Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Code Asks Ruling On Gatorade Ownership

.ji|
ROBERT CADE
... asks judgment

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Kol 62, No. 72

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DOUG CASE
SUNDAY ON THE PLAZA

Sundays on the Plaza of the Americas -a
pleasant pastime and popular tradition at UF. The
crowd studying, sleeping, singing and taking pictures
for journalism courses Sunday was so large it almost

Blacks Released On Bail
As Dorm Probe Continues

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF, caught up in controversy
triggered by a racial flare-up in a
dormitory, is proceeding with its
investigation, and the Alachua
County sheriffs office said more
arrests are forthcoming.
Meanwhile, three blacks
arrested following the incident
were released on bond Friday.
Up to seven blacks allegedly held
four whites at gunpoint and
forced them to clean up the
hallway in Tolbert Hall early
Tuesday.
Ron Jackson, 18, of
Melbourne, Earl Wilcox, 19, of
Miami, and Joseph McCloud, 18,
of Palmetto, all freshmen at the
UF, were arrested Thursday
afternoon by sheriffs deputies
and charged with two counts of
aggravated assault each. Their

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Writer
Gatorade inventor Dr. Robert
Cade said Sunday he is tired of
being tried in the newspapers
once a month so he has asked a
federal judge to decide the
rightful owner of the super thirst
quencher.
Cade, associate professor of
medicine at UF, said lawyers
hired by the Gatorade Trust
have filed a petition in
Indianapolis, Ind.
We are asking for a
declaratory judgement for a
federal court to say who owns
Gatorade, Cade said. The
kidney specialist said the legal
action is not a suit. Were not

The
Florida Alligator

bond was originally set at
$5,000 on each count.
However, Roy Mitchell, UFs
coordinator for minority affairs,
said he appealed to the judge
con due ting arraignment
procedures to lower the bond to
SI,OOO for each- count. Bond
was reduced to SI,OOO, and
Friday night, after being held in
county jail for 26 hours, the trio
was released on bond.
The blacks were arrested on
affidavits signed by two of the
white students allegedly forced,
to clean the halls. They are
Robert L. Wessells, and Bruce G.
Sehwack, both freshmen.
The operator at the main desk
of Tolbert Hall said he was
under strict orders not to
divulge their telephone numbers
or those of anyone else on the
floor where the incident

TItED OF BEING TRIED IN PAPERS

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

turned into an over-population problem. The Plaza
cleared out at sundown, though, when the
temperature began the long drop from nearly 80
degrees to 40.

suing for anything.
The court action is being
taken in Indiana because
Gatorade royalties have been
kept in an escrow account in an
Indianapolis bank. Cade also
believes a fairer judgement
would be rendered there than in
Gainesville or Washington, D. C.
The Board of Regents and the
U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare have
asked the 50 shareholders of the
Gatorade Trust to turn over
v their shares of the product. Suits
have been threatened but not
filed.
The regents say they are
entitled to the Gatorade rights
because Cade is a UF employe.

University of Florida, Gainesville

occurred. Wessells said Saturday
he had been advised not to
discuss the matter. I would like
(SEE'MITCHELL'PAGE 2)

HEW Report Due
The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare
(HEW) said Friday the report of their investigation on UFs
compliance with Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act will be
released within the next ten days.
The HEW investigators, Archie B. Meyer and William
Meredith, met with UF administrative and student body
officials Dec. 8 and 9 during a routine check to all Florida shite
university campuses.
We had nothing to hide and we told them so, said Rae O.
Weimer, spe.cial assistant to President OConnell.
Meyer, assistant education branch chief of the HEW, said,
the report, in the form of a letter, will be in the hands of
President OConnell in no later than ten days. After the report is
filed, it will be a matter of public record.
The report is in its final draft stages, but still has to be
approved by the higher eschelon of the office.

