owes $1340,000 for the East
Stands and Yon Hall additions, plus the University
Golf Course, Cadson said. These debts run
through 1986.
The debt secviee in the form of interest costs and
bend payments amounts to $170,000 per year.
We also have found it increasingly difficult to
maintain a representative athletic program and
balance the budget at the same time Carlson
added.
The 1968-69 athletic budget showed a gross
income of $2,362,305.37 and expenses of
$2,394,768.67, a deficit of $32,46330.
This year's budget shows an estimated income of
$3,002,731 and expenses of $3,047,656.50, a

Feb. 4: 22 Polling Places

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Students will be able to
vote in the Feb. 4 Activities
Center referendum at any of
the 22 polling places located
on and off campus.
Secretary of the Interior
Kevin Davey said he expects a
large turnout for the
referendum.
The polls will be open
between 8 am. and 6 pm.
Davey said students are not
being restricted to voting
according to college or living
* areas, in an effort to make it
as easy as possible to vote.
On-campus polling booths
will be in the Reitz Union
lobby, library colonnade,
Graham Hall lobby, South

Nobody is disagreeing with the need for an
activities center, but the priorities and the means are
what we are questioning,** he said. He said the
students are already overburdened with tuition that
is expected to go up anyway in the next couple of
years.
Thomas Ball, chairman of the Mayors* Council
and mayor of Flavet Village, is another vocal
opponent of the referendum. He has charged that
the UAC plan is a non-plan, an artists pipe
dream,** and says that he wants to see concrete
plans before being a&ed to vote on the matter.
In addition to the Mayors Council and Blue Key,
a group of independent students have formed an
organization called The Committee to Defeat the
Proposed University Activities Center. Chairman
Jim Clark said the group is criticizing all aspects of
the proposed center except the premise that a
center is needed. He favors defeating the
referendum, then taking six months to plan
something better.
Shouldering most of the weight for planning the
UAC is Walter J. Matherly, director of university
physical planning, who has begun work on phase
three of a four-part planning scheme which could
take another two years to complete.
A 16,000-seat coliseum could be adjoined by
pods in which the departments of speech and
athletics, and the College of Journalism and
Communications could be housed.
A natatorium with an Olympic-size pool for
diving and swimming competition will have seats for
2,800 spectators. A movable sliding roof will permit
sunbathing at the pools edge.
An outdoor amphitheater with a stage capable of
holding a 180-piece orchestra located under an
acoustical shell, with facilities for showing movies,
would be built alongside the coliseum.

Hall lobby, Jennings lobby,
Broward Hall lobby, Yulee
Area front porch, Hume Hall
lobby, Fletcher K study
lounge, Spessard Holland Law
Center colonnade, Walker
Auditorium Colonnade,
Stadium Gate 3 and Towers
Commons lobby.
People who wish to vote
off-campus will find polling
places in the Diamond Village
study lounge, Village Park
recreation room, Gatortown
recreation room, Corry
Village laundry room, Flavet
111 recreation had, AOPi
sorority house, Gator
Groomer and Point West
laundry room.
amQaly ftiU-fime

deficit of $44,925.50.
This deficit was primarily created by the expenses
involved with restructuring the athletic department
- the hiring of a new coach and staff.
In rebuttal to charges that the association does
not financially support academic programs, Carlson
hated the projects the organization had contributed
to.
Theyindude:
The donation of $235,000 of its funds to
academic scholarships for non-athletes since 1956.
A donation of $21,500 to the Century Tower
Fund.
The 1953 stadium offices addition of
$219,64637, which indudes the housing of the
College of Journalism* WRUF and WUFT-TV.
Monetary support of student organizations
such as Florida Blue Key, the Gator Band, Dollars
for Scholars, the University Foundation and the
intramural program.
The building of recreation facilities for
students and faculty the University Golf Course,
handball courts, tennis courts and intramural fields.

with both their validated blue
fee cad and picture I.D. will
be paniitted to vote, Davey
said.
The ballot will read:
I* you favor requesting
the IMdature of the State of
Floia to increase the
regi*ration fees of all
fulltime University of
Florida students in the
amount of six dollars ($6) per
student per quarter, provided
the entire increase shall be
pledged to finance not more
than one-third of the total
costof the proposed
University Activities Center
(Coliseum, Amphitheatre,
Natatorium and Performing
AlteAudltqriua^?^



Alumni Will Back UAC
If Students Vote Yes

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
If Wednesdays University Activities Center
(UAC) referendum passes, each yes student vote
may be matched with thousands of alumni dollars.
UFs Alumni Association executive committee
has voiced full support for the proposed UAC.
According to a projection by Fred Cantrell, dean
of university development, $6 million of the
funding for the $17.5 million UAC will come from
donations, primarily from alumni.
I think theres been an expression of alumni
support, said C. Laue Boyd Jr., assistant director
of alumni affairs. I feel if the alumni is called on to
do this ... theyll do their part.
The first major donation for a coliseum came
from Dr. Clyde Anderson of St. Petersburg. He
pledged SIO,OOO.
Since then, other donations and many telegrams
and letters of support have been sent to the Alumni
Association and UF President Stephen C. O'Connell.
The alumni, Boyd said, are looking to the
students to demonstrate a desire for this sort of
thing. He said if the students indicate they wont
endorse the UAC, he doubts the alumni will provide
funds for it.
Its something the university needs badly, he
said, and its long overdue.
Thus far the main role the Alumni Association
has had in working for the UAC referendum has
been support of the student UAC Committee. The
Alumni Association allowed the student group to
use its name and bulk rate mailing privileges to mail
fliers endorsing the UAC.
The association has also put up a display outside

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.. use the gym simultaneously for physical education classes

Action Conference Committee
First To Propose UAC

The University Activities
Center (UAC) committee wasnt
the first to propose an activities
complex for UF. As Walter
Matherly, director of physical
planning, pointed out Monday,
the Action Conference Steering
Committee recommended a
complex last March.
The Action Conference
RYM Meets
Revolutionary Youth
Movement will hold a meeting
Tuesday in room 363, Reitz
Union at 7:30 pjn. and will
HimniM support of arrested black
students. ie
by Studenfr&Eft^^

proposal said the plans
underway at that time for
construction of a coliseum
should be expanded to include
an auditorium for the
performing arts.
We request that in an activities
complex, whether or not
contiguous with a coliseum,
there be a performing arts
auditorium with stage, suitable'
for opera, drama and concerts,
the proposal read.
The proposal requested a
committee of nine be appointed
to study the idea.
It was approved by the Action
Conference March 5, 1969, and
signed by Franklin Doty, dean
of University College and
chapman -d-f tfce rteering
: fIWWIKtHi.

its office, showing letters and telegrams of support
received.
Boyd said the alumni were very interested in
making UF a great university. He criticized those
who look at the Alumni Association as this demon
thing in the sky that comes here on football
weekends. That's not true. Theyre willing to do
their part.
He pointed out that alumni are interested in more
than athletics and said many letters of endorsement
concern only the performing arts facilities which
would be provided in the UAC.
If the referendum passes, Boyd said, a full-scale
campaign for funds will begin. He said he expected
the money could be raised without harming the
UFs annual alumni giving program, which last year
netted $210,000.
The Alumni Association would not expect a role
in governing the activities held in the UAC, Boyd
said.
The only role I can see the alumni in is an
advisory capacity and then only if asked, he
said;
He said the alumni could possibly use the
coliseum for some large reunion activities,
particularly the Homecoming barbeque.
The telegrams which have been received are
mostly from area civic leaders and from presidents
of alumni groups throughout the state.
One, from the Putnam County Alumni read:
... We are wholeheartedly in favor of the
proposed student activities facilities which you will
be voting on in the Feb. 4 referendum. We wish to
encourage all of the students to actively promote
the passage of the referendum, which will provide
UF with a facility that is long past due.

