Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third part of a three part
series on the proposed activities
center for the UF.)
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
If students pass the
referendum Wednesday on the
proposed University Activities
Center, and the City of
Gainesville and Alachua County
contribute $2.5 million, both

'RfiA
*A(I

Vol 62, No. 76

IN THURSDAY MEETING
Senate Backs UAC;
Supports O'Connell

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate
Thursday passed a resolution in
support of the proposed
University Activities Center.
The resolution, which was
introduced by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, urges that
all efforts be continued to
develop an ample University
Activities Center. It also urges
that the center be publicized for
its educational and cultural
worth and support be solicited
from all possible sources.
Dr. E.T. York, chairman of
the finance committee for the
University Activities Center,
answered questions from senate
members about the Center with
Wm
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DR. E. T. YORK
... answers questions

gl|lliilldel:; ;T;
||§ :
ONE WHITE student may
drop charges now pending
against blacks in recent
dorm incident page 2
Classifieds 12, 13, 14
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
FSU News 6
Letters 9
Movies 12
Orange and Blue 11
Small Society 6
Sports 20-23
UAC 6
What's Happening S

UF, Gainesville May Benefit From UAC

Controversy

local and state government may
come out ahead.
A study released by First
Research Corporation of Miami
reveals that city and county
governments could save about

The
Florida Alligator

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiuummiiiiniiimiuuiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
The University Planning Office has been working
out traffic plans and has proposed a road which would
proceed along the west side of the campus in the area
of the Center.
Dr. E. T. York, Chairman
Finance Committee
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHiuniiinniiiiiiiiNiiiiiinniniiiiiiiiiiii

regards to traffic and its effects
on Lake Alice.
The University Planning
Office has been working out
traffic {dans, he said, and has
proposed a road which would
proceed along the west side of
the campus in the area of the
Center, the plans for the center
call for a major, parking facility
of 5,000 plus cars.
He said that the center would
not damage Lake Alice and that
those conservationists concerned

Violence Erupts
At Lincoln High

Police and sheriffs deputies
used tear gas Thursday to quell
several hundred black students
who staged an angry outburst of
rock throwing at all-black
Lincoln High School, which is

Telegram Raps Desegregation Order

By United Press International
Sixty-five thousand Floridians sent the biggest telegram in history
to the U.S. Supreme Court Thursday complaining about the chaotic
situation in their schools and Georgia sued the federal government
seeking relief from segregation orders.
The 13-pound telegram, which filled six big rolls of teletype paper
and several smaller rolls of paper, asked Chief Justice Warren Burger
to visit Florida to see the effects of your mid-year desegregation
carder.
The telegram was delivered to Burgers office, but the Justice was
undergoing a routine medical check at the U.S. Naval Hospital at
Bethesda, Md.

COUNTY, CITY TO GIVE $2.5 MILLION

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

$1 million in capital outlay by
using university facilities instead
of building their own
multipurpose activities center.
Also, State Senator Bob
Saunders has said the state has

University of Florida, Gainesville

have been well satisfied with
the plan proposed.
In another decision a program
of Afro-American studies was
granted certification by the
Senate in a unanimous voice
vote.
7
The program, which is offered
by the) College of Arts and
Sciences, includes courses in
History, Economics,
Anthropology, English, Political
Science and Sociology.

being closed by court-ordered
integration.
Windows in passing cars and
the school were smashed by
flying rocks and bricks. At least
(SEE 'ROCK' PAGE 2)

SENT BY 65,000 FLORIDIANS

no plans for funding
construction of a UAC, which
raises tile question as to where
the $2.6 million expected from
state sources will come from.
On Wednesday, Saunders
reaffirmed his opinion as to a
lack of available state funds.
We dont have sufficient
money for classroom
construction now. Funding a
university activities center is out
of the question. If the

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MODEL CITY?
Today's cities are perfect mirrors of our alienation so says Italian
architect and UF Urban Design professor Dr. Leonardo Ricci. See
story on page 4.

State Sen. Tom Slade of Jacksonville, who organized the telegram
campaign, had sent airplane tickets to all the justices for the trip to
Florida, but the tickets were returned.
j Slade said he hoped the gigantic telegram, financed by the signers at
80 cents each, would bring sanity to what otherwise would be a
chaotic situation.
Those who have signed this telegram are not those who would
take over university buildings, lie down in front of trains or march on
Washington, said Slade. They are the productive citizens of this
state ... but they too have a right to be heard.
Western Union officials said it was the longest telegram they ever
sent. The previous record holder was a4l,ooo>word press release from
the Yalta Conference after WWII.

referendum on Wednesday fails,
you wont get the facility. Its
that simple.
However, the State Road
Department recently budgeted
$600,000 for the construction
of a four-lane highway for traffic
entering and leaving the centers
periphery parking spaces.
Also, a member of the UAC
Student Committee on Thursday
(SEE 'UAC' PAGE 18)

Friday, January 30, 1970



Page 2

t, Tke PtorUa AlHgor, January 30, 1370

54% Os Reitz Union Users Non-Students

By MARY ANNE GILLIS
A> Cl If >a> -- f
AlligSTOr oils I finun
The results of a survey taken by the Reitz Union
show 54 per cent of its patrons sue not students.
The survey, taken over a period of a year, shows
that the total student use of the facilities amounted
to only 46 per cent. Compared by the time of day,
it was found that students used the facilities only 20
per cent in the morning, but this rose to 78 per cent
at night.
The auditorium seemed to be the most popular
gathering place for students. One reason given for

Communist Envoy Returns)
Paris Deadlock May Break

PARIS (UPI) Le Due Tho,
political leader of the North
Vietnamese peace talks
delegation, is returning to Paris
with apparent instructions to try
to break the yeainold Vietnam
deadlock, Communist
diplomatic sources said
Thursday.
The sources said Tho, the
senior Communist official with
the North Vietnamese
delegation, will arrive in Paris on
Friday. He has been in Hanoi
and is now in Moscow for talks

Goal Os Georgia Suit
Total Desegregation
The Georgia suit, filed in federal district court at Washington,
sought either of two alternatives a complete ban from the
enforcement of school desegregation, or complete enforcement in
every state of the union.
Georgia A tty. Gen. Arthur Bolton filed the suit in behalf of Gov.
Lester Maddox and Georgia school officials. It named U.S. Atty. Gen.
John Mitchell and HEW Secretary Robert Finch as defendants.
The suit claimed that enforcement of racial quotas violates the
1964 Civil Rights Act and the due process and equal protection
clauses of the U.S. Constitution.

| 3 Face Indictment
I In Union Slaying

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
federal grand jury in Cleveland
Thursday indicted three men. on
charges of conspiracy in the
killing of United Mine Workers
union leader Joseph A.
Yablonski:
Attorney General John N.
Mitchell said the seven count
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. x Notices for correction must be given before the rjext
insertion.

with Kremlin leaders.
The Communist sources said
Tho apparently is bringing new
instructions to Xuan Thuy, the
leader of the actual negotiating
team from North Vietnam.
Thuy has boycotted the last
several sessions on grounds
President Nixon has
downgraded the talks.
The Communists said Tho
would bring with him the latest
thinking of the Hanoi leadership
that assumed command after the
death of President Ho Chi Minh

indictment charged Paul Eugene
Gilly, Aubran Wayne Martin and
Claude Edward Vealey with
Yablonskis murder at his
Clarksville, Pa., home Dec. 31.
James Charles Phillips and
Annette Gilly were also named
but were described as
co-conspirators, not defendants,
as were other persons whose
names are ... unknown.*
The three defendants, the two
co-conspirators and the
unknown persons were
specifically accused of
conspiring to kill Yablonski
who was to be a witness before
a grand jury in Washington,
D.C., thereby obstructing justice
in violation of federal law.
Among the methods of killing
Yablonski that the three men
and their co-conspirators
discussed were poisons,
particularly arsenic, placing a
bomb underneath Yablonskis
bedroom window and in his car;
and using a rifle and gunshot at
close range, the indictment said.

YFAP-I PNG SURVEY INDICATES

this was that totals taken for auditorium use
included movie attendance. Runners-up were the
cafeteria, ballroom, meeting rooms, lounges and
office space.
The non-student groups were divided into three
categories: university departments, recruitment
(placement services and employment interviews),
and other groups such as university-related short
courses and seminars.
University departments used the facilities an
average of 23 per cent, reaching a peak of 51 per
cent in June and a low point of 13 per cent in

last Sept. 3. Diplomatic sources
in London have reported the
Hanoi leadership divided among
hawks and doves and pro-Peking
and pro-Moscow factions.
The impasse at the Paris talks
remained as solid as ever. At
todays session, allied and
Communist diplomats traded
accusations and made proposals
which the other side rejected.
The North Vietnamese used
today's meeting to launch a
strong protest against an alleged
bombing raid carried out by U.S.
Air Force jets against areas north
of the Demilitarized Zone.
In Saigon, U.S. military
sources did not comment on the
report but said a Communist
MIG shot down an American
rescue helicopter while it was
trying to rescue the two man
crew of an FIOS fighter-bomber
shot down earlier near the
borders of Laos and North
Vietnam.

IN DORM INCIDENT
Student Dropping Charges

By ROB SHARKEY
Alligator Correspondent
One of the two white students
who claimed he and a roommate
were forced to dean up a
dormitory hall at gunpoint last
week is now asking the state to
drop the charges.
Bruce Gerald Schwack and his
roommate Robert Layne Wessels
claimed they were forced to
clean up a dorm hall at gunpoint
by a group of Negro students.
Thursday Schwack told states
attorneys he wants to get out of
the case entirely and let campus
authorities prosecute instead of
the state.
A campus conviction for the
blacks could mean anything
from a reprimand to expulsion,

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January. Afternoon was the most trequent time for
meeting and the cafeteria was found to be the most
frequently used room.
Department office space came to 47 per cent
while student office space was only 34 per cent.
University-related groups used space in the Union
mainly in the morning. Total space used amounted
to 20 per cent.
Placement and interview utilizes 11 per cent of
Union facilities, peaking in November and February.

Rock Throwing Hits
Lincoln High School

three people were treated for
injuries at a hospital, but were
not admitted.
Authorities immediately
cancelled classes at the school on
Friday, scheduled as the final
day of operation for Lincoln.
Police barricaded the area
around the school, and the
Highway Patrol said it was
keeping extra men on duty in
Gainesville. in case of further
outbreaks of trouble.
Gov. Claude Kirk arrived in
Gainesville near the height of the
trouble and drove past the
school without stopping. He was
in town for an unrelated meeting
and said he had been briefed on
the school trouble by sheriff Joe
Crevasse, told it was in hand
and saw no need to stop.
Gainesville Police Capt.
Courtney Roberts said the
outburst followed a day-long

while a state conviction could
mean prison terms.
To further complicate the
matter the other white, Robert
Wessels, admitted to campus

Crusade Visits SAE
How a personal relationship with God can transform any college
students life will be the subject of a talk at 9 p.m. Sunday, at the
Sigma Alpha Epsilon house by Robert T. Norwood, Campus Crusade
for Christ regional director.
Appearing here under the sponsorship of College Life, a group of
several hundred UF Christian students and faculty, Norwood has
spoken at FSU and many other southeastern campuses recently, and
claims students everywhere are responding through God in a real
revolution of love on university campuses; When God enters your
hfe, you rapidly learn how much youre helped in reaching true
brotherhood, and gaining a really full and abundant life, he said.
Open to anyone, the meeting will also feature a guest performance
by a folk-singing group led by SAE president Bob Glenn.

building of tension among the
students over the dosing of the
school, and the striking of a
white woman teacher by a rock
believed thrown by a school
dropout hanging around the
school.
Shouting broke out and then
rock throwing as the students
spilled outside at the end of the
day's dasses.
There wefe no arrests,
although police declared' a state
of civil disorder and threatened
to arrest students for breaking
the peace.
We just want to give
everybody a chance to dear the
area and go home. That's what
we want, '* Roberts said. The
students left the tear-gassed area.
Alachua General Hospital said
it treated three unidentified
people for injuries received in
the school violence, but did not
admit any of them.

authorities that the weapon used
may not have been a gun.
He had something that
looked like a gun, but I would
never say I was positive it was
gun, a real gun, he said.



RESENTS STUDENTS TYING UP s fIME

Paper Raps Rep. Bothwell

ff i£{
By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Writer
The Daytona Beach Evening
News in an editorial Monday
criticized Rep. Cecil Bothwell of
Orlando for telling UF students
concerned with the harmful
effects of DDT that their job is
to go and learn from someone
who knows more than they do.
The Evening News said
Bothwell*s attitude and
treatment of the students
enabled them to better
understand the widespread
student revolt against the

Peace March Begins
In Plaza At 7 Tonight
By CHRIS MOORE
Alligator Writar
Come together on the road to world peace will be the theme of a
student peace procession beginning tonight at 7 p.m. in the Plaza of
the Americas and ending at Crescent Beach.
Participants in the march will listen together, to bands and skits
during a 4 p.m rally in the Plaza. An open microphone system will be
set up for anyone wishing to speak on love and peace.
Andy Kramer, 4AS, a spokesman for the peace activities, said the
purpose is to get people together to get rid of wars within ourselves,
and to establish peaceful relations with others.
He stressed the activities would be non-political and organized by
students, not by any organization.
The candlelight march, for which a parade permit has been
obtained from the city, will begin at the Plaza of Americas, proceed
down 13th Street to the Gainesville Mall, and back down University
Avenue.
The marchers originally were planning to walk from the mall to
Crescent Beach, Kramer said, but because of the distance of 70 miles
they may decide to drive instead.
It the decision is made to walk, the group will go from the mall to a
sunrise meeting in Crescent Beach Sunday.
If cars are used, Kramer said, the peace marchers will return to
campus from the mall and ride to the beach, come back Saturday and
hold a sunrise meeting in the Plaza Sunday.
Meanwhile, people are encouraged to come to the Plaza throughout
the weekend to just dig each other.
India Club Students
Feast Independence

