Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
wM mflf
BBT*'?.' mKmJr

|Vx R s,. it tp'* T-.-vsEm^E^^^W
,V m Jt
j? 1 > Ff *<*?; &jl
if J^B
ki pr
-Vj &:*
Hal ** ?$
, ' \ ~ '"' hl#, $
i h|) o
v < *^H
MHHBBBHBBHHHBBi^^* l,>t *- -"V ,'it
Jjw <
mHMTwP
THE JUNGLE?
Cheetah and Tarzan? No, not really, just two industrious UF
students stripping ivy off a tree beside the Reitz Union. Jane only
knows what they'll do with the ivy.

Senate To Hear O'Connell PE Memo

By MARY ANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writar
A memorandum from UF President Stephen C. OConnell
concerning physical education recommendations will be read to the
University Senate today.
OConnell returned the proposal for a voluntary physical education
program to the senate curriculum committee last week, four months
after it was passed by the senate.
The senates original recommendation read:
jhe university curriculum committee recommends that physical
education as a specific curricular requirement be dropped. Instead,
baccalaureate degree student shall earn six quarter hour credits in
personal development courses of a participatory nature. This
' requirement may be satisfied by courses in physical fitness and sports,
basic military science, art skillsjnusic skills and drama skills. This
requirement shall be met by courses outside the major field.
In his letter to the Senate, OConnell pointed out two main weak
points in the recommendation. Primarily, it did not treat the
question of advance notification of course content, and secondly, it

O'CONNELL

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second of a
three-part series on the proposed activities center
for the UF.)
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
There is a good possibility that the $17.5 million
University Activities Center planned for Beta Woods
wont become a reality unless UF students are
willing to help pay for the structure.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has said the
project could be set back as much as 10 years, and
possibly may never be built if students react
unfavorably in the upcoming Feb. 4 referendum.
Hes concerned with the prospect of federal,
state local and private donors balking at being
asked to back a project students wont support.
The impetus needed to get the project on the
road according to UF administrators, hat with
studsgt willinptta to contribute sls mMkm to the

'Activities Center Impetus
Lies With Students-OConnell

TODAYS MEETING

complex at $6 per student per quarter for 25 years
to pay for a revenue issue valued at $6 million the
remaining $9 million will be used to pay interest
($5 million), depreciation ($2.5 million),
indebtedness and debt service charges.
Dean of University Relations and Development,
Fred H. Cantrell, has broken down the sources for
funding the UAC, which includes a rundown on
what students pay the first year and succeeding
years leading up to the sls million total.
Based on enrollment estimates ranging from
22,000 students for the first quarter of the 1970-71
school year, to a minimum of 11,094 students for
the summer quarter, the average quarterly
enrollment for the year is multiplied by four giving
a total of 71,706 estimated times during the year
students will pay $6 toward the project.
Total revenue collected from students for next
year, based on the above estimates, will come to
$430,236. This wih increase each year until the year

Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 7 5

ON INFLATION BIIL

HouseSustainsVeto;
Nixon Scores Victory

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon scored a
clear-cut triumph Wednesday
when the House refused to
override his veto of a $19.7
billion school and health money
bill he declared was inflationary.
Nixons first major veto was
sustained when the Democratic
House leaders failed to muster
the two-thirds vote required to
override his objection.
House leaders planned an
immediately huddle on what to
do next.
One plan suggested by key
members on both sides of the
issue was to re pass the identical
bill but with an added provision
to let the President impound
part of the money.
That alternative was suggested

added a new requirement that each baccalaureate degree studeni
earn six hour credits in personal development courses outside of his
major field, OConnell said.
Since the Senate did not increase the degree requirements,
OConnell said that this would have the effect of granting physical
education the status of a subject worthy of elective credit.
OConnell also suggested the committee review possible credit
hours to be given to transfer students in this department.
A tentative list of personality development courses which would
fulfill graduation requirements has been released. They are: Livestock,
Dairy and Poultry Judging, Studio for Non-Majors, University
Orchestra, Choral Union, Mens Glee Club, Womens Glee Club,
University Band and Collegium Musician.
Other courses listed are University Choir, Instrumental Ensembles,
Opera Workshop, Use of Books and Libraries, Parliamentary
Procedure, Public Speaking, Voice and Articulation, Group
Discussion, Technical and Professional Communications,
Argumentation, Persuasion, Intercollegiate Debate, Theatre Practice,
Metalcraft, Crafts, Woodworking, Digital Computer Programming and
Publications Laboratory.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

by Nixon in his veto message.
The President nailed down his
winning vote Wednesday by
sending word of a compromise
under which schools getting aid
because of federal impact
would be guaranteed against
drastic reductions.
Nixon, who sent his veto
message to the House Tuesday,
said schools and health had top
priority with him but that
Congress had gone overboard to
the extent of $1.2 billion more
than he asked.
Working against the most
vigorous school lobby ever seen
around Capitol Hill, Nixon held
the way open for compromise.
His aides said later he would
perhaps be willing to accept
S2OO million of the extra

The

1995 -a relative date which could change if
enrollment figures jump or decline over the 25 year
period until a sls million total has been
collected.
The amount of surplus, an amount collected in
excess of the bond issue requirements, is presently
estimated at $2 million, a sum which can be used to
pay for an increase in interest rates which are
presently at 6 per cent, but could go to six and one
half per cent before the bonds are floated, and/or
reduce the number of years students will have to
pay for the center.
A unit breakdown as to where the sls million
will go once it starts coming in, shows that $6
million will go for the face value of the revenue
issue; about $5.5 million pays for six per cent
interest rates; $2 million for depredation,
indebtedness and debt service, and a $2 million
(SEE Wtt >

Thursday, January 29, 1970

unbudgeted funds carried in the
bill for so-called impacted school
districts.
But the house and senate
previously voted overwhelmingly
not for the $202 million Nixon
budgeted for this kind of aid, or
for anything in the
neighborhood of the S4OO
million now suggested by Nixon,
but for S6OO million up from
the $521 million appropriated
for 1969.
Republican leaders said
openly and Democratic leaders
said privately they thought
Nixon had locked up the
minority vote he needed to
prevent the bflTs passage.
The vetoed bill carries funds
to operate the Departments of
Labor and Health, Education
and Welfare and the Office of
Economic Opportunity in the
fiscal year that began almost
seven months ago, on July 1.
The affected agencies have been
operating on temporary
spending authority which
expires at the end of this week.
STUDENT SENATE passes
resolution supporting a bill
to lower the voting age to
18 page 3
Classifieds 12,13
Editorials 8
Entertainment 18
FSU News 4
Letters 9
Movies 12,13
Small Society 6
Sports 20

GLATFELTER



Page 2

Ph"** JwMy 29,,1970

SG Senate SuDDortina Lower Voting Age

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate passed a resolution Tuesday
night supporting a bill now before the Florida State
Legislature to lower the voting age to 18. C
The resolution, which passed unanimously, urges
the legislature to pass the bill placing the issue on
the ballot in the November general election.
The resolution states in part that it is the very
essence of democracy that all qualified and capable
citizens have the opportunity to express their
opinion publicly... The citizens of Florida between
the ages of 18 and 21 possess the educational level
necessary to become responsible
electorate... including the 18 to 21 year old age
group directly in the political process can only work
to revitalize our electoral system.
The bill before the legislature, if passed there and
in the November election this year, would simply
amend the state constitution to require a person to
be 18 years of age to vote instead of 21.
A bill was also passed which earmarked $35,000
for the Lake Wauburg project. The money was
transfered from the campus improvements, special
requests and active reserves funds of Student

Extra Curricular Activities
Credit Proposed ByCouncil

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
One of the proposals introduced at the
Governors Student Advisory Council Jan. 19-20
was the possibility of assigning academic credit for
certain extra curricular activities, such as Project
Concern or SAMSON.
The council, attended by students from public
and private universities and colleges throughout
Florida, was held in Tallahassee and attended by Joe
Hilliard, John Englehardt and Jan Dickens, UFs
representatives. They agreed students present at the
council were all concerned with its success, and
willing to work for it.
Several proposals on many of the current issues
of the day were presented by the students to Gov.
Kirk.
However, due to lack of time, Kirk was unable to
listen to all the recomendations the students had
drawn up, Hilliard'said.
All the proposals which were presented to the
governor had been unanimously approved by the
students, he said.
The students requested they be allowed to meet
once a month, however, because of financial
problems this may not be possible. The next
meeting is scheduled for March 5.
The council was paid for through the governors
office, Hilliard said.
Miss Dickens said it was the first time a governor
has initiated a council of this nature.
One of the proposals which Kirk said he liked

Dialogue Sponsors
Black Forum On WRUF
Roy Mitchell, coordinator for disadvantaged students at UF and
Larry Jordan, student government secretary for minority affairs, will
discuss The Black Student on Campus 01 tonights Dialogue
program on WRUF- AM radio.
Dialogue is an open phone forum program sponsored by Florida
Blue Key in cooperation with WRUF. It starts at 1:05 p.m. with
moderator Bob Moore. The numbers to call for the program are
392-0772 and 392-0773. Tonights will be the second show.
Mitchell was appointed to his position in September 1969. He is the
first person to be appointed to this position on a full time basis. He is
an instructor of comprehensive logic at the UC and former high school
counselor in Jacksonville.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspapei of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

BILL BEFORE cu">pioa LEGISLATURE

Government.
Student Body Treasurer Jim Roll said at the
meeting that it was necessary for the funds to be set
aside for the project so that initial work could
begin. The $35,000 brings to $127,000 the amount
which has been marked for Wauburg. An architect
has now been hired to begin work on the project.
Roll said, and we are hoping that something will be
opened up there by June for swimming.
He emphasized that as yet no money has been
spent besides an initial $5,000 architects fee and
none of the money now earmarked for the project
can be spent until specifically requested. It could be
transferred to some other use if the Student Senate
decided to do so, Roll said.
Senate President Jack Vaughn submitted a report
to the senate in which he answered criticisms about
the recent election of the chairman and
vice-chairman of Student Government Productions.
The election, in which he voted as an ex officio
member of the Public Functions Authority, has
come under criticism from Interhall President Susan
Johnson, who said the electors had not given proper
consideration to all the candidates for the jobs and
had even, in some cases, decided who they would
vote for before they had seen all the applications.
There were three applications for the two

was the possibility of assigning academic credit for
certain extra curricula activities, such as Project
Concern or SAMSON, Englehardt said.
In this way, a students educational experience
may be more meaningful to him and the community
in which he works, he said.
Englehardt said he thought perhaps the most
important issue discussed dealt with the funding of
higher education in the state-supported schools.
He said Kirk had said he thought students should
pay their fair share of education. However, when
asked if he had any idea of what their fair share
would be, Kirk said he didnt.
Hilliard said the relevancy of education was
one of the main discussions of the councils
One of the proposals which dealt with this
problem, asked the governor to incorporate into the
existing curriculum a realistic black studies program.
Kirk said he didnt think it would be a bad idea
for all students to be job ready upon graduation
from high school, even if they planned to go onto
college, Englehardt said.
Kirk said, lt wont hurt anyone, Hilliard said.
Students also asked for representation on the Board
of Regents, or in private schools, the Board of
Trustees, Hilliard said.
The three representatives agreed any real
evaluation of the council would have to wait until
the governor has had time to act upon the
suggestions of the group.
Hilliard said Kirk emphasized the councils only
power was to advise him.

VOTE NO
Open Letter to Charles Shepherd
T* A,, i9ator c,uotes you as saying you are willing to debate
anybody, anywhere at any time..."
Shepherd, when I stood up in open £enate meeting
-s* ssrkiss; ssr open
challenge after all. Xrt IShisST '"**** *"
Or does Charles Shepherd need protecting.
put up Z? shut* from'hlh : T* d '* a9ain 11 '* timefor Y 0U
meetings. TOM BALL and jim ri AmJ ,nd Your c,osecl doors and your secret
RALPH GLATFELTER (iJ'HL' CIAR ? ha,,en 9e CHARLES SHEPHERD and
before the referendum. second time) to a debate over WUFT the night
How about It, Charles?

positions: Leonard Tanner and Tom Nash for
chairman; Caron Balkany for Vice-chairman. Tom
Nash, who was not elected as chairman, was
subsequently for the vice-chairmanship.
Vaughn said he did not vote for Nash in either
case because he did not feel him as well qualified for
either job as the other applicants.
Carol Brunson, secretary of PFA, spoke at the
meeting in defense of Miss Johnson and to clarify
her position.
I felt the people had made up their minds before
they saw the candidates. she said. She also felt
many of Nashs qualifications had not been made
known to the members of the PFA before the
election.
I think Mr. Tanner will do a good job. she said.
I just dont think Mr. Nash was given due
consideration.
Student Senator Tom Ball, chairman of the
Mayors Council, publically challenged Student
Body President Charles Shepherd to a debate on the
University Activities Center. The debate, he said, is
to take place on a special program on the UAC to be
televised on WUFT TV, Channel 5, the night
before the Feb. 4 referendum.
He said it was time to put up or show up, said
Ball, and I say the same.

* ------ v.v.V.J
| CSBP Will Seek j
Support of FSA

Support for the yet-to-be
formed Florida Student
Association (FSA) will be sought
from the Council of Student
Body Presidents and possibly the
Board of Regents at meetings of
those groups Feb. 1 and 2,
respectively.
FSA, to be composed of every
college, junior college and
university statewide, will be a
sounding board for members
and make available to them
benefits such as those currently
received by member schools of
the National Student
Association (NSA).
George Seide, a UF student
instrumental in conceiving and
materializing the FSA, will make
a presentation to the council
which meets the day before the
scheduled Board of Regents
meetings, in Tallahassee, Feb. 1.
Student body presidents from
the seven state universities
directed by the Board of
Regents will be at the meeting to
hear the presentation.
He said three or four schools
in other states have
organizations similar to FSA

which have worked out well.
The first organizational
meeting of FSA will be held at
the UF March 6 and 7. At that
time Seide will present a
tentative constitution he has
drafted and representatives of
schools interested in joining FSA
will combine their ideas to come
up with a final constitution.
' .*
MINI-POSTER
£CSflSttQt>
snow lbm news
analysis t> m
0 EXPERTS. o



UAC Debate Introduces Unanswered Question

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Activities
Center debate at the Reitz
Union on Tuesday saw the
introduction of another
unanswered question into the
battle over center financing
how much will faculty and staff
pledge?
Its known that students are
expected to pay $6 per quarter
for the next 25 years, but thus
far, suggested staff and faculty
contributions have been
included within a figure of $6 or
$7 million labeled alumni and
friends of the university.
The question was directed at
Ralph Glatfelter, chairman of

IN CAMPUS CRIER

SG To Pay For UAC Ad

Student Body President Charles Shepherd
Wednesday instructed the University Activities
Center Student Committee to pay for a full page ad
it ran in the Campus Crier last fall urging students to
support the proposed UAC.
Reacting to an editorial which appeared in
Wednesdays Alligator, Shepherd agreed that the
misuse of the Crier should be corrected.
Student Government has fully understood that
this free page furnished by the Alligator is to be
used as a bulletin board for student organizations,
he said. It is not to be used for the purpose of
advocacy of any particular point of view.
Though intentions were good, this was an
improper use of the Campus Grier. It was done
without my personal knowledge or permission,
Shepherd said.
Ralph Glatfelter, chairman of the UAC
Committee, also admitted the ad was a goof.
We admit we are wrong. We have been billed at
our request by Student Publications today for the

Carswell Denies
Club Segregation
WASHINGTON (UPI) Supreme Court nominee G. Harrold
Carswell denied under opposition questioning Wednesday that he
knowingly tried to preserve segregation during a brief 1956
association with a Tallahassee country club.
During his second day as a witness at a Senate confirmation
hearing, Carswell was pressed about his motive in contributing SIOO
to convert the golf facility from a city country club to a private one.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., strongly suggested that the
conversion was a deliberate scheme to avoid ending race barriers at the
dub.
Carswell said he had never discussed the segregation situation with
anyone and that he didnt assume anything about the matter.
He acknowledged that he was aware that the same practice was
going on elsewhere and was being challenged in the courts but he was
not preoccupied in examining country club practices.
Sen. Hugh Scott, R-Pa., intervened at the Judiciary Committee
hearing to contend that the Democrats were raising the biggest fuss
over a $24 transaction since the Indians sold Manhattan. This was a
reference to the difference between the SIOO Carswell contributed
and $76 he later got back.
Former Florida Gov. Leroy Collins, a Democrat who once
employed the nominee in his law firm, testified that Carswell was not
segregationist and related that he too contributed SIOO to the golf
dub.
I dont recall any racial considerations, Collins said. If there had
been any, I would not have given them $100.
Carswell steadily disavowed any white supremacy attitudes in his
judicial and personal viewpoint during his testimony.
ROBBIES
TV & BILLIARDS^!
I 1718 W University Are I
I f Qn The Gold. Coast I

the UAC StodantCommhtee, by
members of tae audience.
Glatfelter said there is a
faculty committee working on a
method for handling faculty and
staff donations, and added that
they have already donated about
SIO,OOO.
Wednesday the chairman of
the Planning Committee for the
Activities Center, Dr. E.T. York
Jr., said he has met with
representatives from the deans
offices and approved the idea of
asking for donations from
faculty and staff.
In an unanimous vote, we
endorsed the concept of faculty
helping to pay for the center. We
have indicated that we are

IA r lr J i /a; i ML i A I T 1J 1 '1 4% h J*H
HOW MfICH WILL FACULTY. STAFF PAT?

ad. We will provide space in the Campus Crier for
any opposing opinion if they are willing to pay for
it, Glatfelter said.
Ronnie Bloom, editor of the Campus Crier, said
the controversial ad was run in the last Crier of the
fall quarter.
We have run the Crier four times since then and
never were approached until deadline time this
week. The page has already been made up. This was
an obvious attempt to embarrass SG, Bloom said.
Glatfelter said the page will be pulled and
remade, if necessary, to make room for an answer to
the UAC ad if opponents of the UAC wish to pay
for the space.
The Board of Student Publications July 25,1968
provided for a weekly student activities page to be
run in the Alligator. It specified that the intent of
the page would be to support upcoming student
activities that might or might not rate news space in
the Alligator.