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TELEGRAMS FROM ALUMNI
... show backing and enthusiasm
Amid UAC Furor,
What About Trees?
Amid all the controversy concerning funding and planning of the
University Activities Center a group of students and professors are
asking whats going to happen to the trees, Lake Alice and the
wildlife.
The activities center will be one more thing biting away at our
environment,* said Bill Seaman, president of UFs Environmental
Action Group. Seaman said the open spaces on campus are
disappearing too rapidly.
Someone should look into the ecological aspects of this planned
center, Seaman said. Our group wants to see more consideration
given to the effects on Lake Alice and where the incoming highway
will be located.
The university has not taken the whole picture into account,
Seaman said.
J. D. Lindstrom, a journalism instructor and member of the group,
said it should be studied whether Lake Alice is to be protected or
written off and paved over.
He said the group was not against the center per se but, rather,
where the access road would go. Lindstrom said he wouldnt want
Newberry Road widened and the oak trees removed that line the
road. Traffic to and from this center should be given more
consideration with the ecological results in mind.

Legislators Favor Activities Center

Alachua Countys three state
legislators Sen. Bob Saunders,
Rep. Ralph Turlington and Rep.
Bill Andrews issued a
statement Friday in support of
the proposed UF Activities
Center.
They did indicate, however,
that they did not want to
become involved in the students'

-

consideration as to whether the
UAC would be funded through
student activity fees.
There will be no substantial
state funds for capital outlay for
the UAC in the foreseeable
future, whether Wednesday's
referendum passes or not, the
legislators warned.

Page 5



Page 6

i.Tfr* Florida Attfcitor, TtMMday, FabvdaryS, 170

IN TRAIN WRECK
Suspects Arrested
BUENOS AIRES (UPI) Two railroad employes were arrested
Monday pending investigation of Sunday nights express-local collision
22 miles from Buenos Aires, the worst train accident in Argentine
history.
The National Railway System said at least 130 persons were killed
and 300 injured when the 10-car express roared at more than 50 miles
an hour into the rear of a stalled suburban local.
Police said they took into custody two workers at the Benavidez
rail station who thought the suburban local had gone through and
signaled the express onto its tracks.
Railway officials said the death toll might go higher. Unofficial
estimates ranged as high as 140 to 200 deaths.
Provincial Police Chief Col. Eduardo Anibal Nava said the suburban
local pulled out of the popular riverside picnic area of Zarate at 6:40
pjn., Sunday, 4:40 p.m.EST, bound for Buenos Aires with 1,090
passengers. It stalled with engine trouble on the tracks along a field
outside of the General Pacheco station.
The express train had left Tucuman, a sugar-growing city at 10 p.m.
Saturday, 8 pm., EST, with 249 passengers for the 800-mile trip to
Buenos Aires.
Alfredo Amoroso, the express engineer, was in near shock as he
talked to newsmen.
I saw the stalled train but I saw it too late, he said. It was only
300 feet away.
I wanted to stop. I blew the whistle to alert its passengers but
there wasnt anything I could do. We were going at 53 miles an hour.
What could you do? I closed my eyes and prayed.
The express slammed into the back of the stalled train, shot into
the air and crashed down with crushing force on top of the local.
The bulk of the victims were aboard the sardine-packed suburban
train. Only two of the passengers on the express were injured, both
lightly.

Pope Paul VI Rejects
Changes In Celibacy

VATICAN CITY (UPI)
Pope Paul VI appears to have
removed the last possibility that
the Roman Catholic law on
priestly celibacy can be changed
during his lifetime, Vatican
observers said Monday.
At the same time, the official
Vatican Press spokesman
emphasized the authoritative
importance of the pontiffs
statement Sunday rejecting any
change in the law and any
further discussion of the
controversial issue.
Msgr. Fausto Vallainc issued a
statement saying the fact the
speech was made to an informal
gathering of pilgrims and tourists
in St. Peters Square in no way
lessened its significance.
Some Italian newspapers had
sought to minimize the Popes
remarks because they were not
made at a formal occasion. But
Vallainc said the Pope was
speaking not merely as bishop of
Rome but as universal pontiff.
Vallainc said the Pope has
often used holiday meetings to
discuss matters of great
importance committing
without impossible distinctions
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his authority as head of the
Catholic Church.
Demands for a change in the
celibacy law have been voiced
since the Vatican Ecumenical
Council and thousands of priests
have left the church or ministry
to marry. The issue was brought
to a head by a decision of Dutch
Catholic bishops last month to
recommend that the law be
changed to allow married men to
become priests.

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< MUSHROOM 1.60 2.10 o A vini*!*** 8 All above orders include J
COMBINATION 1.75 2.55 "SSStSauce 180 >t*Uan Bread
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2 FOOT LONG MONSTER SUB ECLAIRS V COKE. ORANGE.SMOTE, 1
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Judge Recesses Panther Trial

NEW YORK (UPI) A state
Supreme Court justice angrily
recessed the trial of 16 Black
Panthers charged with a
bombing conspiracy Monday
when the defendants staged a
noisy outburst over his refusal to
give their families the front row
seats occupied by newsmen.
I have a voice and it will be
heard, one of the Panthers
shouted at the start of the
dispute.
If our families cant hear
what happens to our lives, we
wont listen to you. Our wives
are in the back of the room and
the [ness half of them racist
pigs are sitting up front.
A defense lawyer urged
Justice John M. Murtagh to
change the courtroom
conditions but Murtagh told him
to be seated.
All 14 defendants then
jumped up and began shouting,
Power to the people. Off the
pig. Right on.
Murtagh called an early lunch
recess and told the six defense

attorneys they would be held
responsible for their clients
behavior.
As officers of the court, you
should have been as shocked at
the lack of restraint and respect
as was the court, he said. I do
not intend to tolerate this
misconduct.
Attorney Gerald Lefcourt said
he would inform the Panthers of
how they were expected to
behave but could do no more.
I am not here to order them.
I can only advise them, he told
the judge.
Sixteen Panthers were

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scheduled to begin trial today in
the heavily guarded courtroom
on charges of conspiring to blow
up department stores, subway
stations, commuter railroad
tracks and the Bronx Botanical
Gardens but Murtagh agreed to
let Edward Josephs and Lonnie
Epps, both 17, be tried
separately as youthfiil offenders.
He denied youth status for Alex
McKiever, 19.
Another defendant, Lee
Berry, 25, is in Bellevue Hospital
suffering from epilepsy and
Murtagh formally severed his
trial.



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CALL TO GREATNESS

CULTURE
In order for a
commit? to broaden
its current outlook
and sharpen Its per perspectives
spectives perspectives of tomor tomorrow,
row, tomorrow, a forum for
cultural Interaction
Is a necessity. The
UAC can provide the
opportunity for part participation
icipation participation in the
cultural currents
of today's society,
and it could sponsor
a continuing exper experience
ience experience for the motiv motivated
ated motivated
< < ' s" $ >"

RESPOND FEB. 4

f ir-iTTrQ< Architecture
_ 2 *'iiJ _ ~ -PAIDROUIICALADVEftTJ&iIVIENT

SOCIAL
: Our university, as a j
| society, desperately
needs an environment
for cowminl eating the
Ideas, reacting to the j
Issues, and participat participating
ing participating In the events
which generate social |
awareness and under understanding.
standing. understanding. The UAC
conceptually provides
for an Integration of
cultural, academic and
environments facilitat facilitating
ing facilitating this social inter interaction.
action. interaction.
: " : : ; '
Interaction 1s the i
t substance of a great
University community.