If youve always wondered
why some Indians wear turbans
or if elephants still roam the
streets of Calcutta, or what the
Hindus really believe in, wander
over to the Baptist Student
Union Saturday night around 7
p.m.
The India Club will be
celebrating the Republic Day,
their Fourth of July, and
Indian students will discuss five
of the hundreds of religions in
India.
Music is also on the evenings
agenda. Students will perform
IftEQWKfnfrtlj
I JUG BRNOI

juiO itrti iaie SilriSSm :
establishment*
The UF students were
testifying during a legislative
hearing last week on banning
DDT. At that time Bothwell told
Bill Seaman, a zoology graduate
student, The position of
students in a meeting of this sort
is exactly the same as it is on
campus. Their job is to go and
learn from someone who knows
more than they do. I resent your
coming here and tying up our
time.
Seaman replied, Our
generation is more crisis-oriented

with the sitar following a
discussion of religions and any
questions about the customs,
history, and current situation in
India.
More than 100 students of
several nationalities attended the
clubs get-together last quarter,
said Guljit S. Kochnar, club
president.
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and were worried about
contamination of our
environment.**
The Evening News felt
Seamans credentials as a
graduate student may have
brought more specialized
educated opinion to bear on the
DDT subject than possessed by
Bothwell and the others.
When a lesiglator closes his
mind to opinion on any
subject his committee is probing,
then a very clear danger signal
has been sounded, the editorial
said.
Bothwells opinion was not
the majority voice of the
legislative establishment in
Florida, the paper said, citing
the fact that several other
legislators came to Seamans
defense.
As for ourselves, we
welcome student opinion and
realize that if sometimes it seems
too shrill, it may be that in too
many circumstances only a
loud voice can make itself
heard ... Young people have a
special right and duty to be
worried about things like this.
When they speak, we should
listen, the editorial said.
Foreign Aid
Bill Passed
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Senate gave final congressional
approval Wednesday to a $1.86
billion foreign aid money bill
one of the smallest in the history
of the program.
There was unanimous Senate
agreement on the measure which
previously was involved in deep
controversy, particularly over a
House proposal to furnish an
additional $54.5 million to buy
a squadron of Phantom jet
planes for Nationalist China.
With a John Roberts
class ring from g*
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Gainesville, Florida

RaceTalksOn WUFT
Three UF professors will be among the participants in a panel
discussion entitled Racial Balance: A Positive Solution to be
heard Sunday at 5 p.m. oh WUFT Channel 5, Report Five.
Ira J. Gordon, professor of education and director of the
College of Education Institute for the Development of Human
Resources; Hal G. Lewis, professor and chairman of the
foundations department of the College of Education and Robert
Sherman, assistant professor in the foundations department of
the College of Education will be joined by Mrs. Sue Legg,
president of Gainesville Women for Equal Rights and City
Commissioner Neil Butler in a discussion of the positive
possibilities of integration.
The social and educational benefits of balanced integration to
children as opposed to token integration will be discussed, as
well as specific problems connected with achieving a racial
balance in Gainesville.
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No Exam Tuition refunds for Graduate Study.
See our recruiter on Friday, February 13,1970. Visit your
Placement Office Now for brochures and SIGN UP to hear the
full story, or write to:
Paraonel Bureau
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
State Campus Building 5, Albany, Nao York 12226

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Page 3



Page 4

1, Hm Florida AHigator, Friday, January 30, 1970

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Not one city in this worid is liveable or fit for
man, Italian architect and UF Urban Design
professor Dr. Leonardo Ricci says. '
Todays cities are perfect mirrors of our
alienation. The present zoning regulations
represent the sense of separation a man feels
between himself and others, he says.
The cities are divided into three zones: the green
suburbs, the smokey industrial outskirts of the city
and the inner city where the power structure, or
administrators work. This zoning means the
separation of classes, with different residential areas
for various incomes and areas for commercial
interests* he said.
They have alienated everything, says the
visiting professor who contemptuously refers to
Beverly Hills as a rich man's ghetto, and the
suburbs as die most horrible frustration and
isolation you can have.
Architects today must work with sociologists,
ecologists, people in all areas of life, as well as with
the residents themselves, to discard the cadavers
of the past and create new bodies where work,
play and the classes are integrated, Ricci feels.
As a result, he and a group of graduate students
under his direction are designing a living area
embodying all the essential principles for a city fit
for man.
They have chosen an area designated for renewal
by the Federal Model Cities Program in Miami. The
area has a predominantly black population of about
95,000. When their plans are completed they will
present them to the program officials as an alternate
plan. Originally they had hoped to work under a
$300,000 grant as consultants to the model city,
but are now working independently because of the
red tape, Ricci says.
What will life be like in this new city?
traffic patterns, however. Otherwise a mass transit
system on a grand scale will be used for the most
part. Monorails and moving sidewalks are tentative
suggestions.
We've got to start getting along without cars,
Jon Toppe, one of Ricci's graduate students, said.
Cars are inefficient, and cause pollution; why
use two tons to move one body? he asked.
For moving into the megalopolis (an area
comparable to metro Miami, population one
n nggg nm 11
THIN COLUMNS
... hung from a main roof grid

The Problem: Unliveable Cities

But Can It Be Realized?

SIDE VIEW OF APARTMENTS
... shows open plazas jutting out from the sides at all levels

million, which surrounds the neighborhood they are
working on) people would come off the main
highway onto an Exchange Tower, with a huge
parking complex. From there, drivers take the
monorail to any (dace in the city.
The guy wouldn't have to drive his car 1,600
Mocks to get there instead, Toppe said.
Those drivers who are going farther than Miami
will be diverted completely from the city by an
existing interstate bypass, to keep unnecessary
traffic out of the city as much as possible.
Streets surrounding residential neighborhoods
would be prari wjth material, jgrhros
and wcffijKtt pngpl tramLjfie^^
jrmS wouldyyep fcrtfpf §ganjCdrivylfEifj|
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relative safety since most of the traffic would be
shut out, and many roads would be closed off.
Existing streets will be widened to indude service
stations and landscaped areas so that a road
complex similar to a turnpike design would replace
conventional roads.
Instead of the zoning system, Ricci has created a
scale organization, for living patterns on three
levels: the territorial scale (state-size), the
megalopolis scale (Miami size) and the
neighborhood scale (Model City area).
On the neighborhood scale, centrally-located
services that fit the needs of that particular
community are clustered together. Local shopping
centers are transformed into nerve centers where
legal aid, local government, schools and coffee
houses, as well as commercial interests are
represented. Ricti foresees it becoming a gathering
place.
The structures on the megalopolis scale would
likewise include services which benefit metro Miami
as a whole. Airports, coliseums and hospitals would
be located here.
The whole idea is to bring people together and to
create spaces for easy communication, Ricci and his
students maintain.
One of the most revolutionary facets of the city
are the apartment buildings built on suspension
cables like bridges, designed last year by Riccis
students under visiting UF Graduate Research
Professor Riccardo Morandi.
Four large columns would hold up cables, from
which the roof is to be suspended. Thin vertical
wires, enclosed in a cement column, would then
hang from the roof in pegboard fashion down the
length of the building, creating squared spaces.
The wires are the key. Inexpensive prefabricated
walls could be bought, which will interlock in any
direction into the wire columns. Then apartments
could be expanded or made smaller easily, and the
walls would probably be available in a variety of
materials, Ricci's students said.
If a young couple wanted to buy a certain
amount of area on the second floor of these
suspended living areas, they could buy a wall, block
off part of the room and rent it out, until they
needed it when the children came along.
Physical separation between classes based on
income would be reduced, or unnecessary with
these buildings, the students maintain. For with
more money a person could simply buy more room
or a small, but more luxurious area, while a person

with less money could live nearby with a small
amount of space, or one larger, but more
economical design, they argue.
There is no fixed space or design, everything is
flexible in these buildings, its designers say.
Even doors in the living areas are scarce. Folding
panels will be used widely, especially by those who
entertain and wish to combine a kitchen and dining
area to make room for parties.
Stressing the importance of keeping a natural
environment in all spaces in which man lives, Riccis
students have planned for gardens and landscaping
even on the middle floors of an apartment building.
Condors ompfazgupuld be open-ended to let fresh
iffi^^^t^theOTuM^aPStithey have
met all the Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
codes.
Although Ricci has dedicated a large portion of
his career to the idea of this city, he has reservations
about whether or not it will ever be realized in the
United States because of all the bureaucracy and
red tape. But he feels the government is the only
agent who can build the cities.
In the past American structures have been the
work of an individual architect, or of a speculator,
but the speculator doesnt care about the people or
the society which live in his buildings, Ricci, who
is also director of Italys Urban Institute, said.
Only the government can organize a wide range
of people such as economists, doctors, sociologists
and others to build cities as a team so they will fit
all the needs of man, he insists.
Molding the cities to man instead of vice versa is
the basis of Riccis designs.
I could build 10 towns in a night, under water,
in balloons, red ones, pink ones, but they would be
useless for man, he said, gesturing in his animated
Italian fashion.
If we dont combine our efforts to build better
cities fit for man, there is no hope for the U.S.
PROFESSOR LEONARDO RICCI
... "I could build 10 towns in a night"



' Eco-Activists To Face Political Battles

By EARL HARTMAN
Alligator Correspondent
The eco-activist, a name
given those who attempt to
eliminate the evils of
environmental pollution, are in
for some very tough political
battles.
This was among statements
made by Dr. Barry Commoner,
environmentalist, botanist and
author of the book Science and
Survival, to an audience of UF
students and faculty in the J.
Hlllis Miller Health Center
auditorium, last week.
We must face the fact, he
said, that corrective measures
in the fight against pollution will
set off economic, social and legal
controversies.
WHATS
HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
MILITARY MATTERS (?):
The Veterans Club will hold its
monthly meeting in the
Rathskeller tonight at 7.
ZODIAC ZONKERS: The
Aquarius Club will meet at
midnight tonight. Everyone is
welcome to the meeting at 1823
N.W. 2 Ave.
SLOOP AND SAILS: The
Gator Sailing Club will have a
party on Saturday night. All
members wanting further
information should call
372-6760.
ADVISE AND CONSENT: A
Young Socialist Alliance meeting
on Sunday, at 6, will discuss
plans for defense of the arrested
black students. The meeting will
be in room 355 of the Reitz
Union.
IF IT ISNT CRICKET:
Anyone interested in playing
cricket should attend practice
Saturday afternoon at 2 on the
ROTC drill field. For more
information, call 376-7746.
BAND I&ANG: The second
annual Florida Invitational Stage
Band Festival will be held in the
P. K. Yonge auditorium on
Saturday. The festival begins 9
a.m.
SINGLES ELIMINATION:
The Friday Afternoon Club
invites all singles, 21 or older, to
join them in celebration. The
group meets at the Lamplighter
from 5:30 7:30 p.m.
INTERSECTION
ENTERTAINMENT: The Ewing
Street Times is currently
appearing at the Rathskeller.
ALLS FAIR IN LOVE
AND ...: A Revolution of
Love will be the topic
discussion at the Sunday
meeting of Campus Crusade for
Christ. The group will meet at
9:13 p.m. at the SAE house.
I>£l~~l HOLY TRINITY
rH EPISCOPAL
FOLK MASS
9:30 A.M.
SUN. WORSHIP
, 8,9:30,11:00 A.M.
CHURCH SCHOOL
9:30
NURSERY AT
9:30 & 11:00 A.M.
116 N£. Ist STREET

ENVIRONMENTALIST COMMONER WARNS

Among major points made by
Commoner were:
Todays environmental
crisis is an ecological backlash
brought about by modem
technologys disregard for the
balance of nature.
The 1980 s will see
widespread catastrophe because
of the breakdown of ecological
systems unless drastic changes
are made.
President Nixon should
recognize we are in fact in the
midst of an ecological crisis and
declare a state of ecological
emergency.
Ecology is the branch of
biology dealing with the
interdependency of living things
and their environment.
Human intrusion on
ecological systems without
regard for the interdependency,
or balance, of nature creates
cataclysmic changes causing
the breakdown of the systems.
Chemical fertilizers which
have replaced the nitrogen cycle

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whereby manure served to
replenish farmland with
nitrogen. Because of the
breakdown of this ecological
system, agriculture is hooked
on the use of fertilizer just like a
drug addict.
Modem sewage treatment
practices are a gigantic
boo-boo because they violate

Anti-Pollution Resolution
Adopted By Young Democrats

The Young Democratic Executive Committee
adopted three resolutions presented by Bruce
Smathers, president of the UF Young Democratic
Club as the group met this month in Miami.
The resolutions, which passed unanimously were:
0 To formulate plans and coordinate efforts to
counter the efforts of the Republican legislators
visiting our campuses and ensure that the truth
about Floridas Republican leadership is understood
in our colleges and universities.
The resolution came after a group of legislators
from the Florida House of Representatives decided
to tour state college campuses to speak to the

the balance of nature by
releasing an overabundance of
bacteria into our waters causing
growths of algae.
Commoner said he believed
the environmental crisis can be
resolved by the same technology
which created it.
There is no reason why we
cant have closed factory

Friday, January 30, 1970, TIM Florida Alligator, I

silent majority and discuss current issues.
To set up a statewide speakers* forum on
college and university campuses for Democratic
candidates before the primaries (which have been
rescheduled for September), as well as offer the
services of the College Young Democratic Clubs on
an equal basis to all Democratic candidates.**
To express our continued concern with
environmental pollution and urge our support for
the national Environmental Teach-In.*
The resolution concerns each college Democratic
club which will work with environmental groups on
their campuses to help carry our their programs.

systems which do not emit
pollutants, emmissionless
vehicles and other means to
avoid pollution, he said.
He foresees, however, a need
for a return to a scarcer kind of
economy, one in which there is
the elimination of unessential
products and a reduction of
advertising to create the demand
for these products.