Willing and anxious to work out
the mechanics for staff and
faculty and participation.
The mechanics for collecting
donations would probably
involve payroll deductions and
out right gifts to the
University Foundations Fund,
York said.
How long will it take to get
the mechanics worked out?
York said it will take several
months of planning and work
to set up a program of this type.
We plan to write a brochure
explaining what facilities the
activities center will have, the
costs involved, and how payroll
deductions will work.
There will be no pressure

FLORIDA POWER
The company with an engineering future for you.
immediate opportunity in engineering and a
future in Florida.
Opportunity to work with topnotch engineers and
sophisticated hardware at Florida Power Corporation.
Opportunity to work for a corporation that must
double its capabilities in ten years... or less!
Our first nuclear-fueled generator will
go on-lme in 1972.
Floridas booming future is Florida Powers future.
It can be yours, too!
See our representative. He'll be on campus
Wednesday & Thursday, February 4 & 5.
FLORIDA r v/f I
coSSbatiom
1 Jill I B ffyWPy I | TWk w \r
\
. *v .

applied to faculty and staff, he
said. The program will reflect
positive action. We believe there
will be unanimous
participation.
York pointed out that names
of contributors would be
confidential.
During Tuesdays debate at
the union, Professor Reid Poole,
chairman of the Department of
Music j spoke in favor of the
UAC.
He said the present facilities
for the' performing arts are
embarrassing, a shame and an
outrage.
Concerts and recitals at
Florida Gym, according to
Poole, cannot be arranged unless

La Dolce Vita A Lai
Communist Style I
Hie Upper Classes in Eastern Europe Its La Dolce Vita
will be the topic of a lecture by Leopold Tyrmand today at 8
p.m. in Norman Auditorium. W
The lecture, sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha, a political
honorary, has previously been delivered at Yale, the Foreign
Service Institute in Washington, and a number of other places. M
Tyrmand is an acclaimed writer of short stories, essays and X
film scripts. Bom in Warsaw, he received most of his education m
there and then completed his studies at LAcademic de I
' Beaus-Arts in Paris. During the early 50s he served on the I
reporting staff of the Catholic-liberal Weekly, Tygodnik I
B Powszechny, the only independent publication in eastern I
Europe at the time. I
\ While in America he has also contributed articles to such B
1 well-known periodicals as The New Yorker, the Reporter, and U
w The New Leader. Notebooks of a Dilettante, an anthology of A
m Tyrmands articles from The New Yorker, will be published m
8 next month. I

invi f uj t < <
Thursday, January 2d, 1970, Tlm Florida AWgator, I

the police are notified ahead of
time to regulate the radiators in
the facility so they will not
make noise during a
performance*
One of the speakers for the
opposition, law professor Herb
Schwartz, said the student
shouldnt be the one to show an
initiative in funding this project.
Schwartz recommended that
the administration solidte
pledges and hold the money
until the university had saved
enough to pay for an activities
center.
Glatfelter attacked this plan
with the statement that it would
take 12 to 15 years to build and
would cost twice as mucn.

Page 3



HHm flsrtrts ft Hi, Tfvdsy. 4mm wy Z9i 1970

Page 4

THE DRAFT:
question & answer

Q. Im a British citizen, a
senior here at UF, and Fm here
in the United States on a foreigh
student (F-l) visa., which
means that I am not registered
with the draft. Only aliens on
immigrant visas must register.
Under the old draft system, I
would have to register with the
draft six months after
graduation, provided I stay in
the States, at which time I
would be 22. Must I still register
under the new system six
months after I graduate even
though I am past the 19-year-old
cut-off?,
A. Yes, you must register
during the six month period
after your graduation if you plan
to get an immigrant or
permanent visa. You will receive
your random sequence number
from the draft lottery selection
drawn the year you become
eligible for selective service*
Q. I am a student at UF and
will graduate in June. My 2-S
deferment will become 1-A. My
number is 313. What will happen
tome?
A. After graduation, you will
enter the 1-A pool, the First
Priority Group, which includes
all men between the ages of
19-26 who have no deferment.
The Department of Defense has
estimated that 64 per cent of the
available 850,000 will be needed
for military service in 1970.
Those in the bottom third of
the lottery (244-366) have a
relatively low probability of
being reached for induction, and
those whose numbers have not
been reached by the end of the
year, will be placed in a lower
order of call next year and will
be vulnerable for induction only
if the First Priority Group for
next year is exhausted.
Q. Canada has long
accomodated Americans seeking
to avoid the draft. My question
is: as an American citizen, what
requirement would I have to
meet to become a naturalized
British or Bahamian subject?
A. British and Bahamian
citizenship requirements are
almost identical. Information
can be obtained by writing
British Information Services,
845 3rd Ave., New York, N.Y.
10022. You could also try
British
| FSU news |
By FSU Flambeau
BLACK STUDENT UNION:
Members of the FSU Black
Student Union met with FSU
President J. Stanley Marshall
Wednesday and requested he call
a special session of the Faculty
Senate because a state of
emergency exists within the
black community on the FSU
campus.
The 5:30 a.m. meeting was
scheduled before Marshall left
town on a three-day trip.
Though black student leaders
refused to disclose causes of the
state of emergency,- ,it is
suspected problems in
establishment of a black cultural
center is the primary cause.
SPORTS: The FSU basketball
team held high-scoring
Jacksonville University to 83
points, defeating the sixth

Massachusettes Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008.
The Research library has a
book entitled Whitakers
Almanack which contains a
detailed list of the requirements.
The book can be found in the
Reference room, number 314.2
A445, volume 101, page 1163.

KM
I IIKk 181 Hj i
' mm* -4fBKKKBBK^KiBBBF' ; f
... .
BB| ''"Be TH "^V* ~ ~~~ jpP 'iff <." sos | mk .. " I'-'s */ C- XyX/ 'v t
W f m L j I I y s v W
" / I I I I I I jflf
vb A H I 1 \ I 1 bWBBHHHHBBBBBHbHHMBBBWb 1 ;'
Bi I PSBBBI PBBBBBB mmsm
fIA tTf f | A I L i*] |
L4il' l 1 ?b.a 1 1 I I ~AV

BSK b f M B I qj I [lll M II!
mviV 1 ] 1, B I I L s J L w a w A \ 1

Answer that one and you'll open up a
whole new field of solid state physics
that just might come to be called
excitonics." Because the most excit exciting
ing exciting thing about excited molecules in
solids, right now, is that no one knows
what to do with them.
This intriguing state of affairs came
about after physicists began firing
photons into molecular crystals and
observing the results. Which were:
"excitons."
An exciton is a conceptual entity that
has more stateness" than thingness"
about it. When a photon strikes a
molecule in an organic crystal with
sufficient energy, it bumps an electron
to a higher energy level, leaving a
hole" in the molecule. In the brief
interval before it falls back into its hole,
the electron releases the energy it re received
ceived received from the photon, which propa propagates
gates propagates another hole-electron pair in a
neighboring molecule, and thus on

Book Loan Extended

Students who regularly keep books overdue
find it costing them more, but the loan peno
be extended.
Under new regulations laid down m a UF
poficy memorandum dated Jan. 6 fines are now 2
cents a day. Formerly they were 10 cents a
day to three weeks.
The purpose of the increase is to motiraU:
students to return then books promptly, sari
Libraries Director Gustave A. Harrer.
He termed the fine increase an administrative
weapon.
Harrer stressed that the act was nottakeiUogai

through the crystal.
This phenomenon is called the
singlet" excited state: or the singlet
exciton. Du Pont scientists have pro produced
duced produced it with a 150-watt bulb. In the
singlet, an electron is excited without
any change in direction of its spin or
magnetic moment. It dies quickly, and
a blue light emerges from the crystal.
But with an intense light source, such
as the laser, an even more interesting
excited state has been produced: the
triplet."
In the triplet, the spin of the excited
electron is reversed, a magnetic field
is produced, and the excited state lasts
a million times as longabout a hun hundredth
dredth hundredth of a second. Du Pont researchers
have also found that two triplets can
combine, producing a singlet exciton
with greatly increased energy and a
life span of a hundred millionth of a
second. Os promising interest is that
this tendency of triplets to merge can

1 *^ u on t Company, Room 7892, Wilmington, DE19898 1
Please send me the booklets checked below.
Chemical Engineers at Du Pont
i Mechanical Engineers at Du Pont
Engineers at Du Pont
i Accounting, Data Systems, Marketing, Production |
i i
Name I
, University.
j Degree Graduation Date
1 Address I
I
Clty State. Zip
An Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F)
fe

revenue for the libraries. All money collected from
the fines is turned over to the state, he said.
Harrer said the former fine was insufficient to
induce students to return their overdue books.
At 10 cents a day we were just running a rental
agency, he said.
As a further .hnpetus for students to return
books, a 50 per cent discount will be allowed if the
book is returned at the same time the fee is paid.
Tracking down students who dont pay their
fines creates mountains of paperwork for us. We
think this will be much better, Harrer added.

be sensitively controlled by applying a
magnetic field to the crystal.
Perhaps the next step will be the
engineering of devices that manipulate
light signals directly, bypassing the
present need to convert them first into
electrical signals and then back into
light. Perhaps too this line of research
will lead to greater understanding of
the mechanisms of light-energy trans transfer
fer transfer itself, such as those involved in.
photosynthesis by living plants. The
possibilities are many.
Innovationapplying the known to
discover the unknown, inventing new
materials and putting them to work,
using research and engineering to
create the ideas and products of the
futurethis is the venture Du Pont
people are engaged in.
For a variety of career opportunities,
and a chance to advance through many
fields, talk to your Du Pont Recruiter.
Or send us the coupon.

<3TBSSt
Ventures for better living.



Wittmer Eradicates Mark Os The Beast

It was called the mark of the beast and
the efforts of a UF professor were needed to
eradicate it and end a traffic crisis between the
Amish and Indiana law enforcement officials.
Dr. Joseph P. Wittmer, a member of the
College of Education's Department of Personnel
Services, helped halt a year-long impasse between
members of the Amish sect and Indiana law
enforcement officials while in Indiana visiting
relatives during the Christmas holidays.
Wittmers efforts resulted from a request in
early December by the National Committee for
Amish Religious Freedom for his assistance in
solving the controversy.
The problem involved a law requiring a
reflector-type emblem on all slow-moving
vehicles. Old Order Amish objected to the orange
emblem which they termed the mark of the
beast on religious grounds that it was
gaudy and glorified man rather than God.
As a result of this law, numerous Amish were
fined for refusing to affix the emblem to their
horse-drawn buggies, and went to jail rather than
pay the fines. At least one family moved from
the state because of the issue.
While in Indiana, Wittmer met with the
director of the Office of Traffic Safety and

ffttOW EASE tmijU
Ralph Glatfelter, chairman of
the University Activities Center
Student Committee, readily
admits that sls million sounds
like a lot of money, but he
points to Board of Regents
regulations which state that
universities are required to have
all the money for a project
pledged before construction may
begin.
In addition to the $6 million
revenue issued to be floated
through tuition increases,
another $11.5 million in issues

Deputy General Visits
UFArmy ROTC Dept.
The UF Army ROTC Department will be visited today by Major
General Benjamin F. Evans Jr., Deputy Commanding General, Third
U. S. Army.
Evans is a 1936 graduate of the US Military Academy at West
Point. During World War II he served in the Pacific, involved in both
the Guadalcanal and New Georgia Campaigns.
Evans has had subsequent overseas tours, in Germany, Iceland and
Turkey. He became Deputy Commanding General, Third U. S. Army,
Fort McPherson, Ga. in August 1969.
I f Wow! I really ] s. 1
I \ popped my top / / . ... \
\ over you. / f wth )
l good reason. J
I
I See your U of F ring,
February 3 and 4 at the
Campus Shop and Bookstore

FOR ACTIVITY CENTER CONSTRUCTION
Cantrell: Longer Wait, Higher Cost

will have to be raised from other
sources.
These sources, according to
Cantrell, indude:
$600,000 already pledged
from the State Department of
Transportation for a four-lane
highway to serve as the major
route for vehicles traveling to
the center.
9 A possible donation of $2.5
million from Alachua County
and the City of Gainesville to
build a performing arts
auditorium.
An estimated $3.4 million
is expected from state and
federal sources.

arranged meetings between state officials and
members of the Amish community. He also
assisted in mediating these sessions.
Wittmer now has received word from Indiana
Gov. Edgar D. Whitcomb that the state law
requiring the orange emblem on all slow-moving
vehicles has been temporarily suspended.
The governor wrote Wittmer he has ordered
the Office of Traffic Safety to change the
geometries and coloring of the present emblem
as it applies to horse-drawn buggies in Indiana.
It is likely, Wittmer said, that the new emblem
will be one jointly designed by him and the
Amish. That emblem consists of blade and white
diagonal reflector stripes and is rectangular in
shape.-
The Amish are gentle people who are totally
committed to non-violence, said Wittmer.
However, their beliefs strongly prohibit the use
of electricity, automobiles, clothing with buttons
or zippers and gaudy colors.
Wittmer should know. He was bom and raised
in the Amish community of Montgomery, Ind.
His parents, brothers, sisters and childhood
friends still strictly observe all the Old Order
Amish rules and traditions.

The final $6 million is
expected from private sources
the Florida Alumni Association,
UF administrators, staff and
faculty, and other friends of
the university.
Cantrell said the
administration is exploring all
possible sources, which means
that the present breakdown of
contributors is not fixed or
concrete.
The possiblity of tapping the
state legislature for the total has
Club Deadline
The UF Jujitsu Club will not
accept applications for
membership after today.
All interested males are asked
to meet tonight in the south end
of the Florida Gym by 7 p.m.

SUMPTUOUSLY SITUATE AT
1131 W. UNIV. AVE ... NEAR CAMPUS AND ... IN THE GVILLE MALL
&m§
come on in .... we're having a
ZAP IT OUTA HERE SALE
YES, WE DO STILL HAVE SOME FALL ITEMS LEFT A FEW
SKIRTS, A FEW SWEATERS, A COAT HERE AND THERE,
SOME PANTS AND DRESSES... EVEN A FEW BLOUSES,
SHELLS & VESTS.. SO WE DECIDED, WHAT THE HECK!
EVEN THO THERE MAY BE MORE COLD WEATHER COMING,
WHY NOT REDUCE THIS STUFF TO IRRESISTIBLE PRICES SO
WE CAN CLEAN THEM OUT AND MAKE ROOM FOR THE
GREAT NEW SPRING AND SUMMER ITEMS ARRIVING DAILY.
SO WE DID! COME AND SEE.
/ icj; > 4
PRICES. ARE LOW!

been ruled out by Cantrell.
Our needs in construction
here by *73 will total about $95
million, which we can
reasonably expect to receive.**
But tagging onto this total
another $17.5 million for an
activities center complex
wouldn't be considered by the
legislature.
Is there a possibility the
Athletic Association will donate
money to help build the facility?
I dont see any help coming

The Florida Alligator is now
accepting applications for
ADVERTISING SALESMEN
Prefer Junior or First Qtr. Seniors
w/ experience and afternoons FREE.
Come by Rm 330 JWRU M F.

Thursday, JawMry 29,1970, Th* Florid* AMfrtor,

from them. All of their gate
receipts are tied up in paying off
Florida Field and the university
golf course. However, Ray
Graves is liable to do most
anything. Theyre a private
corporation.
One of the dangers in waiting
to start this project, according to
Cantrell, is the fact that
construction costs doubled in
the past 10 years.
The longer you wait, the
more it will cost, he said.