TtiMtay, Friary 3,1970, Tlw Florida AMfttttor,

ACADEMIC
The UAC, ti addition i
to providing a high ii
quality of academic
environment through Us
modern labs, lecture
spaces, and closed
circuit TV systems,
could be a catalyst for
progress In education.
This center promises h|§|
: to stimulate the quest iSH
for new Ideas, Intel* .Mm
lectural InvolvameirtfJjgSt
and concerned aware- IlfeSf
ness to toe forces .JBBBfs...
| which shape our t §m\
L atoMt.-, : ' -: *%ii*
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X-X;:vX;X;X;:;;\v:;X;Xv.;XvX;XvX;!V S'vSSv
4, I'. ' -X ~/i

Page 7



Page 8

>, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday. Fabruary 3,1970

The
Florida.
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Thanks For Helping Jeri

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to express my
sincerest appreciation to the

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\
*7*m frasy putting out fires, folks

Another View

We Want The World And We Want It Now

What have they done to the earth?
What have they done to our fair sister?
Ravaged and plundered and ripped her and bit
her,
Stuck her with knives in the side of the dawn,
And tied her with fences and dragged her
down...
When The Music's Over, The Doors
Jim Morrison and the Doors, supposedly the
Kings of Orgasmic Rock, apparently have a great
deal more to say than sex can be fun." Probably
before Richard Nixon understood the meaning of
the phrase the ecological destruction of our
planet/* they were writing a song expressing what
much of die younger generation feels about the
pollution of our fair sister.
Thank goodness now at long last the major
politicians have begun to jump on the bandwagon,
that Senators Muskie and Nelson have occupied for
years. They are now beginning to realize that if we
continue to destroy the earth, as we have been
doing at a horrifyingly rapid rate, we will have
nothing.
Predictions about the consequences of pollution
range from statements that we have 35 to 100 more
years of breathable atmosphere left, to others saying
that we may create an atmosphere with so much
carbon dioxide and so little oxygen that we will
slowly suffocate.
What are some of the causes of our predicament?
There are many reasons, including the basic values
of our society, our lack of respect for the land, our
greedy capitalistic exploitation, and our fear of
government control of business.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

people who helped make the
benefit dance at the Catholic
Student Center on Friday,
January 23 such a huge success.

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

All the money earned will
help pay for Jeri Blackwelders
second kidney transplant. She
and her brother, Jerry Cams,
and I would like to thank the
following people:
Archie Maldonado, who
initiated the plan
Ward Durrett of Grym, Ltd.,
who did the public relations
work and provided the
entertainment.
The Brothers Grymm and The
Troop for providing the music
Jeff Sweet and all the Delta
Chis, especially the neophytes,
who did all the manual labor and
have such tremendous
enthusiasm and compassion
WGGG Radio and especially
Steve Cannon for their free
advertising
Aiine Beach for her articles in
the Alligator
The University Police Dept.,
especially Officer Gladin, who
donated his time on Friday night
R.C. Cola, Pepsi Cola and
Coca Cola Bottlers of
Gainesville, who donated free
soft drinks
Krishna Light Co. who
donated their light show
Father Gannon and the
Catholic Parish Council for
letting us use the Student
Center.
To all the great people who
came to the dance
And to anyone else I left out.
People are damn good!
LINDA C. WALKER, 2UC

Who are the main polluters of our world? Well,
you and I the average citizen is the main
culprit. But the major corporations and industries
are not far behind.
Why are we all guilty? Because we have bought
the salesmanship of the economic giants, the
materialistic competition for more and better cars,
gadgets, and other types of affluence status symbols
which we believe is the good life."
The automobile is responsible for about 45% of
the total pollution of this world. According to
scientists in the field one of the absolute
necessities of the next ten years is either the total
abandonment of the internal combustion engine, or
the development of a pohitionless engine. It's either
man or car, for the two can no longer coexist under
the present circumstances.
Look at the evolution of the automobile. Without
even considering the evironmental costs, people
demanded cars with more and more horsepower,
luxuries, and comfort. So to meet the demand for
bigger and bigger (a favorite American feeling) we
find the Detroit criminals building a Firebird,
Mustang, Cougar, with maybe 350-horse-power, but
no pollution control at all.
Why no pollution control for all the noxious
fumes that such a powerful, gas-consuming engine
would produce? Because the people did not feel the
danger of atmospheric pollution was enough to pay
for anti-pollution devices attached to their cars.
Some of these devices might also cut down on the
horsepower, add weight to the car, and thereby cut

EDITORIAL
Sign Petition
A petition bearing more than a thousand names may not
change a mans mind if it is firmly closed.
And the petition now circulating around campus
concerning six hours of free courses for university employes
per quarter may not change Jay McGlon s mind.
McGlon, director of the states Department of
Administrative Personnel Division, is attempting to do away
with the free classes for state employes here on the grounds
that it is too costly.
However, UF President Stephen C. OConnell and Vice
President for Business Affaire William Elmore both say these
free courses cost the state nothing.
But it is not equitable. Other state employes do not get
the same benefits, McGlon counters.
Well why not? Why is it not possible to grant all state
employes six free hours of either high school or college
credit throughout the state?
These courses are being conducted anyway in night
classes on the states many junior college and high school
campuses. The few additional persons who might enroll in
these courses will not make any financial difference.
Value must be placed on higher education in this state if
it ever hopes to progress both culturally and intellectually.
When the opportunity is there waiting we do not see
how one man and his department can be allowed to stop it.
We urge everyone on this campus affected by this
erroneous decision to sign the petitions for reinstatement of
these free courses.
Before it is really too late.
Censorship!
Censorship comes in all shapes and disguises... most
recently in the form of one James Clark, student.
In opposing the proposed University Activities Center,
Clark has emotionally and irrationally accused the Florida
Alligator of biased news reporting on this issue.
This is a poorly veiled desperation move of a man who
ran out of facts a long time ago.
We charge him with censorship of fact and fear of truth.
We have reported that which you have a right to know.
And we have reported it as accurately and fairly as humanly
possible.
Our editorial stand on this issue will be clearly marked
Editorial. Until such a time we would advise this
gentleman to find a more relevant and accurate issue.

back on its top speed. And God forbid when we
cant race down the freeway at a hundred miles an
hour.
So there is dual guilt: the people for not
considering the results of their mindless materialism,
and the companies for not trying to educate the
people or doing something on their own until finally
we became aware of what was happening and put
pressure on them.
Well, thats in the past. What should we do now?
We need a tremendous Federal Program on the
financial level of Project Apollo (about 23 billion),
and specific programs form our President, not just
vague generalities like those in his State of the
Union Address.
We need a national commitment of will,
comparable to the drive for civil rights or the
stopping of the Vietnam War. Young people
especially should become involved, because they theywill
will theywill have to inherit this dying planet.
We need, to re-examine some of our more
cherished social values, and put preservation of the
environment on a priority over a big new car.
Enjoyment NOW increases the chances of an
unlivable earth later.
In April, nation-wide teach-ins will be held to
discuss this vital problem. If you care about this
good earth, take a few minutes and come out and
near how bad things really are.
Then maybe, you too will want the world to
survive, and will join the fight to save mother earth
from virtual uninhabitability.

By Mike Hittleman



Dear Nigger
Said The Letter
MR. EDITOR:
I received the following letter on January 28,1970.
Dear Nigger,
If you and the other black monkeys are unhappy at the U. of
Florida,why dont you all leave.
You wont be missed.
Yours,
Willie Taylor,
Tampa, Fla.
The envelope was addressed to me. But, after reading the
salutation, I immediately perceived that this letter was not meant for
me. If the Nigger at UF would like to claim his mail, he can pick it
up at the Black Student Union office located in the Reitz Union.
I wonder if I can press charges for intimidation?
ROSALYN BOYD

UAC Provides
Academic Space
MR. EDITOR:

TO: Mr. Thomas C. Hill
Mr. John W. York
Mr. William F. Hohmann
Mr. Harvey D. Patterson
Mr. L.F. Wood
Mr. Gerald W. Dillehay
Mr. Frank Gillmore
Mr. C.C. Stewart
Mr. George E. Davis

No one could reasonably dispute your feeling that the first
priority for a university must be education.
But, I dispute your assertion that the proposed UAC is
primarily a recreation center. The University Activities Center
will be a social, recreational, and educational complex. It is not
an either-or proposition.
Approximately 220,000 square feet of academic space will be
generated by the construction of the center. This is space
sufficient to situate eleven Rolf Halls. This will be done at a
much reduced cost to the State in that the walls, roof, and air
conditioning will already by there.
When this space is available it will go a long way toward
relieving pressures in other parts of the campus, including the
School of Forestry.
If you are genuinely concerned about improving space
conditions for education on the campus, you will vote Yes on
February 4. You will be voting for the building of the least
expensive academic space likely to ever by provided for this
University.
CHARLES SHEPHERD
PRESIDENT OF THE STUDENT BODY

Sign Off Student Politics, O Connell

MR. EDITOR:
The following is an open letter to President OConnell.
Mr. President, do not be surprised if at the next student body
election the student politicos beat a path to your office for your
endorsement of their candidacy.
It seems to me that you should recognize the February 4th
referendum for what it is; a student political campaign. Even Prince
Charles has observed this by his willingness to pay for student
government ads.
I believe that it may be considered unethical and in poor taste for
administrators and faculty to endorse such endeavors that are totally
confined to students, (i.e. the February 4th referendum.)
Your dorm stomping, posters and broadcasts are becoming
embarrassing to the University Community. People are beginning to
talk about your applying the gentle hand of in loco parentis to
guide the students in a favorable, at least from your point of view,
direction.
One would think that you are possibly considering re-enrolling as a
student and campaigning for the office of Student Body President.
I would discourage you from such actions because I understand
that the law college may be considering awarding Prince Charles the

Mr. Fred Replogle
Mr. Richard Stroker
Mr. Clifford Shaw
Mr. Mike Leclercq
Mr. Philip H. Dube
Mr. Gary Holifield
Mr. J.B. Huffman
Mr. James W. Miller

There is no hope
for the complacent man.

