Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Is There Anything FBK Is For? Asks Shepherd

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Lambasting what he termed a dying race of
strutting political peacocks, Student Body
President Charles Shepherd broke his long silence on
the University Activities Center controversy
Monday.
Chief targets of the presidential tirade were
Florida Blue Key; Jim Clark, a student actively
opposing the UAC Feb. 4 referendum; and Steve
Zack, possible candidate for student body president
in the spring elections.
Shepherd said he was willing to debate anybody,
anywhere at any time in order to get through these
people to the students.
The student president said UF students should
look at who is opposing the proposed activities
center and why.
Methinks they are attempting to pull the wool

jAff J\m\m a

Vol. 62, No. 73

Maloney Quits Law Dean Post

ON A CLEAR DAY
Skydiving is effortless, like jumping off a tree or a four-foot step,"
says parachutist Bill Booth, although popular opinion has classified it
as dangerous. The Gator Skydivers can be observed on pleasant
Saturdays at Stengel Field near campus. See story on page four.

f Carnigras Demise
Not Citys Fault
Student Body President Charles Shepherd attempted Monday to
take the blame for no Carnigras this year off the city of Gainesville
and place it on the owners of the carnival.
He said the reason the carnival will not be held this year is because
the carnival operators holding the contract for Carnigras will not agree
to pay the citys license tax.
Last years tax, amounting to $1,275, was paid by the student body
and later reimbursed by several Gainesville businessmen who donated
$ 1,300 to the benefiting Gator Loan Fund (GLF).
Meanwhile, Hm carnival owners took from $7,000 to SB,OOO in
profits from Carnigras. The GLF made approximately $2,555 from
the carnival, minus the expenses of running the carnival.
Its just not worth the trouble we have to go through to put on a
project like this, Shepherd said. Frankly, I havent pushed it.
Shepherd said the maximum profit the GLF could make off the
carnival is $2,500. This figure was set in the contract drawn up under
the Clyde Taylor administration. It was never signed by the carnival
owners who objected to the stipulation that they pay the city
licensing fees.
Shepherd said he has not pursued the matter since September.

The
Florida Alligator

ITS TIME TO PUT UP OR SHUT UP!'

mum
The last creative thought FBK had
was their formation some 30 years ago.
Since that titne they have constituted
nothing more than a dying race of
strutting political peacocks.
- Charles Shepherd
iinniinnitintuniiiiunmiii * MMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI
over the eyes of the students through half-truths,
character assassinations and secretive whisperings,
Shepherd said.
Just look at the opposition: First there is
Florida Blue Key its supposed to be a leadership
fraternity; their last foray into the leadership area
was opposition to a tuition increase to build the
Union. They lost that one too, Shepherd said.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

EFFECTIVE IN AUGUST

University of Florida, Gainesville

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Writer
UF College of Law Dean
Frank E. Maloney announced
Monday he will resign his
position of 12 years effective in
August.
Maloney said he will accept a
one-year appointment as visiting
professor at Vanderbilt
University beginning in
September. He plans to return to
the UF as a law professor in
September, 1971.
Maloney told UF President
Stephen C. OConnell he would
step down earlier if a successor is
named. OConnell said it is
unlikely a successor would be
chosen before the beginning of
the fall quarter.
Maloney said his chosen
career of teaching and research
has had to necessarily take a
second place during my period
of administration. I believe it is
time for a new hand to guide the
Law Center.
The College of Law is now
involved in a controversy
concerning the dismissal of a law
professor who refused to sign
the loyalty oath. The
Association of American Law
Schools is currently investigating
the law school for possible
censure or loss of accreditation.
Maloney said he has been
considering resigning as dean for
some time.
We now have one of the
finest law school buildings in the
nation, but brick and mortar
alone will not make an
outstanding law school, he said.
A substantial increase in the
size of the faculty and greatly
increased operating funds are
necessary if the law center is to
achieve its destiny of service to
the state and nation.
He said the College of. Law now
has an inadequate library and
such a shortage of funds for
salaries, secretarial help, library

The last creative thought FBK had was their
formation some 30 years ago. Since that time they
have constituted nothing more than a dying race of
strutting political peacocks, he said. They
opposed even having a referendum to let the
students vote on the tuition question. Is there
anything that FBK is for?
He next turned to Clark.
He says he can build a cheaper Center. What is
he going to build it with salvage materials from
Flavets? Shepherd said. Then theres Steve Zack.
Presidential-candidate Zack privately says he is
going to vote for the referendum; but publicly says
hes against it. Come on Zack, flip a coin and tell us
how you really feel.
Shepherd called on his critics to come up with an
alternate program before Feb. 4.
They knew the details of the referendum as
early as the fall, he said. Its time to put up or
shut up.

assistance, faculty research
assistants, travel and publication
costs that faculty and student
morale are suffering
substantially.
If the school is to move
forward as I hope and expect
that it will under new leadership,
these problems must be solved
and soon.
OConnell praised Maloney
for single-handedly,
surmounting obstacles that
would have frustrated most in
bringing into existence and use
the new law center. He noted
Maloney has established
scholarship programs and
(SEE 'MALONEY' PAGE 3)

Lassiter Leaves UF
For NFU Position

By MARC H. GLICK
Alligator Correspondent
Dr. Roy Lassiter, UF Dean of
Faculty Academic Affairs, will
go before the Board of Regents
Feb. 2, for appointment to Vice
President of the new North
Florida University in
Jacksonville.
Lassiter, a 15-year veteran of
the UF, is presently on leave.
Vice President of Academic
Affairs Frederick W. Conner
said, Lassiter is leaving, but his
new position hasnt been
approved or created by the
Regents.
He is using up accumulated
leave until the Regents meet
Feb. 2, Conner said.
Conner would not divulge
Lassiters prospective position.
When reached at home
Lassiter confirmed he was
leaving the UF for the
soon-to-be-created position of
Vice President at NFU in
Jacksonville. All that remains, he

\ J
* /
9 X

Tuesday, January 27, 1970

j|
<1
FRANK E. MALONEY
... goes to Vanderbilt

said, is Regents action.
I hate to leave the UF,
Lassiter said, but not everyone
gets the opportunity to build a
university from scratch.
Fred Breeze, who worked
extensively with Lassiter as
chairman of Omicron Delta
Kappas Teacher Evaluation, said
Lassiter was very concerned with
the curricular and academic
needs of students.
llilllllllMllMl
SUPREME COURT denies
Florida Gov. Claude Kirks
request that integration be
delayed ...page 2
Classifieds 10, 11
Editorials.. i 8
FSU News 4
Letters 9
Movies 10,11
Orange and Blue ....... 12
Small Society '. 6
Sports.. 13



Page 2

TtoFtoritia Alligator, Tuesday, January 27,1970

IFC Presidents
Vote Against
Referendum

~3< -V)> g^ 51 \/ **iy 'S- ,J '*c¥ \J''"*S 1 i!!:^i &' '^ > *' "A BL '.
\ ' -- &
WHAT IS IT? PETE KN CKE
The contorted skeleton of Jonah's whale? Or a modernistic
staircase guard rail? No, it's a metal sculpture in back of the Life
Sciences complex. Our photographer, Pete Knocke, is taking an art
course and he gets carried away occasionally.
Corner Drug Store
On Radio 'Dialogue
The Comer Drugstore will be the first in a series of relevant
controversial, and polemical topics discussed on Dialogue, a
bi-weekly radio show produced by Florida Blue Key (FBK), in
cooperation with WRUF.
The open phone show is aired Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1
pm to 1 am on WROF-AM (850 KC), beginning tonight.
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Comer Drugstore, Dave
Doucette, Vice Chairman Jerry Siegel, and board member Barbara
Eisenstadt, will be the featured guests tonight.
We hope to present a better understanding of the purposes of the
Comer Drugstore, Moderator Bob Moore said. Two phone lines will
be opened after the discussion has gotten under way.
The Comer Drugstore, which opened its doors Monday, is a self
help chug facility based on person-to-person help for those who seek
it.
The controversial referendum which would raise registration fees
six dollars to finance an Activities Center will be the subject of an
informal debate on the Feb. 3 show.
- *, niH Guns uns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
*Selj Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
.? reloading. Harry Beckwith
* 9 un dealer, Micanopy.
* 466 3340.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspapei of the
Univeisity of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekty, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent onlyAhe official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Offire
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Interfratemity Council (IFC)
presidents council Sunday voted to
oppose the Feb. 4 referendum which
would raise registration fees $6 per
quarter to help finance a proposed
$17.7 million Activities Center.
The majority of the 22 fraternities
who voted in a secret ballot gave three
main reasons for their opposition:
The referendum is not specific
enough in guaranteeing where
supplementary funding will come from,
or in the physical planning of the
complex, IFC President Charles
Brackins reported in a release
concerning the vote.
UFs student body should not have to
bear any additional fee increases, nor
does it have the right to impose them on
incoming students who will have no
mm

Kirks Desegregation Delay Plea
Rejected By Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court rejected efforts
of Gov. Claude R. Kirk Jr. to
delay the Feb. 1 deadline for
school desegregation ordered in
the South.
Kirk, who said Friday he
would go to jail, if necessary,
rather than permit the upheaval
of a Feb. 1 massive integration
of students, had no comment
immediately.
At this time, the governor
will have no comment on the
Supreme Courts denial of his
motion to intervene and recall
the mandate press secretary
Russell Stratton said.
The courts action is not
related to the governors
complaint filed on Friday
against the other 49 states and
HEW Secretary Robert Finch,
Stratton added.
Kirk said when he asked
permission to intervene earlier
this month that if the court
turned him down, he would

Tonights Topic: Sex
The UF chapter of Zero Population Growth Inc. (ZPG) will
hold a business meeting today at 8 p.m. in the second floor
conference room of the Space Science Building on campus.
Dr Seymour S. Block, professor of chemical engineering and
president of ZPG of Florida, said there will be a program
following the meeting in which sex education in the schools will
be discussed.
Guest speaker for the program will be Dr. Nell Potter a
university physician, who has participated in a federal program
which teaches instructors a curriculum for sex education
Block said there will be limited seating capacity for those
who want to attend. The public is invited

Student Senate Meets Tonight

The Student Senate will meet
tonight in room 349 in the Reitz
Union at 7:30.