Page 5



Page 6

i, the Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 29,1970

NO JAIL?
Senate Ponders Pot
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate considered Wednesday a
college roommate amendment designed to lessen penalties for the
youth who gives his pal a marijuana cigarette.
Sen. Harold E. Hughes, D-lowa, sponsor of the amendment, said it
and others to lessen marijuana penalties were designed to keep pot
users out of jail.
In contrast with public clamor in past years to toughen narcotics
and marijuana penalties, Hughes amendments to soften sentences for
marijuana violations were the only changes proposed in the bills
penalties.
Even without the Hughes amendments, the bill would sharply
reduce sentences for selling or using drugs from marijuana to heroin.
The Nixon administration has endorsed the bill and Senate leaders of
both parties predicted overwhelming passage, probably Thursday.
The Senate voted Tuesday to toughen enforcement by giving law
officers authority to barge in on suspected pushers and make raids
without warning.
It defeated, 44 to 40, a right of privacy amendment to table the
whole notion of no-warning raids, and 50 to 35 an amendment to
spell out guidelines specified in Supreme Court rulings on search and
privacy under which officers could make unannounced raids.
The college roommate amendment, scheduled for a vote today or
Thursday, would impose a maximum jail sentence of six months for
distributing a small amount incidental to ones own use and for no
remuneration or for insignificant remuneration not involving a
profit. A second conviction would carry a maximum two-year
sentence.
Hughes amendment also would cut the maximum first conviction
penalty for marijuana possession to six months, for selling marijuana
to two years.
Under both the bill and Hughes proposed changes, a judge could
impose fines rather than jail terms, and could suspend jail sentences or
grant probation. Under present law, jail sentences are mandatory for a
second conviction of marijuana or narcotics possession, and for the
first conviction of selling an outlawed drug.
60 Per Cent Os Aid
Assured To Schools

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Administration forces
Wednesday firmed up a
compromise plan to assure
school districts at least 60 per
cent of the federal impact aid
funds they were counting on
before President Nixon vetoed a
$19.7 billion health and
education spending bill.
Democratic and Republican
sources said the compromise
almost certainly nailed down a
Presidential victory as the House
prepared for a midaftemoon
vote on overriding the veto. But
a massive team of education
lobbyists continued to work
against the administrations plan.
Nixon vetoed the
long-delayed money bill for the
Labor and Health, Education
and Welfare Departments and
the Office of Economic
Opportunity on grounds it was
inflationary. It exceeded his
budget by $1.2 billion. He also
objected that it was drafted in a
way that forced him to spend all
the extra money.
But the President left the way
open for compromise and key
House GOP members, meeting
with newsmen as the House
convened, suggested the form it
might take: Let Congress repass
the bill with additional language
to give Nixon discretion to
withhold part of the school aid
money under a no hardship
commitment.
Sources said the President had
in mind an allowance of possibly
$442 million for aid to school
districts with a heavy load of
pupils whose parents work for
the federal government. This
would compare with S6OO
million in the vetoed bill and
$202 million in Nixons budget.
The 1969 appropriation was
$521 million.
Precise figures were ih
dispute, but- the ptopod

compromise was pictured by
administration backers as
providing full impact funding for
schools with students whose
parents both work and live on
untaxed federal installations.
Sixty per cent funding would
be provided those schools where
parents work for the government
and live on private, locally taxed
property.
Qkeee&U
GMtw a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St. H
Gainesville, Florida

the small society

M^PIE
4 TIME Hefe Yoii'UL ifeAU ze
|T*i NOT WHO YeH KNoM KNoMIT*
IT* KNoMIT* WHAT
- - |c. ^

Florida Loses Impact Funds
In Nixons Education Cutback

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Education Commissioner Floyd
Christian said Wednesday the
Nixon administrations plan for
cutting back federal impact
school funds will virtually
eliminate Floridas share.
In an effort to offset the
federal impact of military
bases which bring children into
schools while removing taxable
land from the school fund, the

Florida Supreme Court
OKs Power Transfer

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
State Supreme Court Wednesday
upheld the constitutionality of a
1967 law transferring local
control over junior colleges from
elected school boards to
appointed boards of trustees.
The court did not write an
opinion of its own but
unanimously adopted the
decision by Circuit Judge Hugh
Taylor of Tallahassee in a suit
brought by the Brevard County
School Board.

Engineering,
Math and
Science
Majors
t
Mr fc & \a
i t*n i j
I X -a

federal government reimburses
the states for instructing military
and civil service dependents. The
government pays S3OO for each
child living on a military base
and $l5O for off-base residents.
Christian said Nixons plan to
eliminate payments for all
children whose parents live off
bases would cut the states share
from $12.6 million to $2.6
million, eliminating the program

The board had sought to
regain control over the Brevard
Junior College on the contention
that it was unconstitutional for
the elected board to be required
to levy property taxes to
support an educational
institution over which it had no
direct control.
The courts also dismissed a
school board contention that
junior colleges are state
institutions and not subject to
support from local taxes.

IBM will be
interviewing
on campus
Feb. 25,26 |] i
If you're interested
in a career in
science and engineering,
programming, or marketing,
sign up at your
placement office.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM
m
mmm .* I

by Brickman

in some counties.
Frankly, if the Presidents
plan is upheld, I just dont know
what some of these counties are
going to do, Christian said.
Wes Monkey
Turns On
LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Early morning monkey business
resulted in the flooding of seven
floors Tuesday at the UCLA
School of Public Health
building.
Armed with giant rubber
squeegees, six companies: of city
firemen sopped up the water and
later found the culprit-a
monkey.
The small monkey, used for
research, escaped from his
seventh-floor cage and turned on
a shower used by scientists to
wash off harmful chemicals. The
animal did not know how to
turn the water off and all seven
floors were partially flooded.
Damage was not extensive.
The monkey was later found,
wet and angry, but unhurt.



||| 4|fl 1
Grade "A" Quick Frozen \r 16-20 Avg.
|#> YOU NG TURKEYS lb 39<
SWIsTsTEAKS lb 98,
/a aA A
|hmmhhmhhhhmh| Libby Cut Green Beans or Whole Kernel or Cream Style MAMii^HlM^MiAi^HHiiMH^^^A^&*
BjHw GOLDEN CORN 5 $ 1 00^BK
mm llbeTpeaches 3 ri 00 lIH 188 m *f!m.
m FACIAL TISSUE 4r s 1 00 f /WlJx
I 1
jflr ifr IfY A] Iff rg I Armour ped II
//* STEW 63.
j£y TiyrJff i rrnrn pies -39 <
EVERY $5 PURCHASE If KRAFTI|( m ,BB%r W# V
FEATURE 4 PEniE 4 KM^en^PEQQ^RP^QQBZK
CH OS BNOWY [bHd max will house instant HBH
L week lJ w b lifllHilrf| Bleach,u.EE49c|
NO PWCHASf NKtSSAHY #/ 0000 THROUGH FES. I 1-41-70 I GOOD THROUGH PEG. 1 I*3l-70
seeeeee valuable coupon ###### i *" "" ""i j I
I IS] Cb^ 0S sL\ Anlous Pears 23-
| l| -- ; POTATOES^IO-S*
WIIHtOWOR eedsuiraiAa.ti Nwhk i,ifi J 1 with this Coupon
I <%<% a mm,mm |i 70< TOMATOES -e 33 APPLES... 19 5
|OO V 43 CJ! Pineapple 3 -*1 ORANGES 10.- 49*
GGGOOO valuable ooupoNO0000 iT'X ch ._. IW-?

Thursday, January 29,1g70, TbForld.

Page 7



Page 8

f, AftfeiW, Thursday, January 29, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

FBK Helped Shepherd

MR. EDITOR:
It greatly disturbs me to read Charles Shepherds
words that Florida Blue Key is nothing more
than a dying race of strutting political peacocks.
As I recall, certain of these accursed birds were
still healthy enough up to less than one year ago to
engineer the election of the greatest peacock of
them all.
I did not then hear Shepherd object to the help

i t-v.y.Fluted Columns
Justice OConnell?
By John Parker-wT i

Steve OConnell on the Supreme Court?
Ive got a better idea. Lets hire kleptomaniacs for
store detectives. Or maybe we could get Richard
Speck to serve as housemother for the Tri-Delts.
Os course, the fact that Steve's name was
mentioned doesnt necessarily mean too much.
Unless you remember that it was good ol Spess
Holland who did the mentioning. You recollect
Spess dont ya? He was the good 'ol down home
boy who voted against practically every civil rights
bill anyone in Congress could think of. A fact like
that is bound to swing some weight with the Nixon
cretins.
What Dick is looking for, of course, is a nice
law-abiding conservative to fill in on the court. If
you interpret "conservative as meaning slow to
move then Steve certainly fills the bill.
He has been so "slow to move around UF, hes
often been mistaken for a statue of himself.
QUICK! Name five important things that Stephen
C. O'Connell has done since taking office as
president of UF.
Nope. Freshman beanie thing fell through. Only
one who wore the damned things was Steve. And he
had to quit.; Made him look Hke a grinning
psychedelic rabbi.
I know. Youre about to name a lot of
committees that Steve set up. I have to disallow
those, too. About the only thing those committees
ever did was to recommend more committees. And
we dont give any prizes for bureaucratic perpetual
motion.
Now, I'm certainly not suggesting that the
President of UF necessarily HAS to do anything.
Indeed, history contradicts the notion. Bui you
would at least expect him to SAY something
occasionally; I mean really say SOMETHING, not
just the typical administrative buffoonery.
Gotta problem? Pull out the *Ol whizzaroo
administrative non-statement and fill in the blanks:
"Now, in regard to this affair. I want our
position perfectly dear. We are now in contact with
the proper authorities throughout the state, and
they will be notified as to the state of affairs in
regard to and they will be available to advise us
at that time. Until then, we intend to take no action
ourselves. Our position right now is that we have no
position until die time comes to take a position, at
which time we will take the position which we feel
appropriate at that time.

UAC Isn't Worthy

MR. EDITOR:
If our noble student senate, student leaders,
and pompous sophists in Tallahassee had but the
intellect to observe the status of our campus and
contemplate the ridiculousness of a tuition increase
to finance such a boondoggle as UAC when students
are cammed forty and fifty deep into classes which
diould allow no more than twenty, when professors
in the humanities receive up to twenty-five per cent
less remuneration than their fellow pedagogues in
the sodal and physical sciences, when some
professors and graduate assistants have no offices to
priyatdy qppfet with their students, and wheh
professors muss attempt to instruct their students

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

of Manny James & Co., nor do I now see him
hesitate to use his high office and his own ODK as a
pulpit from which to push his own views to enhance
his own political future.
So lets stop kidding ourselves, Charlie. Your
latest tirade brings to mind an old cliche about pots
and kettles and relative shades of darkness.
JOHN C. ENGLEHARDT, 4AS

Dont laugh. Its worked well for three years now.
But let's see how Steve stacks up against the
Warren court:
Bond V. Floyd (1966). The Supreme court
restored Julian Bonds seat in the Georgia legislature
saying that the state by refusing to seat him, had
violated his right of free expression. His crime?
Bond made and endorsed anti-war statements.
Meanwhile, good '(X Steve was sitting by while
Lavon Gentry went to court for posting anti-war
leaflets on campus. Youd think a future Supreme
Court Justice would recognize this obvious
infringement of First Amendment rights, wouldnt
you?
Elfbiaadt V. Russell (1966). The Supreme Court
struck down on Arizona loyalty oath in which state
employees were required to defend the laws of
Arizona against "all enemies whatever .calling
it "guilt by association and a "real danger (to)
legitimate expression.
Meanwhile, Stevie-Wonder moved with
unheard-of speed in dismissing UF employees
recently who refused to sign a loyalty oath which
was constitutionally suspect. When asked what the
rush was, Steve just grinned and, like the Nazi gas
chamber barons, pointed upstairs.
Gibson V. Florida Legislative Investigation
Committee (1963). The Court restricted the ability
of a Florida investigative committee to harass a
Miami NAACP chapter on the basis that such groups
were "neither engaged in subversive activities, nor
demonstrated to have any substantial connections
with such activities.
Meanwhie, UF Prof. Marshall Jones was pilloried
in a quasi judicial proceeding which introduced into
evidence the fact that Jones had attended "certam
meetings, hnd been amariating with "certam
people mad had been active in "certain
demonstrations. What did Steve have to say about
such an investigation (a combined effort of
Gainesville and Campus Police along with some
super-sleuthes in Tigert)? Well, Steve said that
tenure was a privilege, not a right. Ho-Hum.
My point, if I may wax deadly serious for a
moment, is that if OConnell can show such a
blatant disregard for rather well-accepted
constitutional principles in his capacity as a
university president, heaven only help us if he were
ever on that bench himself.
No, lets keep here at home where he can do less
harm.

within the confines of decrepit facilities, then I feel
certain, nay positive, that these great men could
help us build a truly great university, that is, one
that distinguishes itself academically, not
athletically.
May all of us, establishmentarians and dissenters
alike, then join economically and morally in support
of such a truly worthy cause. (Forsooth, the
bastions of Satan may glaciate ere such stars
coincide;)
JOSEPH A. ALVAREZ
STUDENT, TEACHER, TAXPAYER,
PROPERTY OWNER, AND
iciUoubs SCIENTIST EMERITUS
' (NO RELATION TO CARLOS)

editorial
No Joke
A memory test.
Remember the days when students and student leaders
spoke on the proposed Activities Center?
Those were the days before strutting political peacocks
and presidential ego trips. Days when there was
apparently more concern about the issue at hand than
name-calling and degenerate, petty politics.
It was never meant to slide into the low, groveling
political quagmire seen in the last few days.
At least we didnt think so, nor did the student body now
being subjected to printed temper tantrums from all
factions day after day.
He started it, Florida Blue Key, IFC, et al, are quick to
point out.
They started it, Student Body President Charles
Shepherd and those supporting the Feb. 4 referendum
counter.
Well, we dont care who started it. Neither do the
majority of students whose thoughts on the proposed
activities complex have been muddled by the shambles of
the campaign both for and against the center.
What matters now is the fact that so far neither side has
been big enough to stop it.
There is less than one week remaining until the students
have the final say. Its about time we get back to the issues.
Is there to be an activities center partially paid for by the
students of this university, or is there not?
It is $17.7 million dollars in question.
It is the future of this university in question.
It is how the complex is to be financed in question.
It is how the activities center is to be run in question.
It is not who can gain the most political advantage by
saying the right thing at the right time with an eye on future
political leverage in Student Government.
We do not mean to minimize the importance of SG, but
we do believe the essential question before the students
next Wednesday is bigger than campus politics and
politicians.
We ask both sides of the controversy to stop for a
moment. Take a look at what you have turned this
campaign into, and look at yourselves as we have to look at
you.
Perhaps if you do we can get back to business.
Back to Big Business and away from political
games... at least until after Feb. 4.
We think you owe this to the school. And to the
students. Or perhaps you have forgotten about them?
a*** *o sneak into his neighborhood school"



MR. EDITOR:

Florida Blue Key is actively in opposition to a $6 tuition hike per
quarter. The chapter feels the university definitely needs an activity
center, yet feels that the proposal to hike tuition represents an unfair
burden on the students arid a misordering of priorities for the
university.
In 1965, it cost a student $390 a year tuition to attend UF. Today
an undergraduate must pay S6OO and the graduate student S7OO. A
further tuition hike of $25 per quarter, representing SIOO a year is
imminent.
In the face of these increases, with over half of the student body
requiring financial aid, any additional tuition hike creates an
insurmountable financial problem for many students.
With tuition increases threatening to make higher education in this
state a privilege of the wealthy, it is unfair to make an emotional
appeal for students to bind themselves and those who come after
them to an additional $lB a year for at least the next 35 years.
Not only does the proposed tuition hike represent an unfair
financial burden to students but a basic nrisallocation of priorities of
the university.
For too long, UF has confused academic excellence with buildings,
scholarship with athletics.
It is argued that funding for the activity center will not affect UFs
operational budget or deprive the University of vital needs in the
academic area, yet wouldn't we be closer to being a great university if

Wrongs To Blacks
Not Racial Acts
MR. EDITOR:
The following letter is addressed to the Black Student Union:
I am moved to write about a few well-known instances of alleged
racial discrimination in the light of your position as recently
announced in this newspaper.
Somewhere in your statement of Monday, January 26, was given an
instance where Brother Steve Baker was almost run down by a
drunken white student.
Would I be justified in suggesting that that same driver mightve
also almost run down a white student in his condition? Couldnt also a
drunken black student have almost run down a white pedestrian? And
would you still call it discrimination if a black student is almost run
down by another black?
Its true that less than 200 black students are enrolled at this
institution of over 20,000. But its also true that, because of the poor
educational background most blacks have, they cant meet the
relatively high admission requirements of this university.
Finally, in regard to the recent incident in the Tolbert Area, may I
point out that laws governing aggravated assault show no preference
to color when it comes to one man pointing a gun at another.
Note there is no conciliatory tone in my discussion. I am sincerely
trying to suggest that despite all the wrongs that have been dqne you,
these instances and perhaps others you have mentioned with regard to
UF might have had other than racial causes. Listen please ... Brother?
ANDREW BANKER, lUC

Judge OConnell For Yourself

MR. EDITOR:
To all students, faculty, and
staff alike who have blindly
followed President OConnell
because of the man is reputed to
be, this is for you. I will make
no judgments, you make your
own.

One More Look
MR. EDITOR:
Re the letter from Mr. Richard Braren (IL W Stand Against
Communism Is not Totalitarianism ) printed in the January 22
Alligator: While Mr. Braren has his freshman psychology textbook ofT
the shelf, he should look up one more term PARANOIA.
ECONOMICS

$6 Tuition Hike Unfair Burden

Only weeks ago four of your
peers were ousted from UF for
not signing the loyalty oath.
This was a direct order from
Steve.
Just a few days ago, the same
man issued a statement of which
the purpose was to reassure. I
quote from the January 23

'Speaking Out: Florida Btue Key

* 1 1
'There is no hope
for the complacent man.