Jewish Students Demands

MR. EDITOR:
The recent Supreme Court
decisions indicate that
universities shall not

I§sJel|)

first Student Emeritus Degree ever offered, (for the length of time,
not service, as a law student.)
If they do that, Im sure the Prince might consider another regime
since he has much blind allegiance from his followers, (evidenced by
their refusal to consider the facts about UAC.)
I believe you and your colleagues would be of more assistance to
the UAC if you confined your efforts toward state publicity of the
Center rather than campus grandstanding.
To really show your sincerity in the issue, I think you should
advocate a referendum among the faculty to assess themselves $25 per
year. This would give them the opportunity to bind themselves with
the same agreement as the students and would endear you to the
faculty forever, or should I say for 25 years.
I understand that at the present time efforts are being made to
solicit voluntary contributions from the faculty. If this is such an
effective method of raising funds, why not allow the students this
choice on the referendum?
The faculty should be bound for 25 years, as the students will be, if
the referendum should pass. At least theyll be around to enjoy its
benefits more than the students.
Mr. President, I urge you to sign off the referendum campaign
and to issue a directive to all faculty members to do likewise. Leave
student politics to the students.
JAMES ROYAL, 7AG

Different Views
MR. EDITOR:
Since Mr. Ball has presented his view on the UAC on behalf of the
married students of UF I would like to express my opinion on
behalf on an individual married student.
Mr. Ball has stated that he is opposed to the referendum. This is Mr.
Balls view. Must he include the entire married housing when in fact
many do no share his view?.
I say let Mr. Ball speak for his view or for the representative view of
some.
Mr. Ball has stated that President OConnell should let students run
their own affairs. Isnt President OConnell the President of OUR
University? Shouldnt we appreciate President OConnells interest in
the university and his interest in the students no matter what view
he may hold?
He is entitled to his view, as is everyone, and I feel that President
OConnell is very much a part of this institution.
GLORIA CORBETT, 3ED

I Classes Cancelled I
For Accent Talks? I
MR. EDITOR:
Simply as a member of the community, I believe that students and
colleagues should attend as many of the fine lectures in the Accent
program as they can.
Some of these lectures will have close relevance to particular
courses, and in these cases it would seem to me to be in order, if the
time of the class conflicts with that of the lecture, for the instructor
to arrange for his students to attend the lecture in place of the class.
FREDERICK W. CONNER
VICE PRESIDENT FOR
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

discriminate on the basis of race,
color, nationality, or creed.
Therefore, on behalf of the
Jewish students at UF, I am
making the following

TuMday, February 3,1970, The Florida AMgator,!

non-negotiable demands:
UF will form a department
of Yiddish studies that will
teach, among other things,
Aramaic, Ladino, Hebrew,
Yiddish, Culinary Judaism, and
Shtetl Culture.
§ At least three-tenths of one
vice-president shall be Jewish.
All vending machines will
have kosher food.
Ten percent of all
textbooks shall be printed to
read the proper way; that is,
from right to left.
If these demands are not met
by Purim of this year, I will
march around the administration
building seven times while
blowing a rams hom and the
walls will come tumbling down.
DON A. HALPERIN
PROFESSOR
Football Fee
MR. EDITOR:
It is my fervent hope that the
student body will turn out in
unprecendented numbers to
soundly defeat the proposed
tuition increase as a means of
financing the new activities
center. Most students can afford
the six dollars a quarter, but not
all can. It is for this reason that a
tuition increase becomes the
worst of all possible ways to
raise the money, and I will not
vote to raise some other
students tuition.
Consider instead a fee of
$12.50 a year for five home
football games (20,000 students
X 12.50 yields $250,000) and
$ 1 a game for basketball games
and other events (easily yielding
another $50,000 to $100,000).
So there you have $300,000
to $350,000 a year from the
students and rather than a
regressive tax it becomes a
luxury tax.
JOHN TAUBE

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

F '" im^jJl^ nn jsAlLE
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Wllllston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(J-75-3t-p).
Male part-time: Tues., Thurs., Sat.,
Sun. or any combination of these
days. Outdoor work. 1.60/hr. Call
Ray after 6:00 evenings. 372-7318.
(E-77-6t-p).
My Alaskan Malamute did her thing
with a German Shepherd now we
have 8 outtasite pups. Available this
week to good people. $25. 376-3771.
(A-78-st-p).
PILE is soft and lofty, .colors
retain their brlllance In carpets
cleaned with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer sl.OO Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-78-c).
Studio couch w/bolsters, cover, $lO.
1 BW tire 7.35 l4/Rim, Tubeless,
S2O. 1 bookshelf divider, $lO. 1 85
gallon aquarium, paneled. 378-5032.
80cc Suzuki 1966 Sports Model. In
excellent condition recently
overhauled. Call Chuck. 378-9653.
(A-78-st-p).
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut 8i assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
$32.50. JR Office Furniture Co. 620
S. Main St.. Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-10t-c)
FIREWOOD OLLIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624.. (A-61-3t-c).
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon Installed, A
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$22.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-c).
1967 HONDA CA l6O. S2OO. Call
376-7947 after 5:30. Ask for ED.
(A-76-3t-p).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/C, full carpet, washer/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, partially furnished. 1
Immediate occupancy.ss, 9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p).
305 HONDA SUPERHAWK 1966,
excellent shape, Call Tom, 373-1551,
between 5:00 & 7:00 PM asking
390. (A*76-3t-p).
650 Triumph Bonneville Customize
D, very fast, clean. Call Tom after
3:30-378-5523. (A-st-77-p)
1967 Honda 90 Excellent
condition S2OO. Call Bob
372-9167 or see at Thomas F
room 344 Ift Murphree Area after 4
p.m. (A-2t-77-p)
Super Reverb amplifier. Fabulous
condition. Need cash for school.
Only 200 dollars. Call Fred Fey at
SAE house. 373-1507 evenings.
(A-10t*77-p)
1967 Honda CA 160. Still shines like
new. Call Bob after 7:00 PM at
392-9960. Best offer. (A-4t-77-p)
F-r-e-e: 2 mos. old kitten free
food, catpan & litter Included. Call
392-8095. (A-2t-77-p)
Antiques and used furniture. Wide
assortment. 1511 N.W. 6th Street.
378-6060. (A-st-77-p)
TENNIS BALLS. Pennsylvania
Center Court heavy duty or regular
$2.07 per CAN. B&B SPORTS
CENTER. 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1461;. (A-st-77-C)
COLOR TV 1969 RCA. Retailed for
$469, will take S2OO or BEST
OFFER. Call 372-0920 after 6:00
PM and ask for John Rlbino.
(A-5t77-p)

St. HI. 372-8523 ACROSS FWOMTHHogMIIiMIIiMIiM
r R 1
MW*- fcO **>.; .. A '^r'
v STEVE 1.50 Jg l
Vk;.r McQueen U I
A s>* t nHlf '>?
A. >£ lEJpMW- J&*
L A %
V pP "THE KINC ***"* *" U
. _;_ ~ ..... ,r '