I fenWkn Tried
K 376 6472 K
114 S.W. 34th St.
V f J 372-3649 f
I dinner QQA I
I BOX uJv I
and Gravy *
issr** bring coupon I

say concerning the fee increases, the
IFC release reported.
Ralph Glatfelter spoke for the
passage of the referendum, and Steve
Zack, former IFC president and possible
student body presidential candididate,
urged opposition at the presidents
council meeting where. the vote was
held.
Brackins would not reveal the
breakdown of the vote. However, six
fraternities abstained from voting and
attending the meeting.
Little discussion was held after the
pro and con presentations. Most of the
representatives knew which way they
were going to vote before they went
in, Brackins said.
A letter from the IFC office was sent
to each house during the middle of last
week, and was followed by a phone call
from the secretary, notifying chapters
to hold meetings, or discuss the

issue an executive order telling
local school officials not to
comply.
When he followed this up
with another Supreme Court
petition Friday, he said he
would risk jail in the event the
Supreme Court refused all of his
moves and it came down to
resist or be imprisoned.
Apparently, he intends to do
nothing about the executive
order until the court rules on the

Poll Workers Being Hired

Poll workers are being hired
for the Feb. 4 referendum,
today and Wednesday.
Persons interested should pick
up applications, Student
Government office, third floor,
Reitz Union.
Workers are paid $1.35 per
hour.
Secretary of the Interior
Kevin Davey said he is primarily
interested in getting people able
to work all day, or just in the

A resolution advocating the
lowering of the voting age to 18
will be considered.

referendum so that die presidents could
represent the majority opinion in their
houses/* Brackins said.
How the president went about
finding the majority of opinion in his
house was not specified by IFC
regulations.
Hopefully, they (the presidents)
reflected their houses opinions,
Brackins said, but added nobody would
know how they voted since the ballot
was secret.
About one month ago I would have
expected the council to vote for the
referendum, but in the last two or three
weeks I did not know what to expect
from the opinions I heard from
different presidents, Brackins said of
the result.
An informal poll of about 14
fraternities by the Alligator found most
presidents felt they had noted in
accordance with the prevelant feeling in
their houses

latest petition, in which he asked
that the other 49 states be
required to meet the same
requirements as Florida.
The courts had set the
deadline on Jan. 14 for 14
southern school districts,
including Bay and Alachua
counties.
Kirk said his state is unable,
physically or financially, to cope
with the changes necessary to
keep the courts schedule.

morning.
Polls will be open from 8 a.m.
until 6 p.m., Feb. 4.
Meeting Tonight
The Committee to Defeat the
Proposed University Activities
Center will have an open
meeting today at 7 p.m. in room
346 of the Reitz Union.
The purpose of the meeting is
to clarify many issues
concerning the Feb. 4
referendum and to introduce
less-known facts.
MINI-POSTER
All I KNOW IS WHAT
l READ ON THE
BoTToM oF MY CAGE
0 ft.



KimsasaasaassstaDEVELOPED BY UF A&S STUDENT
'Man In Balance: Environmental Survival

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Hal Barcey decided the concept of man
battling the forces of nature was antiquated, so
he created his own version of what mans
relationship to nature should be.
His idea took the form of a symbol a
symbol representing man in balance with his
environment.
The survival symbol, as Barcey calk it, was
drawn up at a population explosion conference
in Washington, D.C. last November. Dr. Bruce
Welch, head of an environment group, saw the
design and helped Barcey get the symbol adopted
as the national conservation symbol.
All the mass movements in history have had a
symbol. The very quest for survival is a mass
movement, and needs a symbol, the 3AS
transfer student from Ohio said.
As a member of the American Political Items
Collectors, Barcey has had the opportunity to
study many of the great symbols reproduced on
buttons. He said all symbols must be simple and
present positive beliefs.
What more was the Garden of Eden than man
in balance with his environment? What more is
peace than man in balance with his environment?
What more is the impossible dream, over the
rainbow, or utopia, than man in balance with
his environment? Barcey said.

Maloney
Resigns
PAGE o*3
organized the Law Center
Association, Inc.
Maloney, 51, received his
bachelors degree from the
University of Toronto in 1938
and a law degree with high
honors from *UF in 1942.
Maloney was appointed an
associate professor of law here in
1946
Maloney has been a visiting
professor at Columbia University
and New York University.
Qkzce&id
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida
i

Lake Alice Discussed

The problem of Lake Alice
will be discussed today in one of
a series of environmental
engineering seminars. The
program at 3:30 in room 239 of
electrical engineering building
south, is open to the public.
Dr. Ariel Lugo, assistant
professor of botany, will speak

TAMPA MON-STOPS
And all other Trailways Services at Gainesville
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Q
The survival symbol is being used on things
from buttons, to stationery, to Christmas cards.
Money raised will go to solving environmental
problems.
A confederation of conservation students are
distributing an international petition calling for
general conservation and population control
resolutions. Once the estimated goal of rive
million names has been obtained, the petition
will be presented to the United Nations, said the
brown-haired youth.

on Mineral Cycling in Energy
Flow in Lake Alice A Man
Disturbed Ecosystem.

His decision to major in environmental politics
- after first getting degrees in English, history,
economics, political science, and ecology
results from a background of working in politics
and studying political theory.
Barcey has worked for the late Robert
Kennedy, Sen. Joseph McCarthy, Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller and Hubert Humphrey.
The surprise of his short political career
occurred in 1967, when he won the Voice of
Democracy Award, presented by the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, for his speech on Citizens of the
World.
The brown-eyed 20-year-old said the reason
for the surprise is that although he is a liberal, I
consider my allegiance to the world more
important than any allegiance to the United
States.
Currently chairman of adult education for
SAMSON, Barcey is also a member of NAACP,
Zero Population Growth, the UF chapter of the
Environmental Action Group and secretary of
the newsletter for Population Phase I. For the
past two years he has self-supported an
11-year-old Philippino boy he adopted. Barcey is
a bachelor.
He claims his only bit of color as a character
. is that he always wears a sports coat. It's as
much my trademark as Dodgers hat was to
him. (Dodger was a chief character in the movie
Oliver.'!

RED PM qX I
NIGHT Jy
8-10 PM gh
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

r Teeedey,

ORANGES
$2 bushel
UPicem
Model Homes
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143

Page 3



v Tw**V. J?nu*ry 27. 1970

Page 4

"SAFER THAN VARSITY SPORTS 1
Parachuting Fun And Exciting

By DOUG OLANDER
Alligator Correspondent
Its probably twice as dangerous to drive from New York to Miami
as to jump out of an airplane/* said UF parachutist Bill Booth.
Booth, 5 AR, does his jumping as a member of the Gator Skydivers.
Only one member has broken a leg in the past five years. Lets
have any varsity sport match that record, he said.
The jump dub has been in Gainesville for five or six years, its not
very well known, Booth said.
Booth is a jumpmaster licensed by the U. S. Parachute Association
to train beginners.
The dub has 35 active members and welcomes interested students.

College Os Journalism Proposes
Summer Quarter In Japan

By ROBERT H. WOLF
Alligator Corrwyondont
Several top UF journalism
majors may get an opportunity
to spend the coming summer
writing and studying in Japan
while earning a full quarters
credit if a proposed plan can
attract the necessary support.
The proposal, submitted by
Prof. James E. Couch of the
.College of Journalism and
Communications, would consist
of about a half-dozen students
and himself spending ten weeks
in Japan.
Each of the prospective
participants in the program has
already demonstrated high
competence in reporting and
feature writing, Couch said. I
feel each is capable of handling
the difficult assignments they
would get in the Japanese
environment.
They would be writing
in-depth feature articles on such
topics as population control
measures, pollution control,
urban expansion, student
activism, industrial regeneration,
economic revisionism, womens
rights, etc, he said.
I dont think there is much
need for routine tourism articles
in the same year the worlds fair
(Expo *7O) is being held in
Osaka.
The College of Journalism
currently has arrangements to
give its students practical
experience at both the

Don't miss Alby's An ArbVS & A Shake
W/NTW om,
Arby's
ConsUntly growing Coott to COSSt > M js f South of the Underpass I

Gainesville Sun and St.
Petersburg Times, the latter
cooperating in a special summer
program.
While working for these
newspapers is a valuable link in
learning journalism, I believe we
need not necessarily limit
writing experience for all. Some
few students each year are
capable of achieving excellence
under the type program I am
suggesting. And if we can take
students out of Gainesville, why
not out of the country? Couch
said.
The biggest obstacle to the
program is one of financing.
Couch feels there are. two
avenues open to exploration in
obtaining the money necessary
to support the program.

news i*^
from... JmMPtEsu
By FSU FLAMBEAU
JACKSONVILLE: FSU basketball coach Hugh Durham called this
probably the biggest basketball game in the history of the state,
unbeaten and sixth ranked Jacksonville University will meet FSUs
twice beaten team in Tully Gym tonight.
Both the Seminoles and the Dolphins have long been awaiting this
showdown between what many sportswriters have called the souths
two best independents.
SEC: Florida State University President J. Stanley Marshal
yesterday acknowledged that he has been exploring the possibility of
the universitys admission to the SEC.
Marshall said, By the opening of the SECs annual meeting I will
have met with the presidents of every university in the SEC to discuss
our admission to the conference.

A student must complete eight hours of ground instruction before he
can try his first jump.
Total cost for the first five jumps, all carefully supervised by an
authorized jumpmaster, is $65.
Then the jumper is on his own and the cost falls to $3.50 per jump
and for another SI.OO the club will rent parachutes and all necessary
equipment. Booth calls the beginners cost among the cheapest rates
in the country. Membership in the chib is $6 per year.
Skydiving, a rapidly-growing sport in the U. S. for over a decade,
has more than 50 collegiate teams, many of which are sponsored by
their schools. Booth said a bid has been made to have the 1970
Collegiate Nationals held at UF and thinks there is a pretty fair
chance that it may work out.

The first would be to set up a
general syndicate-type
arrangement to which all
students would contribute their
stories for distribution to those
newspapers contributing to a
general fund.
The second way would be for
each student to become
affiliated with a specific
newspaper sponsor, which would
make a scholarship contribution
of a specified amount. In return,
the student would write
exclusively for his sponsor those
stories requested of him.
Couch feels the latter way is
more likely and feels newspapers
should be anxious to sponsor a
student as a special foreign
correspondent to Japan at a
total cost of about $l5O a week.