Alligator:
All members of the
University community
students, faculty and staff alike
must be able to live and work
in an atmosphere free of fear
and in which they are able to
pursue the intellectual life in
accordance with their own
interests and their own needs
without intimidation or threat
of violence. It is the duty of
the University administration to
take all possible steps to provide
such an atmosphere and we will
continue to do so, he
(OConnell) concluded.
tin
(20JHA) ot /immwmvc

we channeled the time, money and energy being spent by
administration and students, in funding the activity center, into the
more necessary academic and socio-economic programs of the
University.
Resources in a state university will always be scarce, therefore it is
imperative that they be carefully allocated.
In addition to the problems of finance and priorities, some of the
aspects of the proposed (dan and the way it has been presented are
subject to misgivings.
It is unfortunate that the referendum was phrased in such away
that one must be either for the $6 tuition hike or against the activity
center. The student body deserves more than die emotional blackmail
of an ultimatum.
Furthermore, do we really need a 17.7 million dollar complex? To
date we have seen no alternative proposals which might be more
practical in the light of limited resources.
Other universities have met the need of a coliseum with much more
modest investments. At Auburn the cost was $5 million, while at
Alabama, where the athletic department contributed 40% of the
funds, the cost was 6 million. At Georgia, the state footed the entire 4
million dollars, while Pauly Pavilion at UCLA cost 5 million.
We hesitate to give a blanket approval of a $17.7 million complex
on the basis of an artist's handsome dcetch.
In conclusion, three arguments delineate our position. Florida Blue
Key feels that the $6 tuition hike represents an unfair financial
burden to students, a misordering of priorities of the University, and
an over-extended plan to provide an activity center.

Education First
MR. EDITOR:
We, the undersigned students, attend classes in Rolfs Hall, the third,
fourth and fifth floors of which house the School of Forestry. The
fifth floor is actually condemned, yet classes must be held there due
to a shortage of classroom space. While we attend classes in
condemned rooms, the UF proposes to build a 17. S million dollar
complex for primarily recreational purposes.
We realize that money for class areas comes mainly from different
sources than the money for the proposed UAC, however an
overwhelming feeling that this is an improper arrangement of
priorities for an EDUCATIONAL institution exists within each of us.
Please VOTE NO on UAC, keep education first at UF.
THOMAS HILL, 4FY GERALD DILLEBUR Y, 7FY
L. F. WOOD, 4FY FRED REPLOGLE, 3FY
RICHARD STRAKER, 4FY FA CUL TY MEMBERS:
CLIFFORD SHA W, 4FY J. B. HUFFMAN
PHILLIP DUBE, 4FY JAMES MILLER Jr.
WILLIAM HOHMANN, 4FY G. STEWART, 4FY
HAR VY PA TTERSON, 6FY GEOR GE DA VIS, 3FY
JOHN YORK, 4FY FRANK BILLMORE, 4FY
E. GARY HOLIFIELD, 4FY
No Vote Wont Help
UFs Need For Funds
MR. EDITOR:
Beautiful guys, just beautiful;
Motherhood, apple pie and keep education first.
(When has it ever been first in Florida?)
Jeez, no one knows better than I that the facilities in Rolfs Hall
are nothing short of gross. I have class in the pidgeon loft 3 times a
week.
But what about the Journalism tunnel in the stadium? And what
about the Anderson (Arts and Sciences) Crate? Come on people,
lets be realistic. A frightening number of facilites on this campus
should have been condemned long ago including the gym.
No one will deny that we need better education facilities, better
housing, better pay for professors. Thats obvious to even the most
naive residents of this state.
What is grossly naive, however, is to assume that voting against the
Activities Center will somehow alleviate this need by funnelling that
17.75 million into the UF campus, or perhaps that a yes vote will
cause the state to ignore the pressing need for education facilities.
Neither will happen.
A yes vote will allow construction of a complex that will benefit
every member of the University Community, socially and culturally,
as well as the recreational aspect. A no vote will cost UF enough
academic space to build 10 Rolfs Halls. Think about it.
But youre right about one thing, guys, there is an improper
arrangement of Priorities here. I suggest however that that warped
sense of values may be found in Tallahassee, where a Government
charges the Bth highest tuition in the UJS. and yet has the 31st spot in
quality education/
J itefiv/ line Mn-jbujt naili rt3 l w hftni b- iv
nvl; Jju n i2nt o\

Tlmraday> JfQfry 29 r 1970, Tl*a Florida.

Page 9



Page 10

K TN FWOi M|||rh;, Tbphc -4r

A" W
Jan. 28Feb. 4 1
I DIXIE DARLING CAKE I GIANT ARROW BLUE, WHITE OR COLD WATER
MIX DETERGENTM.
B i_ nan J i :
fl LIBBY CS OR WK H CRACKIN'GOOO thrifty maid extra fancy long grain VAN CAMP VIENNA
I Corn 5 'ts 95 c I Fig Bars .. 39 c Rice 39 Sausage .. 4 89 c
I Evap. Milk 3 39 c I Bread 29 c Tissue -1 Vegetables 237 e
I Pet Milk.. 3s: 47 c I Rolls 4 r S I OO Inst. Coffee 99 c Beans ... 5 ST *l
THRIFTY MAID H DIXIE DARLING HONEY THRIFTY MAID BARTLETT THRIFTY MAID WHOLE OR SU. WHITE
I Gelatin.. .4 39 e I Buns .... 2 ~ 69 c Pears -T 19 c Potatoes 2 29 c
I MfuiTc ARROW I THRIFTY MAID CALIFORNIA
I m tenderleaf bags
W.EACH TOMATOES tea
aBMAbjIK foods, and you can afford them all
I when you buy Thrifty Maid .. Our
1 H custom brand. |
I ASTOR I B |
Salt 9 C No. 303 N&l 65 / ,00-Count
THRIFTY MAID
Sugar 5 49
DIXIE
Sugar 5 BAG 59*
| GIANT DETERGENT I
I DEEP SOUTH QUARTS
J"£ I MMONNMSEM;
I Halves or Sliced Peaches 3?*l / \
I G,ANT I I Pineapple Juice 3 35*1 ( y
I cnsco I y~ BY r* \\DEEP*^9i\
I & rte "9 3& 75 I £!, Green Beans s " tasf\\ BM^^B
Paper Towels . .3 *l I CS or WK Golden Corn 5 QUART WSmm
I KING (100 53.83 Cln.) H THRIFTY MAID J JAR
Cigarettes $ 3 76 Tomato or Vegetable Soup... 8
if BIZ PRE-SOAK Hoi. 38c...24-ox. Ja SUPe OSt __ <*.
I Detergent 77 Sweetner 75' Dinner Napkins ... 23' Potted Meat 3/29'
I Softener 83' **ms 33' Aluminum F0i1.... 33' Vienna Sausaae 8/*l.
I Censer:::" ... .45' 3421 west university ave. open on su,ay 30
I PrA'S; ~ Qc HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS
j GIANT SIZE OXYDOL \ J BjTjl VI !J f|TM' i i 111
I BOLD GT. SIZE B^..KING SIZE $1.49. .FAMILY SIZI BlotkVe p i VA^ U i SJAMPS j STAMPS
" **4% iT-i a iTTv* < ;-'IT >'V '.. 9 It''-* .,;.:.



*YiiriV*ii!ti ISLE.
BB 1 Fryer I
W-D BRAND USDA j Parts I
USDA CHOICE W-D brand CORN FED ... U.S. Choice Beef ..
CHUCK STEAK 68 c H
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED P ,eked for W D FRYER W
>A|ir fTf All nr Or Brand. It mu,t be pr- BACKS K
CALIF. STEAK . .78 v I is c 1 I
SH LDR STEAK .. 98 c LB, IH I l>. VV I
Quantity Rights Reserved H
WINN 00(11 ITOMS. INC.-COfTSKWT-ISTO H
nMsi BfiK* TARNOW |B ;
| g TAUAADOE FARMS COUNTRY CURED HALF OR WHOLE SUNNYLAND SMOKED m | Ajl
Tenderloins s l l9 Horn 98 Sausage ... r $1" I Frank s ~ 49 e I
rur.n nnrnr,,,. n.rr -. . ... .. *7 10-01. TARNOW WHOLE HOG LINKS OR PATTIES
BORDENS SLICED SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN I '/.-LB. AVG. SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH W-D BRAND LONOHORN m
Cheese Food 59 £ Game Hens 2 $ 1 69 Cheese 89 c I Sausage ... 69 c I
PALMETTO FARMS TASTE O'SEA OCEAN PERCH KRAFTS PHILADELPHIA H TASTY TENDER COOKED
Pirn. Cheese ~ 69 c Fish Fillets 49 c Cheese 39 c I Ham ~ $ 1 39 I
CRACKIN'GOOD FRENCH FRIED HEAT It SERVE FREEZER QUEEN. Sails. Steak, Vaal Farm., Moat Ls. or Gvy It H COPELAND S
Biscuits .. 6ss 59* Fish Sticks 99* Sliced Beef. $ 1 I Chip Beef. 3 *l I
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE CHUCK W-D BRAND LEAN GROUNdI 808 WHITE I
m 1 I
sir tmum EPraHgk LB. PKG. I I
'2^l | w-d brand all mi at stew oi
. \ Ground Chuck . *\ 99 I
V'K Hamburger .r *1
TEMPLE "KINO OF ORANGES" s AAI fIBBI YBI IAW ASTOR OR HI-ACRES FROZEN ORANGE MORTON ASSORTED
Oranges .10 69 c _ golden yellow Juice 3 slo0 __ I
Potatoes . 4 . 59' Puddings....... 79' |r|*||lt PICSi
Apples ... 13 -0. *l W Pizza Pies... S 99' I , lt J IJ| I
Potatoes .. 5 & 49' Sprouts... 4 Bsfl* I CO£ N UT (L T I
Fruit Salad .. * 69 c BP Ice Cream ... SS 59' I CHERRY FO r M I
MIXED SALAD OR RIPE H T TH,FTY MAID AU FLAVORS
slaw -19' lOl Ice Milk 49'|
Potatoes 10 79' Corn-on-cob 2IS 1 I " _..
Lettuce .... 2 49' .. 4 m 99 < SCJiSr -39* Pound Cq ke 69' | arjs*"" e ...ioo I
VINE RIPE r'eTlutiaae SARA IK BLUEBERRY. STRAWBERRY OR PINEAPPIE meat rICS .e e D PKG^| W
Tomatoes. .. 33 c Potatoes 5 e MorgoriiioS s i Cheese Cake PKG 89 C I OCOMA TURKEY
No. 2% Can CHUN KING CHOW MEIN S-oi. CHUN KING lUiFRITOS PINEBREEZE OR. "A~ FU. AU WHITE FRESH MEDIUM
Noodles 31' Soya Sauce 23' Corn Chip5.........53' # f% c I
No. 303 Can CHUN KING BEEF No. 303 Can CHUN KING PLAIN 5-oi. FRITO GREEN ONION PIB|B\ DO Z I
cUop Suey 65' Fried Rice 41' Potato Chips ...... 39' E' %JUJ 002 O 7 I
1 # 1 1416-as. ALPO CHOPPED BEEF
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. Dog Food 29* I
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST. Yummies 29* I
v v-j iginw ttniiim
11l T ifSSTSa inilT toIvAuSsTAMK I iflllW TOP VALUE STAMPS : iNIII TOP VALUE STAMPS | W VALUE STAMPS j I [ill F VALIS STAMPS
ls If lUr VALUE B coween um >vnhm a* | cow- -a dwoobam e* > -.. covam * w e.. o. bmtm cowdom .~o >vt a BHmndm ii a A/ i 2-18. PKG. e b ONE PKG
TMPC PLA OBAOC A' F*SH ) TREP4CH PRY OLD SOUTH ONf Jit. CANP4CO 1 SUPIOitAMD W DC MOPPED
wMOlo.cuT.ur : Mflirvfff Potatp.. Fruit Cobbler* I SiM' Normal Ham Cottage Ch.e.e i :# Beef St.oh.tte.
Er T* r uooothiSJS.. I MHBjf 0000 TMGUHB HraV N. j oo '- ; BeEljOV ooooihwh. ; GoooTMtyiiA
HB9H ooooiMUfl i Iffifl No. 2 IWITT.'IrW No 3 ; HEM No 5 fTrt'lfflW No. 6 No. I
.BBaSr_ N __ "J" rr.T.T- j Tm*. |Tipiiia'> in bhi ijiubbi .. n i l'hi* i ii" i Yi jj. j i iTii >i rii ; '- .. .-d,' J

Thur*day,artu*y

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

650 CC Rigid frame Triumph Rebuilt
engine New paint. Beautiful. Call
373-1610 afternoon and night.
(A-3t-73-p).
Vox Wyman bass guitar. 1 year
old, used only 6 mos. S4OO original
cost, sell for S2OO. Hard shell case
Included. 392-8365. (A-st-73-p).
Moving Must Sell Refrig, Washer,
Dryer, Desk, Chair, day beds, dresser*
single bed. Call 376-9845 Between
5:30 8:00 PM. (A-st-73-p).
1966 VW Good condition very clean,
radio heater large tires. Beige. Call
after 5:30 P.M. 462-2792.
(A-3t-73-p).
Fender Jazzbass with case and
accessories Ex. Con. $250 Bassman
amp 2 12 speakers $350 378-8670
Arnle. (A-st-73-p).
Complete golf set. Matched set of
spauldlng aluminum Irons; 2 thru 9.
Wilson aluminum woods 1,3, 4. SSO
Wilson bag. Need money. Steal at
$150.00 Call evenings at 392-8223.
'New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut & assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
$32.50. JR Office Furniture Co. 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-10t-C)
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624.. (A-61-3t-c).
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER
1969 2,200 miles $625 or best
offer call 378-5192 after 5 or
weekends. (A-71-st-p).
12 STRING BY MIGUEL HEIS made
them for Feliciano and Fred Nell.
$6 00. Call Paul at 378-7943.
(A-7 2-st-p)
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon installed, &
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$22.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-C).
Buy DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, and
other gifts wholesale. Name brands.
Guaranteed highest quality, see our
large selection and get your free copy
of our 200 page wholesale gift and
jewelry catalog. IMPERIAL
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS,
Williston cutoff at S. W. 13th St.
(A-75-3t-p).
Bolex, 16mm standard, 25mm lens,
perfect condition, In original box,
S3OO. Call 373-1947 after 6 PM.
(A-75-2t-p).
HONDA P-50 Good condition, IV2
old, SBS with helmet. Karen
373-2727. (A-75-3t-p).
Honda 50 Excellent condition.
Florida Tag. S9O or closest offer. Call
372-0333. (A-2t-73-p).
THE amazing Blue Lustre will leave
your unholstery beautifully soft and
clean. Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-3-c).
1969 HONDA 90 s2so or best
offer. Only 2,000 miles. -I**ll
LARRY. 373-1614. (A-75-2t-p).
FOR SALE: 1968 HONDA 50. Blue
with one helmet. Good condition.
Best offbr. Call Glhny 376-7948.
(A-75-2t-p).
MUST Sacrifice 1970 Honda CL-90
Brand New. No miles. Call 373-2912
Evenings. (A-75-lt-p).
GROOVEY Professional Gibson
guitar extras and case slOO
Sacrifice! TENOR BANJO -4 String
must go s6O or best offer case
and books. 378-7638. (A-75-st-p).
IIIHII > ;
I FOR RENT j
smaass troniwnn n pnnnn wwwwsawitissiM 1
One bedroom apt. furnished, at
University Gardens for Spring and
Summer quarters. Call 376-2046
evenings. (B-74-3t-0i.2
juhltatr Furnished apartment 3
blocks from campus sgs a month, air
ail electric. Call 378-7635 or come
by evenings. 1716 N. W. 3rd Ave.
Apf£l7. (B-3t-73-p).
Sublet: Beautiful 2 bd. furn.
apt.. AC & heat carpeted. $155
mo. or will consider 3rd male
roommate (grad pf) Come to
835 Ave. after 6

11 VnVfrri rriVrn
| FOR RENT |
4 Bedroom house in N.W. area,
central air and heat, fireplace,
S2OO. Call anytime 373-1747
(B-71-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-tl-c).
HELP! Must rent 2 br. furnished apt.
before Feb. Ist $125 per month. 314
N. W. 14th St. Apt. 4 Also for sale
1968 Yamaha 250 Ex. Cond. $375.
(B-75-2t-p).
Sublet Immediately!! Large furnished
1 bedroom apartment. Air
conditioned, three blocks from
campus. SIOO per mo. 1716 N. W.
3rd Ave. 378-8503. (B-75-2t-p).
WANTED |
NEED MONEY?? Psychology sleep
laboratory needs male subjects aged
<>l-35 to participate In isolation
experiment. Requires 21 consecutive
days and nights free (no classes, etc.)
Possible to earn S4BO. Inquire at 101
SSRB (across from Hub) or call
392-2007. (C-74-10t-c).
I need a geology tutor for Gy 201
prefer grad, student for two one hour
sessions per week will pay well. Call
372-7258 after 5 p.m. (C-74-3t-p).
Wanted Male Roommate Wtr. and
Spr. qtrs. SSO + util. 5 min. walk to
campus. Immediate occupancy. Call
Pete 378-6024 or leave word
Alligator newsrm. (C-4t-73-p).
Female roommate Landmark Apts.
We have everything but you. Color
tv, dishwasher, pool, kinkajoo. All
deposits paid. $46.25 mo. 378-3518.
(C-3t-73-p).
Roommate wanted to share large
home distant from UF. Heat-but-heat
proof. See at 2110 NE 12th St or call
Danny for details. 373-1670. $64
mo. (C-72-st-p)
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. Jan rent free.
Central air and heat. $43.50/mo. Call
Herb 376-6361. (C-72-st-p)
Roommate wanted: Plush
University Gardens apt. Sin City
Immediate Occupancy. Furnished.
Pool. SSO. a month. 378-7649,
372-5978. (C-71-st-p).
Wanted One Roommate, male, to live
in French quarter 114, in Interested
call 378-0774, anytime. (C-74-2t-p).
Female roommate to share 2 br. apt.
with 2 others; $37 plus utilities. Call
372- Anytime. 1930 N. W. 2nd
Ave. (C-75-3t-p).
Female Roommate for Fredrick
Garden apt. 70. Immediate
occupancy. $46 per. month. Phone
373- or 378-6510. (C-75-st-p).
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. central air, and
heat, pool. $143.50/MO. Call
376-6361. (C-75-4t-p).
*
iP^HaPWANTED^I
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT In
Yellowstone and all U.S. National
Parks. Booklet tells where and how
to apply. Send SI.OO to Arnold
Agency, 206 East Main, Rexburg,
Idaho 83440. Moneyback guarantee.
(E-72-6t-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open
In the Business and
Administration Offices of
Student Publications. Call Mr.
My king at 392-1681 between
the hours of 8 and 5. An
Equal Opportunity Employer.
(E-ts-73-c).
WANTED Male over 21 at Woodys
Sandwich Shop married if possible 24
hours a week must be neat
permanent work. Come by In person
between 2:30 4:00 for Interview.
(E-74-st-p).