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

Page 6

Q. Why does the University Activities Center cost so much?
A. Component costs are estimated at $2.5 million for the
performing arts theatre, $1.5 million sos the natatorium, $400,000 for
the amphitheatre and sl2 million for the coliseum, with roads and
parking lots costing an additional $1.35 million. Under the concept of
the complex, the sharing of such facilities as 2,000 tons of air
conditioning and more than 200,000 sq. ft. of much needed academic
space can be built at considerable savings if such space is constructed
in conjunction with the coliseum, thus sharing its mechanical and
circulatory system.
Q. Will the inflation of building costs increase the proposed $17.5
million total?
A. A cumulative cost inflation rate is figured into the Activities
Center estimates at approximately 10 per cent per year until 1972
estimated bid date for the facility. With construction costs constantly
rising, delay is a prime factor in high costs.
Q. Could the complex be built if the student referendum is
defeated on Feb. 4? If so, how much longer will it take to complete
the complex?
A. If support for funding the Activities Center is not forthcoming
from the students, UF cannot expect it from other sources. A
percentage of state support is essential before a campaign can be
launched to obtain private support for the facility. The specially
assessed student fee would be pledged against revenue certificates
which cannot be sold without such a base for repayment. The
Legislature did not provide any capital outlay funds during the last
session and there is limited chance for state appropriation from
general revenue sources at the next session, but appropriate legislation
could be obtained to permit funds from the new student fees to be
pledged against revenue certificates.
Q. Will students be asked to finance more facilities in the future if
the students decide to finance this one?
A. The student fee is only one part of the funding as it is planned
to finance the Complex by a combination of student and faculty
participation, county and municipal support, state and federal
appropriations and contributions from alumni and other friends of
UF. Students have participated in financing facilities on this campus
since the 1930s when they assessed themselves to build the original
Florida Union. It is impossible to say whether or not future students
may choose to contribute to their university in a similar fashion.
! news till..
; from... JHMP*! SU
RETREAT: Civil rights activist Dick Gregory will kick off Student
Governments annual junior college retreat at a lecture tonight, 8:30
p.m.
SG sponsors the junior college retreat annually and hosts SG leaders
from Florida junior colleges.
DEBATE: With only five days of active campaigning left,
candidates for student government offices have scheduled a TV debate
and an open forum debate tonight and Monday night.
The commissioner of elections yesterday announced that
continuation of the universitys bloc seating system for campus
organizations will be listed on the ballot for student opinion.
Four official parties have nominated candidates for this years
election and SG officials hope for a turnout of 9,000.
Funky Print Dresses /M
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_____ if VoO WANT To
'' A WHY
SENATE CLERK NOBO SAYj
Office Search Successful

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Response to letters sent to colleges and dorms
last quarter by the Student Senate requesting office
space was generally very good, Clerk of the
Senate Ralph Nobo said.
Office space was requested by the senate in an
effort to get closer to the students and their feelings
so the senate would be more aware of what the
students want, not just what the senators feel,
Nobo said.
He said coordination with councils in the dorms
and colleges would hopefully alleviate
apathy . and the failure to communicate.
Nobo pointed out that only 25 per cent ol the

THE MIAMI HERALD A JW
Will have newsroom and OL H fll
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campus Tuesday and pg m n m m m
Wednesday, February 3 WLu LJ W I I
and 4, seeking summer WyM A, M I
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students turned out at the last election. He said
perhaps students would get more involved if they
have someone to whom to take their requests,
questions or problems. We want to have a two-way
street, he said.
In requesting office space, the senate hopes it
can set up a desk with a person in attendance at
least one hour a day, or a minimum of three days
per week. Nobo said they would try to get a phone
and mail box so students can leave messages.
Living areas and colleges mentioned by Nobo as
having consented to provide space for this purpose
are Broward Hall, Towers, the College of Forestry,
the College of Business Administration and Graham
Hall. The College of Arts and Sciences has already
established a Student Senate office.

by Bridcmqn



NOT GUILTY
Mans on Pleads
LOS ANGELES (UPI) A Superior Court judge entered a plea of
innocent on behalf of hippie cult leader Charles Manson Wednesday
over the shouted objections of the principal defendant in the
Tate-Laianca murders.
Manson, clean-shaven for the first time in a court appearance and
pacing nervously in the prisoners box, tried unsuccessfully for
another delay entering a plea. He is acting as his own attorney in the
case.
Manson, dressed in a white blouse with a red tapestry vest, his hair
falling to his shoulders and looking girlish without his beard, bit at his
lips and put his head in his arms until Stovitz had finished and asked
him how he pleaded.
Your honor, I object to any further proceedings, Manson said. I
object to the grand jury system. I object to the indictment. I object to
the heinous behavior of the establishment in relation to the
indictment.
Superior Court Judge George M. Dell interrupted, and Manson said,
Hold it.
Im not going to hold anything, Dell said. 1 enter a plea of not
guilty on behalf of the defendant. Mr. Manson, you have pursued
delay for the sake of delay.
Is this justice? Manson shouted.
Yes, this is justice, Dell replied.
The courtroom was packed with spectators, including a dozem
members of the Manson Family, who have not been indicted in the
case.
Meiklejohn Named
Kirk Special Assistant

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Don
Meiklejohn, a former newsman
who became a state official and
a Republican under Gov. Claude
Kirk, Wednesday became special
assistant to Kirk for
governmental affairs.
Meiklejohn, who headed the
Beverage Department and the
old State Development
Commission, will resign as
director of the Division of
Commercial Development.
An aide to Kirk said he will
continue for the present at the
same $22,500 salary he now
draws.
No successor has been picked
for the commercial development

GE Strike End Nears
Impending Agreement

NEW YORK (UPI) The
General Electric Co. (GE) and
14 unions were in the critical
final stages of negotiations
Thursday to end the longest
strike in GE history, but
mediators said it would be
Friday or later before an
agreement could be announced.
Bargainers for GE and the
United Electrical Workers (UE)
and International Union of
Electrical Worker? (IUE) the
two largest unions which head
teams bargaining for 12 others
met for three hours late
Wednesday and early Thursday
in the first joint meeting in a
month.
Sources close to the talks said
the meeting was very
beneficial but added, It was
not the friendliest of situations.
GE and the unions have
estimated that the strike has cost

A Kibbutz...
whats it like
Come talk with Shimon Schwartz
Feb. 2 Lounges 122,123, Union 4:00
Sponsored by the JWRU & the Maeoabees

JBNWMIUS.
imhk
job, which functions as the
states chief promotion arm.
I am highly pleased to have
Meiklejohn on the immediate
staff, Kirk said. He will serve as
chief link with the Cabinet and
every department in the
executive branch.
Meiklejohn was an
investigative reporter for the St.
Petersburg Times, and formerly
worked for the Perry news
group.

employes at least S2O million a
week in wages. The cost to the
nations economy was estimated
at more than S 2 billion.
Norm Walker, spokesman for
J. Curtis Counts, director of the
Federal Mediafion and
Counciliation Service, said he
did not expect a settlement
Thursday. Walker said another
joint session certainly would
have to be held before an
announcement could be made
and none had been scheduled.
Counts met with the IUF. and
UE teams during the afternoon.
His spokesman said, I do not
think anything will happen at
todays meeting.
The very basic issues wages
and benefits have been settled,
but now the problem of writing
the contract must be overcome
to end the 95-day-old strike. No
details were released.

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Friday, January 30, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
Fatal
A /)/> Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
. Executive Editor News Editor
A
W Strawberry Fields
| |
| Squawk! J
Carol Sangrwi
With multitudious and vibrant colors that do stagger the Poodian
imagination they strut throughout the land in styles most becoming
peacocks.
Harken, peasants of Poo! they cry out into the night most dark
and quiet, We come to you in living color to save you from an evil
most vile and perilous. For the day doth approach with great speed
and rapidity for that which is called The Referendum.
Squawking thus and other chants of similar nature, the strutting
political peacocks of Poo, they, known as the brothers of The Great
And Exaulted Chapter of Poodian Pale Blue Key flock and flutter
with much noise throughout the kingdom.
Vote No! Squawk. Vote No! Squawk, they chant three times in
rapid succession. Thereafter follows a pause of short and shortening
duration and the chant is picked up again, gaining in volume and force
most fierce.
Verily, it is as if they fight to save their own necks, the peasants
marvel with great and growing disbelief, For sooth, it doth begin to
grate upon our nerves to hear the squawking peacocks far before the
light of dawn reaches Poo, and then on far into the Poodian night.
Yes, oh peasant who labors most long and diligently in the
strawberry fields day after day, it will be most joyous when this
squawking shall cease and they of greater and lesser noble stature do
again forget that we exist at all, his peasant partner laboring at his
side in the fields did speak with much weariness of spirit.
But woe! All pleas for the forces of good and evil and evil and
good, (being some of each on each side), to cease the repetitious and
continuous squawking were in vain.
Methinks it is of grave and solemn importance that this edict shall
be approved by the peasants of Poo. It shall be so! See to it, cried
out Diaries the Shepherd, he who is king of all the land and who is
now approaching the end of this his second reign.
And so with great speed and fleetness of tongue all of the greater
and lesser nobles and ministers of state who did line the long and
brilliant halls of Poodian state set out to carry the wishes of the king
to all in the Land of Poo.
But lo! There are those within the kingdom who dare to denounce
the will of the king, and with even greater fleetness of tongue they did
begin a series of chants that were soon to drive all those who heard
them out of their Poodian minds.
Squawk! It is unfair ... all is unfair ... all of the mighty
factions of Poo are against us! Squawk! It is a plot of most unfair
nature! they did soon begin to chant. And it was picked up and
repeated by all who heard and agreed with the bright and brilliantly
colored peacocks.
And the peasants did toss and turn in their sleep at night, as they
muttered against the feathery phantoms who did plague and acurse all
the land.
Verily. It soon shall be over and sleep will come to us again,
those peasants of great patience soothed.
But lo! There were, among the peasants of Poo, those who were of
dark and pessimistic nature.
Woe unto you who sooth us now. These peacocks shall not be
vanquished from our sight and hearing ever! For come the spring Poo
shall choose a new king and the squawking shall grow in volume and
number, they cautioned darkly.
You cannot speak the truth for such is not possible.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Karen Eng
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor n .u:*Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,87,
88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82, 83, or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expreaad In the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

EDITORIAL

Open The Doors

The results of a recent survey on usage of
the Reitz Union readily reveals the need for
more student space in the building.
Here are some interesting facts from the
survey, which was taken over a year s time.
Student use of the building at all times
is only 46 per cent;
Department office space came to 4/
percent;
Student office space came to only 34
per cent.
We think there are two primary factors
which contribute to this small number of
students using the Union: Not enough office
space for student organizations and, when
you get right down to it, there isnt really
anyplace in the building where you can sit
down and relax.
The office situation could be solved
relatively easily by removing the Department
of Religion from the third floor and Alumni
Services from the first floor.
Student Government recently spent
thousands of dollars remodeling their offices
to provide more space.
Several student organizations have small
offices on the third floor and there is a
constant hassle to provide more space for

Powers: No Such Statement

MR. EDITOR:
Some law students have attacked me in letters
appearing in The Gainesville Sun on January 27 and
TTie Florida Alligator on January 28, 1970
concerning a statement attributed to me by them,
which they state appeared in an article on January
21 in The Sun. There is no such article in the
January 21 issue of The Sun. They apparently refer
to my letter that appeared in The Gainesville Sun on
January 22. It is a letter stating that the word
incompetency should not have been used in the
earlier news stories about Mr. Lamboms
termination. The remainder of the letter is a factual
statement about the termination of Mr. Lambom.
This letter is the only written statement I have made
about the matter until now.
The students in their letter state that I am quoted
as having said that Professor Lamborn knew he was
going to be denied tenure for reasons of
incompetency and that it would have been a better
record to have been fired for refusal to sign the
loyalty oath. I did not make any such statement in
my letter of January 22, and the statements that
have been made to that effect appeared in an
editorial in The Gainesville Sun of January 24,
1970, and perhaps in other newspapers. I did not
make the statement. I did not attribute bad faith to
Professor Lambom, as the students charge, and their
statement that my statement is a calculated attempt
to save face for the College of Law is ridiculous. The
only face I was trying to save was Mr. Lamboms.
I have not questioned the sincerity of Professor
Lambom, as the students state, though others have
including The Suns editorial. I am sure the
students know that I do not write editorials for the
Gainesville Sun. The students say that my
statements are no more than a vicious attempt to
divert public attention from the teal issue. This
makes it appear that I voluntarily intervened in the
matter. This is not true. It started when The

I, The Florid* Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

Page 8

other groups.
Student Publications is cramped and
could use more space in a few years if the
growth rate continues.
The Religion Department location in the
Union has been debated before and everyone
agrees they should move, but nothing we can
tell has been done.
Student groups need the space in the
Union more than Alumni Services.
The responsibility with this situation lies
with the Reitz Union Board of Managers.
They must take a leadership position and
work to get the students more space in the
Union for student organizations* offices.
Another small thing the board could do
for the benefit of the students is to open up
the lounges on the first floor for student use
during the time the building is open.
These three lounges are equipped with
comfortable furniture the kind where a
student could just relax and talk with other
students. There really isnt anyplace in the
Union like this now.
The board can accomplish this small task
simply by turning a key and unlocking the
doors.
Are either of these too much to ask?

Gainesville Sun called me stating that they had a
report that Mr. Lambom had been terminated prior
to the loyalty oath firing. They asked me to confirm
or deny it, and I had to confirm it, because it is the
truth. I have no idea how The Gainesville Sun got
the information originally, but it has been common
knowledge in the law school community since June,
1969.
There is one factual error in my letter of January
22 that I would like to correct, though neither Mr.
Lambom nor the students have mentioned it. I truly
thought that Mr. Lambom had completed five years
of service in June of 1969 and was terminated
because of the constitutional provision requiring
termination at the dose of five years of continuous
employment without a grant of tenure. Mr.
Lambom was not terminatedunder this provision.
He had only served four years. He was terminated
under a provision of the Constitution permitting the
termination of employment of a non-tenuired
faculty member and requiring a full year notice if
he is in his third year of employment and
thereafter. This termination action was taken by
the Dean after a vote of the tenured faculty against
recommending tenure for Mr. Lambom. The fact
remains that Mr. Lambom was terminated under
provisions of the University Constitution in June,
1969 prior to the November, 1969 termination for
failure to sign the oath.
I am amazed that advanced law students attribute
statements to me that are not in the artide I
assume they refer to, and also attribute statements
to me which in fact made by others. Either these
law students cant read, or someone has taught them
how to lie and distort. Such irresponsibility in one
about to become an attorney is shocking.
Thank you for printing this letter.
L.S. POWERS
ASSOCIATE DEAN
COLLEGE OF LAW



Phi Delt Support
MR. EDITOR:
Having discussed at great length the need for and the methods of
funding the activities center, the members of Phi Delta Theta
Fraternity have concluded that student support will be a prerequisite
to the actual building of the activities center. The benefit to each and
every student on this campus, no matter what his future connection
with the University be, far outweighs the one-third cost we must
contribute ourselves.
It seems unreasonable to us for students to desire an activity center
and not be willing to pay only one-third of the cost of its
construction. We support UAC and will help the committee in any
way we can.
RANDY ATWATER
PRESIDENT
PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY
Students Neednt Pay
&

MR. EDITOR:
We are being brainwashed and railroaded into
voting for more than we, as students, should
finance. Im sure the students agree that we need a
place for entertainment to perform.
But who decided that we should also finance the
classrooms, handball courts, weight training rooms,
indoor track, basketball courts, natatorium, outdoor
amphitheater, and arts center?
This referendum is NOT our only choice, nor
should we entertain such a ridiculous idea.
UF has a voting potential capable of making the
state and city governments stop and think twice. We
are 21,182 potential voters, each capable of
influencing two parents thus giving a possible
63,546 voters at election time.
If the students of UF want a place to bring in top
name entertainers, a defeat of this referendum will
not stop us. Nor can the politicians sit back and
ignore our needs and demands.
NORMA CALVERT, 4ED