FOR SALE |
GROOVEY Professional Gibson
Guitar + Extras and case slOO
Sacrifice! TENOR BANJO A string
must go s6O or best offer case
and books. 378-7638. (A-75-st-p).
HONDA Pso. Good condition, IV2
old. SBS with helmet. Karen.
373-2727. (A-75-3t-p).
I FOR RENT
jfitwiec tv
Sublet thru Aug.: 1 bdrm apt.. A/C,
W/W 1 carpet, cable TV, l block to
campus. sllO a month, half-of Feb.
rent free. Call 373-1883 after 5.
(B-3t-77-p)
One bedroom furnished apt. Central
air & heat, with carpeting,
dishwasher, disposal, 150 per month.
Call 376-4521 before 6 PM,
376-1482 after 6. 'Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished#
ww carpet, a/C, $l2O mo., Cable TV;
Colonial Manor apts. 1-216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-ci.
1 .I 11 1 M 1 1 - 1., a.
Roommates needed: Large house,
walking distance to campus. Two
rooms available, one with private
entrance. Call anytime 376-7755.
(B-76-st-p).
One bedroom apartment, some
utilities furnished, Rent SBO. See at
916 S. W. 7th Ave. or phone Mr.
Blrkett at 376-3442. (B-76-3t-p).
I WANTED 1
Found mans watch. Call
392-8031 after 11 PM. (C-78-3-nc.).
NEED MONEY?? Psychology slee.
laboratory needs male subjects aged
18-35 to participate In Isolation
experiment. Requires 21 consecutive
days and nights free (no classes, etc.)
Possible to earn S4BO. Inquire at 101
SSRB (across from Hub) or call
392-2007. (C-74-10t-c).
Wanted two female roommates for 2
bdrm. Gator Town apt. Call
376-1131. (C-76-st-p).
Female Roommate for Fredrick
Garden apt. 70. Immediate
occupancy. $46 per. month. Phone
373-1064 or 378-6510. (C-75-st-p).
Female roommate for La Bonne Vie,
rest of Wtr. & Spg.: Rent negotiable,
call 373-1368 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-77-p)
Used trailer suitable for fishing camp.
17 to 28 ft. 392-6061 before 3 p.m.
or 481-2277. Ask for Dot Gamber.
(C-3t-77-p)
One female roommate needed for 2
bdr apt. at Hawaiian Village. $55 a
month. Close to campus. 372-2949.
(C-st-77-p)
Wanted: Male roommate Graduate
student to share, townhouse two'
bedroom apt. (Williamsburg). Call
btw 5-5:30 p.m. 378-8638.
(C-st-77-p)
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. Jan rent free.
Central air and heat. $43.50/mo. Call
Herb 376-6361. (C-72-st-p)
aQtoiMoehwywft^wawwwwftiiiiiii
j HELP WANTED |
jftl 1 iqr 8 UMOMWB BBWW BWB WWWW
WANTED Male over 21 at Woody's
Sandwich Shop married If possible 24
hours a week must be neat
permanent work. Come by In person
between 2:30 4:00 for Interview.
(E-74-st-p).
Wanted: GO-GO DANCERS. Up to
$l5O per week. No Experience
Necessary. Must be good dancer. Call
376-9175 for audition. (E-10t-77-c)
Cocktail Waitress. Part or Full Time.
No Experience Necessary. Call
376-9175 After 4:00. DUBS STEER
ROOM. (E-10t-77-C)

Page 10

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 3,1970

1 AUTOS
>: f
;vx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-:-x.v;-x-x-x-v
Pontiac Catalina 2 + 2, 4 speed, 421
cubic inch, new tires and paint, full
power, stereo black vinyl interior,
cream puff. Call 392-7450. Pontiac
GTO 4 speed, black vinyl top, new
engine, radio and heater, good shape.
Must sell, Call 392-7450. (G-78-4t-p).
1960 Renault Caravelle sports car.
Removable hard top. Very good
condition. $225. Call 373-2901.
(G-st-77-p)
Jaguar: 1958 3.4 Sedan; New tires,
recent engine overhaul, clean. $495
Call 376-8586 after 5:00 p.m.
(G-st-74-p).
1965 Corvalr Monza coupe factory
air. cond., automatic, radio Good
condition. Priced to sell. $375. Call
378-6529. (G-75-st-p).
1963 Falcon Futura Automatic
Transmission, good interior. Good
tires, great gas mileage, radio. Call
376-0989 after 5:00 or on weekends.
(G-76-st-p).
1965 MUSTANG CONV. 289 VB,
new top, air-cond., power-steering,
automat sB2s see at 4 Frat
Row. Call Buchanan at 376-9235.
(G-76-st-p).
1966 Mustang 2 + 2 289 V 8 4 speed,
new tires, good condition. 378-6225
after 7 PM and Sundays. (G-76-st-p).
98 LUXURY SEDAN: 1968. Full
pwr. $5,800 new. Sell for $3,195.
Student 372-6931. (G-76-st-p).
67 Chevelle v-8 st, Wa radio, heater,
alrcond., Low mileage, new tires, tint
glass, boughten new In 1968. Excel,
cond. 376-8458 after 5:30 PM.
(G-78-3t-p).
1963 MGB Good Condition.
Tonneau, Luggage rack, new carpets,
leather seats, radio, and good
mechanical condition. Call 378-8347.
$950. (G-74-st-p).
| |
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress, Wedding Dress & Sportswear
by your English Dressmaker,
KATHLEEN OF YORKSHIRE.
Phone 378-0320. (J-st-77*p)
S6O a month for room and board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St., Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J 75-st-p).
808 Hume Hall I had a great
time Sat. nlte. The hawallan punch
was good, by the way what Is your
last name? hope you feel ok
barbara. (J-3t-77-p)
Rhonda, congratulations on being a
new KAPPA DELTA pledge! Have
fun!! Sdsam (J-78-lt-p).
Dear R. L. For ALL the pleasant
memories youve given me this past
year Thank you. (J-78-lt-p).
A local disk-jockey is starving
because he doesnt have time to
cook. If you look as good as you
cook call 372-1390 from 2 til 6.
(J-78-3t-p).
Reward! fOr return of yellow nylon
jacket lost hr woods near Main St.
376-4120 ask for Al. Lost Sunday
will pay well on return. (J-78-2t-p).
Dave Some more sunshine for the
worlds greatest Dragon Dad! When
you're around nothings down. Have
a .good day! p;s., I promise no more
late evening calls or tears Paula.
(J-78-l-nc).
For sale: The biggest & most
expensive mistake of your life. Only
$6 a quarter for ever and ever and
ever. Phone 378-5843. (J-78-lt-p).

uuuuuuijoewtwwowwwoonnnnnin
p PERSONAL
Gainesville Singles Club social mixer
tonight adult singles welcome. All
drinks 50 cents. Ironwood Golf &
Country Club. 8:00 PM on.
(J-78-lt-p).
I LOST A FOUND J
iwX-MOMOMeMOt-M-NSMiNSMiSSSS'S'X'X-SOX'S'
FOUND: Female Siamese kitten
about six months old. Walked Into
Fla. Gym. Call 378-4116.
(L-3t-77-nc)
LOST: Sterling silver parker pen
grid pattern. Reward offered, please
call 392-7519. (L-76-3t-p).
V.
I
KW^rdl^
WEEK!
'Camille baa bar flings
I is high style!-*.?.
I jMk H

GOETHES
FAUST
THIS HUMANITIES FILM WILL BE SHOWN IN
THE REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM ON
FEBRUARY 3 & 4 AT 7:00 & 9:30 P.M. THE
ADMISSION CHARGE IS 504.
SPONSORED BY J.W.R.U.
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Vi BROILED CHICKEN
*. Si .09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Si Sauce and
Spaghetti QQa
GAINESVILLE MALL

W o ***
J iijf
Sr* J



GATOR
classifieds

Tuesday, February 3,1970, The Florida Alligator,

| LOST A FOUND *f
Gold wallet lost in McCarty Hall.
Reward offered. No questions asked.
2029 McCarty Hall. (L-3t-78-p).
f""" Services
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-lf-57*C)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-p).

We've got a book coming
out. It's a thriller.
It's about the dawning of
an age. The Age of
Aquarius.
It's about battles and
hard times. It's about the
sweetness of life.
It's about sex and
narcotics and ideals and
winning.

Baby,
its you.