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FOR DRAFT SUP-UPS

Students Given Recourse
From Induction Order

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court
declared Monday that college students who lose
their deferments and are ordered into service as
draft delinquents are entitled to fight the action in
the courts prior to induction.
The unanimous, 8-0 ruling repudiated an argument
by Attorney General John N. Mitchell that war
protesters and others could not challenge their
reclassification before being summoned into the
service.
The law has given the ordinary draftee no
recourse but to refuse induction and subject himself
to criminal prosecution or to submit and try to get
out of uniform afterward through a habeas corpus
proceeding.
But Mondays majority opinion by Justice Hugo
L. Black held that college students who lose their
deferred status by action of a draft board can
challenge the reclassification by a civil suit.
The ruling came in a case involving Timothy J.
Breen of Bridgeport, Conn., an undergraduate at the
Berkeley School of Music in Boston. He was
declared a delinquent and classified 1A after he
handed in his draft card at a Vietnam protest
meeting.
In other actions, the court: Rejected without
comment a move by Gov. Claude R. Kirk Jr., to
delay the court-ordered Feb. 1 deadline for school
desegregation ordered in 14 school districts in
Florida and four other Southern states. Kirk had
sought reconsideration of the deadline order.
Ruled against a group of Negroes who sought to
prevent closing of a once all-white public park in
Macon, Ga. The park had been willed to the city by
a former Confederate soldier on condition it be
segregated.
The Supreme Court ruled previously that the city
could not maintain the park on a segregated basis
and city authorities moved to return the land to the
heirs of the donor. The Negro plaintiffs sought to
block the move but lost their appeal in todays
decision.
In the draft case, Mitchell had submitted the
governments arguments to the court after Solicitor

Romney
To Resign?
WASHINGTON (UPI)
George Romney said Monday he
has no plans to run for the
Senate in Michigan but he
declined to dose the door on the
possibility he might leave
President Nixons cabinet.
Romney, former Michigan
governor who is secretary of the
Department of Housing and
Urban Development, told a news
conference he hopes Michigan
Republican leaders can unite
behind a consensus candidate to
try and unseat Democratic Sen.
Phillip A. Hart next fall.
He said neither he nor his wife
Lenore, also mentioned as a
possible candidate, would make
any effort to get the
nomination. Asked if this meant
he was closing the door to a
race, he would not elaborate.
I already have a rare
opportunity to serve Michigan
and the nation as HUD
secretary, Romney said. The
president has indicated to me
that as far as he is concerned, he
would like to see me remain in
the cabinet.

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SHRIMP 1.60 2.10 Clam Sauce t-* manicotti 2 44 e e
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General Erwin N. Griswold refused to sign the
brief.
Justice Black held however that the court found
no indication in the law that Congress intended to
allow the draft boards to deprive otherwise qualified
students of their deferments for the reasons relied
upon.
<
The court acknowledged that the law prohibits
prior court challenges for ordinary inductions to
prevent the draft machinery from being snarled by a
deluge of individual court suits.
But it cited a ruling of last term which protected
the deferment status involving a divinity student.
The law specifically exempts divinity students.
The court said it saw no difference between this
type of special exemption and a student deferment.
There is... no statutory scheme to permanently
exempt certain individuals while only deferring
service for others, Justice Hugo L. Black wrote in
the majority opinion.
Both deferments and exemptions accomplish the
same congressional purpose, that of not inducting
certain registrants at a particular time.
The court ruled last Monday that local selective
service boards have no authority to speed up
induction of antiwar protesters to punish them as
draft delinquents.
Referring to last terms divinity student decision,
the court held Monday:
We are consequently unable to distinguish this
case from the 1968 case. In both situations a draft
registrant who was required by the relevant law not
to be inducted was in fact ordered to report for
military service.
In both cases the order for induction involved a
clear departure by the board from its statutory
mandate.
The opinion said the law should not have been
construed to require the registrants to submit to
induction or risk criminal prosecution to test the
legality of the induction order. The cases arose
because of selective service policy allowing a
challenge to induction only as a defense to a
criminal prosecution for refusing induction or by a
habeas corpus suit after a youth was in uniform.

Pope Paul Proclaims
New Catholic Saint

VATICAN CITY (UPI) The
newest Roman Catholic saint
was a 19th Century nun with
two characteristics Pope Paul VI
admires.
He paid tribute to the
humility and charity of Maria
Soledad Torres Acosta of Spain
when he proclaimed her a saint
Sunday in a canonization
ceremony in St. Peters Basilica.
The Pope cited the
characteristics he supported in
the lives of priests and nuns
detachment from ordinary life in
the world, dedication to charity
and profound and organic

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adherence to the holy church.
Maria Soledad, who died in
1887, at age 61, founded the
Congregation of the Sister
Servants of Mary. It still (daces
emphasis on visits to the poor.
The new saint began her work
in 1825 when she started visiting
the sick with six other nuns.
The order now has more than
2,600 nuns and operates 122
hospitals, clinics and other
establishments in Spain and the
Americas. More than 600 nuns
traveled to the Vatican to attend
the two-hour canonization
ceremony.

Page 5



Page 6

r i I ' i/v v ( M x

TO TEACHING COLLEGE
President Returns
To Keep Rapport
MOBILE, Ala. (UPI) For college administrators who want a
course in better understanding their students, one college president
suggests a return to the classroom as a teacher.
The president of Jesuit-run Spring Hill College, the Rev. William J.
Rimes, taught chemistry for 18 years before he was named president
in 1966. Now hes back lecturing in chemistry and supervising a
laboratory for four hours once a week.
It is good to be bade in the classroom thinking and talking in the
terms of my area of concentration, he said. It also keeps me in
much closer touch with the students.
He says his students were not in the least overawed at having the
college president as their instructor.
In fact, they merely wanted to know why Father Murray, our vice
president, had taken over so rapidly. A news report had mistakenly
listed Father Murray as the schools president.
He said administrators have found that teaching gives a better
perspective where their administrative jobs are concerned.
In the dassroom they are better able to evaluate student attitudes
and certainly a stronger rapport can be established between the
administrator-teacher and the student.
The president of the 1,000-student, liberal arts college also suggests
that administrators spend time at the campus center where they can
meet students in a relaxed atmosphere.
To educate students properly today, administrators, faculty and
staff should strengthen relations with students, he said.
After all, they are the chief concern of the college and the subject
of our teaching and administrative efforts. He says students have
changed sharply since he first began teaching.
They are more critical and, in many instances, justly so, of their
leaders and adult attitudes.

Principals Nix
Pledge
NEW YORK (UPI)
Principals of New York Citys 36
public high schools have been
urged by their professional
organization to discontinue the
classroom Pledge of Allegiance
in their schools.
The High School Principals
Association said it made the
recommendation, which will be
mailed Monday to principals,
because of a court case
challenging the daily ceremony.
.
The association said there is
no plan to suspend the pledge at
school assemblies and other
schoolwide gatherings.
Elementary schools are not
involved in the recommendation.
Dr. Nathan Brown, acting
superintendent of schools, said
he was disturbed by the
associations recommendation.
He said he would discuss the
legality of the move with the
state Education Department
Tuesday.
State regulations require that
New Yorks 240,000 high school
students offer the pledge and
salute the flag each morning.
However, many schools have not
observed the regulations.
The associations
recommendation resulted from a
Brooklyn federal court decision
handed down last month which
the city says it will not appeal.
Ruling in favor of two
12-year-old girls who challenged
school regulations, Judge Orrin
G. Judd temporarily enjoined
the Board of Education from
exercising the regulation that
students must leave the
classroom if they do not want to
pledge their allegiance.
The association said that the
Board of Education should now
make the choice.

Excuse me,
could you spare 8 cents
for an activity center?

I y Ip
*.
ip/
"" % X
v.
! 1 s ncjh* H wli only take 8 cents a day for eo< fi *t >j rf' *?:?
to make sure your university gets the Activity Center
i* needs. 8 cents isn't very much to brighten
a future for the U. of F. Vote Yes on Feb 4ih
Vote Yes on Feb. 4th

hirTna ill f linii fir
AgEAPP?
, , Y<2>U'f?e rTTute
WWmt.n

Scott OKs
'No Knock
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Republican Leader High
Scott Monday endorsed the
controversial no knock
authority in proposed legislation
dealing with drug abuse, saying
sob sisterism accounted for
much of the opposition.
The no knock authority
would give police the right to
crash into an apartment or other
suspected haven of suspected
narcotics pushers or wholesalers
before they could get rid of the
evidence.

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1 V IfTTTTT: ll
THERES A BIG WORLD
IN THE 1970 SEMINOLE
x
Sold 3-t the
v # i>' ite
i Jb nt Ih k
JMmmW'
Judy and David Rossi at their fall
M quarter trial.
*
\
Our little world extended far beyond Gainesville. What
some of us did as part of the Washington March in November
affected millions of Americans. Someone else in Washington
later pulled my birthday out of a fish bowl and told me when
Id join the Army.
Hundreds of us slept in mud and shivered by fires just to
hear the Stones at West Palm Beach. Judy and David Rossi
fought in Gainesville for some of our freedoms.
What somebody did to us at Auburn, Ala. broke a lot of
dreams. Playboy started the year by calling us number one.
Tom Slade said other things.
Our world isnt a little one. What effects our lives comes
from the rest of the world. It takes a big book to cover it all.
A book like the 1970 SEMINOLE, sold at the sign of
Aquarius.
Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., Mike Ri6h on the loose in Gators
November 14-16. first football loss at Auburn.
l|j|jjji|jitfiji
The Seminole. J. Wayne Reitz Union
M
,S please reserve copies of the 1970 Seminole B-S[ |.. .'. it .'v'S; v.'-J-' ''" .*, '." '>f\ >-- ''.^'; rf v;.-;',, 1
\M in my name. §£[
I have enclosed $ ($6.00 per copy) BE|
Name ~~~" ||jj||
!9f Student Number ~~ ||| % ; \ {->?:% f ; w'..V i* .*w '- ~?C ; v V '\ |
|9 City State & Zip K I
l3| You will be notified in the Alligator when the K| |
l c 3gj yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1970 Seminole. I
l|lf Rm. 330, JWRU. jK| I:;-

T mm**. Jmmmrf 27, tf7o, Tlw Firm niT^ii.