UAC Wont Help Education
MR. EDITOR:
We are told UAC will end seating problems for graduations and
basketball games. A functionally valid problem in the running of a
university? Conceivably, yes but integrally related to improving the
mode of education at UF hardly.
We are told that UAC will give us a chance to enjoy music under
the stars and relevant political debate. It is insulting to discuss the
importance of hearing music under the stars, but it is important to
consider whether or not a shiny new coliseum will engender the
opportunity to enjoy relevant political debate on campus.
We are told that UAC will give us all a place to swim indoors and
that it will make UF a national swimming power.
It is truly fantastic to realize that this is considered an integral part
in the solution of educational crises in our time.
DAVID HOCH
Facts Have Been Distorted
MR. EDITOR:
It has been charged that the UAC is underplanned and over-priced.
The truth is that three years have been spent in the planning of UAC,
with the present plan as the result.
As to the charges of overpricing, it would seem obvious that
because construction costs are more than doubling every 7-10 years,
prices of structures such as the UAC which are bid out now would
necessarily be higher than estimates bid out 10 years ago.
It is also to be remembered that those who say the legislature
should come up with the entire funds are forgetting how the
legislature would have to get those funds: by raising taxes. Who then
would be paying for the Activities Center the people of Florida?
And how can we claim that they would get any more use out of UAC
than we students? Lets not ask others to be the unselfish ones; we
can do our share, too. .
RICHARD L. HUBBELL, 2UC

-OPEN FORUM
( jAJmia mil VliAwt y

UAC

m

A
{Student
| Vote

Friday, January 30, 1970, The Ftorhfe Alligator,

Not Enough Seats
MR. EDITOR:
Why must we students once more suffer from Tigerts mistakes?
We do need a mass seating complex for this campus, but the
proposed activities center is not the answer.
OUR CENTER WILL ONLY SEAT 16,000 WHEN IT IS
FINISHED, AT WHICH TIME OUR ENROLLMENT WILL EXCEED
30,000 STUDENTS. THIS IS ONLY HALF THE STUDENT BODY.
Not much better than Florida Gym today!
I urge you to vote this plan down and demand that Student
Government and the University Administration provide a better plan.
WILLIAM A. FERGUSON, 7EG
Let Us Tell You...
MR. EDITOR:
The John Marshall Bar Association opposes the current plans to
build a University Activities Center. We feel that peihaps the recent
experience of the law school may serve as a good example for
ooposing the Center.
In his recent letter of resignation, Dean Maloney noted that We
now have one of the finest law school buildings in the nation; but
brick and mortar alone will not make an outstanding law school.
We urge students to not make the same mistake twice: Vote NO
in the referendum on February 4.
S. WILLIAM FULLER
PRESIDENT
Athletic Dept. Share

We ll Be Better Off With UAC
MR. EDITOR:
After working for several years at lowa State University on their
Center campaign, and after happily authorizing a sls per month
deduction from my pay for this purpose for three years, I joined the
staff of the University of Florida. Because I have seen the profound
changes that this Center made in the character of lowa State, I am
fully prepared to get involved to an equal extent in a similar enterprise
here.
Prior to the Center at lowa State, cultural events were scheduled at
the Armory where lighting, acoustics, etc., were atrocious. Now the
very best orchestras, plays, operas, recitals, etc., are booked regularly
at the C. Y. Stephens Auditorium. lowa State is now a university in
every sense of the word.
MORTON SMUTZ
ASSOCIATE DEAN
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Use Donations To Pay
MR. EDITOR:
The proposed six dollars per quarter tuition increase is just one
more way to force us to pay for something whether we want it or not.
If the activities center is necessary and wanted by the students and
other residents of Florida, it can be had by fund raising and
donations. Student populations are famous for endeavor in fund
raising functions and donations for worthy causes. With this method
the center will truly belong to those who wish to have it here and
everyone can donate as much as they are able without pressure.
& TmTrrnr^. mm***** MmmM&mmmtxmmwm
DONNA G. SAPP

MR. EDITOR:
Campus married students, prohibited from
earning more than a subsistance wage by University
Housing Regulations, are now being asked to tax
themselves another $6 per quarter for an overpriced
athletic complex.
These are the same students who experienced so
much difficulty getting student data tickets for their
wives. They also are the ones who spend all last
season in the end zone.
They are the ones who, after years of successful
accomplishment, were rewarded by being booted
out of the card section in what we consider to be a
very shoddy manner.
No, there is no love lost between married
students and the Athletic Department. Why cant
the Athletic Department kick in its share of the
projected cost? If they are really as broke as they
say, perhaps they need some new management.
Furthermore, this $6 tax, under the proposed
time table, will still be in existence when our
grandchildren come to this university.
TOM BALL
MAYOR, FLAVET VILLAGE
CHAIRMAN, MAYORS COUNCIL

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

You cant please every one
but the job must get done
'" v' '> - d& -
The University of Florida can be a first rate academic institution of national
distinction.
But it can be only if we provide the necessary cultural facilities. The UF campus has
now been termed a "cultural desert."
The University Activities Center (UAC) complex will do more to bring about this
national significance than any other single program or prroject now planned for this
campus.
It cannot, however, be built alone by any single group of organization be it alumni
city, county, state or university officials or students. It will take a joint leadership
effort. M
Together we can work to change and improve the life style on this campus and in
this community.
Help make the UAC Impossible Dream possible.
. : l
I urge you to Vote Yes on February 4



Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYN.i REITZ UNION

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
requirement, before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400,
or the Elementary Blocks.
ENGLISH and SPEECH
MAJORS do not take the test, as
Speech 201 is required in all of
their programs. Appointments
are now being made in Room
124, Norman Hall.
GRE APPLICATION
DEADLINE DATE: Feb. 3 is
the last day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ. 08540, of the
Registration Form to take the
Feb. 28 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee. GRE application
booklets can be obtained in
Room 235, Tigert Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM is Saturday, Jan. 31, at
8:30 a.m. in Room 207, Leigh
Hall. The exam is in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish.
PREMEDICAL AND
PREDENTAL STUDENTS must
register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education,
Room 105 Anderson Hall, Jan.
12-30. Bring full names of your
instructors and course and
section numbers.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be on Thursday,
Feb. 5, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
235, Tigert Hall.
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
briqg a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium
MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m. in Little Hall, Rooms
101,109,13,121, and 125.
CPS 122 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, Feb. 5,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221. 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117, 118, or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium, T-V to

Ym BECOME A CHEF...
fy :r n V our own back yard. Let us help
r == r\ '\ ITm I you build that new patio you've been
£/ \ Snip* wishing for. We'll even let you include
J jy the world s ancies t grill...and outdoor

Administrative Notices

Anderson 2,4, S, 7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 1, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 19;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102, 110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 113 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CSS 116 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. in Peabody 201, 202,
205, and 208.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June and August
graduates unless indicated
otherwise. ""Indicates U.S.
Citizenship required. Degrees:
3-Ba chelor's, M-Master's,
D-Doctorate.
Feb. 2: Weston Instruments,
Inc.; Pan American Petroleum
Corp.; Prudential Insurance Co.
of America; Federal Reserve
Bank of Atlanta; U.S. Naval Ship
Res. & Dev. Laboratory;
Lybrand, Ross & Montgomery;
Schlumberger Offshore Service;
Environmental Science Services
Administration; N.A.S.A.
George C. Marshall Space Flight
Center, Alabama; Western Union
Telegraph Co.
Feb. 2-3: Shell Companies
Feb. 3: International Paper
Co.; Georgia Power Co.;
Hewlett-Packard Co.
Feb. 34: Buckeye Cellulose
Co.; Union Carbide Corp.
Chera & Plastics Div.
Feb. 3-5: The Bell System
Non tech.
Feb. 4: Washington National
Insurance Co.; Charleston Naval
Shipyard; North Carolina
National Bank; National Center
for Health Statistics;
Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
Feb. 4-5: Florida Power

BLUE BULLETIN

Corp.; General Dynamics Corp.
Convair Div.
Feb. 4-6: Monsanto Chemical
Co.
Feb. 5: American Cyanamid
Co.; Price Waterhouse 8i Co. 8t
Daly and Andersen; PPG
Industries, Inc.; Federal
Communications Commission;
Cunningham Drug Stores, Inc.;

Campus Calendar

Friday, January 30
Varsity Rifle Team Matches,
Tampa, Florida 8:00 a.m.
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Union Movie, "Planet of the
Apes," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Veterans Club Meeting,
Rathskeller, 7:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.,
Israeli Dancing Afterwards.
Baha'i Association Meeting, 150 G
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Muslim Students Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, "Ewing Street
Times," 8:30, 10:30 & 12:30
p.m.
Union Dance, "The Jades,"
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 31
College and Hi-School
Invitational Stage Bands, P.K.
Yonge Aud., 9:00 a.m. and
every 30 minutes.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m..
Lunch Served Afterwards.
Union Movie, "Planet of the

We help build
better business 4 ways
Like bringing the product or service to And like making business more responsive
the student. We help thousands of to the needs of their customers. We help
students find what they want through them to find out what the student wants,
advertising.
Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
Like uniting the academic and business
communities. The two worlds most |f you've got something to offer...so do we.
students live in come together on our
pages. The
Like letting the student compare before FlOridft
he chooses. We help students plan their All lopcitOl*
time and expenses. We help them save
money. An ACP-rated All-American College Daily

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Citrus Council of Girl Scouts,
Inc.
Feb. 5-6: Dow Chemical Co.;
General Motors Corp.
Feb. 6: Garrett-Ai research
Mfg. Co.; Virginia Dept, of
Highways; North American
Rockwell Corp.; Atlantic
Richfield Co.; Levitt and Sons,
Inc.; Charleston Naval Shipyard

Apes," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 8i 10:30 p.m.
Basketball, Univ. of Fla. vs.
Georgia, Florida Gym, 7:30
p.m.
Hillel Foundation Party, Hillel
Foundation, 8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, "Ewing Street
Times," 8:30,10:30.
Sunday, February 1
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Phi Chi Theta Formal Pledging,
355 Union, 2:00 p.m. for
sisters, 2:30 for rushees.
Music Dept.: Woodwind
Quintet, University Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Union Classic Film Series, "Don
Juan," Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C 8t D,
7:00 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
College Life Meeting, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon House, 9:13
p.m.
Monday, February 2
Maccabbee and Reitz Union
Lecture, Simon Schwartz
"Kibbutz Living," 122
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,

s%*& !. .* ;v,v '/< vt ,t
Friday, January 30, 1970 r The Florida Alligator, >

Nuclear Power Oiv.;
Burroughs Wellcome St Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Feb. 4: Naval Ordnance
Station
Feb. 6: Joseph E. Seagram &
Sons, Inc.; Merck & Co., Inc.
(Calgon Corp.)

7:00 p.m.
A.I.E.S.E.C. Meeting, 357
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, E & I Bldg., 8:00
p.m.
Tuesday, February 3
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, Elec. Eng. Bldg. 310
South, 7:00 p.m.
Union Humanities Film Series,
"Faust," Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Angel Flight Rush Party, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Panhellenic Fashion Show,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: "The Little Known
Liszt", Lecture Recital,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
Audubon Wildlife Films, U.
of F. Students, SI.OO, GP.
$1.50, HS Students, $.50.
"Dion", $1.50 for
Rathskeller members, $2.00
for non-members.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Vox Wyman" bass guitar. 1 year
old, used only 6 mos. S4OO original
cost, sell for S2OO. Hard shell case
Included. 392-8365. (A-st-73-p).
Moving Must Sell Refrig, Washer,
Dryer, Desk, Chair, day beds,
single bed. Call 376-9845 Between
5:30 8:00 PM. (A-st-73-p).
1966 VW Good condition very clean,
radio heater large tires. Beige. Call
after 5:30 P.M. 462-2792.
(A-3t-73-p).
Fender Jazzbass with case and
accessories Ex. Con. $250 Bassman
amp 2 12" speakers $350 378-8670
Arnie. (A-st-73-p).
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut & assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
$32.50. JR Office Furniture Co. 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-10t-C)
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 3*B-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon installed, &
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$22.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-c).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(A-75-3t-p).
Bolex, 16mm standard, 25mm lens,
perfect condition, in original box,
S3OO. Call 373-1947 after 6 PM.
(A-75-2t-p).
HONDA P-50 Good condition, lVz
old, SBS with helmet. Karen
373-2727. (A-75-3t-p).
1969 HONDA 90 s2so or best
offer. Only 2,000 miles. Call
LARRY. 373-1614. (A-75-2t-p).
FOR SALE: 1968 HONDA 50. Blue
with one helmet. Good condition.
Best offer. Call Ginny 376-7948.
(A-75-2t-p).
MUST Sacrifice 1970 Honda CL-90
Brand New. No miles. Call 373-2912
Evenings. (A-75-lt-p).
GROOVEY Professional Gibson
guitar extras and case slOO
Sacrifice! TENOR BANJO 4 String
must go s6O or best offer case
and books. 378-7638. (A-75-st-p).
Blue Lustre not only rids carpets of
soil but leaves pile soft and lofy.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-30-c).
12 String by MIGUEL. Hes made
them for Feliciano and Fred Neil.
S6OO. Call Paul at 378-7943.
(A-72-st-p).
1968, 12 x 60 Skyline. Central Heat
A/C, full carpet, wasner/dryer, 10 x
10 addition, cabana, utility shed,
cable TV, partially furnished.
Immediate occupancy.ss, 9oo.oo Call
376-7649 after 5 PM. (A-76-10t-p).
SALE 4 formats, $lO 3O, Size 10
l2, worn once. Andrew & Connell
Tr. Pk. no. 27 on 23A off Archer Rd.
(A-76-2t-p).
1967 HONDA CA l6O. S2OO. Call
376-7947 after 5:30. Ask for ED.
(A-76-3t-p).
ADMIRAL TV 19 in. Good
condition. Cable. Call 376-0122
anytime. (A-76-2t-p).
305 HONDA SUPERHAWK 1966,
excellent shape, Call Tom, 373-1551,
between 5:00 & 7:00 PM asking
$350. (A-76-3t-p).

live Broadcast
1111 l Hill TACO BELL
ffW WW at 826 w. university
SATURDAY 1-4 PM
S 7OO OO IN FREE PRIZES

FOR RENT
WWXOiWy.KW.VVWWW!'!
Sublet: Beautiful 2 bd. furn.
apt., AC & heat carpeted. $155
mo. or will consider 3rd male
roommate (grad pf) Come to
835 N.E. 4th Ave. after 6
P.M. (B-71-st-p).
One bedroom apt. furnished, at
University Gardens for Spring and
Summer quarters. Call 376-2046
evenings. (B-74-3t-D.2
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
HELP! Must rent 2 br. furnished apt.
before Feb. Ist $125 per month. 314
N. W. 14th St. Apt. 4 Also for sale
1968 Yamaha 250 Ex. Cond. $375.
(B-75-2t-p).
Sublet Immediately!! Large furnished
1 bedroom apartment. Air
conditioned, three blocks from
campus. SIOO per mo. 1716 N. W.
3rd Ave. 378-8503. (B-75-2t-p).
Roommates needed: Large house,
walking distance to campus. Two
rooms available, one with private
entrance. Call anytime 376-7755.
(B-76-st-p).
Sublet 1 large bedroom apartment.
Close to campus, air & heat. Call
376-8061 daily and at 372-1338 on
weekends. Only $110.50 per month.
(B-2t-73-p).
One bedroom apartment, some
utilities furnished, Rent SBO. See at
916 S. W. 7th Ave. or phone Mr.
Birkett at 376-3442. (B-76-3t-p).
Clean, quiet, one bedroom furnished
apt. Large kitchen, new fridge, big
stove, married cpls. only. Just
SBO/Mon. inclu. sew & water Call
372-2793 eve. (B-76-2t-p).
WANTED |
2 Female Roommates Starlite Apts.
Close to campus. 2 bdrm. $37 a
month. Call 373-2925. (C-74-3t-p).