K^vvppnj
" Hiaujim £
I Bv seating HHHHHHHHHBSi

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 29,1970

Page 12

e eea e ana a are e ere
|ioo,oao,.,^Mimnrr "
1963 MGB Good Condition.
Tonneau, Luggage rack, new carpets,
leather seats, radio, and good
mechanical condition. Call 378-8347.
$950. (G-74-st-p).
1967 Sprite excellent also 1962
Studebaker not so excellent make
offer. Want scout or bronco. Call
after 5 376-9724. (G-74-3t-p).
66 GTO automatic excellent
condition. Mags. Gold black vinyl top
air-conditioning, all-power.
378-0774. Ask for GALE.
(G-2t-74-p).
Jaguar: 1958 3.4 Sedan; New tires,
recent engine overhaul, clean. $495
Call 376-8586 after 5:00 p.m.
(G-st-74-p).
1964 Comet Caliente 3 speed 6 cyl.
Extra clean throughout, drafted,
make offer, Call 376-0336.
(G-71-st-p).
1965 Impala Conv. RED r-h a-c new
top new paint. $875. Call 378-6292
after 2:00 Mon. thru Wed. Not in on
Thur. thru Sun. (G-72-3t-p).
58' Chevy station wagon. Excellent
shape. Great for long distance and
around town. Automatic
transmission. $350 Call 378-8548
after 1:30. (G-74-3t-p).
Triumph TR 4, 1964 Blue
w/wire wheels, good top,
tonneau, radio, demountable
luggage rack, & roll bar: Very
good cond. Call 372-7980.
(G-71-st-p).
Must sell 1967 Pontiac Catalina
Convertible full equipment with
air, best offer takes it!
3 73-2747 373-1573 422 S.E.
Bth St. Apt. D. (G-70-st-p).
1965 Chevy SS, automatic, air
cond., power steering, brakes.
Only 34,000 well kept miles.
Call 372-6652. (G-71-st-p).
1965 Comet Caliente 4 speed mag
and chrome reverse wheels 289 4
barrel. $995. Notify Brad Lohmann
l3 Frat Row Call 376-9271.
(G-72-st-p)
1964 MGB, New Top, Toneau cover,
Radio, Heater, $750. PHONE
378-8706. (G-74-3t-p).
Red 59 Sprite. Excellent engine,
dependable and fun car. Bargain. 500
S. W. 34 St., Point West Apt 7.
(G-75-2t-p).
63 Spitfire Engine rebuilt, new top,
black with black interior. $550 Cash
Sale. Call 372-7293 after 5 PM or
weekends. (G-75-3t-p).

. warm V
I PHI I NOW
ii Dammita]]
I Why I* everything were good at il legal ?
1 f 1 i'l 1 'll 1 || l l | )i| l |, l
20th Century-Fox Presents
I RAUL NEWMAN B
I ROBERT REDFORD KATHARINE ROSS
THE SUNOANfF tary
I /G\ no ONE UNDER 17
|gSaga tXJ ADMITTED .. .*<* POOF I
Rk REQUIRED I
i MTlHllin c *P tur * beautifully colored, 1
SyStSfSSM sex, in Roman pads filled I
11 WSSStm ith aethre *wingors. ar.K r^.l

.^v.v.wv;v;w>:^
AUTOS
1965 Corvair Monza coupe factory
air. cond., automatic, radio Good
condition. Priced to sell. $375. Call
378-6529. (G-75-st-p).
1966 Comet VB, 289, AT, R&H
Excellent cond. Almost new tires.
Only 29,000 miles. Well kept. $795.
Call Chuck 392-0581. Nights
378-2012. (G-75-3t-p).
PERSONAL $
M. %
ATTENTION VETERANS! The
monthly meeting of the U of F
Veterans Club meets at 7:00 PM
FRIDAY at the Rathskellar
VETERANS. (J-74-3t-p).
Are you sorry you missed Shane?
Do you want to see "High Noon?
"Advise and Consent? Anything
else? If so, ask at RM 310 Union.
392-1655, These are cheap for
groups. Green Chevy, 3D, 1/20. RJF switch
back to PM r you belong together.
Best past, present or future you will
find, without a space trip.
(J-74-3t-p).
Dennis Silverman Mike White
Darwin Scott from Great Pledges
to best brothers! Kappa Sigma
Forever! Love your little sister
Shirley. (J-3t-74-pJ.
Dance to the Riff. AEPhi Open
House Friday, Jan. 30. 8:30 12:30.
(J-74-3t-p).
60 day tour of England,
student organized, and
unchaperoned, Food, and shelter
plus round trip air fare limited
enrollment $615 Phone
372-8841. (J-71-st-p).
SIP IN 1970. A great way to start
the new decade. Join the singles for a
cocktail party this Friday from 5:30
to 7:30 at the Lamplighter. Cover
charge $.25, Drinks, $.50.
(J-74-3t-p).
Summer Charter Flight s22o &
$lO Admin. Fee. Tampa to
Amsterdam. Call 373-2590 or write
AIESEC, Room 300, J.W. Union.
GIRLS!! Do YOU have what it
takes. ..? If so, you may be
eligible to be a TIDY TIGER!
The maid service of last
quarter is now expanding. Due
to copyright, problems, were
now the Tigress Co-ed Maid &
Hostessing Service. Call Nancy
or Lisa for details. 373-2760.
(J-70-st-p).

§ PERSONAL
JC '.
German shepherds 9 weeks AKr
best champion stock. Show or net
quality. $125. 372-4653. (J-72-st-p)
Captain Louies Is now delivering
chicken, shrimp, fish, oysters, frog
legs, and other great treasure chests
on campus. 4 to 9 p.m. Call
372-3546. (J-72-st-p)
It*B a switched-on
laugh riot!
KURT tSS P
RUSSELL ROMERO FUf NN
TECHMICmM *HM Ml Ml NM*l
WAU DISNEY
2£rWRTOUOH
TO Bg A BIRD!,
FAR UP! FAR OUT!
FAR MORE!
James Bond rmr
M; JSp jfl
rtti/SfUi:*' gfcy jl
WM
I HI W. *>rsw^li^
"Mokes Jfc
Hefners
iyRF
Penthouse s J/
'*//*# Ik,
nursery
school!
-4#f-7K lOf f
I
.JsSn. jplr-.'
NMMK*. fx?
; it mum ; fit r f
..nentt..- Ilf
.Iff
RAOLEY METZGER 0t(
Wjibertine;



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

KHfIW TWtl V^McWkiSVIIM^
3 HORROR SHOWER
I NO. 1 CREATURE OF I
I
NO. 2 THE UNDERTAKER!
AND HIS PALS I
|prL> rin ,M NO. 3'MONSTROSITY I
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA*
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
FRIED CHICKEN
All You Coro To Eat //
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce /n
Choice of Potato / f y
GAINESVILLE MALL
SHOPPING CENTER
PSSIS

I Remember I
I 1969-70? I
I m
I Theyre making I
I a book about it. I
I Remember the year you fell in W 9,raid I
I love, or blew your grades you d forget how.
| because there was too much to w e remember. I
I do, or finally graduated?
I And we saved as much as we
I Remember the year you could so you'd remember I
I started to look around you ~ where you were. I
? because you began to realize I
I that nothing ever stays the 19b9-/u 9
I 580167 seminole I
I Remember the year you began I
I doing funny little things I
X ir' *" .'3 y \ M
- v-e

Thursday, January 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

;w*w .%vAv; xw:wx.>vywwwvw ;v>!
| PERSONAL
v **
*.y.VM%'X< K<'WW>^
Travel In Europe for academic credit.
6 weeks, 7 countries, jet crossing,
private Coach, excellent
accomodations, low cost, loans
available. Small U F group lead by
highly experienced graduate couple.
Arrangements by World Academy.
Call for booklet. 372-5489.
(J-70-6t-p)
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-C).
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates in
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-68-10t-p).
SCIENCE FICTION Book Exchange
will meet tonight at 8:00 PM at Reitz
Union in Room 356. Interested
people are invited to attend.
(J-75-lt-p).
HAPPY 29th LOVE!! The past 28
months have passed so quickly.
Havent they been Great?! Hoping
for an eternity Nancy. (J-75-lt-p).
Charlie & Steve: Sorry, must drop
out to support Crystal Palace, 16
tons & what do you get, another day
older, & $lB million in debt. Mayor
c. (J-75-lt-p).
Delta Chis: Your possessions and
belongings will be your delight, if
youll sing to us before dinner
tonight. Love, Your Little Sisters.
(J-75-lt-p).
S6O a month for room and board,
Collegiate Living Organization, 117
N. W. 15th St., Call 376-9420 for
secretary, COED. (J7s-st-p).
Love, Peace, Freedom, Happiness,
Aquarius Is here. Come together FrL
Jan., 30, Sunset at the Plaza of Amer.
Bring candles and LOVE. (J-75-2t-p).
Are you going to N. Y. C. during
spring break? I will pay you to bring
some boxes to me. Call 376-7948.
Yours In love & peace, Ginny.
(J-75-2t-p).
Best of luck to the TEP 69 7O
pledge class during Hell week! Special
luck and bioya to Kaplan and Arnie.
Teps are Tops! RLK. (J-75-lt-p).
Flora, Thank you for just being the
sweet girl you are. Smile and keep
spilling Cremora on my pants. This
yid digs you. Yunk, Yunk.
(J-75-2t-p).

Page 13

I LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Boys prescription glasses.
Brown frames. Lost near Peabody
Hall. 1/22/70 PLEASE CALL
376 : 9129. (L-3t-73-p).
LOST: Green wallet. Important
personal items. Reward offered NO
questions asked. Call Robin at
373-1768. (L-75-3t-p).
FOUND One set of eight car keys (2
Mustang) on pink powder puff key
ring. Call Karen at 378-9157.
(L-3t-73-nc).
LOST: Ladys silver watch in area of
Pike or Oelt house. Sentimental
value. REWARD. Call 392-9814.
(L-74-2t-p).
FOUND: One pair black glasses in
front of Information services. If
yours call 392-1681. (L-3t-74-nc).
FOUND: Hitchhiker accidentally
picked up math book. If yours, call
DAVID, 376-1577 evenings.
(L-74-3t-nc).
Will the boy who asked Terry Clay to
hold his G.M. car keys while playing
football Sunday afternoon Please call
378-8120. (L-3t-73-nc).

I S*EAK.T>f*
* FESTIVAL
# ALL TICKETS # I
P cowps i
I *o # 000 MffiHjlH 54i,000 I
I mpfmwGH [if jflBW Th " I
B last wggKt I WKmw.mtLw
THIS IS POSITIVELY
About It In THE LAST WEEK!!! About It On I
Newspapers and 4 HIT c Radio and TV
| Maaaaines m Now Soa ttl I
IWE WILL OPEN EARLY TO ACCOMODATE
I THE CROWDS. COME EARLY TO GET YOUR I
I Filters Keepers... I
I liters Weepers! I
B common-law wife, caught up in the tovt/kiit ola nun for his daughter!
aiWM JBmzz**?. Ib nini dirwelwdby RUSS MEYER
H lagan CT I _ii KM ah tvt production
M IASTMANCOLOR
S.

f LOST FOUND jj
Lost: Black Right-hand mens glove.
If found kindly return for reward.
PLEASE phone 376-0428.
(L-75-lt-p).
%*CWSOOCWWX^WV.YWWW ;%'XW;
SERVICES i
* SOOOOeeiSSWK^X'X'M.MWiSSSrJWWWWWsS
ARCHERY Lessons! only $3/hr.
Qualifications: 10 years experience,
placed in many state and regional
tournaments. Call Tom for Info, at
392-8124 or 392-9821. (M-75-3t-p).
Volkswagen Parts and services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist,
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-C)
-=
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).



Page 14

I, Tho Florida AMflator, Thuiaday, January 29. 1970

\ m PRIDE
"IN THEBAG"!

B

f NESCAFE INSTANT^
COFFEE
I [JSSSEI 6oz I
I IMPiIMJ I

appMaaaamaMiat
sill
co

f KRAFT )
MAYONNAISE
1 100% PU RE I
I WITH LEMON JUICE MR I

JHMMRfIEHHEEMNHHPORNfIFOEHPBHRA.
fill
LYKES BEEF
STEW
15 OZ. CAN
3 FOAs|oo
SAVE VJe

COMPARE! Wgr* COMPARE! COMPARE 1 otml-
Air Fresheners JWts. 3/.m * Yuban Coffee B9 c Sandwich Cookies * JT *'*
Book Matches -lie Frozen Waffles vsst 10/$1 4 5 < Win, Ydi.w Zonke r r ::: 3J Galvanized Garbage Can $1.99 3 < Frozen Coffee Rich n 24c 25* Jc Fiddle Faddle J2 Xl:* u
Pantry Pride Tea Bags - 68c m m Frozen French Fries 10/$1 $1 65 Potato Sticks ?S Nescafe Instant Coffee 79 e *i 30c Fish Sticks Ol m <* 3/$l *1.17 i 7t Dog Food .,> cm* 1 17 ,7<
Maxwell House Coffee -69 c 77 < 8 < Frozen Bagels 4/$l sks* s & c 409 Snrav PImIIZ um 77 ,I 05 5<
Pantry Pride Coffee- 49c w 20c Chicken Dinner -38 c 49, t Fyne-Taf Detergent 's*jp lie Z Z

B
a

V
MfPP9MVMPMVP9MS^
a

i
Us

flEHH[Hfl|HHflppflpM
2=3
ml
|§|

HawHjPMawiVPaPMa^
0

/National)
BEER
I THROW-AWAY BOTTLES HHF I
slx emOw +
I PAKC2Tr M i
V i2ox bottles JP Mm y

BMpofaawffaawiaak
H

f Pantry Pride )
BLEACH j
I GALLON fmm] > I
I plastic jinmajj \ I

PRmRERRRPRIRMEMRL
ml


HMHfIppHRHHBRMRL
Hi

BIIWIWPPBWIPWfPWk
mm
PMBufcr

S' SINGLETON FROZEN BREADED "\
f SHRIMP
I MINIATURES I
I @ l .sl_AQ /
v pko

Bi

m Evaporated ]
ITMILK t
I Cans / A |
I fitiim l K / DC I
I luirnsj I

BHjIpHBHHHfIMRHEfIBfIRk
B
BVRMRMRRHHRMMRBk
jm E|
fRUyLP

I

H

H
fill

CBSBWSL^
figgl
B



GIANT 1/2 LB LOAF m>
Mad* With Pur* V*g*tabl* Shortening 0
r | 111
m M iHHii^BH
B BfefaMGfl Hr V

EVERYDAY LOW PRICKS GOOD ANY DAY OF THE WEEK. SONUS BUYS GOOD THRU WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4th 1970. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.