SERVICES |
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Your typewriter can type crisp clear
letters like an IBM. New ribbon fits
all machines. Types like carbon
ribbon. Reuseable. $3.95. 376-0779.
(M-78-lt-p).
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)

It features wild mobs
screaming and lonely
people alone.
Happiness.
It's a true story.
It's about you.
seminole
In the Age of Aquarius.

Page 11

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
We Dont Claim To Have I
ALL The Answers I
(But We Do Have Some Questions) I
VOTE NO-ITS TOO COSTLY I
WHY HAVE WE BEEN TOLD 6 MILLION? I
No matter what they say at this late stage, 6 million IS the figure they've been 1
emphasizing all along.
Reporter Don Yokel broke the 15 MILLION STUDENT PRICE TAG story only
last Thursday in the same Alligator that carried a full page ad saying "6 I
Million and no more"
I VOTE NO -Its Poorly Planned I
i WHY HAVE THEY TRIED TO GIVE THE IMPRESSION PLANS I
I ARE FIRM? I
I Natatorium Seating 1
1800 Public statement
2000 Public statement
2800 Alligator ad 1-16-70,1-21-70,1-13-70
5000 Alligator ad 1-12-70,1-19-70 f
5800 Alligator ad 1-15-70
6000 Public statement
"The natatorium is not a 5000 seat indoor pool. The
only spectator seating will be rollaway bleachers seating
between 1400 and 1600."
I (Walt Morgan, Gainesville Sun 1-25-70) 1
I VOTE NO-The Athletic Dept. Should I
I Pay Its Share I
I What about wrestling meets and practice?
How many weeks and months are spent practicing basketball?
Will the team work out in Fla. Gym? (They start practice in October).
Did you ever hold a philosophy class in the deep end of an indoor Olympic pool?
With one pool already on campus and two more to be built near dorms and
supposedly finished by Sept. 1970 (Shepherd's Senate Speech 1-20-70) won't
the Athletic Dept. REALLY get most of the use?
Doesn't the swim team practice most of the yew?
I VOTE NO- NO TIME LIMIT I
I WHAT'S THE REAL TIME LIMIT? I
"The referendum for a SPECIFIC figure, for a SPECIFIC purpose, for a SPECIFIC
time." (Alligator 1-23-70)
"... no time limit is mentioned in the wording of the ballot because of an effort to
keep the plan flexible. Shepherd said." (Alligator 11-13-69).
I VOTE NO- The Truth Has Not Been Told I
I WHY HAVE WE BEEN SUBJECTED TO INACCURATE STATEMENTS? I
"No state in the South paid for the center at their state schools they were done f
I by contributions and pledges." (Ralph Glatfelter, Senate minutes, Nov. 11,1969). 1
"Thank you for your inquiry concerning the funding used to construct, our
Coliseum here at the University of Georgia. This building was constructed using
building authority funds. We did not dedicate any student activity fee money for
construction." W. E. Hudson, Director, Letter to Mayors' Council 12-15-69
I VOTE NO- NO ONE REALLY KNOWS |
| WHAT W ILL BE FINISHED WHEN |
WHEN WILL IT BE COMPLETED?
"By 1980 the academic community will only see the skeleton of the coliseum,
auditorium, natatorium, and amphitheater complex north of Lake Alice in Beta
woods, which could take as long as 20 years to complete."
1 (Walter Matherly, UF Planning Director Alligator 1-14-70) I
"What Mr. Matherly said was a misprint."
I (Public statement. Rathskeller program) I
I "It was no misprint; that's what he said." 1
1 Don Yokel, Alligator Writer 1
I DEMAND AND GET A BETTER PLAN I
VOTE NO FEBRUARY 4 §
I PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT |
mmmmemmmmmmam paid for by mayor's council



Page 12

!, Tbs Florida AIB gator, Tuesday, February 3,1970

C l Ll,' if?;. % i Iff# V
and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be on Thursday,
Feb. 5, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
235, Tigert Hall.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
or the Elementary Blocks.
ENGLISH and SPEECH
MAJORS do not take the test, as
Speech 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124, Norman Hall.
MIDTERM TESTS: All
students Jaking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium
MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m. in Little Hall, Rooms
101,109,13,121, and 125.
CPS 122 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, Feb. 5,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; Cto Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matheriy 2 f 3,4, 5,6, 7,8, 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matheriy 102, 105, 108, 111,
1t3,115,116,117, 118, or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium, T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 1, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matheriy 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 19;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102, 110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.

FANS DONT DO IT. 00
Jt M V Especially during our summer months.
Y \&JT This is your year to air condition...
/( | I \ Jay/ \ /Tjf you owe it to yourself, and to make it
" &ZL easy et us e *P you w t^l t^,e nanc > n 9*
J GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION QB
V-' # > v *'* '-" l ** '** 4 # *. " l *' v ~-

Administrative Notices

CSS 113 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CSS 116 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. in Peabody 201, 202,
205, and 208.
CBS 264 MID-TERM TEST
will be given on Monday, Feb. 9,
in Leigh Auditorium.
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given on Tuesday, Feb.
10, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 10 at
7 p.m. in Little 101, 109, 113,
121 and 125.
CHN 252 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb.
11, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A report
to Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 221, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13,14, or 16; M to
Matheriy 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, Jiine and August
graduates unless indicated
otherwise; U.S.
Citizenship required. Degrees:
B-Bachelor's, M-Master's,
D-Doctorate.
Feb. 3: International Paper
Co.; Georgia Power Co.;
Hewlett-Packard Co.
Feb. 3-4: Buckeye Cellulose
Co.; Union Carbide Corp.
Chem. & Plastics Div.
Feb. 3-5: The Bell System
Non tech.
Feb. 4: Washington National
Insurance Co.; Charleston Naval
Shipyard; North Carolina
National Bank; National Center
for Health Statistics;
Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
Feb. 4-5: Florida Power
Corp.; General Dynamics Corp.
Convair Div.
Feb. 4-6: Monsanto Chemical
Co.

BLUE BULLETIN

Feb. 5: American Cyanamid
Co,; Price Waterhouse & Co. &
Daly and Andersen; PPG
Industries, Inc.; Federal
Communications Commission;
Cunningham Drug Stores, Inc.;
Citrus Council of Girl Scouts,
Inc.
Feb. 5-6: Dow Chemical Co.;
General Motors Corp.
Feb. 6: Garrett-Airesearch
Mfg. Co.; Virginia Dept, of
Highways; North American

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, February 3
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Union Humanities Film,"Faust,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Fla. Engineering Society, Electric
Eng. Bldg., 310 South, 7:00
p.m.
Angel Flight, Rush Party, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Environmental Action Group,
150 B Union, 7:30 p.m.
Young Democrats, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Peace Union, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Citrus Club, 118 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Panhellenic Fashion Show,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: 'The Little-Known
Liszt/' University Aud., 8:15
p.m.

A book for
all seasons

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Rockwell Corp.; Atlantic
Richfield Co.; Levitt and Sons,
Inc.; Charleston Naval Shipyard
Nuclear Power Div.;
Burroughs Wellcome & Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Feb. 4: Naval Ordnance
Station
Feb. 6: Joseph E. Seagram &
Sons, Inc.; Merck & Co., Inc.
(Calgon Corp.)

Wednesday, February 4
Dialogue with a Theologue, 122
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Sigma Nu Chapter Meeting, 362
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Basketball, Univ. of Fla. vs.
LSU, Fla. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Circle International, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Phi Kappa Theta, 357 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Sigma Alpha Mu, 150 C Union,
8:00 p.m.
\ Young Socialist Forum, "Should
America Go Socialist?",
(SPU), 361 Union, 8 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium,
College Library, 8:00 p.m.
Mensa, 356 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 5
Black Student Union, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization,
357 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.

GENERAL NOTICES
INDIVIDUAL needed to
translate a 40-page article
written in UKRAINIAN. Will
Pay. Please call Dr. Levy,
392-2007.
INDIA CLUB presents an
'lndian Film/ "YE Raste Hain
Pyaar Ke" (These are the Paths
of Love) with English subtitles
and music by Ravi. This movie
will be screened in the Union
Auditorium on Sat., Feb. 7, at 2
p.m. Admission is 50 cents.