I MORRISON S CAFETERIA
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I FRIDAY
I LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
I Choice of Potato

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

Page 12

WANTED J
NEED MONEY?? Psychology sleep
laboratory needs male subjects aged
18-35 to participate in isolation
experiment. Requires 21 consecutive
days and nights free (no classes, etc.)
Possible to earn S4BO. Inquire at 101
SSRB (across from Hub) or call
392-2007. (C-74-lOt-c). __
I need a geology tutor for Gy 201
prefer grad, student for two one hour
sessions per week will pay well. Call
372-7258 after 5 p.m. (C-74-3t-p).
Wanted Male Roommate Wtr. and
Spr. qtrs. SSO + util. 5 min. walk to
campus, immediate occupancy. Call
Pete 378-6024 or leave word
Alligator newsrm. (C-4t-73-p).
Roommate wanted to share large
home distant from UF. Heat-but-heat
proof. See at 2110 NE 12th St or call
Danny for details. 373-1670. $64
mo. (C-72-st-p)
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apL_Jan rent free.
Central air and heat. $43.50/mo. Call
Herb -376-6361. (C-72-st-p)
Female roommate to share 2 br. apt.
with 2 others; $37 plus utilities. Call
372- Anytime. 1930 N. W. 2nd
Ave. (C-75-3t-p).
Female Roommate for Fredrick
Garden apt. 70. Immediate
occupancy. $46 per. month. Phone
373- or 378-6510. (C-75-st-p).
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. central air, and
heat, pool. $143.50/MO. Call
376-6361. (C-75-4t-p).
Wanted two female roommates for 2
bdrm. Gator Town apt. Call
376-1131. (C-76-st-p).
\ HELP WANTED |
WANTED Male over 21 at Woodys
Sandwich Shop married if possible 24
hours a week must be neat
permanent work. Come by in person
between 2:30 4:00 for interview.
(E-74-st-p).

REITZ UNION THEATRE
20th Cwtvry Cwilory-Fox pr.s.nf
CHARLTON HESTON
IN
PLANET
e APES
FRI A SAT JAN 30, 31 5:30, 8:00,10:30 P.M.
# ALL TICKETS I
I 60,000 Pfiffllffil 242,000 1
PEOPLE IT IVT PEOPLE SAW IT I
LAST WEEK! | WLm Wm 9
THIS IS POSITIVELY'TirZri
About It In THE LAST WEEK!!! About It Ou
I Newspapers and 4 HITS I Radio, and TV
IWE WILL OPEN EARLY TO ACCOMODATE I
THE CROWDS. COME EARLY TO GET YOUR '
I SPEAKER!! OPEN AT 6:00 -SHOW at 7:30 I
| Finders Keepers... I
I levers Weepers! I
UUIIII CT I (NEVE PRODUCTION
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Am A fl I V I I F



gator classifieds

I help wanted I
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT In
Yellowstone and all U.S. National
Parks. Booklet tells where and how
to apply- Send SI.OO to Arnold
Agency, 206 East Main, Rexburg,
Idaho 83440. Moneyback guarantee.
(E-72-6t-p)
AUTOS |
Jaguar: 1958 3.4 Sedan; New tires,
recent engine overhaul, clean. $495
Call 376-8586 after 5:00 p.m.
(G-st-74-p).
1964 Comet Caliente 3 speed 6 cyl.
Extra clean throughout, drafted,
make offer,. Call 376-0336.
(G-71-st-p).
1963 MGB Good Condition.
Tonneau, Luggage rack, new carpets,
leather seats, radio, and good
mechanical condition. Call 378-8347.
$950. (G-74-st-p).
1967 Sprite excellent also 1962
Studebaker not so excellent make
offer. Want scout or bronco. Call
after 5 376-9724. (G-74-3t-p).
58 Chevy station wagon. Excellent
shape. Great for long distance and
around town. Automatic
transmission. $350 Call 378-8548
after 1:30. (G-74-3t-p).
1965 Comet Caliente 4 speed mag
and chrome reverse wheels 289 4
barrel. $995. Notify Brad Lohmann
- 13 Frat Row Call 376-9271.
(G-72-st-p)
Red 59 Sprite. Excellent engine,
dependable and fun car. Bargain. 500
S. W. 34 St., Point West Apt 7.
(G-75-2t-p).
63 Spitfire Engine rebuilt, new top,
black with black interior. $550 Cash
Sale. Call 372-7293 after 5 PM or
weekends. (G-75-3t-p).
1965 Corvair Monza coupe factory
air. cond., automatic, radio Good
condition. Priced to sell. $375. Call
378-6529. (G-75-st-p).
1966 Comet VB, 289, AT, R&H
Excellent cond. Almost new tires.
Only 29,000 miles. Well kept. $795.
Call Chuck 392-0581. Nights
378-2012. (G-75-3t-p).
65 MG Midget, new battery, top and
paint 6 mo. old. Must sell $795. Call
Roger 378-0782. (G-76-2t-p).
1963 Falcon Futura Automatic
Transmission, good interior, Good
tires, great gas mileage, radio. Call
376-0989 after 5:00 or on weekends.
(G-76-st-p).
1965 MUSTANG CONV. 289 VB,
new top, air-cond., power-steering,
automat sB2s see at 4 Frat
Row. Call Buchanan at 376-9235.
(G-76-st-p).
1966 Mustang 2 + 2 289 V 8 4 speed,
new tires, good condition. 378-6225
after 7 PM and Sundays. (G-76-st-p).
98 LUXURY SEDAN: 1968. Full
pwr. $5,800 new. Sell for $3,195.
Student 372-6931. (G-76-st-p).

|TJf ] J I [f PENTHOUSE THEATRES SAT. AND SUN. 1 acrosSfrom the mall^bbm
SHOWS START AT 3:00P1W |
V STEVE
UORRQR PLAYmGFRI.-^T.
^ E
| JAH 30 THAU th nTp^iS^
MONSTER \jOJl T
>. *- "?' -* g l a"- '-TA-T-Jf. jT.* &. j&iefeia^m\f y _

Friday, January 30. 1970, The Florida Alligator,

i*~ WW9QWWCWWW ! Wffl'X-.'i I
1964 MGB, New Top, Toneau cover,
Radio, Heater, $750. PHONE
378-8706. (G-74-3t-p).
PERSONAL
ATTENTION VETERANS! The
monthly meeting of the U of F
Veterans Club meets at 7:00 PM
FRIDAY at the Rathskellar
VETERANS. (J-74-3t-p).
Are you sorry you missed Shane?"
Do you want to see "High Noon?"
Advise and Consent? Anything
else? If so, ask at RM 310 Union.
392-1655, These are cheap for
groups. (J-74-3t-p).
Dennis Silverman Mike White
Darwin Scott from Great Pledges
to best brothers! Kappa Sigma
Forever! Love your little sister
Shirley. (J-3t-74-p).
Dance to the Riff. AEPhi Open
House Friday, Jan. 30. 8:30 12:30.
(J-74-3t-p).
SIP IN 1970. A great way to start
the new decade. Join the singles for a
cocktail party this Friday from 5:30
to 7:30 at the Lamplighter. Cover
charge $.25, Drinks, $.50.
(J-74-3t-p).
Summer Charter Flight s22o &
$lO Admin. Fee. Tampa to
Amsterdam. Call 373-2590 or write
AIESEC, Room 300, J.W. Union.
(J-74-3t-p).
Its great to be a kappa sig!
Congratulations to our new brothers.
The Little Sisters love yall!
(J-76-lt-p).

jHpMMppiappp npjTfnVTflfe
3 HOIMWIR MOWS §
no. ) "CREATURE OF I
THE WALKING DEADI
1 NO. 1 IN COLOR
no. 3 IN COLOR I
IMONSTROSITY I
W. EHOENERAL AUDIENCE J

Page 13

PERSONAL
%
v ....,v
I am 23, naive, and looking for a
liberal woman to share
companionship and whatever
happens. No strings attached. Please
call 808 372-2137. (J-76-3t-p).
Irving (1301) I still think the same
way that I thought before and I dont
mind telling other people. Thought it
was over eh? Ha! Ha! (J-76-lt-p).
Dave Some more sunshine for the
worlds greatest Dragon Dad! When
youre around nothings down. Have
a good day! p.s. I promise no.
(J-76-lt-p).
THE BENT CARD COFFEE HOUSE
W. Univ. Ave. 372-3225 Features The
Minimum Daily Requirement Jug
Band + Iron, Fri. Sat., 9 & 11 PM.
(J-76-lt-p).
Ride to Jacksonville Fla., every day
or on weekends. For information call
387-3428 in JAX., Any day after 4
PM. Address 4416 Melrose Ave.
(J-74-2t-p).
Beeja, without you, theres nobody
up here but me. Only you can make
me so very happy I love you.
Remember HPQ + TO AMF 86,
Rick. (J-76-lt-p).
To my Gary-Honey, Happy 22 to my
luvey. This year I will try harder.
Thanks for being such a wonderful
pumpkinhead. LINDA LOVE.
(J-76-lt-p).
Happy 21 COOKIE LADY, Love,
Sgt. ROCK. (J-76-lt-p).
Ed, you answer that for me. Call.
(J-76-2t-p).
Lou Happy Birthday and 35 still to
go. I love you, Wolf. (J-76-lt-p).

REITZ UNION THEATRE
DON JUAN
Starring:
John Barrymore
Mary Astor
Sunday Fab. 1 7:004 9:30 PM
FEATURE
1:30 3:29
6:28 Iml
from! "Dammitalle over!
Why Is everything.
|f fa
7..-. p.-. *:*' fi rlTi^J
I 20th Century For Presents I
I ROBERT ROSS I
I RUTCH SUNOftNCE KID I
d^tk 7 MaapaJHfflPllk AN EYE OAZZIER. SEX EXCITER: 1
H I tan 1 [ C M The scenery. photography-and all
fflHf those mirrors put this one in big bigH
H bigH time ciass!" -Arckv wi*ttn. n. y rst
PtntOMS UMOtK



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 PERSONAL
K
&sv;v: w German shepherds 9 weeks AKC
best champion stock. Show or pet
quality. $125. 372-4653. Captain Louies is now delivering
chicken, shrimp, fish, oysters, frog
legs, and other great treasure chests
on campus. 4 to 9 p.m. Call
372-3546. (J-72-st-p)
Green Chevy, 3D, 1/20. RJF switch
back to PM, you belong together.
Best past, present or future you will
find, without a space trip.
(J-74-3t-p).
Si, Amigos ... You may win a stereo
tape system and over S7OO in prizes
Saturday afternoon at Taco Bell!
MuchoFun begins at 1 PM at 826 W.
University Ave. WUWU RAdio will
broadcast the Fiesta LIVE from 1 till
4 PM on 1390 Radio. Plan to be
there! (J-76-lt-p).
Rosemary, thinking of you always.
Things arent the same by myself.
Dont walk in the rain without me!
Love always, AL. (J-76-lt-p).
Mike, Last weekend was great. I'm
counting the days till I see u once
again. Remember, Ill always wait 4
u. Love forever and ever, Mona.
(J-76-lt-p).
Michael sweetheart, Have missed you
much. Two wonderful days together.
Remember I will always love you and
be your bestest buddy; Kath.
(J-76-lt-p).
Travel in Europe for academic credit.
6 weeks, 7 countries, jet crossing,
private Coach, excellent
accomodations, low cost, loans
available. Small U F group lead by
highly experienced graduate couple.
Arrangements by World Academy.
Call for booklet. 372-5489.
(J-70-6t-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates In
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-68-10t-p).
Charlie & Steve: Sorry, must drop
out to support Crystal Palace, 16
tons & what do you get, another day
older, & $lB million in debt. Mayor
c. (J-75-lt-p).
Delta Chis: Your possessions and
belongings will be your delight, if
youll sing to us before dinner
tonight. Love, Your Little Sisters.
(J-75-lt-p).
S6O a month for room and board.
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St., Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J7s-st-p).
Love, Peace, Freedom, Happiness,
Aquarius is here. Come together Fri.
Jan., 30, Sunset at the Plaza of Amer.
Bring candles and LOVE. (J-75-2t-p).
Are you going to N. Y. C. during
spring break? I will pay you to bring
some boxes to me. Call 376-7948.
Yours in love & peace, Ginny.
(J-75-2t-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372- (J-ts-64-c).
Flora, Thank you for just being the
sweet girl you are. Smile and keep
spilling Cremora on my pants. This
yid digs you. Yunk, Yunk.
(J-75-2t-p).
; | LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Sterling silver parker pen
grid pattern. Reward offered, please
call 392-7519. (L-76-3t-p).
FOUND: Hitchhiker accidentally
picked up math book. If yours, call
DAVID, 376-1577 evenings.
(L-74-3t-nc).
Lost: Black Right-hand mens glove.
If found kindly return for reward.
PLEASE phone 3 76-0428.
(L-75-lt-p).
LOST: Green wallet. Important
personal items. Reward offered NO
questions asked. Call Robin at
373- (L-75-3t-p).
SERVICES |
: QOOOOOTOmo ~ | ri-.-.-.-.w.-.wAv | g
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
Buy a gator ad.
Well fit you In.

Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

| SERVICES j
ARCHERY Lessons! only $3/hr.
Qualifications: 10 years experience,
placed in many state and regional
tournaments. Call Tom for Info, at
392-8124 or 392-9821. (M-75-3t-p).
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S. W. 4th Ave, Across from
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-ts-59-c).

THERES GOTTA BE ONE FOR YOU
CAN TAKE IT
1611 S.W. 13th St.
THE sound in Gainesville
as only RUDI and the
Lights can doit!
BUT!
IF YOURE NOT READY
TRY THE
' 1 N.W. lOthWve.
offers a relaxed mood
where you can dance
or listen to the HAMILTONS
THEY PLAY OLDIES AND
UPBEAT six nights a week <
(BEST SINGLES CLUB IN TOWN)
OF COURSE
IF YOURE IN THE SING-ALONG
MOOD
'(M&
3334 W. Uriiv. Ave.
THE LOUNGE FOR YOUI
with RICHARD PARKER on
the ORGAN and/or PIANO.
Gives you a chance to participate.
He can Sing & Play anything.
(Relaxed Neighborhood Atmosphere )
>
YOU CANT GO WRONG
THEYRE ALL
t^/nHed

I SERVICES |
Volkswagen Parts and services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Can
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
' I 1 1 -
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrlcal Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)

/ binSiS*?r^ m P OVER! x
vDon t Miss Tho Fun!
IT S THE SWITCH OF THE CENTURY...
as a college sophomore plugs his brain
gap and electrifies the
establishment!
WALT DISNEY .mil
STARRING
Kim RUSSELL cesar ROMERO joe FLYNN I AND-MORE HI-FL YING HI-LARITY h
/ bS4iiri^^ off*/ \
Llllllll X.yi FOR THE 4th
[ ?01 N. W. 13H Si. Vy| EXCITING WEEK 4^.
Jamns BondL
is back! iHIMW
|il I Jii i A iWiTa u
P V 1 IN I ill Ikjl I / 1/ N
HELD OVER \
for a 2nd Sizzling Wk.
DONT MISS IT!
"Catherine Spaak
is Curious Green,
with envy... and.
decides to become
a one-woman IfkjHHr 'if'.
Kinsey sex survey. fHEL., Jji
-BtSStkutp.WtMS.JMio sf~'. |
RADLEY METZGER JbH
presents
. THE IjBERTINE |
starring j'TMfWR
Catherine Spaak and JJXflg*. 9Bm
\.AMsma./ jBHHi
Jean-Louis Trintignant
Product* by Silvi CW.nMli WgtMm
\ EASTMAN COL OR
BirnrTjrwr'Tiiiwii ieWimh i
i lH^^^MHa awaaa*aBMate



Kirk Proposes'LegislatorsTake A Ride

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirk proposed
Wednesday that every legislator
ride a full eight-hour shift with a
state trooper to get acquainted
with the highway safety crisis.
My God, you can get killed
out there, Kirk said. Its a
battle zone.

REA Guard Arrested,
$1 Million Loot Found
NEW YORK (UPI) Police arrested a Railway Express Agency
guard early Thursday and charged him with stealing more than SI
million in loot ranging from machine guns to outboard motors.
Ernest H. Ernie Nelson, accused of grand larceny, said I never
used a cent of it... I never fired a single one of the guns.
The goods, including a suitcase containing $500,000 in travelers
checks were found stacked a yard deep throughout his three-room
Brooklyn apartment.
Nelson, 58, was a 23-year veteran of Railway Express Agencys
private police force. In 1965 he received a commendation for routing
four bandits trying to steal $500,000 in cash and merchandise from
the Inland Terminal in Brooklyn.
According to agency officials he fired four shots from his service
revolver while breaking up the attempted robbery.
A patrolman became suspicious when he saw youngsters carting
guns away from Nelsons apartment building. Police raided the
apartment Wednesday night.
A patrolman said they took 22 guns, one machine gun and other
goods to the station house but well need at least two trailer trucks
to cart in the rest of the merchandise.
Nelson, a tall, greying man, talked with newsmen at the station
house. Speaking in a quiet voice, he said that 12 years ago his
supervisors called him into their office and wanted me to change my
religion they wanted everyone the same .. after that I went out
and took everything I could get my hands on. I didnt care what, 1
took it.
He did not explain what religion they wanted him to join, but said
he was a Lutheran.

The burgers
bigger at
WHEN YOU BUY A WHOPPER SHAKE
Offer good only with this coupon at
I Burger King, NW 16th AVE. I
I I
-- -* *

The governor also suggested
that while they have legislators
at their side, the troopers
become advocates for good
roads and tell the lawmakers
where new highways should be
built.
He said he wants a list of the
legislators who take him up on

PATROLMEN to share shifts

the proposal to ride, adding I
dont mean for them to get in
one door, have their picture
taken, and get out the other. I
mean a full eight-hour day.
The governor also told the
two hour round table discussion
with patrol troop commanders,
he intends to ask the legislature
for $4.5 million to put another
350 uniformed troopers on the
highways.
I refuse to be politically

HEW, OEO Without Funds
Congress Looking For Solution

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Congressional leaders scrambled
unsuccessfully Thursday for a
quick solution to a stalemate on
school and health aid that will
leave three major government
agencies without funds at the
end of this week.
No agreement was reached at
a preliminary meeting on how to
proceed in the wake of
Wednesday's House vote
sustaining President Nixons veto
of a $19.7 billion bill to finance
activities of the Labor
department, the Health,
Education and Welfare
department and the Office of
Economic Opportunity.
Agreement was reached to let
existing temporary spending
authority, under which the
agencies have been operating

practical in this regard, he said,
after finally getting assurance
from High Safety Department
Director Ralph Davis that the
extra men could be recruited
and trained in a crash program if
the money is provided.
He said it would mean holding
classes at Eglin Field as well as
the police academy here.
It would increase the total
patrol strength to 1,250. Davis
original budget proposed adding
only 173 new troopers in the

since July 1, expire on schedule
on Jan. 31 at midnight. Key
House members expressed hope
the fiscal impasse could be
resolved within the next couple
of weeks.
Chairman George H. Mahon,
D-Tex., of the House
Appropriations Committee said
the affected agencies faced no
immediate crisis with expiration
of their spending authority on
Saturday.
Payrolls can be met for work
periods completed prior to Jan.
31, Mahon said. But
commitments and grants for aid
to schools, hospitals, research
projects and other affected
programs presumably cannot be
made during the interim period.
Todays unfruitful talks took
place at an informal session of

Friday, January 30, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

1970-71 fiscal year.
The patrolmen agreed the
courteous intimidation gimmick
of stepping up traffic arrests and
warnings is losing its punch and
the governor must come up with
another idea to catch the fancy
of the careless driver.
The governor tossed out
several ideas including
featuring the accident of the
week and enlisting bartenders
to dish out a safe-driving spiel
with every cocktail.

an appropriations subcommittee
which handled the vetoed bill.
Nixon rejected the measure
on the grounds it was $1.26
billion over his budget. He said it
would feed the fires of inflation.
An appropriations
subcommittee chairman, Rep.
Daniel J. Flood, D-Pa., said after
the meeting that no decision was
reached on where to go now.
No further meeting was set
and Flood said none probably
would be held before Tuesday.
A compromise promise by
Nixon to spend $450 million
more for education than he
originally proposed, soothed the
way for the House vote
Wednesday sustaining his veto.
The vote to override the veto
was 226 to 191 52 short of
the two-thirds vote necessary to
override.

Page 15



The
Florida
Alligator

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
One of the tilings that is in
America is some strange kind of
allegiance and respect for our
criminals. Or maybe if s just
fascination.
Don Juan
Screened
7
Sunday
The university Film Classics
Committee Sunday is presenting
Don Juan with John
Barrymore and Mary Astor, a
film that was one of the first
with a fully synchronized
musical score.
The system used for the
sound of the 1926 vintage movie
is called the Vitaphone system
and employed the use of a disc
recording played along with the
picture for musical backup or
dialogue.
But the film, though
remembered by many for its
innovating sound, has been
placed among the classics of
cinema for its great story, too.
The movie supposedly is based
on Lord Byrons poem of the
same name though the
adaptation reportedly is not
terribly exacting. Barrymore
himself has been credited with
much of the innovation involved
in the adaptation to the screen.
The film is in the series of
classics of the motion picture art
brought to campus by the Union
Board and the Film Classics
Committee.
All of the Sunday films are
screened in the Reitz Union
Auditorium with showings each
Sunday at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents.
IF YOU UKED
VOLKSWAGEN...
YOULL LOVE
DATSUN
Station Wagon $2,268-
GODDING A CLARK
115 S.E. 2ND ST.
378-2311 Til 7PM Mon Sat.
P.0.E., plus tax, tag, local freight,
| D.tH.
your
mail-order
magazine
club
th* florida qtrnmriy

ENTERTAINMENT

Cassidy And The Kid Are Here

This is no new thing. My
grandma once bragged that she
was related to Jesse James and
God knows he was a mean son
of a gun.
And so,* here comes another
glorified crook movie, Butch
Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,
now playing at the Plaza after
weeks of delays and much praise
from friends who saw it while
home during the holidays.
And so we all can expect to
begin to hear all that nonsense
that the reviewers dragged into
the Bonnie and Clyde reviews.
Judith Crist will ask again that
biting question, What is wrong
with America?
Nothing is wrong with
America and nothing much is
wrong with the movie. These
people (in this case Paul
Newman and Robert Redford)
arent real criminals, none of us
are so dumb as to make any
connection between the
fun-loving characters on the
screen and the creeps who
actually steal things from
people.
The film concerns a tale that
supposedly is true about a
character named Butch Cassidy
(Newman) and his young and
cocky sidekick the Sundance
Kid (Redford). Both have a lot
of fun robbing banks and trains
and somehow getting to Bolivia,
of all places, where they do
more of the same. And
throughout all their crimes, all
their shootouts with their fifteen
shot six-guns, theyre nice as
they can be and we love them,
by God, crooks or not.
Clean Food
The Florida Department of
Agriculture inspects food from
the standpoint of sanitation,
production, processing, retail
sales, warehousing and
transportation.

dlwyk W. Univ.
i camma shops i 376-7657
Cant afford a
new camera cameracant
cant cameracant buy a new
projector!
You can rent
them both at Ro-Mo!

MOVIE REVIEW TPS GOOD

Theyre joined along the line
by Katherine Ross who, as in
The Graduate, is soft and
understanding. She does some
beautiful things in the film,
always with that kind of
gentleness that makes every shot
of her look as if there is a glow
about her face.
Technically the film is really
nice. There are a lot of tricks
like stopped action and still
photography and scenes tinted

Union Offers Afternoon
Os MusicRock And Folk

The Reitz Union is offering an
afternoon full of free
entertainment Sunday with
shows by two rock bands and
two individual folk-type singers.
Its all set to run
simultaneously and everything is
free from 2 to 5 p.m.
RGF, a hard rock group, will
be playing on the Union Terrace
for listening and dancing. The
group features a psychedelic
sound and has appeared in the
Union and in other local places
on several occasions.
Another rock group, The
Frosted Glass, will be playing at
the same time Sunday afternoon
in the Union Cafeteria. The goup
is known for rock music of a
slightly softer tone and mood.
They too have appeared several
places locally.
John from Berkeley, half of
the team of John and Ned who
appeared with Biff Rose at the
Rathskeller last weekend, will be
singing, playing the guitar and
reading poetry in the lounge on
the second floor of the Union
Sunday. And Doran Oster will
be in the Browsing Library at
the Union playing folk music on
the dulcimer and banjo. He too
sings.

Page 16

brown all of the tricks
handled with just enough
pretentiousness to make them
fun to have in with the storyline.
At one particular point in a
scene in which Butch kills his
first man the action is slowed
and the sound is slowed and
reverberated. The effect is
incredible. It takes about three
seconds to realize that what you
have seen and heard in the scene
has taken the wind out of your

The jam-packed afternoon of
music is an experiment at
offering many types of

HM
House
V' ySHtajrdaM 31 Qvuwjrv 1970
&00 P'TTL. 7)TMILL£L n4y 254 admission*
e~ -"\
I
! #1 chicken
j salesman j

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

insides. The handling oi tne ena
of the film is such a nice
surprise, too.
And so,- beyond what the
sociologists fear is happening to
your morality, the picture is
really very good, uplifting in its
own way, full of life and love
and excitement. Go and see it
and laugh out loud at the crooks
and murderers and violence. We
arent afraid that our hearts
arent good.

entertainment at the same time
in the Union, according to
Union officials.



flicks

Mini-Notes
On The Movies
THE LIBERTINE Its a movie about a young lady and her several
friends and their several perversions. She finds happiness at last with
an X-ray technician who takes her for a ride, two rides as a matter of
fact. The girl is good looking and some scenes are funny. Its playing
at the Florida downtown.
* *
PLANET OF THE APES This one stars Charlton Heston and the
Statue of Liberty. Its a lot of fun though it doesnt make as much of
a point as the people who made it might think. Its the Friday and
Saturday night fare at the Reitz Union.
* *
CREATURE OF THE WALKING DEAD Some of these things
are scary and some are funny. I dont know about this one. I do know
its playing with The Undertaker and His Pals, and Monstrosity.
The Gainesville Drivein is where the ghouls are.
* *
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID What a great
flick! Its fresh and funny and warm and doesnt push violence into
your face although its about violent things. Beyond all the
intellectual nonsense being written about glorifying crime, its a
picture that people across the country will see, like, and tell their
friends to go see. Go see it, friend. Its at the Plaza One.
* *
THE COMPUTER WORE TENNIS SHOES Walt Disneys
talented heirs make another Walt Disney film, succeeding very well at
doing what they want to do. It probably is the only film in town this
weekend that features a predominance of characters who you might
feel safe with in a dark room. No sex, no monsters, no killing. With it
at the Center One is Its Tough To Be A Bird.
* *
LION IN WINTER Katherine Hepburn and Peter OToole star in
a story about kings and kingdoms. The color is supposed to add a lot
to the enjoyment. Playing at the Suburbia Penthouse Two.
* *
GONE WITH THE WIND Oh wow! Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh
star. And they star in the way stars used to star, taking the picture
into their hearts, acting with a kind of hugeness. Its one you probably
already have seen and will want to see again. When Gable says,
Frankly my dear I dont give a damn, youll feel warm inside. Its at
the Penthouse Three at the Suburbia.
# *
DIE MONSTER ME What a good idea. This monster pic is
included with three or four others that will produce a night of pure
hell if you want a night of pure hell. The Raven, The Terror,
Black Sabbath, and Comedy of Terrors, is the scare-o-rama or
whatever at the Suburbia Drivein on the big screen, outdoors. Put on
your white socks and pants with the buckle in the back and drive your
56 Ford with the dice on the mirror out there. Be sure your girl is
sitting almost on top of you when you drive and give her a hickey on
the neck before you take her home. (It was so much more fun to be
alive back then.)
* *
CAMILLE 2000 The mirrors in every room make this one a
study in angles. Take away all of the transitional and storyline
nonsense, and you have about 30 minutes of erotic footage starring
the Fun-Seeking and Beautiful Rich. Its at the Plaza Two.
* * i
DON JUAN The Film Classics Committee brings us another in
their fine series of pictures that were the beginnings of a new art. This
Sunday its Don Juan with John Barrymore and Mary Astor. See it at
the Reitz Union.