Page 7



\. The Florida Alligator, Tuasday, January 27,1970

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Tuition Raise Only sl9

MR. EDITOR:
I am a concerned freshman. For three
weeks I have listened to arguments in favor
of the February 4 Activities Center
referendum.
For three weeks I have listened with a
negative attitude. Being a member of the
Freshman Council, I feel I have been
exposed to more information regarding the
UAC proposal than the vast majority of the
students on this campus.
As a member of the Council, I voted
against its resolution supporting the
referendum. The resolution passed in spite
of my vote. I am now glad it did.
I have done a great injustice to the
proposed plan. The referendum is based on
a lot of ifs. Anything dealing with the
legislature of the State of Florida must be
considered a big if.

/ A I If 1
Tighten your belts

PE Opens Gates To Enjoyment, Fitness

MR. EDITOR:
In regards to the editorial A Phys Ed
Test?, apparently the opportunity to
express another's viewpoint as related to
the field of Health and Physical
Education is necessary so that
misconceptions might be clarified.
The article was based essentially on
the word education and the inability
to comprehend as to how one's
reasoning powers could be utilized in
physical education.
It is recognized that some individuals
have a difficult time attempting to cope
with the phys. ed. world. This is
unfortunate, for the final test is the
success with which one can pull lifes
ingredients together in a meaningful
whole.
Perhaps by many teachers and
* atike, wfcb issues as hi the article should be overlooked. But
such an approach is difficult because
there are students on this campus that
recognize physical education as being ***
important dement in their way of life.
As they gun an understanding of the
true objective of physical education,
they realize the importance of health
and physical education as open gates to
enjoyment, recreation, health and
fitness as well as, an emotional release
in relation to physical disorders such as
ulcers and hypertension as, in many
cases, brought on by emotional stress
and teoikNW> v,\

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Yes, the article has some degree of
merit in respect to phys. ed. Certainly
due to inadequate facilities and poor
instruction in this discipline as well as
other disciplines, and the weakness of
the professional people to change or
accept readily new ideas and concepts
worthy of the deepest intellectual
pursuit, the students along with lay
public and, too, some physical
educators speak against the profession.
However, such reasoning should be
directed to the inability of the
profession to visualize the needed
change to meet individual needs and
should NOT be directed to the
profession as such that it has no place in
the University Curriculum.
Obviously instruction should not be
one of a superficial nature, not one of
strict tradition, nor one of a stereotype
approach as has been used extensively in
the past and the present by many
instructors.
It is evident that the informed person
recognizes the depth that which
physical education can encompass as
concerned with other disciplines. For to
participate in such thinking of
mechanical and physiological pawing at
the door of acceptance in our present
physical education classes would be far
from the students capability of
comprehension.
Yea, too, to teach in tome respects
the dUfce of studying the rire of a

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

There is one certainty, however; the
legislature is planning to raise tuition at all
state institutions another twenty-five dollars
within the next three years.
They have promised that when this
increase takes effect, our tuition will only
be raised nineteen dollars if we, the
students ourselves, take the initiative by
voting Yes on February 4.
Whether or not such a promise holds any
water is hard to ascertain. Those that want
an activities center on this campus will take
that chance. We have all to gain and very
little to lose.
I will abide by the Freshman Council
resolution, and, in doing so, I urge all
concerned parties, especially the freshmen
who will be paying the most, to vote
Yes on the February 4 referendum.
ALLEN R. GROSS, lUC

regulation tennis court is apparently a
poor indication of what the students are
capable of learning. It is inconvenient
and unnecessary to learn such material
in many cases, but to attempt teaching
beyond such a level into one of even
general depth is said by students to be
too hard to understand.
However, this is the case because
they, as students, have never had the
opportunity to progress through a
program by which ones intelligent
involvement was measured as intensely
as their physical involvement.
Without a doubt, college students
want to learn how to adjust to
emotional and physical stresses. They
want realistic and dynamic programs to
perpetuate total growth, both physically
and mentally.
College students realize that ones
physical activity is of a personal choice
and must be consistent with his thiniring
to grasp and structure a logically
organized mature approach to maintain
physical and mental well-beiig.' ;iou
Apparently many individuals need to
redefine their definition of physical
education in regards to themselves as an
individual. The profession doesn't have
to argue that physical education is
educational. That is self-evident
However, by not having sufficient
bright, such statements as contained
within the article may influence
young boy or gul to abstain from

EDITORIALS
Nows The Time
We cant say we didnt expect it.
It has been no secret that Frank Maloney, dean of the
College of Law, has been in disfavor with the administration
for a long time.
And so he resigned Monday, after 12 years as dean.
In his own way, Dean Maloney did a good job. We have
not always supported him, nor his ideas.
We feel the College of Law could be a lot better than it is
now, and Dean Maloney could have contributed much to
the schools national reputation that he did not.
His reasons are his own.
But the future of UFs College of Law now rests in the
hands of UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
It is up to him to choose a man of progressive ideas, a
man willing to experiment with other than conservative and
provincial thought, a man of foresight and youthful
outlook.
In essence, it is up to OConnell to return this law school
to national stature.
If this law school is to change direction, something which
is of dire necessity, then it must be now and it must come
from OConnell.
We call upon him to look to the future, and to look
beyond the southeastern United States.
Theres a lot of new and different ideas out there that
havent reached this law school, or have been neatly filtered
out.
How long can we continue to hide from them?
Well tell you... for just as long as you say, President
OConnell.
An About-Face
Remember last year when there was little apparent
opposition to the University Activities Center and various
groups were dramatizing their needs for the complex?
Remember how the Interfratemity Council cried about
the terrible seating accommodations in Florida Gym for
their Frolics performances? They even went so far as to
sponsor a concert in Florida Field to raise money for the
center.
And it rained.
This was even more justification for a mass-seating
facility on the campus and the IFC was quick to admit it.
They knew of the need from first-hand experience the
rained-out Rascals concert and crowded Frolics.
But when the time comes for groups to take a stand on
the referendum we expected IFC to be one of the first to
jump in line for the center.
For some reason, however, they opposed the UAC.
IFC should be commended to an extent for taking a
stand on a current issue, for a change, but we wonder how
they of all groups can justify their stand.

activity altogether.
Naturally, such isnt a complete
breaking point, but consider the factor
that only through proper involvement,
as in an activity of some type, was he or
she able to enhance a positive
self-image; thus, allowing for greater
fulfillment in other areas of life; or,
influenced others to avoid tike
development of then philosophy in
relationship to then involvement and
the implications for their own health
and fitness.
It seems probable, if real progress is
to be made in an area of great concern
by many, the truth must prevail without
the existence of undesirable and
uninformed small talk. The student
must not be deprived or divorced from
being physically active by adhering to
the physically frustrated, disinterested
few.
To educate in physical education will
mean: to provide in depth facts about
interrelated sciences concerning health
and physical education; to hopefully
educate students to find themselves; to
elaborate on methods by which students
individual needs can be met
successfully; and, yes, to allow each
person the opportunity to
Ksat degree of health and fitness as
pert of then everyday growth and
maturity.
WILLIAM THOMAS BOONE
INSTRUCTOR



Coliseum,
Nafatorium,
Nothing Else
MR. EDITOR:
The proposed Activity Center
is to be composed of four
separate buildings. (1)
natatorium (2) performing arts
theater (3) amphitheater (4)
coliseumm. Does UF need all
four of these buildings?
The university could use a
natatorium. The pool now used
is old and outdoors, which
makes swimming meets and
practice very difficult on cold
days. The natatorium would be
very beneficial and helpful for
this university.
Do we really need a
performing arts theater? I say
NO. What is the purpose of
Constans Theater? What will
become of it if the new
performing arts theater is built?
If Constans Theater isnt large
enough for certain
performances, then the new
coliseum could be used.
Why an amphitheater? I can
see nothing beneficial in this
structure. It will be $500,000
wasted. It will be used very
rarely and then only if the
weather is good. If an outdoor
performance is necessary, then
Florida Field could be used.
The UF definitely needs a
Coliseum. Florida Gym has been
long outdated. Not only would
this give the Florida basketball
team a place to play, but also it
would give us a place for
Graduation Exercises, Frolics
and performances too large for
Constans Theater.
Could the ballot for February
4, 1970 be changed? Let the
ballot give each student the
opportunity to vote on each
building separately.
Not only would this let the
news media know what the
students want most but also it
would give the students a voice
in spending our money, since we
will be paying for 1/3 of the
complex, if the referendum is
passed.
Instead of spending money on
an amphitheater and a
performing arts theater, this
school and state could spend
money more wisely by replacing
Floyd, Flint, Bryan, Peabody,
Walker, Rolf, and Newell Halls
and also by replacing the shacks
known as Buildings C, D, I, R
and Grove Hall.
Student Government, if you
are really interested in being for
the students, give us a chance to
vote on each building of the
activity center complex
separately.
DAN CALLAHAN, 4AS

Substitutes Wont Accomplish PEs Goals

MR. EDITOR:
By your perfidy you have tried to
roake the students of this University
believe that physical education is
worthless and has no place in an
academic university such as ours.
You state at times that you want the
facts. The following are some excerpts
b y learned individuals concerning
physical education and the reason for it
bein g at any university, college or
school.
Physical fitness is not only one of
jh* most important keys to a healthy
it is the basis of dynamic and

There is no hope
for the complacent man.