Assoc, for Childhood Ed., 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi, 118 Union,
7:15 p.m.
Florida Blue Key, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 356
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Friday, February 6
Union Movie, "Valley of the
Dolls," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Rathskeller, 'The Celebration,"
8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "Styrophoam
Soule," Union Ballroom,
9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
Audubon Wildlife Films, U.
of F. Students, SI.OO, GP,
$1.50, HS Students, $.50;
Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00, "Dion," $1.50
members, $2.00
non-members.

Good things happen as the
seasons change.
Things like a carpet of multi multicolored
colored multicolored leaves. A still cold
night. A flower in bloom.
And the Florida Quarterly.
We'll see you through the
seasons, from the Harvest
Moon to the first dandilion
and beyond...
As long as you remember.
florida
quarterly -ri
We only did it for you.



Maravich Prepares For UF Tilt

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
Pistol Pete Maravich will be
here Wednesday night when the
LSU Tigers take on UFs
slumping Gators.
The 5,000 or more fans that
will pack the decaying Florida
Gym to pay tribute to college

gATOK EARL FINDLEY
An Overnight Sensation

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writer
Gator forward Earl Findley
finds himself, in his first year of
major-college basketball, in the
enviable position of being the
teams second leading scorer and
rebounder.
Findley, who is averaging 12.8
points a game and eight
rebounds, didnt begin playing
basketball until his senior year in
high school.
When 1 finally started
playing, the only real ability 1
had was jumping, Findley said.
I only got to play about five
minutes a game my whole senior
year.
He attributes most of the
change in his playing to the fact
that while at Palm Beach Junior
College he had the opportunity
to play basketball.
l got to play in every game,
Findley commented.
Apparently the big remans
East chase to come to the UF
was because of the hhance of
Us big brother, Ted, and die
persistence of both head
basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett and assistant coach Dick
Davis.
I would talk to my brother
about the UF and both Bartlett
and Davis would come down to
see me play and occasionally
they would call to find out how
everything was, Findley said.
After being named most

tii
I I i Li k
+ #
I IrMy
tgffl
a MMnHiBMBHBB
iHiWrfflnl^
ESBBSHSO#
#

basketballs all-time number one
scorer may be a little
disappointed that he didnt wait
until then to break the record
mark of 2,973 points set by
Oscar Robertson at the
University of Cincinnati in 1961.
Maravich broke the career
record Saturday night with a 53
point performance to lead LSU
to a 109-86 victory over Ole*

valuable player at Palm Beach
during both the 1967-68 and
1968-69 seasons, Findley has
not noticed any appreciable
change in his play since coming
to the UF.
I cant say that Ive
improved a lot since I left Palm
Beach, but I am getting a chance
to play, Findley said.'
mm
EARL FINDLEY
... needs more weight

Miss before 11,000 delirious
Tiger fans.
Thats not the only record UF
fans will miss being first-hand
witnesses of either.
Maravich only had to score 14
points in last nights battle with
Mississippi to be the first player
in the history of major college
basketball to score more than
3,000 points.

Findley reached a season high
for the Gators by throwing in 34
points against Ole Miss and has
been in double figures in nine of
the Gators contests.
Ole Miss was covering Owens
(Gator captain Andy and
number one scorer) heavily, so I
had the open shots and the ball
just kept going in, Findley said.
One of Earls recurring
problems is his lack of weight to
go with his lanky 6-foot-7
height.
I only weigh 185 and a lot of
times I get pushed around under
the basket, Findley said.
While practicing before the
Georgia game last Saturday Earl
had a hot hand hitting on three
successive shots from the top of
the key and at another time hit
four out of five from the base
line.
In the game, however, he only
put in three points in die first
half before Bartlett took him
out far die muaiudrr of the
Through most of the first half
he had at least four shots that
rolled off the dm and a number
of bank shots that just refused
to go in.
I intended to keep shooting
because I did not feel my shots
were very far off at all, Findley
commented following the
regionally televised contest. If I
had been left in the game I'm
sure the shots would have
started falling in.

UF fans will have the distinct
privilege of greeting to Florida
Gym for the last time the king
of college basketball.
iTrouuKED
VOLKSWAGEN ...
YOULL LOVE
DATSUN
Station Wifon $2,268*
GODDING & CLARK
115 S.E. 2ND ST.
378-2311 Til 7PM Mon Sat.
P.O.E., plus tax, tag, local freight,
_ D. & H.

Treat Your Feet I
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Gold Cup Socks 1
f Dont count calories, count the colors, ..., tempt* II
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And all knit in a creamy smooth blend of 75% hi-bulk
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For up to ten times more wear, theres a reinforced
toe and Hi*Heel shield. Fed up with fussy care?
11l BeC^ USe Go d Cup doesn t need any, just ma- II
HI for $1.75 or indulge yourself with ||.
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111- - -- - 11


Tuasday, Fabruary 3,1970, Tha Florida Allipiqr,

TO
$ BWCHO |
I 1
I ole-'J
i i
$ BEER i
§ A FmJ Onb. $
v Tuos. thru Fri.
a 3-5 p.m. A
\/ 1624 SW 13th $]
bfeyx
Page 13



Page 14

tlirfFainifcVvnWiy MmWf 3 WH)

\ S 'J ; 7 .'f 4 C 'I" / x '' -*
ipip%liip
/
BE PREPARED TO DRESS PROPERLY FOR FLORIDA GYM
The Four-Step Method:
1. Brine your portable air conditioner strapped on your beck, to cool
you off.
', ; i * ***" ; '. 1
Z Wear asbestos clothing (fire would bum more then the building).
3. Bring earphones (you'll need amplification to hear even the public
address announcer.)
:. < " j ,f' i: 4/ , V- ff 'vj' -
4. Keep your checkbooks and wallets handy!
rji \ : -'* ; >: r
". -'.'V* '-'-il ; V. .
With a 5,100 seating capacity, tickets cost much more than
anywhere else. We (IFC, SGP or others) must, charge, for
example* at least $3.00 a ticket for a $15,000 attraction (plus
other costs) or $6.00 for you and a date. But if we had e
16,000 seat facility think of the SI.OO cost you would
have.
t (
You are already paying the $6.00 per quarter now for talent and
programs in Florida Gym.
VOTE YES ON FEBRUARY 4th
' i iMsvamwwiJ i



UF Swimmers To Rely On Veterans

By BRUCE PAGE
Alligator Correspondent
The Florida swim team faces
FSU at Florida Pool on Feb. 14,
'Mi
BILL STRATE
... in NCAA Championship

NEXT SEASON
Alabama To Battle (JSC

LOS ANGELES (UPI) The
University of Southern
California and University of
Alabama announced they would
take advantage of a new NCAA
rule permitting colleges an 11 th
football game by meeting in the
seasons opener for both teams
Sept. 12 at Birmingham.
The announcement was made
jointly by USC Athletic Director

Transfers Cant Play
Says Arizona Coach
TUCSON, Ariz. (UPI) University of Arizona head football coach
Bob Weber said Monday two University of lowa football players who
planned to transfer to Arizona will not be allowed to play football for
the Wildcats.
Weber said, We do not encourage transfers and will not take them
into our football program. He made the statement after meeting with
the other members of the Wildcat coaching staff. Weber would not
comment further on the matter.
He was referring to plans announced Sunday by quarterback Larry
Lawrence and fullback Tom Smith that they were considering
transferring from lowa to Arizona.
Lawrence, a 193-pound junior, and Smith, a 210-pound
sophomore, said they planned to transfer to Arizona but refused to
give any reason for their plans.