BONUS BUY
CHUCK
STEAK
- 58'

f FRESH sxr.
FRYERS
m oq<
I WHOLE RAGGED I
l SAVI lOiLB J

FYNE-TASTE
SLICED
BACON
tSx 68'
SAVE lie
A

COMPARE! WfrV COMPARE! f s COMPARE! f ?
Cut Green Beans 24c Z u Fruit Cocktail l ""r n 4/$l *'-> 4 Corned Beef 49c s* w
Cut Green Beans 9/99c*i.3<> su Tomato Juice 29c 3* >w California Tomatoes rrs. 4/$l *>>* ,4
Cut Green Beans ws 4 *"* Eya ated Mj | k iqc 3 < Green Limas 6/$l t\. m*
Ufhito PftfotAP* w ox. packer un 5 M $1.16 16* K
SSiISfT. .4 $1 StoleVs Gatarade 3| .... ... tarto. Peas / ~
Lykes Beef Stew 3sl*> > 7 17 Fyne Bake Shortening - e 59c m 10* fynmw whit. or .lui
Bltmre Lacteon Loaf 3(51 ... ... Swee t Potatoas jmss. 1 ... . SaJ 10. Z

jjpHjMm
mLut
Hi

f r*ntr goidin ripe j
Lbananas

sirfY
Pantry Pnd* V
i t rs

| BONUS BUY! 1
PANTRY PRIDE W'l
I PURE PORK
SAUSAGE I
ilb MOc I
ROLL |

ggjg
guoj

laTOTXlMiuiAy^jU

pppppG^pwwfJfjWv
s '"Y
rTT^RjJ
B

fSIRLOINA
= STEAKS
[8 $ 109 t .j

BEmHHR

Bl

BONUS BUY j
I FRESH-FIRM-FANCY I
TOMATOES I
( LB. 29* j

UMiUIUUIiIMMuM PANTRY PRIDE
CREAM
RdT/Jr CHEESE
8-OZ. PKG.
m 29 c
save ioc
FRESH LARGE JUICY
CALIFORNIA
LEMONS
*£s 8 49*

GAINESVILLES
UyilUi LOWEST
illlfrftM FOOD
QBH PRICES!
927 North Main at Corner 10th St.
1349 N. W. 23rd Avenue in
J. M. Fields Plaza j

QUARTERS
PORK
LOIN
" 78*
SAVE lie

t FRESH J
GROUND BEEF j
3 1 j

T

'
r[mm rl ROME BEAUTY *\
I EATING OR COOKING I
jAPPti^j

Thuredey, January 29, 1970. The Roridi Alitor,

in
BONUS BUY
U.S. NO. I
RUSSET
BAKING
POTATOES
10 sag 67c

Hi

OBBSOk^
m

B


Page 15



i. The Florida AMgator, Thursday, January 29.1970

Page 16

**'**' **.*" It p 111 ll**'
'J kl ~ \ il< tr*l, FhrM Whit.
fsg \ SssSJSSy ,k **
/ HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
\ I Swift'i Premium lontltn
4 \~~k / / rpyM Swift's Premium Proten
\n k Cl" Key Club Steak ~ *i'*
zf 8 I V Swift's Premium Bone-In
IFTTT EXTRA \ r v Pet Roast 79*
- 4 f \ Chuck Steaks ... 89*
Lavoris Mouth Wash I ( \ Premium Boneless
|
|l^r n I / y
*jgp^*.. ...'^:.-*>..-'< \ X English Cut Roos9 $l O9
... P RlbS eeeeeeeeeeeoeeib. 59*
Paste |
- H w
Grapefruit Juice . 4 t. 89 e *4 Cooked Ham !* 89*
Bayer Aspirin Tablets <<> To.ty s r* :,. *2?j£3M!n i Frozen Waffles '.V." 49' \ V Bar . C ued Chicken ..89*
: J.miom Froxoa mul W A \
Cinnamon Sticks ,£ 39 c i %f. 1 /Potato Salad 49*
Jf T l EXTRA *'" '~j 7oi
ULmm n nn cwn> tw mcuii 01 ksmi Morten'* DolMMS*enr* SrUo 1# #.
Sue Bee Honey 1 A /~~N f \ ) V'""*)
; 4 ib. jar $1.45 | Sugar Donuts *. 39 c f\ \/ / A
H9qm (*re9k.tti Moot Sails,Macaroni Ch*., \ /V. ( |
j VKMimU
adhda . uni coupon n ruicHAn o Biiiijgi l> 1 ulluii outful b ...... pkg- /Y / \ \ a y y *.
| Green Peas 6 V& >1 M /
,*./ .. _. i O | / y LLJ *x J 11 \
5. Oxriroi Wo4- Fofc. 4. I*7| I Green ( \
nftnnnnnnnnnnrinnnnfnsnnnnnnnnnnnnnAnx irl* ... A L \ M / W H Us
|ill|4wSreenStampsp?J Shfas; 59* KJW m^m V iMr
1 Kraft's 1000 Island Brassing I Shrimp* "*"* V* M 49 \
*^ rc ** Dressing | r r #*. . y A y/
1$ os. bet. s9c I rrozen entrees....... 5 a,- *1 s^#- > ( k./
f* SUk" Wo*. NS 4. Itm I (Chlck.o, Soo. Torkojr Pot Fim, Mocorooi S Choo.o. 111 1 \ )
nnnn-r*fiftfinrnrnn nnnnftnsonnnnnnrtnm srofhotti s Moot soocoi



Thursday, January 29, 1970. Tha Florida Alligator,
*

§SAVI I|<, Cherry, Florida Punch, Grope, BHP"'
Orange, Apple, Pineapple Orange
Hi-C Drink* ...... 3 89* pTHIDIIV^
raJjA Lima Beans 4 M \dJr\\ KHHft ji
iarly Garden Peas 5
Jewel Oil ...."*-69* /
# Kleenex Towels.... 3 *st M (Bp?/
SAVI 14c, Kleenex Assorted / Sliced American ^69*
Boutique Napkins ..as: s l M^mcQdar.... 69 <
SAVE 6c, Kleenex Printed or Boutique Asserted ck..<. s.r
Bathroom Tissue ... u? 29* ~ 49
save 24c, stekeiy whole Cottage Cheese *.£ 59*
Green Beans 4 # ,r $ l bTnT&is 39 <
J\ Plll.kury Hungry Jock
/( "Yx Butter-Tastin' Biscuits 21 e
A Good at Publix Markets Only
Gerber's Strained A s § WORTH f
Baby Food ,7 10
SAVB Ac, Lady Betty \ MargaHno
Prune Juice a bottje 39* -£ (
*v it*. i Pineapple 3' (j \ Cucumber Chips '? 9 V '"' J
Bavarian Kraut s- 3s l { Luncheon Meat 49< Mil^GreenStampsP]
Shellie Beaus ....4 # - 3 *l 59 I .d *-* I
£ f wns. b r ..f;E£;. I
ESlfLi,?? *"" 14 ~ 1
Green Beans 4 # .n?*l **-. ory *... | pbii* C om ou i
Coffee- Mate ".r69* A .X EigbtGuard 4 ..~ 59* | * |
sir 1,,r ,, on* BmuS
Little Brownie I \ |
SaHines ... pltg 25 C V 1 ur Cream |
Crackers ..it"2s* c csskistr
sskistr csskistr k*i v}Knlv
(Ice, Molasses, Vanilla Wafers, Butter / U f
Cookies and Animal Crackers) I | Mrs. Smith's Golden |
.JnHfBEMkI A 1
1 Prices are effective I n J *;***- I
\ / Wednesday noon, Jan. 28 f 1
thru Wednesday noon, n^nnMSMnsslniMnnM^aw^
Sjbcum(fflUduce S&ane | |
M / I Tornow's Oven-Ready |
/ / 1 Bliss Pfin I Meat Loaf |
( f a Tafv Potatoes 10 69* uSHSo |
wr wfy
{ lettuce 2.30* LmIfJZL 11
\f J 4 f 3-Minute White or Yellow § Potato Salad
vV v-f* DaBCAVII ....... 2 baa 25* i 13 1 lb. or more f
rU|Vwi eoeeeee m bag e|uw w i *3. *). r.s. 4. i*7i i
PT TBLDf-M
1 vJ lylJl y V
GAINISVIUE SHOP.NO CBNHR GAINBVIUtMAU VWSTGATf SHOWN. CENIi. W m s/wpp
. MM c 2630 N.W. 13h Streef W. University Avenue at 34th Street S
1014 N. Main street hlpn^UTf
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. *7 Sat ld u c

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator i:

RECORD REVIEW: FOREVER YOURS
New Group Turns Out Fresh Rock Sound

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The name of the group is
Forever More. The album is
called Forever Yours. Their
music sounds a lot like that of
Traffic and derives much of
what it is from several other
groups. Yet the sound is
somehow original and fresh
beyond that which it came from.
The album is an RCA-Reprise
release of the last few days. No
information on the group can be
found just yet. There are four
men in the group and the usual
host of helpers and studio
people are featured on the LP.
Forever More comes across as an
English group their accents
and that particular English use
of strings and horns hinting
about their homeland.
The most definite statement
the group makes about itself is
in their music. The band is
extremely versatile and seems at
ease with the wide variety of
material on the album. There are
several Traffic-type cuts,
featuring that distinctive
high-pitched, nearly strained
lead vocal and that particular
sort of rhythm. And then there
are some country-type things
with harmony parts similar in
many ways to the vocalizations
of The Band. And, finally, there
are a couple of songs featuring
horn arrangements and string
parts making the pieces feel
Beatle-ish.
The group members are Alan
Gorrie, who plays piano and
bass; Mick Travis, lead guitar;
Onnie Mair, guitar, bass, and
backing vocals; and Stuart
Francis, drums and backing
vocals. The lead vocal parts are
handled alternately by Gorrie
and Travis.
Back in the States Again, is
the first cut on side one and
features the Traffic kind of
thing, both vocally and
instrumentally. The chorus is,
Gee but its good to be back in
the States again, but the other
lyrics are vague in their design
and dont seem to work toward
much.
The second cut is called, We
Sing, and features some very
nice guitar work and another
good vocal. (All the vocals are,
in fact, good so they wont be
mentioned here again.) The song
is slow and has a strange mood
to it that is enhanced by an eerie
reverb effect.
Its Home, the third cut on
side one, has the same mood to
it as Maxwell Silverhammer,
has on the Beatles latest. The
song is light and airy, about a
bum that rolls in the sack with
some member of the aristocracy,
gets caught, and sleeps in the
park. Its Home, they say.
Home Country Blues, isnt
very blue. It is hard to say just
what it is, though. Some nice
piano is featured and again you
hear that same straining vocal
that comes across so well.
The last cut on side one is
called Good To Me, and is, I
think, the best on the album. It
is long eight minutes or so
and goes through some
tacdible changes. from

.:.:.v.v.%v.N%%v.v.%v.v.%y.vA%v.%v.vA\%%v.v.v.vAv.vA%vvASN:.%v.vA%yAVAv.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.y.v.v.y.%v.y.y.
ENTERTAINMENT
JJiV.w.'.w/'Kv'AV.v.^/.v.v.'.vffil'S^.v.vlv.'.vKv.vw.'.v.vM'lffi^wl'.vlv.vl^^w.v.'lKv.vK'J.v.Wl

a kind of jazz feeling into
classical movements and finally
back to something that is
between those two and many
other music styles. It stops in
several points builds up from
nothing doing new things
and dies again. Three quarters of
the way through the song, a
beautiful sax part moves in
quietly and makes the song rich
and more complete. Again, the
Traffic sound is there. The bass
work in this song is extremely
well done and does what it does
without having to be at the front
of the stage.

A musical group with leanings
toward the Lovin Spoonful
sound, the Ewing St. Times is
appearing through Saturday
night at the Rathskeller.
The group lives and plays
around the Coconut Grove area,
a small village in Dade County
that has, at times, been the
home of singer Fred Neil and
many folk-rock groups including
the Mamas and the Papas.
Their week-long engagement
at the Rathskeller is a part of an
extensive tour that will close in
February with a performance at
the Fillmore West in San
Francisco. Other dates set up for
the group include engagements
at the Bottom of the Barrel in
Atlanta, the Vanguard in Kansas
Group Hopes
For Success
LUBBOCK, Tex. (UPI) Five
young men, musicians from the
West Texas area near Lubbock,
are aimed on a straight and
unswerving line to the tops in
the modem music market.
They are called Willie and
the Red Rubber Band. They
were formed in April, 1967, and
have individual and combined
interests in music ranging from
country and Western through
rhythm and blues to the classics.
Most of the recording material
is composed by the group.
Best-known single by the
group was ChickyChicky
Boom Boom, a hit of the week
choice of Cashbox Magazine and
for weeks was tops on the
country and Western charts in
many areas of the nation.
Computers In Dairyland
DAVIS, Calif. Computer
science is the basis for a modern
revolution in milk production.
Most of the recent
improvements in milk
production are due to electronic
data processing, says Clem
Pelissier, University of California
Extension dairyman.
Computers are being used to
evaluate bulls, to plan feed
mixes, to improve breeding
efficiency and to keep track of
the many records needed in a
modern dairy management

Ewing St. Times Appearing At Rat

Yours, begins side two. The
song has a nice harmony
between Gorrie (who sings lead)
and Mair. Strings are added
effectively.
As is the trend lately, an
accoustical guitar is featured at
several points on the record. One
cut that particularly uses the
accoustic well is, Beautiful
Afternoon, a song written by
some guy named Sam Hedd and
sung by Gorrie. The lyrics are
good.
Using a ryhthm drive much
like the Stones and with that
characteristic Stone shouting

City, and the Cellar Door in
Washington, D.C.
The group is composed of
four members -two playing
hollow-body electric guitars, one
playing an electric bass, and the
other a singer.
Admission price to hear the
Ewing St. Times is 50 cents for
members of the Rathskeller and
75 cents for others. There is a
continuous show each night
beginning approximately at 9

WEEK
MVJA FREE you buy
ft a membership card.
TONITE! Friday and Saturday
members
non-members
NEXT WEEK
1 CELEBRATION
FEBRUARY DION
m W U FEBRUARY 26-27-28 ROTARY CONNECTION W.
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW at RAT, REITZ UNION
. RECORD BAR
J -W yjf YOU DONT HAVE TO BE 21

Page 18

between drum beats, 8 Oclock
and Alls Well, comes across as
the most driving song on the
record. It is cut three on side
two.
Mean Pappie Blues, is a
mock-hillbilly tune with the
conductor of No. 72 bus
featured on jews harp. Again,
the protagonist runs away with
his pants about his knees.
You Too Can Have A Body
Like Mine, is the next to the
last cut. Sylvesters Last
Voyage, is the final tune on the

p.m.
Weve had the group before
and have been pleased with their
reception, Marc Glick, an
official of the Rathskeller said
early in the week. Theyve been
one of our most popular
attractions and we think well
see more good crowds for the
shows this weekend. he said.
The Ewing St. Times follow
an extremely successful three
day engagement of singer and

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 29,1970

album. Both have many
good things about them, but
nothing that is particularly
different from the other songs.
All in all, the group sounds
very good. It is a real treat to
come across an album these days
that isnt overly heavy, or stuck
artificially in the blues vein. The
music is theirs. Although they
have learned a lot of what they
do by listening to those who
have gone before, they have
added much of their own and
what they have come up with is
strong and good.

conversationist Biff Rose at the
Rathskeller. Rose played to
packed houses both Friday and
Saturday night of last week.
According to Glick, upcoming
shows at the Rathskeller include
music next week by Celebration,
a Miami based hard rock; and
performances in the coming
weeks of Pacific Gas and Electric
and Rotary Connection, two
rock groups with national
prominence.



UPI Reviews
Latest Book Releases
Decent and Indecent: Our Personal and Political Behavior, by
Benjamin Spock, M.D.
(McCall, $5.95)
Richard Nixon and Dr. Norman Vincent Peale have blamed
Americas unruly young on the child care principles of Dr. Spock.
Without what they call Spocks permissiveness, they have suggested,
college students would not occupy buildings, march against the war
smoke pot or take a precocious interest in sex.
There are many who would dispute his permissiveness. His new
book is anything but permissive. It is, instead, an open attempt to give
new life to old principles.
Dr. Spock describes himself as having an oppressive conscience,
despite his efforts to bring it under control. Formed from the flinty
nature of New England, it forces him to oppose a war he considers
illegal and immoral, to insist on the dignity, even sacredness, of the
person (despite the crude dress and speech of so many of the young
he respects), and to admit he has a fundamental belief in the soul,
God and other concepts that make some people uneasy.
It is a tribute to Dr. Spock that his book presents a persuasive case
for beliefs so uncompromisingly traditional without being stuffy or
intolerant. One devoutly wishes more of his critics had his strong
commitment to seeking what is right and living by it.
Thomas Powers (UPI)
* *
The French Lieutenants Woman, by John Fowles.
John Fowles plays with words and the techniques of the novel with
the skill and precision of a scientist in the laboratory. He has not
always been successful, but in his latest effort he has created a
remarkable novel that is amusing, engrossing and wonderfully
revealing of the human character.
The first portion takes a bir of slogging. In aping the manner and
approach of the Victorian novel, the author inevitably lards on
enough details and pomposity to offend modem readers.
Perserverance is well rewarded.
The story line is simplicity itself, the eternal triangle sprinkled with
Victorian icing. The time is a century ago. A young English nobleman,
properly engaged to the frivolous daughter of a rich merchant,
becomes involved with a woman who has fallen into dishonor because
of an affair with a French lieutenant. Morality decreed that the young
man be marked and defiled to the end of his life.
Under Fowles command, the cliche story line turns into a telling
indictment of Victorian hypocrisy and a provocative study of the
enigma of human existence.
Joan Hanauer (UPI)
* *
The Peoples War, by Angus Calder.
(Pantheon, $8.95)
Heres a sour view of Britains finest hour.
The author, a young British university lecturer, did his research.
The fat book is speckled with footnotes and the bibliography is
almost as long as Calders prejudices.
The book is hailed by its publishers as a brilliant account of
Britains homefront during World War 11. Some of Calders notions
which make this boast doubtful:
Calder says one man really spoke for England during the war,
lifting the hearts of Britons and saying what Britons really were
thinking. Churchill? No, sir. Calder says it was novelist J.B. Priestley.
What toppled Neville Chamberlain from the premiership in 1940,
clearing the way for Churchill? Almost everybody else credits the
disastrous turn of the war, a fallaway in Parliamentary support and
the need for an all-party government. No, sir. Calder says it was
Britains trade union leaders.
Calder sees everything through his firm belief that the Conservative
party was rotten while the Labor Party was good and true, though
squally.
It is sad that prejudices mar what would have been a fine book,
with excellent detail.
Richard H. Growald (UPI)
* *
Bobby Orr and the Big, Bad Bruins, by Stan Fischler.
(Dodd and Mead, $5.95)
Claude Ruel, coach of the superb Montreal Canadians, left no
doubt after his club dumped the Bruins in the Stanley Cup playoffs
last spring that he things the big, bad brawling Bruins label is
deceiving, but there arent many others around the National Hockey
League wholl quarrel about it.
The fact is the Boston Bruins are a hardnosed club. Under
aggressive Harry Sinden, the team has more spunk than it had in the
early 1960 s its a well-rounded outfit and should be an NHL
contender for years to come.
But Fischler makes it clear the rough-tough tag isn t something t lat
developed with the arrival of Bobby Orr, Sinden or Teddy Green. It
dates back to the mid-1920s when the Bruins were the first American
franchise in the NHL and Eddie Shore was the resident star.
The team is rich in hockey heritage and although the boo is
well-laced with current anecdotes, Fischler also weaves in ta es rom
the past.
Perhaps the use of routine publicity pictures for a half dozen
current players detracts from the too-brief picture section, ts a sma
problem, though, because the book is highly rea a e an
entertaU **' P^R^WMdJPI)