20 Hours Os Foreign Language

MR. EDITOR:
The following is an open
letter to the Chairman of the
College of Arts and Sciences:
I challenge you and everyone
else who advocates the
language proficiency
requirement to justify imposing
it upon students at the
undergraduate level of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
How can you possibly justify
asking a student to spend twenty
of his 186 credit hours studying
a foreign language? Studying a
foreign language is good for the
student, you say. How? If you
attempt to justify it by saying
that it promotes self-discipline
and concentrated effort, then 1
ask you whether or not other
courses (in ones field) could
accomplish the task equally well.
(1 would suggest that a
negative response to this
question indicates a need for
revision of course content in
other areas.)
Since virtually all of the great
works are translated into
English, what would an
undergraduate student with only
a command of English be
missing? Well, he would not be
able to drop neat foreign phrases
in social conversations, that is
true.
Neither would he have the
pride and pleasure (?) of saying,

creative intellectual activity. This
statement was made by the late John F.
Kennedy.
A well-known heart doctor who
attended the late President Eisenhower
- Paul Dudly White, M.D., has stated
that exercise is, Mans Best Medicine.
John Mayer, Ph.D., D.Sc. at Harvard
Univeisity, a known nutrition researcher
states:
Inactivity is the most important
factor explaining the frequency of
creeping overweight in modem
Western society. Strenuous exercise
on an irregular basis in untrained
individuals already obese is

Speaking Out

MR. EDITOR:
I have been charged, tried and found guilty of
political opportunism by this newspaper. In order
for this decision to come about, I have been
misquoted, my arguments disavowed, and have had
fabricated statements put into my mouth.
The students, however, have a right to know what
is really going on, and its about time they were able
to hear the story straight.
Three months ago I spoke to the editor of this
paper in relation to the proposed activities center,
and at the time expressed my dissatisfaction with
the use of students paying for its completion.
At that time I was asked the question (heard
many times since), if we dont pay for it, who
will? But there is another question that should be
asked: What of all the other things this university
needs even more, i.e. higher salaries for recruiting
good professors and new equipment? The answer
they give: well worry about that later!
How can any member of this university
community honestly believe that this activities
center is the panacea of our problems and will be
the most significant achievement in making this a
first rate university?
Are we not all too concerned with new buildings
and not near enough concerned about what goes on
inside them? Florida has been called by many, a
cultural and academic desert, however, we are told

I attended the University of
Florida which requires the
proficiency of a foreign
language.
Yet, I believe that most
students would be willing to
forego these small pleasures in
exchange for a twenty hour
refund to be spent studying
subjects in which they are
genuinely interested.
Is it possible that this
so-called student-oriented
university is retaining the

UAC-- Top Priority?

obviously not what is advocated
here. But a reorganization of ones
life to include regular exercise
adapted to ones physical
potentialities is a justified return to
the wisdom of the ages.
Here at UF we have an adapted
physical education program that has
included within it, weight-training
classes and diets for the obese as well as
the underweight students.
Our program is also concerned with
the physically and medically
handicapped. Many of the students in
this program would never participate if
it was voluntary. These same individuals
? ' *v .** : (

language requirement in order to
enhance the schools prestige?
If so, is it more important
that the school carry a tough
label than for it to meet the
actual needs of the students who
attend it?
(Incidentally, if the schools
reputation is the primary
concern, I suggest that greater
emphasis be put on English so
that distinguished graduates
and employees of the institution
will know better than to make

TiMMtay, January 27,1970, Tha Florida AWipatar,

the activities center will change that perhaps as
much as the loyalty oath. Where is our sense of
priorities of what a university should be?
Two months ago, when I went to the Student
Senate to fight against the complex, I was told, by
the powers that be, they had deckled an activities
center was what the students need and that is what
they are going to get... and no one is going to say
otherwise.
At the time I also attempted to have two
questions put on the ballot: (1) Do you want an
activities center? (2) Should the students pay for it?
The way the resolution is now worded, the student
loses however he votes. (Remember if you vote no
youre not a Good Gator!)
The Alligator has accused me of political
opportunism and has fabricated statements such
as FBK Stand Slapped OConnell, a figment of
some writers imagination.
I am proud to be a member of FBK, especially
when, as in this case, it lives up to its obligation to
be a leadership organization; but I neither speak for
the entire organization nor have I ever claimed to.
Again, I was asked to comment on the resolution
by this paper.
If political opportunism means speaking against
an issue that the Florida Alligator favors, then so be
it. But, Id rather be called that than sit back and
watch a system that is so inbred once again tell me
what I need!

are elated by the progress and
accomplishments they attain.
The American Medical Association
passed a resolution that they were in
favor of physical education programs
being a part ofeyery school arid college.
There are no substitute courses for
physical education. You don't
accomplish the same objectives or meet
the same needs by substituting courses
of the type that were recommended as
personal development courses by the
Curriculum Committee.
WALTER R. WELSCH
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
''**> *
*i*4 i a t

By Steve Zack =

such errors as real Fine team,
feel badly about losing, and
good bunch of players.
I believe that the
undergraduate students who are
required to learn a foreign
language have a right to question
this requirement and to receive
more thoughtful explanations
than Thats the way it has
always been, or We have to
keep our standards high.
MICHAEL KUEHR, 4AS

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

IP FOR SALE |
1969 HONDA 50 cc Like New.
Less than 300 miles. Need
Money. Best Offer. Call
392-8949. (A -68-st-p).
650 CC Rigid frame Triumph Rebuilt
engine New paint, Beautiful. Call
373-1610 afternoon and night.
(A-3t-73-p).
Vox "Wyman" bass guitar. 1 year
old, used only 6 mos. S4OO original
cost, sell for S2OO. Hard shell case
Included. 392-8365. (A-st-73-p).
Yamaha 250 Big Bear Scrambler.
Smith Corona Portable Electric
Typewriter PH. 392-8702 After 9
PM. (A-73-lt-p).
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-73-lt-p).
Moving Must Sell Refrig, Washer,
Dryer, Desk, Chair, day beds, dresser,,
single bed. Call 376-9845 Between
5:30 8:00 PM. (A-st-73-p).
1966 VW Good condition very clean,
radio heater large tires. Beige. Call
after 5:30 P.M. 462-2792.
(A-3t-73-p).
Fender Jazzbass with case and
accessories Ex. Con. $250 Bassman
amp 2 12" speakers $350 378-8670
Arnie. (A-st-73-p).
Honda 50 Excellent Condition.
Florida Tag. S9O or closest offer. Call
372- (A-2t-73-p).
Complete golf set. Matched set of
spaulding aluminum irons; 2 thru 9.
Wilson aluminum woods 1,3, 4. SSO
Wilson bag. Need money. Steal at
$150.00 Call evenings at 392-8223.
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373- (A-66-10t-p).
Martin 0018 C guitar & hardshell case
$175. Sherwood fm tuner 75
Lafayette 160 watt amp 80 two ar4x
speakers 90 german lute 150
372-7024 after 5. (A-st-69-p)
4-drawer file cabinet good cond. S2O.
175 cc Bultaco campera 67 a steal at
$225. 813 S.E. 2nd Ave. Apt. A.
(A-st-69-p)
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut & assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
$32.50. JR Office Furniture Co. 620
S. Main St.. Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-10t-C)
Self-contained travel trailer, has hot
and cold pressurized water, gas stove
w/ oven, and gas-electric refrigerator
and heater. Extras. 372-7332.
(A-70-st-p)
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
STEREO COMPONENTS ADC
speakers, 75 watt AM FM
Stereo receiver, two months old,
call 378-6761 after 5.
(A-71-3t-p).
3 8 SPECIAL 3/4 In. Barrel,
nickel plated, holster and box
of ammo. Asking $65.00 Call
378-7953. Ask for STEVE.
(A-71-3t-p).
G.E. TELEVISION with Stand
2l" Screen B&W
Good Condition s4O Call
378-9344. (A-71-3t-p).
350 cc HONDA SCRAMBLER
196 9 2,200 miles $625 or best
offer call 378-5192 after 5 or
weekends. (A-71-st-p).
12 STRING BY MIGUEL HEIS made
them for Feliciano and Fred Neil.
S6OO. Call Paul at 378-7943.
(A-72-st-p) x
1969 Honda CL9O like new. Must
sell. $250 or best offer. Call Paul
372-0672 or see at 210 NE 10th Ave.
(A-72-3t-p)
1967 Honda 90 Excellent
condition S2OO. Call 372-9167
after 5 p.m. Ask for Bob. (A-72-2t-p)

jjjl 25 V MRT
ADM $1.50 BI ^ ' 2IoS?JOJE3 S
]l (VKtJUtEIX C h l Tts FIHKiPPH^^I
KATHARIN6 H6PBURN
M||HttO C KIN AI R - jak
-

{7 "rotSMi""" I '' |
THIS WEEK ONLY 10% OFF TO
STUDENTS! Our prices are always
lowest but this week save additional
money on purchase of used or
standard typewriters. Royals,
Underwoods, Remingtons & SCMs.
Fully guaranteed. From $29.50 to
$139.50. JR Office Furniture Co.,
620 S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-st-C)
COMP STEREO SACRIFICE Craig
Deck, Dyna amp, criterion speakers,
36000 ft. scotch tape cost SSOO in
Aug., sell for $375. Perfect Call
Mac 373-2394. (A-72-3t-p)
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon installed, &
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$22.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-C).
Seiberian huskeys for sale
378-3568. (A-69-3t-p)
| FOR RENT
ipocoe e v--.-.-:->x-XxX-x.xo.x.w-sw-%v-sv! : :
Sublet 1 large bedroom apartment.
Close to campus, air & heat. Call
376-8061 daily and at 372-1338 on
weekends. Only $110.50 per month.
(3-lt-73-p).
Sublease Furnished apartment 3
blocks from campus $95 a month, air
all electric. Call 378-7635 or come
by evenings. 1716 N. W. 3rd Ave.
Apt. 17. (B-3t-73-p).
Sublet: Beautiful 2 bd. furn.
apt., AC & heat carpeted. $155
mo. or will consider 3rd male
roommate (grad pf) Come to
835 N.E. 4th Ave. after 6
P.M. (B-71-st-p).
4 Bedroom house in N.W. area,
central air and heat, fireplace,
S2OO. Call anytime 373-1747.
(B-7 l-st-p).
Unique one bedroom apt. Panelled
walls. Mediterranean furniture.
Private patio. Central A C. In country
setting l*/2 mi. from Med. Center.
Rent sll-5. Couples only. 378-3571.
After 5 please call 378-0969.
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student couple only. $55 per month
for long-term tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 372-9903.
(B-70-st-p)
Male roommate needed to share
a well-furnished 2 bdrm. apt.
Apply in person at French
Qtr. 81. (B-69-4t-p).
Sublet till June 15. Lg. 2 Bdrm. Apt.
Central Heat & A.C. (Very) close to
campus. ($145. mo) Call EMMY
378-7467. (B-68-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo.. Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
.J.X-X-X-X-X*XW X-XX-X-X-X-SN X-X-X-X-X'C'>;
WANTED |
w-x-sxw*x-x-x-x-x-x-x-vx*x-x-x-x-xm-ssv
Wanted Male Roommate Wtr. and
Spr. qtrs. SSO + util. 5 min. walk to
campus, immediate occupancy. Call
Pete 378-6024 or leave word
Alligator newsrm. (C-4t-73-p).
Female roommate Landmark Apts.
We have everything but you. Color
tv, dishwasher, pool, kinkajoo. All
deposits paid. $46.25 mo. 378-3518.
(C-3t-73-p).
Roommate wanted to share large
home distant from UF. Heat-but-heat
proof. See at 2110 NE 12th St or call
Danny for details. 373-1670. $64
mo. (C-72-st-p)
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. Jan rent free.
Central air and heat. $43.50/mo. Call
Herb 376-6361. (C-72-st-p)
Roommate wanted: Plush
University Gardens apt. Sin City
Immediate Occupancy. Furnished.
Pool. SSO. a month. 378-7649,
372-5978. (C-71-st-p).