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Political
Figures
Interviewed
*
NEW YORK (UPI) Three
national political figures will be
on the television networks this
weekend.
Former President Lyndon B.
Johnson will be on CBS tonight
in the second of a series of
special interviews about his
administration.
Vice President Spiro Agnew
will be interviewed on CBS
Sunday and ABC Sunday will
present an interview with Sen.
Mike Mansfield of Montana,
Democratic majority leader.
ABCs The Hollywood
Palace variety hour leaves the
air next Saturday in its seventh
season.
NBC presents an original
90-minute drama Sunday
starring Peter Ustinov, play in
the annual Bob Hope golf
tourney and a folk music special.
Other programming Sunday
includes Tell It Like It Is on
NBC, a one-hour folk-musical,
first of a group of four religious
programs produced in
association with the Southern
Baptist Convention.
jp ssss:
Studio Passports
and Applications
5 prints for
5 dollars
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Phone 372-2512
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Friday, January 30, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

UAC Control Divided:City And UF

said the $2 million in state funds
will be generated for the center
because there will be about
220,000 square feet of
classroom space.
Ernie Litz, handling
promotion for UAC, said he
didnt know exactly when the
UF will get the funds, but
added: We will get more than
$2 million for classroom
facilities in the next few years.
The first $2 million could easily
be set aside for UAC classroom
construction?
In the area of city and county
governments saving money by
joining forces with the university
to build an activities center,
First Research Corporation of
Miami -at a cost of $9,500 in
September of 1969 said it had
arrived at adequate
approximations of what it
would cost to build a
multi-purpose civic center for
the downtown Gainesville area.
The report recommended the
city and county build a 30,000
square foot building with 300 to
400 parking spaces, located on
three to three and one half acres
of land in the Vicinity of North
East Third Street and Northeast
First Street to Fourth Avenue
about one block from city hall
at a cost of $3.5 million.
The report goes on to say
what this would include for
community cultural and social
purposes.
An auditorium with seating
for 800 to 1,000 persons in an
area of 10,000 square feet.
A center for the performing
arts with a 400 to 500 seating
capacity in an area of 5,000
square feet.
A banquet and exhibit hall
of 5,000 square feet.
And conference rooms with
10,000 square feet of space.
According to university
administrators, the city and
county are being asked to
contribute $2.5 million for a
center for the performing arts
which will seat 1,200 people.
IIFC Says I
No UAC |
In a statement released
Thursday, IFC President Charles
Brackins made the following
comment:
The official stand of the
Interfraternity Council
representing the men of
Floridas fraternities is to oppose
the referendum on Feb. 4. The
statement accredited to me in
the Wednesday, Jan. 28 Alligator
article was incorrect.
I APOLLO
GERMAN SHEPHERD
KB4NELS
" Quality ShephcrdM for
Particular people"
Champion-sired
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now available
378 3817
KLT 372-0276
UF Student

Controversy

In exchange for the donation,
the city and county are asking
for a plan that would let them
use die total facilities in
proportion to the amount of
monetary support they give the
facility which would amount
to about 14 per cent of total
operational time or 49 days a
year.
G. M. Davis, chairman of the
Alachua County Board of
Commissioners, said the county
will participate with the
university in this project, but
wants to make sure both local
units of government will have a
voice in running the UAC.
We are looking forward to
working with the university, and
at the same time, we are
concerned about how the
facility will be controlled, not
just today, but also after
OConnell and I are gone.
Davis claims he wants
eternal assurance that the
county and city will always have
a voice in governing the facility.
He said he has confidence .in
the leadership erf UF President
Stephen C. OConnell in getting
the job done. OConnell is the
most outstanding man in the
Southeast. Im glad he is heading
this project up.
The city has also expressed its
concern as to how much it
would be allowed to use the
facility. If it split its interest
with the county, then it would
.be allowed use of the facility
only 7 per cent of the time the
UAC is in operation.

.v.v..v.v.w.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.'.v.nv.v.
| Bands Play Saturday j
:j Music by a different jazz band every half hour, free, all day $
:j Saturday!
$ The Second Annual Florida Invitational Stage Band Festival
j will be held in the P.K. Yonge High School auditorium, beginning
9:30 a.m.
The final concert, given by UFs variety band, will be IVz :
hours, beginning at 6:45 p.m. :j:
j: Several of the best high school jazz bands will be performing.
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February 3 and 4 at the
Campus Shop and Bookstore

STATE TO GIVE INDIRECT AID

However, the university and
other possible contributors
involved have not sat' down yet
to determine how much of a
voice each group would get in
administering it.
Presently the city has reached
its ten mill limitation on
advalorem taxes, which may put
the city in an awkward position
for supporting this project.
Even though the city has a
tight budget, Saunders has said it
can get the revenues for
supporting this facility and other
projects at the UF by charging
the university for the water it
uses.
According to a contract made
between the city and the
university at the turn of the
century, the city furnished the
school all of its water free for
locating in Gainesville.
Saunders claims that if the
university payed fits water bill
then the city could give the
money -about $140,000 per
year back to the university for
funding the ACU.
The University of Florida is
the only university in the state
that gets free water. This is not
ethically right. If we pass a law
forcing die university to pay for
its water, die money would
come from the state, not out of
the university budget, and the
university would end up with a
net gain when die dty turned
around and pledged it back to
the university.
An informal indication of
approval of this plan, according

to Saunders, has been given to
him by the dty.
But he added that he wont
seek legislation on this matter
until public agreement to this
effect has been made.
Mayor-Commissioner Walter
E. Murphree on Wednesday said
he is reluctant to give his
opinion on die subject of the
citys help to build an activities
center.
He daimed there was a lot of
campus politics involved in the
issue, and he doesnt want to get
involved.
B. Harold Farmer, Gainesville
dty manager, said he hasnt
discussed with Saunders any
methods for financing the
project.
The commission has said it
will cooperate all that it can
with the university. We are

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concerned about whether the
people who put their money
into the facility will get good use
out of it.
Conflict in the area of use of
the facility, Fanner said,
wouldnt be so great as to hurt
our cooperating to build a joint
facility.
Error Made
The Alligator Tuesday
reported that Hal Barcey had
worked for the late Robert
Kennedy, Sen. Joseph
McCarthy, Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller and Hubert
Humphrey. Barcey, designer of
the National Conservation
symbol, in fact, worked with
Sen. Eugene McCarthy.



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Friday, January 30, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

/ I .TV /,-i "''/ ''<'*' I. I I I I', a' I I - V";
'sn
*£ v ? *F |V ';';# \1 ij| rjt** : i% r .\*"i -v^: ;
| \ v :._ J?W 'SSmjj&A
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f
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v>r aB plllil :
\.V; V
Kv | / A;. ;
F J k 1"
|r a
HOT-SHOTTING EARL FINDLEY
... scored 34 points against Ole Miss

: ; :-:*:*xv:v:-:*:-:*x-:*:-:%v:v:v:-:w
Sports On Tap
$ &
ft FRIDAY :j:j
::
S !$
v: Swimming at North Carolina, 4 p.m. ft
ft: Track Millrose Games in New York City ::
v! !v
$ >;
ft SATURDAY ft
3 &
v. v
|:|: Basketball against Georgia in the Florida Gym at 1 p.m. ft
ft Wrestling at Pensacola Navy :ft
$ Swimming at North Carolina State, 4 p.m. :ft
ft Track Ohio State Dual Meet in Columbus, Ohio :§
ftvX-XvXlvXvWvXvXvXw^
Matmen Face Tough
Test In Pensacola

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writer
Saturday against the
Pensacola Naval Base the
undefeated UF wrestlers will
face the sternest test of the
season in Pensacola.
Like the Gators, Pensacola has
a 4-0 record.
The wrestlers at the naval base
are a club but all the members
are in the aviation cadet program
so they are on a rigorous
program of regular exercise and
will be in top physical condition
for the match.
While all but two of the Gator
wrestlers are freshmen, most of
the Pensacola wrestlers have four
years of college wrestling
experience.
The main threat for the naval
base is their heavy weight Cleo
McGuire, who was NCAA
champion in 1967-68.
Head Wrestling Coach Keith
Tennant thinks the key classes
are the 134, 142, 150 and 158
lb. groupings.
Below the 134 and above the
158 lb. classes we dont have the
strength to beat the Navy. Those
five classes will decide who wins
the dual meet, Tennant said.
For us to win it will take as
+ Guns Guns Guns
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* 466-3340

GATOR SPORTS

good a performance as we had
against FSU last weekend and all
the boys will have to be 100 per
cent effective, Tennant
concluded.
The Pensacola wrestlers will
be our toughest test of the
season. If we get by this one
then we will have a real
successful year, Tom Deirough,
freshman wrestler, commented.
This match is crucial because
the Gators return home for three
weekend meets in a row against
FSU, Georgia and then the
Pensacola wrestlers again on
Feb.2o.
On Feb. 27-28 the Gators will
host the All-Florida Collegiate
tournament before ending the
season on March 6-7 at the SEC
tournament in Auburn, Ala.

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SATURDAY AFTERNOON

Gators Take On Georgia

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
The Gators encounter the SECs number two
team Saturday, as they play the Georgia Bulldogs in
the Florida Gym at 1 p.m.
Florida, after losing to both Mississippi State and
Ole Miss by identical 79-77 scores, bring a 5-9
overall record into the contest*
The win for the Gators would even their marie in
SEC play as they currently hold a 3-4 record..
The Bulldogs are 7-1 in conference play with wins
over Mississippi State and Ole Miss during the past
week. Their overall mark is 8-6.
Bob Leinhard, 6-foot-1 senior center, leads
Georgia in the scoring department as he has
consistently averaged better than 20 points a game.

Trackmen To Participate
In Millrose Competition

The Gator track team begins a
weekend of meets tonight as
they participate in the Millrose
Games in New York City.
Saturday the team travels to
Columbus, Ohio, for a dual meet
with Ohio State.
The 63rd annual Wanamaker
Millrose Games, first of New
Yorks five-meet winter track
season, will feature a
star-studded field Friday night
which includes 11 record holders
and eight Olympic gold medal
winners competing for
additional fame and glory.
The field for the showcase
event to be staged at Madison
Square Garden includes
Australian middle distance
runner Ralph Doubell, the world
record holder in the 800 meters
who is unbeaten in nearly three
years of campaigning on
Americas indoor track circuit.
Doubell, winner of 12
consecutive indoor titles, will
compete in the Charles H. Howe
half mile. To keep his record
intact, the Aussie runner will
have to beat Czech Josef Plachy,
winner of last years Millrose
half mile in 1:54.4. Also in the
field is Juris Luzins, competing
for sports international of
Washington. D.C.
Doubell, who says he likes to
run in New York even though
the weather creates difficult
training conditions, considers
Plachy and Luzins formidable
opponents.
1 respect them and 1 dont
expect an easy race. You never
know what to expect, said the

Page 20

Aussie on the eve of the meet.
The Wanamaker mile, usually
the most popular event on the
program, includes a prestigious
field consisting of Marty Liquori
of Villanova, Americas premier
Are?
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I We also stock Ace and Seamless Handballs; plus
I| j essw win

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30,1970

Leinhards 23 points and 22 rebounds led the
Bulldogs attack in the 96-84 triumph over Ole Miss.
Senior guard Jerry Eppling and junior guard
Lanny Taylor have also produced additional scoring
strength for Georgia, as both have averaged well
over 10 points a game.
Andy Owens continues to pace the Gators in
shooting, but it was Earl Findley who stole the
thunder during the Ole Miss game, as he hit for 34
points to Owens 14.
As an added attraction, Student Government will
present George Two Bits Edmondson an
honorary letter sweater at halftime for his
cheerleading activities at UF football games this
season*
Also, the Gainesville Tip-Off Club will present the
basketball team with a special surprise gift.

miler; John Mason of the Pacific
Coast Gub; Chuck Labenz;
Brian Kivlan of Long Island
Athletic Gub;; Don Rowe of St.
Johns and John Baker of
Maryland.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
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Swimmers Looking For Double Win

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
The UFs star-studded swimming team left for North Carolina
Thursday where it has two big meets this weekend.
The Gators are facing the University of North Carolina today at 4
p.m. at Chapel Hill and then travel to Raleigh for a 4 p.m. meet with
North Carolina State. The Gators are confident of coming home with
two more victories and extending their record to 6-1. The Gators
only loss came at the hands of Tennessee.
The North Carolina schools are expected to be on the same level as
FSU, but not as good as Tennessee. The only team better than
Tennessee is Florida was the sentiment of the team which is obviously
looking forward to their rematch with the Vols at the SEC meet in
Athens next month.
Both North Carolina schools hold an edge over the Gators in prior
meetings with the Tar Heels of UNC winning 9 out of the last 16
meetings and North Carolina State winning 7 of 12 prior matches.
Head Coach Bill Harlan feels the team is in fine physical condition
and is raring to go.
The Gators are obviously pointing to the SEC and NCAA matches
that are over a month away. The Florida State meet which is Feb. 14
at Florida Pool will be the highlight of the season for the Gators as far
as the home fans are concerned. It is expected that a large crowd will
be on hand for that battle.
The Gators strength this year has been in the breaststroke and the
backstroke. Freshmen Gary Chelosky and John Plemons have given
the team tremendous depth in the breststroke. Transfer student Bill
Domey finally overtook standout backstroker Bill Strate in the FSU
meet and eclipsed the Florida backstroke record in so doing.
Juniors Mark McKee and Bruce Williams have improved throughout
the year and are expected to peak about the time of the SEC meet.
Other standouts for the Gators this year have been Steve Hairston
in the sprints and Greg Hardee in the distances.
Jake Gaither Retires
As FAMU Mentor

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) One
of the most successful coaches in
college football, Alonzo Jake
Gaither of Florida A&M
University, announced his
retirement as Head Coach
Thursday.
But Gaither will stay on as
athletic director, with Robert
Pete Griffin, his chief assistant
for 25 years, stepping up to the
head coach position.
Gaither is 65.
Gaithers teams, during a
quarter century, have amassed a
204-36-4 record and have won
the National Negro Collegiate
Football championship eight
times.
The Rattlers under Gaither
also have won the Southern
Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference title every year but
three.
With desegregation, there are
now white students at A&M but
no white football players at the
predominantly Negro college.
However, last season Gaither
scheduled a predominantly
white football opponent for the
first time playing against
Tampa University in Tampa
Nov. 29. The Rattlers won
34-28.
At the conclusion, Gaither
said, We dont have any 'black
people or any white people here.
We just have two football teams
ready to play and a lot of
football fans to watch them. It
should have always been like
this.
He was named to the Helms
Foundation Football Hall of
Fame in 1961, and in 1962 was
noted Coach of the Year by
the American Football Coaches
Association. He also was named
that same year to the Florida
Sports Writers Association Hall
of Fame.
There is a Tallahassee
center and golf course
name d in his honor and the
A&M University gymnasium and
athletic center was dedicated to
him in 1966.