FOUNPCD lU
NjfAl
Meeting
7:00 pm >
Tuesday, Feb. 3,1970
Electrical Engineering
Building South
Room 310
Topic
Engineering l.n
T.rdining E.xam
Engineering In
Training Exam
and Professional Registration
What is it?
Why me?
M
FLORIDA
ENGINEERING
SOCIETY
Speaker:
Mr. Eugene Lent, Jr. P.E.
Executive Dir., of F.E.S.

and a week later travels to
Georgia for the Southern
Intercollegiate Championships.
Preparing for these meets, the
Tankers will be depending
eA'Jtk
BILL DORNEY
... sat out last year

Jess Hill and Alabama Athletic
Director and Coach Paul Bear
Bryant Saturday. The game next
September will be followed by a
second game in 1971 at Los
Angeles on Sept. 10.
Alabama and USC had
scheduled regular season home
and home games in 1977 and
1978 but were not able to woric
in any earlier games until the

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Tuesday Only
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IN UPCOMING FSU MEET

heavily on the talents of three of
theirveterans: Jamie Murphy,Bill
Dorney and Bill Strate.
Murphy, a junior from Winter
Park, swims in the individual
JAMIE MURPHY
... favors the IM event

NCAA voted to permit teams an
11th game.
We wanted to schedule an
outstanding intersectional
opponent for our 11 th game and
we feel we have done so by
scheduling Alabama, Hill said.
Bryant said Alabama had not
planned on adding the extra
game so soon but when the
opportunity presented itself to
meet the Trojans we just had to
take advantage of the new rule.
Southern California had 9-0-1
regular season record and then
scored a 10-3 win over Michigan
in the Rose Bowl. Alabama had
one of its poorer records this
past season with a 6-5 mark,
including a loss to Colorado in
the Liberty Bowl.
Coach John McKay of the
Trojans and Bryant are close
friends and had hoped to match
their teams when it could be
arranged.
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
4c Sell Trade Repair. 4
M Reloading supplies. Custom
M reloading. Harry Beckwith,
Z gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

medley event but has recently
started swimming freestyle
sprints.
He has surprised a lot of
people, as his time of 48.5 for
the 100-yard freestyle is the
third fastest on the squad.
Jamie likes switching events,
but feels that he is mainly an IM
swimmer because, Swimming
four different strokes in one
event is more of a challenge, and
1 feel stronger and more
confident in the IM.
Jamies success in the
freestyle events has shown what
a strong and versatile swimmer
he is, and this is just what we
need for our upcoming meets,
coach Eddie Reese said.
Backstroke is also a bright
spot on the team. In just about
every meet thus far Strate and
Domey have taken first and
second in the 200-yard
backstroke with only a few
seconds separating them
Domey, a transfer from
Michigan, sat out last year, since
transfer swimmers are ineligible
for a year. However, he used this
time to good advantage,
practicing daily with the team.
His efforts have paid off and
this year he has provided the
Gators with much-needed depth
in the backstroke, as well as
setting records in his event.
But Bill feels he has not done
his best yet and is looking
forward to the championship
meets and the Nationals, since
the added competition should
help him lower his times.
Strate, a sophomore from
Jacksonville, has already
qualified for the NCAA
Championships with a time of
55.9 for his leg of the medley
relay. Being on a relay appeals to
Bill. You have three other guys
depending on you so you have
to do your best.
Commenting on the 200
backstroke, he feels that
swimming stroke for stroke with
Domey bothers him This is a
psychological factor and I feel it

TiMf**, 39/O r Th* F JpcHj* Alli^rtot,.

has held me back, but lam
looking forward to the
upcoming meets for a chance to
break loose.
RED PIN q A
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM Mb
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
ORANGES
$2 bushel
U-Pic-em
MODEL HOMES
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

GOU'MIt 60
<]jt GOLF CLUBS RENTED
lift., CLUB HOUSE
mm* electric carts
WBP* LESSONS AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3Vi Ml. WEST OF 1.75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

Page 15



I. Th# Florida Alligator. Tuasday, February 3.1970

Page 16

j|* ON WHEELS
| Porsches Win
808 THOMAS *&
The 24-Hours of Daytona marked the beginning of a new decade of
endurance racing last weekend as a pair of 917 Porsches finished
one-two.
With the victory, Porsche picked up nine pTecious points toward
the World Manufacturers Championship and limited Ferrari to only
four points.
The Porsches, entered by J. W. Engineering whose Ford GT-40s
won seven major endurance races in 6B and '69, were different from
the factory Porsches of the past. Prior to the start of the race
Saturday the Porsche mechanics were resting. The cars were
clean-looking both inside and out. There was no last-minute fixing to
do. The whole team was prepared to race.
When the race started, the blue and orange Porsches took the lead,
and between the two of them, never once gave it up. The car driven
by Jo Siffert and Brian Redman led the first three hours and the car
driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Leo Kinnunenled from 6 p. m. to the
finish.
During the race, problems encountered by the John Wyre team
were with the Siffert/Redman car. It experienced minor lighting
trouble Saturday evening, causing it to give up the lead, and a clutch
failure Sunday at 7 a. m. In spite of an hour long pit stop to replace
the dutch, the car still finished second.-
The only trouble experienced by the winning car was a broken
exhaust pipe, which did not effect the cars performance.
After the race, Rodriguez said, The car was prepared beautifully."
He also said that the Porsche was easier to drive than other cars he
has raced. Rodriguez was driving a Porsche at Daytona for the first
time. In the past he has usually driven for Ferrari.
We were very lucky that the other cars had problems, said
Rodriguez. We just drove as fast as we could safely."
Ferraris problems began early in the race when one of the factory
512 s hit the wall coming out of the infield. The car sustained
suspension damage, and it was suspension failure that eventually put
all of the 512 s out of contention.
The only 512 Ferrari to finish driven by Mario Andretti and Jacky
Ickx (who was moved into this car when his failed early in the race),
pitted twice to have suspension parts welded. In spite of these long
delays, it still finished third, only one lap behind the second place
Porsche.
The Ferraris also experienced body damage as the fiberglass began
coming apart. Several of the red cars cracked bodywork in minor
accidents or from stones thrown up form the track. The wind then
took over to enlarge the cracks and require extensive repairs on four
of the cars.
The two Ferrari 312 prototypes, entered by North American
Racing Team, finished a commendable forth and fifth, but not
without minor problems. Both suffered oil seal leaks late in the race.
The Matras, running as high as third during the night, experienced
electrical problems. One of the French cars stopped out on the course,
and had to be repaired by the driver, Jean-Pierre Beltoise. The other
car had several very long pit stops with a failure starter. Both Matras
finished the race on pit row, one in tenth place.
During the last decade, Ferrari was the most respected name in long
distance racing. But in the 24-Hours the German cars clearly out-ran
and out-lasted the Ferrari challenge. If the 24-Hours was any
reflection of what is to come, the next ten years of endurance racing
could belong to Porsche.
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phon>

PLAYER OF THE YEAR
Hickok Award To Seaver

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (UPI)
Tom Seaver, the All-American
Boy" of the world champion
New York Mets, Monday night
was named the winner of the
20th annual S. Rae Hickok
Professional Athlete of the Year
Award.
Seaver, who won 25 games
and was voted the National
League's Cy Young Award last
season, received the SIO,OOO
diamond-studded, gold-buckled
belt which goes with the Hickok

{ K* n turi(if fried 1
M 214 N.W. 13th St. K
1145. W. 34th St.,
m 376-6472 372-3649
I [-Bl DINNER GOA I
I mmJl box v9y |
I 3 Pc. Chicken Reg. 1.25 K
Mashed Potatoes 's
I BRING COUPON I
Rolls
I The Seminole means a lot of things to I
I a lot of people. Its a corsage-presser. a I
I volume to put on your bookshelf-show I
I your children. Its a pictorial capsule of I
| everyday life-the highlights of those very |
| special events at the University of Florida|
| 1970. Its hard work, learning, fun I
| weekends and you. I
I Let the 1970 Seminole be I
I something for you. I
I ORDER NOW I
I At the sign of Aquarius or I
I Use the coupon. I
I 1970 SEMINOLE IS YOU I
I Please reserve copies of the 1970 Seminole I
dl I have enclosed $ ($6.00 per copy) I
II Enclose extra dollar to have it mailed. I
I| J Student Number
3| Yu will be notified in the Alligator when the I
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1970 Seminole. KI
V Rm. 330.JWRU. Kl

award during the annual
Rochester-Press-Radio Club
Charity Dinner at War Memorial
Stadium.
The 25-year-old right-hander
from Fresno, Calif., received the
Hickok award only 24 hours
after accepting the New York
Baseball Writers Association
award as the player of the year.
Also honored at Monday
nights dinner were Carl HubbeD,
the famous meal ticket of the
New York Giants during the

19305, and former heavyweight
champion Joe Louis. Former
heavyweight champion Rocky
Marciano, 1952 Hickok winner
who died in an airplane crash
last year, also was honored
during the dinner.