The

Page 10

1 WANTED
2 roomies to share campy new 12X70
mobile palace. Private bdrm., central
heat/air, pool, stereo, color TV. $65,
split utilities. Jan. free. 372-1702.
(C-70-st-p)
Female roommates to share 3
bedroom house. NW section. Own
room. Central heat and air. Car
necessary. SSO/month. 373-1027.
(C-70-4t-p)
The Program office, J. Wayne
Reitz Union, is trying to locate
old recordings of songs popular
in the twenties and thirties for
a program scheduled this Spring.
Contact Pat ONeill, 392-1655.
(C-71-3t-p).
Female roommate wanted to share
two bedroom apt. Landmark no. 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-70-st-p)
HELP WANTED |
v
>^.-. .v;-;->:-: ;->x<.v.*.*.*.vx*x-x-x.w.v.v;-:-:-;-; JS
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT in
Yellowstone and all U.S. National
Parks. Booklet tells where and how
to apply. Send SI.OO to Arnold
Agency, 206 East Main, Rexburg,
Idaho 83440. Moneyback guarantee.
(E-72-6t-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open
in the Business and
Administration Offices of
Student Publications. Call Mr.
My king at 392-1681 between
the hours of 8 and 5. An
Equal Opportunity Employer.
(E-ts-73-c).
LAST 4 DAYS
WALT DISNEY
LAST 4 DAYS
M4kll4Sl x, I jiui
I ws h. w. im st.
JT FABOPiriii
/boot!J!ls4
//FAR MORE!
I James Bond^iTf
l\ bwcn 113 mil
Diwliw EriawWi
f "Makes
/ Hu h mX
£ Hefner's
J Pleyboy Jp
\ look like jjjL A*
a nursery C
schooll"
T IJf 1
theJibertlNE

Triumph TR 4, 1964 Blue
w/wlre wheels, good top,
tonneau, radio, demountable
luggage rack, 81 roll bar: Very
good cond. Call 372-7980.
(G-71-st-p).
1966 Karmann Ghia convertible.
Runs perfectly. AM-FM radio, new
brakes and tires. (Has a great
personality) SBOO or best offer. Call
378-0156 and ask for Larry.
(G-st-6 9-p)
1965 Chevy SS, automatic, air
cond., power steering, brakes.
Only 34,000 well kept miles.
Call 372-6652. (G-71-st-p).
1967 Sprite. Excellent condition.
Tonneau, 22,000 miles, radio,
$l,lOO. Call 378-9004. (G-st-69-p)
Must sell 1967 Pontiac Catalina
Convertible full equipment with
air, best offer takes it!
373-2747 373-1573 422 S.E.
Bth St. Apt. D. (G-70-st-p).

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline >3OO pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* U> IO ~ r.
I I l | l| £
~~ ~ z
> 1 ' '"
Q
>
W A W W -
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| AUTOS I
9 9
1965 Comet Caliente 4 speed mag
and chrome reverse wheels 289 4
barrel. $995. Notify Brad Lohmann
l3 Frat Row Call 376-9271.
(G-7 2-st-p)
PERSONAL
;. .vMwWWXvywv.v.vA^v.vX-XWv
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress & Sportswear by KATHLEEN
OF YORKSHIRE, Phone 378-0320.
(J-st-69-p)
An experience not to be
forgotten Hear GERT
BEHANNA at University
Lutheran Church, 1826 W.
Univ., Tues. Jan 27, 8 P.M.
(J-71-3t-p).
60 day tour of England,
student organized, and
unchaperoned, Food, and shelter
plus round trip air fare limited
enrollment $615 Phone
372-8841. (J-71-st-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
v
U.A.C. In the sky with diamonds
18 million of them. My kaleidoscope
eves tell me It looks more like a glass
onion. C.D.P.U.A.C. & Mayors C.
(J-lt-73-p).
GAINESVILLE SINGLES CLUB
WELCOMES YOU. Come to the
mixer for adult singles at the
Winjammer tonight 8:00 PM on.
(J-lt-73-p).
GIRLS!! Do YOU have what it
takes...? If so. y u ma y be
eligible to be a TIDY TIGER!
The maid service of last
quarter is now expanding. Due
to copyright, problems, we're
now the Tigress Co-ed Maid &
Hostessing Service. Call Nancy
or Lisa for details. 373-2760.
(J-70-st-p).
JEANNIE, why stop at a phone call?
The months have passed but the lines
are still open. Ed. (J-72-3t-p)
German shepherds 9 weeks AKC
best champion stock. Show or pet
quality. $125. 372.-4653. (J-72-st-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates In
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 80309. (J-68-lOt-p).

1 Listen Here! I
I WUWU R<,di I
DIAL 1390
I Take an Entertainment Break 1
ICA PATRONIZE
Unra if mKmMm
I JLjJjj ADVERTISERS?
H There are lots of good reasons. They are a special I
group of people, who advertise in our Gator be- I
cau se they like doing business with UF students, I
they deal in the goods and services that we spec- I
ifically want, and they know this is the best way
to get their message across to us. Most of all, I
their advertising contributes to The Alligators I
success, so they are as much a part of The Alii- I
q ator gang as the editor and the staff. If we, the I
students, are the backbone of the university news news
news paper, then the advertise!* are the life s blood. I
So do business with them. They're on our side. I

PERSONAL §
Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-lOt-p).
Chatterbox 4551 N.W. 6th
Street. Two Happy hours every
day 5:30 6:30 AND 9:00
10:00. 12 oz Draft of Bud
or Miller 20c. (J-70-3t-p).
Captain Louie's is now delivering
chicken, shrimp, fish, oysters, frog
legs, and other great treasure chests
on campus. 4 to 9 p.m. Call
372-3546. (J-72-st-p)
1965 Impala Conv. Red r-h a-c new
top new paint. $875. Call 378-6292
after 2:00 Mon. thru Wed. Not in on
Thur. thru Sun. (G-72-3t-p)
1964 COMET Caliente, 3 speed
6 cyl. Extra clean throughout
drafted make offer call
376-0336 (G-71-st-p).
Travel in Europe for academic credit.
6 weeks, 7 countries, jet crossing,
private Coach, excellent
accomodations, low cost, loans
available. Small U F group lead by
highly experienced graduate couple.
Arrangements by World Academy.
Call for booklet. 372-5489.
(J-70-6t-p)

Tuesday, January 27,1970, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL
!' X
y.NvMwxwxwy.y.v.ttvw-wxwX'K'
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-c).
f LOST FOUND |
ft
FOUND: Male puppy about 10 wks.
old area of sth Ave and Bth St.
Call 373-2513. (L-72-3t-nc)
LOST: Boys prescription glasses.
Brown frames. Lost near Peabody
Hall. 1/22/70 PLEASE CALL
376-9129. (L-3t-73-p).
Will the boy who asked Terry Clay to
hold his G.M. car keys while playing
football Sunday afternoon Please call
378-8120. (L-3t-73-nc).
FOUND One set of eight car keys (2
Mustang) on pink powder puff key
ring. Call Karen at 378-9157.
(L-3t-73-nc).

Page 11

SERVICES I
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrtcal Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-C)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)

Nonusormnlmr
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER I
'A BROILED CHICKEN
$1.09 I
WEDNESDAY I
LUNCH AND DINNER I
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN I
Tomato Sauca and
Spaghetti QQA I
GAINESVILLE MALL I
rllMMi |li
& IFEE?&%£riLJI I ' e RE,VEns "I
I
Mw* butch if we
;.HHP have to go
' INSHOOTINI
. i J
-- --'. 2S v
m t I*mK\ >jrk ;t^
*77*. c -.' -3L \m--3
-* - /.' W ms
i|m /v
TJa *" v v>'
2flHi Cpntu'y Fob PrtMnii
ROBERT ROSS I
PERSONS
KSpRippJfTfBH UNDER 17
NOT^JWIITTED
KdrT # I 9 jifl PROOF OF
age
[HI trHU required
1 I

^V^*X*>XW>XWVA%VWvw*
SERVICES i
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
Happiness Is getting your
eyeglasses at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive
your own waiting room to
University Opticians at 519 S.W.
4th Ave. Across from
Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th Street 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-71-3t-p).



m~

Page 12

and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

GRE APPLICATION
DEADLINE DATE: Feb. 3 is
the last day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N.J. 08540, of the
Registration Form to take the
Feb. 28 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee. GRE application
booklets can be obtained in
Room 235, Tigert Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM-is Saturday, Jan. 31, at
8:30 a.m. in Room 207, Leigh
Hall. The exam is in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish.
PREMEDICAL AND
PREDENTAL STUDENTS must
register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education,
Room 105 Anderson Hall, Jan.
12-30. Bring full names of your
instructors and course and
section numbers.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be on Thursday,
Feb. 5, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
235, Tigert Hall.
ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
test as listed. Each student must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium
MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 7 p.m in Little Hall, Rooms
101,109,13,121, and 125.
CPS 122 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, Feb. 5,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13,14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium, T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to

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H jg|p 1m ygX J \\ UNION is for!
m Gainesville Florida campus federal credit union