'Delicate BalanceOpensTonite
At Gainesville Little Theatre

The state of matrimony is the
subject tonight when the
Gainesville Little Theatre opens
for a six night run of Edward
Albees A Delicate
Balance.
The play is considered by
many to be the best of Albees
work. The playwright also
authored Whos Afraid of
Virginia Woolf? and The Zoo
Story.
GLT Director Craig Hartley
has as his task the setting up of
the delicate balance between the
man, played by Robert Scholes,
and his wife, played by Phyllis
Dilgren. And that balance must
exist, too, between the man and
wife and their daughter, played
by Kris Blancq.
Curtain is set for 8:30 today,
Friday and Saturday of this
week and next.
Best Seller
Book List
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
FICTION
THE FRENCH
LIEUTENANTS WOMAN
John Fowles
THE GODFATHER Mario
Puzo
THE HOUSE ON THE
STRAND Daphne du Maurier
FIRE FROM HEAVEN
Mary Renault
PUPPET ON A CHAIN
Alistair Mac Lean
THE SEVEN MINUTES
Irving Wallace
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT Jimmy
Breslin
THE INHERITORS Harold
Robbins
IN THIS HOUSE OF BREDE
Rumer Godden
THE PROMISE Chaim
Potok,
NONFICTION
THE SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinniss
PRESENT AT THE
CREATION Dean Acheson
AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
William Morris, editor-in-chief
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
AMBASSADORS JOURNAL
- John K. Galbraith
THE COLLAPSE OF THE
THIRD REPUBLIC William L.
Shirer
THE GRAHAM KERR
COOKBOOK Galloping
Gourmet
PRIME TIME Alexander
\C PfinricK
MY LIFE AND PROPHECIES
Jeanne Dixon
Texas Site For
'AmigolancT
BROWNSVILLE, Tex. (UPI)
- By 1971 Disneyland will be
joined by Amigoland.
Youve never heard of it?
Thats because it is not built yet,
but is off to a flying start.
Amigoland is a projected SSO
million amusement park to be
built at the tip of Texas
Brownsville only minutes
from Mexico or Padre Islands
sun-drenched benches.

Reservations for A Delicate
Balance may be made by
phoning 376-4949. Tickets are
$ 1.50 Thursday nights and
$1.75 on Friday and Saturday

fL dale PATRICK
fW\h\ Carpeting, painting, roofing
U Kin k] and everything for improving your
HjEj7\W house. We do it right the
JsST$/\\ first time. All our work
\| is guaranteed.
ksygua 4 Special rates for Fraternities
L and Sororities.
Gainesville, Fla.
Ph. 468-1537
I 10, the quarterly cometh I

Chaim

Thursday, January 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

evenings. Students may receive a
$.25 discount. The Gainesville
Theatre is located 4039 N. W.
16th Boulevard, one block east
of the Millhopper Road.

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

M TENTH ROUND

San Diego Drafts Steen

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
Mac Steen, Gator captain and All-SEC offensive tackle last year,
said he was thrilled when he learned of his being picked by the San
Diego Chargers in the 10th round of the second day of pro footballs
annual draft of college players yesterday.
Steen, who was seriously considering going to dental school
following his graduation in June, said he would now have to weigh the
possibilities of both to determine his future.
Ill have to wait until we negotiate a contract, Steen said. It all
depends cm what I am offered to play before I will be able to sit down
and think about my future.,
Local Gainesville attorney William C. ONeal, who has handled
many of the former Gator footballers that have gone to the pros, will
negotiate Steens contract with the Chargers.
Steen is excited about joining two former Gator teammates,
Richard Trapp and Larry Rentz, who are now playing with San Diego.
Two other Gators who were instrumental in last years successful
9-1-1 record, Skip Amelung and Raul Maliska, are likely to be picked
before the 17-round draft is completed, Steen added.
Stew Tannen, All-American comerback for the Gators last year,
was picked Tuesday in the first round of the draft by the New York
Jets.

Pros Find Slim Pickings As
They Turn To Unknowns

NEW YORK (UPI) Pro
football teams, faced with one
of the dimmist talent crops in
recent years, dipped deep into
the small college ranks for
possible sleepers Wednesday
at the 35th annual draft of
college players.
Few name players were
chosen as the teams, after
selecting nearly one-third of
their players from the college
division ranks in Tuesdays
opening session, concentrated
heavily on possible gems in the
rough in Wednesdays meeting.
The biggest name pick was
Jim Otis, the All-American
fullback from Ohio State, who
went to New Orleans on the
ninth round. Otis, 6-foot and
206 pounds, was 12th in the
nation in rushing despite the fact
that his team played only nine
games. He carried 225 times for
1,027 yards and 15 TDs, but his
lack of size and speed apparently
discouraged many teams from
picking him earlier.
Few other prominent players
were taken. Atlanta took Seth
Miller, the 6-foot-2, 212 pound
defensive back from Arizona
State who led the nation with 11
interceptions, on the eighth
round.
Los Angeles took Rich Saul,
the Michigan State linebacker

|W& M *H
] CHICKEN BOX SPECIAL 1
| Dork Meat White Meat j
I 3 pieces 3 pieces |
I 89< $1.09 |
I JA I
| FREE DELIVERY J

GATOR SPORTS

whose twin brother Ron was
taken by Houston Tuesday, also
on the eighth round.
On the ninth round,
Pittsburgh took Carl Crennel,
West Virginias linebacker;
Buffalo took guard Bill Bridges
of Houston; and the New York
Jets grabbed Ed Bell of Idaho
State who set three college
division pass receiving records
while leading the nation with 96
catches.
But the concentration was
mainly on the largely
unpublicized talent abounding in
the small college ranks.
College division players were
chosen by 10 dubs in each of
the eighth and ninth rounds.
Seven more went on the 10th
and nine more in the 11th.
Generally, most small college
choices predominate in the last
five rounds of the 17-round
session.
One of the brighter prospects
taken from the college division
ranks was tight end Larry
Brewer of Louisiana Tech.
Brewer, a 6-foot-3,235-pounder,
was one of the favorite targets of
Terry Bradshaw, the quarterback
taken by the Steders to open
the draft.
Brewer caught 44 passes as a
junior.
Green Bay took halfback Tim

BK' /&;, 'MB
S&gi: IImM
m v
H Vgv',v j,
..rm
mk Bk m
WL % W
K i M :
MAC STEEN
... drafted Wednesday

Mojos of North Dakota State,
the small college champion, on
the eighth round and Kansas
City took running back Bill
ONeal of Grambling on the
11th.

* -HI I
'
fifteen minutes between classes
witb a moment to talk and watch
the passing scenery.
a day at the u.f.
seminole 1970
IV.--..-
A i I

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 29,1970

Page 20

Bartlett Collapses
After Road Game

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writer
Head Basketball coach.
Tommy Bartlett collapsed
Tuesday morning from
exhaustion as the Gators were
returning from their Monday
night defeat at Ole Miss.
Coach Bartlett, suffering
from the flu, was taken to a
Montgomery, Alabama hospital*
The team was supposed to
land directly at Gainesville but
were rerouted first to
Jacksonville, and then to
Montgomery as all the airports
were locked in with heavy fog.
Bartlett fainted as he went
into eat breakfast with the team
after having spent the whole
weekend in bed and just going to
the games against Miss. State and
(He Miss.
The hospital gave Bartlett
some additional medicine and
anti-biotics plus recommending
more bed rest for the ailing
coach.
Bartlett spent all day Tuesday
at home resting in bed.
Im feeling a little better,
Bartlett commented Thursday,
but I still feel awfully weak
with this flu and bronchitis.
I definitely wont be going
to practice today but if I
continue to improve Ill make it
to practice on Friday.

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

The whole team is pretty
tired from the road trip but we
have had practice and Coach
Dick Davis and Coach Jim
McCachren have taken over
practice in my absence, Bartlett
concluded.
... hospitalized in Alabama
Archery Begins
The UF Archery Club is now
organizing teams to attend the
1970 Florida State Collegiate
Archery Tournament to be held
this spring at the University of
South Florida.
Any student who is interested
in trying out for the team or
practice with the Archery Club
is welcome to attend the
practice sessions on Mondays at
4:30 p.m. at Broward Field.



i eatherwqqd dynasty?

Brother Scouts Brother

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Correspondent
If one believes the local
Gainesville paper, there is a
brother of former UF basketball
point guard Mike Leatherwood
who is already a cage superstar.
Mark Leatherwood of
Pensacola Escambia High was in
town last weekend as the Rebels
met defending state class AA
champ Gainesville High.
Reports in the local paper
lavishly billed young
Leatherwood as over 6-foot-1
with a 22-point average. The
sophomore was supposedly
attracting college scouts.
But in real life, Leatherwood
just reaches the six-foot mark
and has just over a 14-point
average as a freshman.
About the only college
scout to investigate him has
been brother Mike, who is now
an assistant coach for the Gator
freshman team while in graduate
school.
Mike was in the stands to see
his younger brother sink a
team-high of 17 points in
Escambia's loss to Gainesville.
I told the paper he had a
12-point average and they
thought I said 22, Mike
explained. Nobody has looked
at him either.
Mike, with obvious pride,
pointed out that Mark was
especially cool playing varsity
basketball as a freshman.

UF Students To Compete
In Region Six Tournament

More than 25 UF students
will travel to Atlanta, Ga. in
February to attend the Region 6
Campus Tournament.
The Campus Tournament
consists of five contests: chess,
table-tennis, billards, bridge and
NL Wins Battle
NEW YORK The National
League traditionally
overshadows the American
League in attendance. Since
1960, the NL has won the box
office battle, Bl. The AL came
closer than usual in 1968 when
National League clubs drew
11,785368 fans to the junior
circuits 11,172,942. In 1966,
the NL played to 15,015,471,
compared with the ALs
10,166,738
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
AJS? Waldo Road

When I started high school
varsity I was scared to death,
he admitted.
Mark comes from a
family of successful basketball
players. Mike before transferring
to UF, starred on the Pensacola
High state championship team
and at Pensacola Junior College.
Another brother, Ricky, is on
the Pensacola Junior College
squad after a successful PHS
career.
We taught him a lot, said
Mike. But he has an advantage

I M.
I I
FORMER GATOR MIKE LEATHERWOOD
... scouted his brother Mark for the UF

bowling.
Region 6 comprises colleges in
Florida, Georgia, Alabama and
Mississippi.
Those representing the UF in
order of finish by division are:-
CHESS William Moehle,
Hector Canberes, Toni
Ristorcelli, Ron Cooper and
Richard Olsher.
TABLE TENNIS Yee Tale
Fung, Ernie Remzetti, Donald
Story, Victoria Baxter and
Debbie Mathews.

THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE
{ MINI-SKIRT CONTEST l
Tonight I
§ $lO Every Contestant %/f
BLr-41
Never
All The
P That You Can Drink Last 3 Nights WESTON PRIM REVUE |
9:30-10:30 Back for 2 More Weeks
I I 12:00-12:30 1 TH £ HAMMER
? DUBS LOUNGE
3 mtmsnuji osm

of natural ability. He is also big
for his age.
There is big pressure on him.
He needs composure against
older boys. He may be mature
physically but hes only
14-years-old.
Gainesvilles Coach Ed Poore
was impressed with
Leatherwood even if the paper
was wrong.
Hes the best freshman ball
player Ive ever seen, he
complimented. He has a lot of
potential.

BILLIARDS Wayne Wallace
(pocket), Dan Numan (carom)
and Toni Gitles (pocket).
BRIDGE Merkland Jones
and Patricia Sprague, Monty
Marchus and David Meade, and
Robert Story and Thomas Moss.
BOWLING Paul Rosenfield,
John Moore, Rex Wallin,
Merkland Jones, Larry Fuscio,
Bob Bench, Dee Dee Horn,
Cathy ODonnell, Priscilla Ebel,
Phyllis MacFeeley, Dianne
Alterman and Toni Gitles.

INTRAMURALS

Roaches Move Up

INDEPENDENT TENNIS: The Flavet Roaches moved into the
finals of independent league tennis on the strength of a convincing
win over the Chen Cats. The Roaches have exterminated the SC&BA
and the Roadrunners enroute to the-finals berth.
The Bisons will face the Roaches in the finals. They sport wins over
MBA, FEA, and Sahper.
The Flavet Roaches are led by Carlos Linares, Tom Porter, Robert
Harmen, Richard Perez, Norm White, and Rich Beckman. The Bisons
have a four man team composed of Ben Vam, Dave Hall, Skip Lees,
and Jim McClave.
DORM VOLLEYBALL: Jennings I and Reid IV have moved into
the finals of East Campus by winning their respective brackets. In
Hume area, Yeaton will play Gaddum in their finals.
DEADLINES: Today is the deadline for signing up for independent
bowling. February 4 is the deadline for dorm tennis. All those
interested in signing up a team should stop by Fla. Gym room 229 or
call 392-0581.
COREC: The Corecreational table tennis tournament will be held
Monday, Feb. 2, and only two teams have signed up. One guy and one
gal comprise each team and will play a two out of three game match.
Corecreational intramurals has been a big favorite here in the last
year and more teams are urged to sign up for this event. Sign up in the
Intramural Department, room 229 Fla. Gym. All costs for games will
be payed by the Intramural Department.
Nicklaus Readies
For Williams Open
SAN DIEGO (UPI) Big Jack Nicklaus, who showed a months
layoff didnt mean a thing in the Bing Crosby Tournament, defends
his Andy Williams San Diego Open title starting Thursday before again
knocking off for a rest.
Nicklaus shot a tourney single round course tieing 65 at Pebble
Beach Sunday in the windup round of the Crosby, missing winning
the whole thing from steady Bert Yancey by a stroke.
I surprised myself, said Nicklaus of the 65. I made some very
good shots for this early in the year but I had practiced some in
Florida before coming West.
As for the San Diego open, Nicklaus won it last year even though
he shot a final round one over 73 over the special tourney course laid
out from both the North and South courses at Torrey Pines.
Nicklaus said last Sunday that he plans to take off a few weeks
after the San Diego, rejoining the tour in Florida.
Gene Littler, playing practically in his own back yard, led last
years San Diego Open from the start but skied to closing 76. Gene
hasnt been playing well thus far this year but home cooking and a
familiar course could prove just the tonic.
Yancey, who surprised everyone by his steady shooting in the
Crosby, is playing about as well as he can, which is pretty dam good,
as Nicklaus and the other pros found out at Pebble Beach.
Billy Casper, like Littler, has been having problems the last couple
of weeks after opening the year by winning the Los Angeles Open.
Billy missed the cut at Phoenix the following week and then was
disqualified in the final round of the Crosby when his caddy failed to
show up at the scheduled tee-off time.
Casper wasnt doing that well anyway, but he likes Torrey Pines,
and the chance to play before the home folks.