Born in Dayton, Tenn.,
Gaither graduated from
Knoxville, Tenn., College in
1927 and was head coach at
Hendersonville, N.C. Institute
and St. Paul Polytechnical
Institute at Lawrenceville, Va.,
before joining the Rattler staff
under then coach Bill Bell in
1937.
Griffin, slated to succeed him,
was a Little All-American
center on the A&M team when
Gaither started coaching there in
1937.
He joined Gaither, then head
coach, as an assistant in 1944.
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Friday, January 30, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 21



i c # * t ri i IT- t /. ri ;
The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30. T 970

Page 22

SEC Wcmts Tq Slim Sideline Crowds

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
TAMPA The Southeastern Conference wants to
thin out overcrowded sidelines at its football games
next fall even though that probably means a
confrontation with Gov. Claude Kirk of Florida.
Somethings got to be done, Louisiana State
Coach Charles McClendon, a member of a three-man
committee named to study the problem, said
Thursday. The situation has become severe. There
are so many people on the sidelines who dont
belong there that it interferes with the progress of
the game and furthermore somebody is going to get
hurt.
How does this involve the governor of Florida?
Kirk, a rabid football fan, runs up and down the
sidelines during games cheering his team on. UF
President Stephen OConnell goes Kirk one better
by going out with the captains to take part in the
coin flipping ceremony.
Obviously, theres no one at the UF who feels
he can order the Governor to stand back, said
McClendon. If we come up with a rule for the
whole conference maybe well get the Florida
people off the hook.
The SEC athletic directors and coaches
association, in its second day of preparation for
Fridays official conference meeting, devoted

Sleepers Emphasized
In Annual Pro Draft

NEW YORK (UPI) The
National Football League,
working in record time,
completed its 35th annual draft
of college players Wednesday
with heavy emphasis on
sleeper small college picks.
With very few name players
available in the comparatively
weak field of college prospects,
the 26 teams concentrated
heavily on possible gems in the
rough during the two-day
session.
The biggest name of the
second days selection, in fact,
wasnt even a football player. He
was John Carlos, the worlds
fastest human from San Jose
State who burst into national
' prominence with his black
power salute during a playing of
the national anthem at the
Mexico City Olympics in 1968.
Carlos, who has run a 9.1
second 100-yard dash and holds
most of the sprint records from
60-yards to 220-yards, was taken
by the Philadelphia Eagles in the
15th round.
A few of the big names who
lasted into Wednesdays second
round were Jim Otis, the
All-America fullback from Ohio
State; Tom Curtis, the
All-America defensive back from
Michigan; and Rodney Brand, an
All-America center from
Arkansas.
Otis went to New Orleans on

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the ninth round, and Curtis to
baltimore and Brand to the New
York Giants in the 14th round.
Highly publicized players who
were not drafted included Terry
MacMillan, Missouris
record-shattering quarterback;
quarterback Harry Gonso of
Indiana; and safetyman Buddy
McClinton of Auburn, an
All-American.
Os the 442 players chosen in
the 17-round, session, 287 were
from schools considered in the
major category and 155 in the
college division classification.
The entire draft was
completed in 20 hours and 45
minutes, the fastest the process
has ever been finished.
Other significant choices
included: Seth Miller, the
Arizona State defensive back
who led the nation with 11
interceptions, by Atlanta on the
eighth round; Ed Bell, the
leading small college receiver in
the nation with 96 catches on
the ninth round by the New
York Jets; champion hurdler
Willie Davenport of Southern
University by New Orleans on
the 12 th round; Olympic
wrestler Jess Lewis of Oregon
State by Houston on the 13th
round; basketball player Seaburn
Hill of Arizona State on the
16th round by Dallas: and
basketball player Don Crenshaw
of Southern California by Los
Angeles on the last round.

KIRK HIT HARDEST BY PROPOSAL

Thursday to discussions of academic requirements
for athletic scholarships again and to junior college
transfers.
SEC Commissioner A. M. Tonto Coleman said
the association voted to recommend to the
presidents of the 10 member schools that the
conference again adopt its own requirements rather
than those laid down by the NCAA.
The NCAA gives us two choices, Coleman
explained. We can either use its plan, which is
based on the prospects high school ranking or come
up with one of our own provided it receives
NCAA approval.
Generally, it doesnt matter which plan you
adopt, Coleman said. But at critical points
prospects who are border line cases either way the
national table is higher than the one we propose.
The SEC plan is based on grade average rather
than class standing. However, the SEC, unlike the
NCAA, also has a minimum entrance test score
which each prospect must make to receive financial
aid. A proposal to do away with this requirement
received a surprising 5-5 vote from the athletic athleticdirectors
directors athleticdirectors Thursday.
However, the only action that really counts in the
SEC is that taken in the presidents meeting here
Friday. The presidents met with Coleman Thursday
afternoon to go over the various items on Friday's
agenda.
Also meeting with the presidents on Thursday

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was Gov. Kirk who was in town to make a pitch for
Florida States admission to the conference.
However, it is pretty well understood that neither
Florida State, which has been seeking admission for
more than a decade, nor Memphis State, which
seeks admission despite being a member of the
Missouri Valley Conference, has any chance of
getting in at least not this year.
It was announced Thursday that the Nov. 7
Mississippi State-Auburn football game, supposedly
a home game for Mississippi State, has been
switched to Birmingham, Ala., as the night portion
of a doubleheader. Alabama meets LSU in the
afternoon game.
An Auburn spokesman said both schools agreed
to the switch for financial reasons.
The SEC business managers Thursday named
Tennessees Gus Manning, absent from this years
meeting, as their 1970 president and the SEC sports
information directors named Kentuckys Russell
Rice as their new president.
The SEC athletic directors and coaches said they
would like to keep the present rule that says a
transferee must sit out a year of athletic
competition unless lie is a junior college graduate.
This was in answer to a proposal that an athlete
be permitted to transfer and play after only one
year at a junior college if he has a grade average
approximately one point higher than normally
required.



Dickey Names Coach
To Fill Haynes Spot
By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
After a month of trying to get his staff completed UFs head
football mentor Doug Dickey finally found an offensive line coach to
succeed Jimmy Haynes and fill the last vacant position.
Bill Fulcher, 35, Georgia Tech offensive line coach last season was
named Wednesday by Dickey to replace Haynes, who was reassimed
to the head freshman coach position.
Dickey announced early last week that he had offered the job to
Green Bay Packer player and assistant coach Forrest Gregg only to
find himself still in the cold when Gregg decided to remain with the
Packers.
* *
THE NCAAs new ruling that allows its members to play an extra
regular season game is much to the liking of UF athletic officials.
The Gators 11th game for next year is shaping up to be a
intersectional match between Florida and Syracuse. Probable dates for
the second meeting between the two schools are either Sept 12 in a
night game in Jacksonville* Gator Bowl or Dec. 5 in an afternoon
game there.
Athletic Director Ray Graves said that he should know this week if
Syracuse can play the game.
If the plans for the game fall through, there still remains a
possibility that the Gators will play Duke University on Sept. 12 or
Nov. 21.
Both Duke and Syracuse said that they would play the Gators in
Florida only if they played the game at night.
Obviouslyi they find the Sunshine States warm September
afternoons a little unbearable.
*
Thirteen players from the state of Florida were picked by the pros
in this weeks annual draft of college players.
Those selected (by schools):
FLORIDA: Steve Tanneri, DB, by the New York Jets in the Ist
round. Mac Steen, OT, by San Diego in the 10th round.
FLORIDA STATE: Bill Cappleman, QB, by Minnesota in the 2nd
round. Grant Guthrie, PK, by Buffalo in the 6th round. Jeff Churchin,
OT, by Chicago in the 6th round. Phil Abraira, DB, by Chicago in the
13 th round.
FLORIDA A&M: Hubert Ginn, RB, by Miami in the 9th round.
Melvin Jones, WR, by Los Angeles in the 13th round. Kent
Schoolfield, WR, by Boston in the 12th round.
MIAMI: Tony Cline, LB, by Oakland in the 4th round. Bill Trout,
DT, by Cincinnati in the Bth round. Vince Opalsky, RB, by Los
Angeles in the 10th round.
TAMPA: Steve Starnes, LB, by Buffalo in the sth round. Dick
Nittinger, OT, by Miami in the 10th round.
Steve Kiner, native-Tampan and a two-year All-American linebacker
at the University of Tennessee, was picked in the third round by the
Dallas Cowboys.
* *
JOHN REAVES and Carlos Alvarez, UFs football whiz-kids, added
one more honor to their never-ending list of credits at last nights
ninth annual Tampa Sports Awards Banquet.
They received the Florida Sports Personality Award from' Lt. Gov.
Ray Osborne. It was the first time there were two recipients to the
award.
Reaves played his high school career at Robinson High School in
Tampa and Miamian Alvarez was recently made an adopted and
honorary citizen of Ybor City, Tampas well-known Cuban Quarter.
j Arthur Ashe Case J
Still Simmering f

NEW YORK (UPI) Amid
strident protests from Negro
groups in America, and turmoil
in the British press, the Arthur
Ashe case still simmered today.
Following the decision of the
South African government to
refuse Ashe a visa to play in the
apartheid nations open tennis
chamionship, the U.S. Lawn
Tennis Association president,
Alastair Martin, called upon the
international federation to expel
South Africa from the group.
But more drastic and punitive
measures were being
recommended in the black
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community. The American
Committee on Africa called
upon the United States to ban
all South African athletes from
competition in America, and to
forbid American athletes to
compete in South Africa.
The American Tennis
Association recommended that
the USLTA refuse to permit its
players to appear in South
Africa and that the U.S.
government refuse to allow
South African athletes
competing here to ship their
winnings back to their country.
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24 HOURS OF DAYTONA
... first of an 11-race series begins
I'*' I** 1 ** ON WHEE
Daytona Events Begin 1
§ V
y-Sx-x-SSSSSSSSBOB THOAIAS

Ferraris, Porsches, Matras, and a Lola-Chevy will
seek victory this weekend in the 24-Hours of
Daytona, first of the 11-race series for the World
Manufacturers Championship.
The 24-Hours has more factory entries this year
than ever before.
Ferrari, launching its first full-scale assault on the
title since 1967, will field seven cars, five new 512 s
and two 3125. Driving under the Italian banner are
such notables as Mario Andretti, 1969 Indianapolis
500 winner; Belgian Jacky Ickx, winner of Sebring
and Le Mans last year; Dan Gurney, 1967 Le Mans
winner; and Chuck Parsons, winner of last years
24-Hours.
Porsche, who won its first Manufacturers
Championship last year, will be back to defend it
with six entries, three 917 s and three 908 s. Porsche
drivers include Jo Siffert, winner of six races last
year for Porsche; Brian Redman, Siffert's teammate
in five of his victories; Pedro Rodriguez, 1968 Le
Mans winner; and Vic Elfoid, who won the 1968
24-Hours.
Matra, whose lone entry last year crashed in
practice, has entered two 650 prototypes, similar to
the ones that finished fourth, fifth, and seventh at
Le Mans last year. Frivers are three-time World
Driving Champion, Jack Brabham of Australia;
Johnny Servoz-Gavin, a French Grand Prix driver;
and Jean-Pierre Beltoise, also of France.
In previous practice sessions Ferrari, Porsche and

Little Judy says... stop by at 9 1
for our one-hour earlier show. I
(See if I'm really five!) I
r
Back for another big weekend is big Little
Judy of the Judy Miller Trio. Friday and
* Saturday from 9-2. Featuring 808
CLAYTON on the drums. And Little Judy,
who is not so little anymore. Rounded out by
an all-star cast of beers, wines, bagels, lox, and
excellent sandwiches.
* B
% % n cl] ai)b Bap
\ai xI I 11:30 AM to 2:00 AM I
1222 West University ; except Sundays

Friday, January 30, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Matra each broke the track' record unofficially.
Ferrari and Porsche broke it by nearly five seconds.
A Lola-Chevy won last years 24-Hours after
mechanical failures eliminated the Porsche and Ford
teams. Defending the win this year will be a single
Lola, driven by Canadians John Cannon and George
Eaton.
The race starts at 3 p.m. Saturday and ends
24-Hours later.
* *
English Trials, a test of balance and technique,
will be run Sunday by the Gainesville chapter of the
American Motorcycle Association (AMA).
For those who have never been to this type of
event, die course is laid out over rough terrain and
each rider mades solo runs. Time does no count.
Penalty points are given for touching the ground,
stopping or loosing balance.
The course is located west of 1-75 on Archer
Road. There are classes for both the experienced
and novice rider. Registration starts at 1:30 a.m.
and trials begin at 12:30 p.m. The entry fee is sl,
spectators 50 cents.
*
Competition, Stock and E.T. eliminations
comprise the Gainesville Dragway program Sunday.
E.T. dasses will again be divided into money and
trophy groups.
Gates open at 1 a.m. and eliminations start at
2:30 pjn.

Page 23



i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, January 30, 1970

Page 24

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Findley, a 6-foot-7 junior, is a transfer student
See for Yourself > from Palm Beach Junior College. Findley never
_j o played basketball until a senior in high school.
[]J td So far this season, Earl has played in the
CO f j? shadows of scoring ace Andy Owens. He has. Join forces with the greatest
H M PlCpp r however, managed to average well over 10 points a soggy fried chicken fighter of
8 | I Him $> game. them all Capt. Wishbone.
t M M 10 OZ. 5 This is the second time this season that Earl has aversion for greasy fried
B O been selected as Player of the Week. chicken that promotes
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