Administrative Notices

Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 1, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 19;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102, 110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 113 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CSS 116 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
7 p.m. in Peabody 201, 202,
205, and 208.
UNIVERSITY SENATE will
meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 29, in McCarty Auditorium.
The following items are on the
agenda:
ACTION ITEMS
1. From the University
Curriculum Committee:
1. Revised Departmental
Curricula for the College of
Engineering
2. Proposed Curriculum
Improvements in Music Major
Programs
3.) Proposed
Afro-American Studies Program
4.) Proposal for
Experimentation with Innovated
Programs
5.) Degree Revisions in
Industrial and Chemical
Engineering
2. Resolution pertaining to
the University Activities Center
3. Oral Report from the
Salary and Fringe Benefits
Committee
4. Report from Committee
on Honorary Degrees
INFORMATION ITEMS
1. From President O'Connell:
Senate Action of Physical
Education and Personal
Development Courses (Note:
This has been referred by the
Steering Committee to the
University Curriculum
Committee with the request that
a recommendation be presented
at the earliest possible date.)
2. Annual Report of the
University of Florida Press
3. Annual Report of the
Research Council
4. Annual Report of the
University Curriculum
Committee
FUTURE ACTION ITEM
1. Proposed amendments to
the University of Florida

BLUE BULLETIN

Constitution.
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, co-educational
honorary service organization,
will be holding its winter
membership social Jan. 29, at

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, January 27
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 8t 4:00 p.m.
Union Lecture, Coliseum Forun,
Union Aud., 4:00 p.m
Committee to Defeat Proposed
University Activities Center,
346 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting on
Poultry, Air Force ROTC
Library, 7:30 p.m
Public Relations Student Society
of America Rush Smoker,
123 Union, 7:30 p.m
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: Florida Baroque
Ensemble, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m
Wednesday, January 28
Student Agricultural Council
Meeting, McCarty Hall Cons.
Room, 5:00 p.m.
Sigma Nu Chapter Meeting, 362
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Accent 70 Lecture: Edward
Teller, Union Ballroom, 8:00
p.m

I We help build I
I better business 4 ways I

I Like bringing the product or service to
I the student. We help thousands of
I students find what they want through
I advertising.
I Like uniting the academic and business
I communities. The two worlds most
I students live in come together on our
pages.
I Like letting the student compare before
1 he chooses. We help students plan their
I time and expenses. We help them save
i money.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

7:30 p.m in room 123, Reitz
Union. Students interested in
doing service for the University
and community are invited to
attend. For more information,
call Richard Spool, 378-0529.

Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m
Cinema Classic Club Meeting,
Choosing Union Films, 123
Union, 7:30 p.m
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m
Audubon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer: Wilfred E. Gray,
"Four Seasons," Union Aud.,
8:00 p.m
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m
Mensa Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 p.m
Thursday, January 29
Union Poetry Series, Peter Lisca,
122 Union, 4:00 p.m
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m
Student Contractors and
Builders Association Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m
Gamma Beta Phi Society Social,
123 Union, 7:30 p.m
Political Science Lecture: Mr.
Leopold Tyrmand, "La Dolce
Vita Communist Style,"
Norman Aud., 8:00 p.m
Propeller Club Meeting, 118

And like making business more responsive
to the needs of their customers. We help
them to find out what the student wants.
Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
If you've got something to offer...so do we.
The
Florida
Alligator
An ACP-rated All-American College Daily

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA
CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION'S annual membership
meeting will be Tuesday, Jan. 27
at 8 p.m. in the Medical Science
Building Auditorium.

Union, 8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, "Ewing Street
Times," 8:30 and 10:30 p.m.
Friday, January 30
Varsity Rifle Team Matches,
Tampa, Florida 8:00 a.m.
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Union Movie: "Planet of the
Apes," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Veterans Club Meeting,
Rathskeller, 7:00 p.m.
Muslim Student Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, "Ewing Street
Times," 8:30, 10:30 & 12:30
p.m.
Union Dance, "The Jades,"
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
Audubon Wildlife Films, U.
of F. Students, SI.OO, GP,
$1.50, HS Students, $.50;
Series of 5 films, U. of F.
Students, $4.00, GP, $6.00,
HS Students, $2.00.
Rathskellef Membership:
$2.00.



The
Florida
Alligator

SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS

Dickey: Man Os Confidence

Three weeks ago nobody
could have told me that next
years Gator football stalwarts
could win the SEC
championship, especially after
the weird resignation of Ray
Graves and hiring of Tennessee
head coach Doug Dickey
following the Gator victory in
the Gator Bowl over Dickeys
SEC champs.
Well, now Im convinced,
since talking with Coach Dickey
last week, that the
sophomore-sensations-tumed sophomore-sensations-tumedjunior-supermen
junior-supermen sophomore-sensations-tumedjunior-supermen may walk off
with the SEC crown and who
knows, maybe a national
championships
That may sound unbelievable,
but one has to meet Didrey to
believe such statements.
Dickey didnt tell me
anything about his hopes for
next season. He didnt have to.
Everything the man says, every
mannerism about him is
brimming with confidence.
When I asked him what he
thought about the way some of
Floridas sports writers and
sportscasters, many of whom
probably gave Graves the most
troubles during his 10 years as
head coach, had expressed their
profound grievances over his
appointment and Graves
resignation, Dickey merely
scoffed it off as being the nature
of reporters.
As for the reaction of many
of the players, notably just
about everybodys All-American
Carlos Alvarez, Dickey said that
he thought that it was a natural
reaction expressing a loyalty to
coaches who they had come to
know, giving me the impression
that if he were Alvarez he would
probably have responded in a
similar manner.

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Its time to get to work,
Dickey told me, and he has
already got the players hopping
on an off-season training
program. Dickey added that
spring was only a month away
and that he wanted the team in
shape and ready to go.
As far as Dickey is concerned
all of the trouble over his
coming bade to his alma mater
may as well have happened
twenty years ago.
The most important thing to
me right now is today, Dickey
said, putting much emphasis on
today.
Coach Dickey may be worried
about today, but more than
anything he is glad to be back
home.
Gregg Nixes
UF Position
Ex-Green Bay Packer star
Forrest Gregg Sunday night
declined to accept a position on
Doug Dickeys coaching staff at
theUF.
Gregg, who is an assistant
coach with the Packers, said he
talked it over with Green Bay
head coach Phil Bengston
Saturday and decided to stay
with the Packer organization.
Gregg was also offered a job
in 1964 by Dickey, who was the
head coach at Tennessee, but
also turned that offer down.
Bengston had named Gregg an
assistant coach in February of
1969, but the 36-year-old
veteran returned as a player last
season following the retirement
of other veteran linemen.
He said he had not yet
reached a final decision about
playing again next season.

KEN MCKINNON >

The strangeness of coming
back after so many years is
beginning to wear off. Im
enjoying being in Gainesville
again more and more everyday.

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And you get a removable
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tom bottom of every bottle, a

; Gators lose Close One
To Ole Miss, 79-77
I
OXFORD, Miss. (UPI) Ron Coleman sank two free throws with
three seconds left Monday night to give the Mississippi Rebels a 79-77
come-from-behind Southeastern Conference basketball victory over
Florida.
.The Rebels, trailing 36-33 at the half, finally caught up with 14:40
left when Coleman hit on a jump shot. From that point on it was nip
and tuck, Florida the visitors usually keeping a one-point edge.
With 1:10 to go, Coleman hit on a three-point play to give the Rebs
a brief lead at 76-7 S. Then forward Tom Butler of Mississippi made
one of two free throws to make it 77-75 with 45 seconds left.
The clock showed 18 seconds remaining when Gator forward Tom
Purvis scored on a tip-in. Coleman was then fouled to set up his
winning shots.

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§
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Page 13



Page 14

L The Florida Alligator, Tueaday, January 27,1970

Tannen Awaits Draft Verdict

Steve Tannen, UFs
All-American defensive back, is
nervously awaiting todays
results of the 17-round two day
annual football draft of college
players being held at the
Belmont Plaza Hotel in New
York City.
It has been rumored' that
Tanned will be picked 23rd in
the first round by the Dallas
Cowboys.
Id love to play for the
Cowboys, Tannen said. They
were in touch with me more
than any of the other pro
dubs.
Tannen also expressed an
interest in the New York Jets
who talked with him at length
after his excellent showing in
Tampas All-American Bowl
Game on Jan. 10.
If he is picked in the first
round Tannen doesnt know
how much money he will ask
for.
I really dont know much
about those kind of things,
Tannen said. I*ll have to talk
with somebody who knows
something about it after this
draft riling is all over.
Ill tell you one thing, Ill ask
for more than $5, Tannen
added.

Pros Prepare For Draft
Steelers Get First Pick

NEW YORK (UPI)
Representatives of pro footballs
26 teams arrived in New York
Monday to complete
preparations for the annual draft
of college players which begins
Tuesday at 10 a. m.
The Pittsburgh Steelers have
first choice in this years draft,
having finished tied with
Chicago at 1-3 for the worst
record in pro football and
winning a coin toss with the
Bears for the first pick.
Chicago traded its choice to
Green Bay, which will select
second, with three American
conference teams Miami,
Boston and Buffalo following
in order.
Philadelphia will draft sixth,
followed by Cincinnati, St.
Louis, San Francisco, New
Orleans, Denver, Atlanta and the
New York Giants. Houston is
next, followed by San Diego,
Green Bay, San Francisco (using
THE SWINGS
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Gainesville Airport
gmm Waldo Road

DALLAS COWBOYS INTERESTED

Terry Bradshaw, a solid
215-pound quarterback from
Louisiana Tech considered by
talent scouts to be the best
passer to come out of college
since Joe Namath, will be the
probable no. 1 pick.
Bradshaw, a 6-foot-3-inch
senior, heads a list of 442

DEFENSIVE BACK STEVE TANNEN
... listed as a top draft prospect

a choice obtained from
Washington), Baltimore, Detroit,
the New York Jets, Cleveland,
Los Angeles, Dallas, Oakland,
Minnesota and Kansas City. The
teams draft in inverse order of
their final standing, with the
exception of Minnesota and

Miss Seminole
applications may be
I r \ J
picked up in
Student Publications
office- tbey must be
returned February 6
with 8 x lO pboto and
$5 entry fee.
Entering organizations
can sponsor more than
one candidate..

collegians expected to be drafted
during the two-day player
selections at the Belmont Plaza
Hotel.
The Pittsburgh Steelers have
the first choice in this years
draft, having finished tied with
Chicago at 1-13 for the worst
record in pro football and
winning a coin toss with the

Kansas City, the Super Bowl
teams, who pick last.
The draft will last 17 rounds
over two days. A 15-minute time
limit is in effect on the first two
rounds and five minutes for each
subsequent round.