Thursday, January 29,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

STEVE ROHAN

Page 21



Page 22

* The Florida AMfutor, Thursday, January 29,1970

Seminoles Scalp Sixth Ranked Dolphins

By United Prw International
9
The lesson at Florida State
today will be how to love thy
neighbor while beating him at
basketball.
And the Seminoles proved
Tuesday night they are well
qualified to teach the subject as
they knocked off sixth ranked
and previously unbeaten
Jacksonville, 89-83.
Jacksonville, the surprise of
the season which moved up
steadily in the ratings week by
week behind the play of 7-foot-2
center Artis Gilmore and
seven-foot forward Pembroke
Burrows 111, proved no match
for Florida State which posted
its 15th win in 17 games.
Despite the Seminoles
glittering record, they have no
hope of competing in a
post-season tournament as the
school is on probation for
recruiting irregularities.
But meeting the highly touted
Dolphins proved incentive
enough for Florida State which
led by as much as 15 points and
was ahead by at least four points
the entire second half.
Willie Williams led the
Seminoles with 22 points and
teammate Dave Cowens added
19 while Gilmore,
double-teamed all game, scored
21 and Burrows, who left the

Don 'TheSnakePrudhomme
To Drive Funny Car In 70

POMONA, Calif. (UPI)
Theres bad news for drag racers.
Don Hie Snake Prudhomme is
branching out.
The 28-year-old Granda Hills,
Calif., ace, who was selected as
Drag News Driver of the Year in
1969, will pilot a funny car in
1970 in addition to a fuel
dragster.
The first big meet of the year
- the National Hot Rod
Associations Wintemationals
is scheduled at the Los Angeles
County Fairgrounds Friday
through Sunday.
I decided to race a funny car
this year because Id attained all
my goals with my fuel dragster,
Prudhomme explained.
It may be somewhat of a
problem jumping back and forth
between cars but I have a good
crew for each so all I have to do

£/- \&v Bud 12 ox. 14.99 cm.
£/ Schlitz $4.99 com
7 beverage Old Milwaukee 120z .53.79-
triangle* Pobst 120*. $3.99,*.
1202 N.E. Bth Av. Busch 12oz $3.99ca
372-6476
15% gal Party Keg
and set-ups
Complete 372-6476

contest because of a back injury
with five minutes remaining, was
held to one point.
Three other teams in the top

I
1b 9 1WP 1 1
u I
SEMINOLE COACH HUGH DURHAM
... shows exhuberance after victory

is drive them.
If The Snake makes it to
the finals with both cars, hell
make five runs on the
quarter-mile strip with each
machine.
Os course, he quickly
added, I have to qualify em
first.
In 1969, the Californian
finished first in one of the
NHRAs four big meets the
nationals at Indianapolis and
was runner-up in two of the
others the Wintemationals and
the Springnationals at Dallas,
Tex. He won more than
SBO,(XX).
This year could be even better
for Prudhomme. The NHRA has
added three more major events.
Hie 6-foot-1, 158-pounder
actually will be driving two new
cars in the Wintemationals. The

FSU LOVES THY NEIGHBOR

ten saw action and all came
away with victories. No. 5 New
Mexico State ran its record to
17-1 with an 88-65 triumph over

NHRA ace has a new fuel
dragster sponsored by the Wynn
Oil Co.
The funny car and the
dragster have different
transmissions so theyll be
different rides, he offered. I
have to shift three times in the
funny car and only once in the
dragster.
Both vehicles are powered by
426 Plymouth engines.
Prudhomme tested his funny
car at a meet at Phoenix, Ariz.,
last weekend. He had a top
elapsed time of 7.68 seconds and
a best speed of 189 miles per
hour.
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
4c Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith, T
gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

West Texas State, seventh
ranked Marquette won its 14th
game in 15 starts by trimming
Wisconsin 60-51, and 10th
ranked Houston got by Seattle
92-88.
Jimmy Collins scored 22
points for New Mexico State
while Jeff Smith chipped in with
15 as the Aggies had no trouble
with West Texas after racing to a
41-23 halftime lead. Ed
Fitzgerald paced West Texas
with 19 points and 22 rebounds.
Marquette, behind Ric Cobbs
18 points, was forced to hold off
a determined Wisconsin
comeback which saw the
Badgers close a 20 point deficit
to five at 56-51 with 1:20 left.
However, two free throws by
Gary Brell and one by Cobb put
the Warriors out of danger.
GOIF*PAR 60
.Jl DRIVING RANGE
TOi GOLF CLUBS RENTED
llhU, CLUB HOUSE
tWyh* electric carts
jjl LESSONS available
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

(Q VOLKSWAGEN OF AMCHICA, INC.
- ''
.;Xvvv>vvj < ;i>vv.v\v.. .. /
After a few years,
it starts to look beautiful.
"Ugly, isnt it?"
No class."
"The hump."
"Looks like an afterthought."
"Good for laughs."
"Stubby buggy."
"El Pig-O."
New York Magazine recently had a few
choice words to say about it too: "And
then there is the VW, which retains its
value better than anything else. A 1956
VW is worth more today thanany American
sedan built the same year, with the pos possible
sible possible exception of a Cadillac."
Around 27 miles to the gallon.
Pints of oil instead of quarts.
No radiator.
Rear engine traction,
low insurance.
$1,911* is the price.
Beautiful, isnt it?
MILLER-BROWN /O),
422 N. W. 13th St 376-4551 \W/
OPEN TIL 7:00 SJ.
"Local Delivered Price oealcr
Ptu Tax . Tags

Houston, trailing 31-17 in the
first half, managed to close
within 43-39 at halftime and
finally pulled ahead of Seattle
for good on Jeff Hickmans free
throw with 6:58 left to play.
Dwight Davis and Tom
Gribben shared scoring honors
for the Cougars with 21 points
each while Ollie Taylor hit for
20. Lou West and Sam Pierce
each tallied 26 for Seattle.
Davidson, ranked Ith, had to
overcome a 42-38 halftime
deficit before downing stubborn
West Virginia, 87-82, behind
Mike Maloys 23 points and 22
more by Brian Adrian; 16th
ranked Pennsylvania upped its
record to 15-1 as Steve Bilskys
17 points helped die Quakers
past Lasalle, 76-67.
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.



First Five Rounds Os Football Draft

NEW YORK (UPI) Here are
each teams round-by-round
selections in the Annual Pro
Football Draft:
Atlanta Falcons
1. John Small, LB, the
Citadel; 2. Art Malone, RB,
Arizona State; 3. Andy Maurer,
G, Oregon; (from New York
Giants) Todd Snyder, WR, Ohio
University; 4. (from
Philadelphia) Paul Reed, OT,
Johnson S. Smith; traded to St.
Louis; 5. Philadelphia, through
New York Giants Bruce
Vanness, RB, Rutgers; second
fifth round pick Ken
Mendenhall, C, Oklahoma.
Baltimore Colts
1. Norm Buliach, RB, Texas
Christian; 2. James Bailey, DB,
Kansas; 3. John OBrien, WR-K,
Cincinnati; (from Los Angeles
through Philadelphia) Ara
Person, TE, Morgan State; 4.
(from Washington) Steve Smear,
DT, Penn State; traded to Green
Bay; 5. Billy Newsome, DE,
Grambling.
Boston Patriots
1. Phil Olsen, DE, Utah State;
2. Traded to Houston; 3. Mike
Ballou, LB, UCLA; 4. Eddie
Ray, RB, LSU; 5. (from Miami)
Bob Olson, LB, Notre Dame.
Buffalo Bills
1. A1 Cowlings, DT, Southern
California; 2. Dennis Shaw, QB,
San Diego State; 3. Jim Reilly,
G, Notre Dame; (from San
Diego) Glenn Alexander, DB,
Grambling; 4. Jerome Gantt,
DE, North Carolina Central; 5.
Steve Starnes, LB, Tampa.
Chicago Bears
1. Traded to Green Bay; 2.
Traded to Dallas; 3. George
Farmer, WR, UCLA; 4. Lynn
Larson, OT, Kansas State; (from
Los Angeles) Ross Brupbacher,
LB, Texas A&M; 5. Traded Pick
to New Orleans.
Cincinnati Bengals
1. Mike Reid, DT, Penn State;
2. Ron Carpenter, DT, North
Carolina State; 3. Chip Bennett,
LB, Abilene Christian; 4. Joe
Stephens, G, Jackson State;
(from Kansas City) Billy Hayes,
DB, San Diego State; 5. Traded
Pick to New York Jets, who
traded it Houston.
Cleveland Browns
1. (From Miami) Mike Phipps,
QB, Purdue; Bobo McKay, OT,
Texas; 2. (From New Orleans)
Joe Jones, DE, Tennessee State;
Jerry Sherk, DT, Oklahoma
State; 3. Traded to choice
received from Houston to Dallas;
Traded to Dallas; 4. Ricky
Stevenson, DB, Arizona; 5. Steve
Engel, RB, Colorado.
Dallas Cowboys*
L Duane Thomas, RB, West
Texas State; 2. (From Chicago)
Bob Asher, OT, Vanderbilt;
Margene Adkins, WR, Ottawa,
Canadian Football League; 3.
(From Houston through
Cleveland) Charlie Waters, DB,
Clemson; (From Cleveland)
Steve Kiner, LB, Tennessee;
Denton Fox, DB, Texas Tech; 4.
John Fitzgerald, OT, Boston
College; 5. Traded Pick to St.
Louis.
Denver Broncos,
L Bob Anderson, RB,
Colorado; 2. Alden Roche, DB,
Southern University; 3. John
Kohler, OT, South Dakota; 4.
Jerry Hendren, WR, Idaho; 5.
Billy McKoy, LB, Purdue.

Detroit Lions,
1. Steve Owens, RB,
Oklahoma; 2. Ray Parsons, TE,
Minnesota; 3. Jim Mitchell, DE,
Virginia State; 4. Traded to New
York Giants; 5. Bob Parker, OG,
Memphis State.,
Green Bay Packers
1. (From Chicago) Mike
McKoy, DT, Notre Dame; Rich
McGeorge, TE, Elon College; 2.
Alvin Mathews, DB, Texas A&I;
3. Jim Carter, LB, Minnesota;4.
Kenny Ellis, WR, Southern
University; (From Baltimore)
Skip Butler, K, Texas-Arlington;
5. Cecil Pryor, DE, Michigan.
Houston Oilers
1. Dough Wilkerson, DT,
North Carolina Central; 2.
(From Boston) Leo Brooks, DT,
Texas; Bill Dusenberry, RB,
Johnson C. Smith; 3. Traded to
Cleveland; 4. John Spike
Jones, P, Georgia; 5. (From
Cincinnati through New York
Jets) Ron Saul, G, Michigan
State; Ed Douley, DT, Northern
Arizona.
Kansas City Chiefs
1. Sid Smith, OT, Southern
California; 2. Clyde Werner, LB,
Washington; 3. (From San
Francisco) Billy Bob Barnett,
DE, Texas A&M; David Hadley,
DB, Alcorn A&M; 4. Traded to
Cincinnati; 5. Mike Oriard, C,
Notre Dame.
Los Angeles Rams.
1. Jack Reynolds, LB,
Tennessee; 2. (From San
Francisco) Charlie Williams, WR,
Prairie View A&M; Traded to
Philadelphia; 3. Traded to
Philadelphia: Traded to Chicago;
Traded choice received from
Minnesota to New Orleans; 5.
Traded Pick to New Orleans.
Miami Dolphins.
1. Traded to Cleveland; 2. Jim
Mandich, TE, Michigan; 3. Tim
Foley, DB, Purdue; 4. Curtis
Johnson, DB, Toledo; 5. Traded
Pick to Boston.
Minnesota Vikings
1. John Ward, OT, Oklahoma
State, Bill Cappleman, QB,
Florida State; 3. Chuck
Burgoon, LB, North Park, 4.
Traded to Los Angeles. 5. Greg
Jones, RB, UCLA.
' New Orleans Saints
1. Ken Burroughs, WR, Texas
Southern; 2. Traded to

JETS TAKE TANNEN FIRST

Cleveland; 3. Clovis Swinney,
LB, Arkansas State; 4. Dellis
Howell, DB, Grambling; Traded
choice received from Minnesota,
through Los Angeles, to
Washington; 5. (From Chicago)
Glenn Cannon, DB, Mississippi;
(From Los Angeles) Steve
Ramsey, QB, North Texas State.
New York Giants
1. Jim Files, LB, Oklahoma;
2. Traded to St. Louis; 3. Traded
to Atlanta Falcons; 4. Traded to
Pittsburgh; (From Detroit)
Wesley Grant, DE, UCLA; 5.
Clade Brumfield, G, Tennessee
State.
New York Jets
1. Steve Tannen, CB, Florida;
2. Richard Caster, TE, Jackson
State; 3. Dennis Onkotz, LB,
Penn State; 4. John Ebersole,
DE, Penn State; 5. (From
Boston) Cliff McClain, RB,
South Carolina St., Gary Arthur,
TE Miami, O.
Oakland Raiders
1. Ray Chester, TE, Morgan
State; 2. Ted Koy, RB, Texas; 3.
Gerald Irons, DT, Maryland
State; 4. Tony Cline, LB, Miami
(Fla.); 5. Bart Laster, OT,
Maryland State.
Philadelphia Eagles
1. Steve Zabel, TE,
Oklahoma; 2. Ray Jones, DB,
Southern University; Traded a
choice received from Los
Angeles to San Francisco; 3. Lee
Bougess, RB, Louisville; Traded
choice received from Los
Angeles to Baltimore; 4. Traded
to Atlanta; 5. Traded Pick to
New York Giants, who traded it
to Atlanta.
Pittsburgh Steelers
1. Terry Bradshaw, QB,
Louisiana Tech; 2. Ron
Shanklin, WR, North Texas
State; 3. Mel Blount, DB,
Southern U.; 4. Ed George, OT,
Wake Forest; (From New York
Giants) Jim Evenson, RB,
Oregon (VancouverCFL); 5.
Jon Staggers, DB, Missouri.
San Diego Chargers
1. Walker Gillette, WR,
Richmond; 2. Tom Williams,
DT, Califomia-Davis; 3. Traded
to Buffalo; 4. Bill Maddox, TE,
Syracuse; 5. Pettus Farrar, RB,
Norfolk State.
San Francisco
1. Cedric Hardman, DT,

North Texas Stall; (From
Washington) Bruce Taylor, DB,
Boston University; 2. Traded to
Los Angeles; (From Los Angeles

BELL & TACO BELL Q> TACO BELL &
1 COME TO OUR
cS -) r
5 GRAND I
\ OPENING |
ill V
o
2 SAT. JAN. 31 l
cS P
J r
8 (2) TWO (2) i
A <*
t GRAND PRIZES ?
8 PLUS OVER 700 00 ;j
4 IN FREE PRIZES
d m
j f
ioaBOOBSB L;
jj 826 W. Univ. Ave.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 10:30 AM TO 12:00 PM
3 Friday A Saturday til 1:00 AM p
H -I*l3B oovj. Ti3B oovxsj-naa

Thursday, January 29, 1970, Thu Florida Alligator,

through Philadelphia) John
Isenbarger, RB, Indiana; 3.
Traded to Kansas City; 4. Vic
Washington, WR-CB, Wyoming
(Ottawa-CFL); 5. Gary
McArthur, RB, Southern
California.
St. Louis Cardinals
1. Larry Stegent, RB, Texas
A&M; 2. James Corrigall, LB,
Kent State; (From New York
Giants) Chuck Hutchinson, OG,
Ohio State; 3. Charlie Pittman,
RB, Penn State; (From
Washington) Erie Harris, DB,
Colorado; 4. Greg Lens, DT,
Trinity (Tex.); (From Atlanta)
Don Parish, LB, Stanford; 5.
Tom Lloyd, OT, Bowling Green;
(From Dallas Barry Pierson, DB,
Michigan.
Washington Redskins
1. Traded to San Francisco;
Bill Brundige, DT, Colorado; 3.
Traded to St. Louis; 4. Traded
to Baltimore; (from Minnesota,
through Los Angeles, through
New Orleans) Paul Laaveg, OT,
Iowa; 5. (From New Orleans)
Manuel Sistrunk, DT, Arkansas
AM&N; Danny Pierce, RB,
Memphis State.

Page 23



Page 24

Thu Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 29, 1970

7
| ' i "7-- . .- ;
These Are The Facts:
* I
-*> ' W-- "...
Why such a large facility?
We need a University Activities Center (UAC) complex with auditorium, coliseum, natatorium and
amphitheater because these facilities cannot be afforded individually. We either build them now, or
none. The U.F. is now competing with eight other state universities, and time is against us. The longer
we delay, the less likely we can get any funds for such structures.
Why does UAC cost so much?
Inflation accounts for 50-60% of the cost increases. The J. Wayne Reitz Union would cost over 10
million dollars by today's prices. Miami Beach Convention Hall over 30 million. Other (particularly
Southern) Universities have built inferior and poorly planned facilities with student fee
participation. Most schools did not include natatorium, amphitheatre and performing arts audjtorium,
although some already had these facilities. We have none, except the elderly Florida Gym and
University Auditorium.
. Why should students have to pay $6?
Official estimates are that $11.75 million dollars can be raised from all sources. This leaves the final six
million dollars unaccounted for. If students really want such a facility, they can provide for this last
six million dollars (no more) along with a matching proportion of responsibility of control. None of
the money will be forthcoming unless students give some sign they are willing to participate in funding
and responsibility. How can city, county and state tax dollars be pledged to some facility students
express the view they don't want?
Why pay $6 if I will not be here?
Most state and local building construction is financed this way. Alachua County's new school building
program pledges property taxes for over 20 years to pay for buildings. The present J. Wayne Reitz
Union had its funding begun this way. Other students voted, and paid fees for a facility which they
never saw, but which you are using. Last November Florida voters pledged utility tax revenues beyond
the year 2000 to pay for higher education building projects on all Florida's nine state university
campuses. Os the first $25 million generated from this fund, 13.7 went to the UF to match 19 for
Medical School expansion alone. Yet those who pay those taxes probably won't ever see, let alone use,
these facilities.
Why vote yes on February 4?
Because a no vote means no UAC. Our local legislative delegation has pledged to get matching state
money if students vote yes thus showing they want such a facility. They can only get the money if
they can show a yes student vote on the UAC.
- %a
Make the Impossible Dream Possible
Vofb Yes on February 4
LOOK AT THE FACTS NOT RUMORS!
t
>AID POLITICAL AD