Bears for the first pick.
However, it remained a matter
of conjecture on the eve of the
draft whether the Steelers will
exercise their no. 1 choice for
Bradshaw or some other top
collegian or make a trade with
some other club.
Chuck Noll, the Steeler head
coach, said he was undecided
over how his club would act
when the draft opens but Noll
did indicate that as many as 15
teams have made inquiries as to
whether Pittsburgh would like to
trade their first choice.
(PAINT FOR
FUN
CLASSES
I register tonight
I at 7:00 in room C-4
/ J. Wayne Reitz Union
' $6.00

k?
I ...crop, cut, head,
I graph, logo, sig...
H ~
KvV
JK'
+
r
| It's one of the most
j fascinating jobs in the
| business.
Its holder must take
the raw material that
makes the news and
i use ingenuity and hard
| work to mold it into
| an attractive and
readable newspaper.
The Alligator needs...
copy
editors
For more information,
contact Dave Doucette
or Carol Sanger any
afternoon Sunday
Thursday in the
Alligator newsroom,
330 Reitz Union or
call 392-1686.
The
I Alligator



OConnell To Sponsor
FSU For SEC Membership

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida State University may
press for membership in the
Southeastern Conference at
the association's meeting in
Tampa Wednesday with rival
UF as its sponsor, President
Stanley Marshall said
Monday.
By the opening of the
SECs annual meeting, I will
have met with the president
of every university in the
SEC . (and) I am
encouraged by the responses
of several... Dr. Marshall
said.
On the basis of our strong
interest in membership in the
SEC and the advantages to
the university and to the
conference, I believe we
should press for membership
at this time he said.
However, he added, A
final decision on our posture
in the matter will not be
made until I have completed
my conferences with member
presidents and have
disscussed the matter further
with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
OConnell has offered to
sponsor FSU for SEC
membership.

NBC Gets Super Bowl
Telecasting Rights
NEW YORK (UPI) The National Broadcasting Company
announced it has acquired for the next four years rights to televise the
games of the American Conference of the National Football League.
The agreement between NBC and NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle
also gives the network the exclusive rights to telecast the Super Bowl
game following the 1970 and 1972 seasons.
Rozelle was meeting with the Columbia Broadcasting System also
today, to announce the granting of TV rights to CBS to carry games
of the NFLs National Conference and the Super Bowl game for
alternate years.
NBC announced its rights also include a number of regular season
interconference games in which the American conference club is the
visiting team and for exclusive rights for the Interconference All-Star
Games following the 1971 and 1973 seasons.

TONIGHT: The Ewing Street Times
THE EWING ST TIMES
50{ for members free if you buy
754 for Non Members a members* card
Abf Th Spqghlrt Sptiol COME AND STAY ALL NI3HT
NEXT THURSDAY-FRIDAY-SATURMY
YOU DON7 HAVE TO BE 21
MEMBERSHIPS ON SALE
AT RAT AND REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE

f§
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... goes to bat for FSU
Marshall hinted that one
factor in delaying a final
decision is the probationary
status of its basketball team,
but he said it should not be
since FSU took its own
disciplinary action following
basketball recruiting
infractions.
The NCAA placed FSUs
basketball team ons two years
probation for violation of
recruiting rules by head coach
Hugh Durham. Before the
NCAA acted, however,

Marshall, based on the
schools own investigation,
restricted Durham to
on-court activities, banning
any recruiting, outside
speeches or radio-television
appearances by the coach.
Marshall gave three reasons
why having FSU in the SEC
would benefit the
conference:
Florida is the most
populous state of any with
teams in the SEC, yet only
UF belongs. Three other
states have two universities in
the conference.
i FSUs athletic program
is comparable in quality with
those of other SEC
institutions and its teams
compete successfully with
SEC schools in all sports.
FSUs enrollment is
expected to jump from
17,000 to 28,000 by 1975
and the university is in
Tallahassee, a city that will
pass die 100,000 population
mark by 1975.
Present SEC members are
Florida, Alabama, Auburn,
Georgia, Kentucky, LSU,
Mississippi, Mississippi State,
Tennessee and Vanderbilt.

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Maravich Selected
11 ?
| In Secret ABA Draft
GREENSBORO, N.C. (UPI) Pete Maravich, the nations number
j: one collegiate scorer, has been selected by the Carolina Cougars in a
£ secret American Basketball Association (ABA) draft.
>: Cougars general manager Don DeJardin said Monday We will
£ pursue every avenue possible to see to it that he is a Carolina Cougar
§ next year.
DeJardin said, The fact that we selected Maravich is indicative of
: the interest we have in him.
: The Cougars, which reorganized out of the old Houston
: franchise, like to sign players from the area. Maravich, of Louisiana
State, played his high school basketball in Raleigh, N.C.
: DeJardin made his comments in a telephone interview after a story
broke in Los Angeles about a secret draft. He said the ABA completed
; a four-round draft in Indianapolis prior to the ABA All-Star game last
week.
Bob Linehard of Georgia was the Cougars second pick.
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Tuesday

Page 15



Page 16

The

Casey Views Nixon As Sportscaster

NEW YORK pJPI) Casey
Stengel is positive President
Nixon can do it.
Why not? he asks. Why
couldnt he? I dont think hell
have to worry about getting a
job when he's through with this
one, but if he decides to become
one of them sportscasters I'm
sure hell do good. You gotta
remember hes been interviewed
for 12 years. When you get on
the other side, you know what
questions to ask. Specially when
youve seen ball games like he
has.
Still sharp, spry and up on
current matters at 80, the
peppery ex-manager of the Mets
and Yankees was commenting
on Life magazine's report that
Richard Nixon may be the
most openly avid spoils fan ever
to occupy the White
House... (and) there are dose
aides who seriously contend that
he just might take on a part-time
sportscasting job when he
finishes the work at hand.
The important thing about
him, Stengel said of Nixon, is
that he follows all these sports
so closely and knows many
people in them personally.
Eisenhower, Truman and
Kennedy also liked
sports. 4 Ive got pictures taken

UCLARemains Number One

NEW YORK (UPI) Its still UCLA all the way
in the United Press International board of coaches
major college basketball ratings.
The three-time national champion Bruins, still
unbeaten in the post-Lew Alcindor era, increased
their 1969-70 winning streak to 14 games through
games of last Saturday night and received 342 of a
possible 350 points from the 35 coaches who make
up the UPI board.
That total was one fewer than UCLA received in
the previous weekly survey but the Bruins point
margin over second-place Kentucky increased from
38 to 40 points. UCLA wrested the no. 1 spot from
Kentucky in file fourth survey by the coaches and
has been an overwhelming choice since then.
UCLA kept rolling last week with an 89-80
victory over UC Santa Barbara and a 115-77 romp
over Wyoming. The Bruins received 28 first-place
votes compared to six for Kentucky and one for St.
Bonaventure. Kentucky, St. Bonaventure and

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with them at my home, two of
'em were right-handed and one
was left-handed ... but this here
man follows sports even more
than those others did.
I remember when all the
baseball people and myself went
to the White House during the
All-Star game last summer. The
cpmmissioner (Bowie Kuhn)
introduced me to the President
and said, 'I suppose you know
this man. He said, Why
certainly.' 7 He talked to me like
Casey Stengel. He asked me how
my bulks were doing out in
California and I told him pretty
good. He knew me right away.
Stengel, who has had nearly as
much exposure on TV as Milton
Berie, revealed he had offers to
do commentary on TV after
leaving both the Yankees and
Mets.
Yes, sir, I was offered some
tremendous sums, he said. I
never said anything about the
offers because there was no
reason to. But I thought about
em. I knew what they wanted.
They thought possibly you'd tell
all your secrets, how the players
hide in the lockers and all that,
but if you double-talk on those
intricate plays, they say *Well, it
lodes like hes okay,' and besides
if you was to ask me I look

SAYS PRESIDENT CAN DO IT

Jacksonville are the other three unbeaten major
college teams in the country.
Kentucky, also 14-0, received 302 points
followed by St. Bonaventure (250), South Carolina
(242) and New Mexico State (207).
There was a long drop to no. 6 Jacksonville,
which received 133 points. The Dolphins are
followed by Marquette (72 points), North Carolina
(71), Illinois (51), and Houston (45).
The second 10 is composed of Houston,
Davidson, North Carolina State, Utah, Southern
California, Ohio University, University of Texas at
El Paso, Pennsylvania, Drake, Santa Clara and
Western Kentucky.
The lone change in the top five from the previous
rankings was the upgrading of St. Bonaventure from
fourth to third with South Carolina dropping to
fourth and New Mexico State remaining fifth.
Houston dropped from no. 7 to no. 10 as a result of
its upset by St. Marys of Texas.

better now than I did a few
years ago.
Sometimes, Casey finds a spur
in the track and is off and
running on another railroad but
usually he comes back.
Yes, sir, I think hed do a
real good job if that's what he
wants to do when he's finished,
Stengel said, talking again about
Nixon, who also has said he
would like to be a sports
columnist and was presented
with an honorary card in the
Baseball Writers' Association of
America only the other night.
In the first place, he was
Vice President under Eisenhower
and I remember he (Eisenhower)
came out one opening day .in
Washington and Mantle hit a ball
over the centerfield fence which
went into a big tree. The second
time up he hit the ball into that
same tree, which was there
behind the fence during Gehrig
and Ruth's day but hadnt
grown up yet. Later it was ...
Just when you begin to think
Casey has gone and left he has a
way of showing you he hasn't.
Lemme tell you something
about TV, he said. They can
slow up the picture and show
you what's wrong with you. Not
only that, but when it comes to

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mk Jm
||.. Jr
' '
RICHARD NIXON
... future sportscaster?

the world series and all those
other big games, you're getting
the privilege of the choice
seats.

-

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Thats straight from the old
professor.
From there on though, the
President is strictly on his own.

Buy a gator ad.
Well fit you in.
w
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