All faculty members are
supposed to sign a form giving
the university rights to such
inventions. Somehow Cade was
overlooked and never signed the
form. The administration was
not interested when Cade
originally offered to turn over
the drink to the UF.
HEW claims the right to
Gatorade since the department
sponsored Cades research at the
time he invented the drink. Cade
discounts HEWs claim. He said,
The age of the divine right of
kings has come to an end, in
referring to HEW Secretary
Robert Finchs threat of court
action.

CITY WONT BUDGE
Carnival Tax
Cuts Carnigras
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Carnigras, a week-long Gator Loan Fund-sponsored carnival, will be
no more because of a Gainesville ordinance which taxes carnivals.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd said Sunday it wouldnt
be worthwhile to hold Carnigras this year.
Gator Loan Fund Chairman Eddie Floyd said the City Os
Gainesville licensing fees make the cost of the carnival prohibitive.
He said Carnigras was financially successful last year because
Gainesville businessmen donated the price of the fees.
But, he said, we cant just count on them again.
Last year, the fees came to SI2OO. The price is determined by the
size of the carnival, so the cost this year has not been determined.
During the Carnigras last year, two separate incidents of blacks
attacking whites were reported.
However, both Shepherd and Floyd said these incidents had
nothing to do with the decision to discontinue Carnigras.
The decision is being made on the basis of the financial problems
with the city last year, Floyd said.
City Commissioner T. E. Ted Williams said the problem
concerning Carnigras is more misunderstood than any problem
students have had with the city in the past.
The ordinance involved applies to anyone within the corporate
boundaries of the city, he said.
Because UF is within these boundaries, the ordinance must apply to
Carnigras, he said.
If the city were to let students have this carnival without charging
them, anyone else who wants to hold a carnival here would want the
same privilege. They could challenge the ordinance and have it thrown
out.
Williams said the ordinance is almost punitive to discourage
carnivals.

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BRADY GREATHOUSE
... resigns as trainer

Monday, January 26, 1970

Inside
Tfae-0QlOI*i;f:; i
A CHIMNEY fire at the Chi
Phi house Saturday night
resulted in SSOO damage to
the structure page 2
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 10, 11
Editorials .8
FSU News 7
Letters 9
Movies 10, 11
Small Society 6
Sports 6
Whats Happening 7



Page 2

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PHIL COPE
REPRESENTATIVE WILLIAM B. ANDREWS
... calls for law reducing cost of campaigning for office
Mitchell: Appalled

PACEOM^
to say something, but I can't,
he said.
The incident apparently stems
from long-standing employment
practices at the university. The
janitors and maids in the
dormitories are predominantly
blade, and the black students in
the dorms feel a special kinship
toward them. They consider it
an affront to their race for
whites to burden the maids and
janitors with undue litter. They
said as much in a visit to the
Tolbert Area Council in
December.
At that time, they told the
council to make sure the halls
were kept clean. A sophomore
present at the meeting, Herman
Hoehn, said Saturday:
They said if it wasnt taken
care of, the brothers would take
care of it. They said theyd make
sure it was cleaned up by the
residents. They used some
four-letter words that werent
appropriate in the mixed
company.
Following that meeting, D.J.
Snapp, president of Tolbert
Area, said he issued a memo to
all the residents.
It said that any floor with
undue messiness would not be
cleaned up by the janitors,
Snapp said. The residents
would have 24 hours to clean it
up, and then would be assessed
for the janitors extra work.
Another Tolbert resident, Jim
Gundrey, said the blacks told
the students on his floor after
the meeting to clean up the hall
by midnight or else.
Snapp and Hoehn said that
McCloud, one of those arrested
Thursday, was the spokesman
for the group which visited the
meeting in December.
Reaction to the incident has
been mixed. The three Tolbert
Area students quoted above said
the blacks could have settled
their grievances by taking their
complaint either to Snapp, the
area council or the resident
counselor for administration.
But blacks on campus
maintain the incident is a

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspapei of the
University of Florida and is published five Times weekly except during
June, July and August when lt*s published setm-weekfy, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent dhly the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Bunding, University of Florida; Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not considei adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several tunes. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

manifestation of racism at the
university. A 20-year-old
sophomore, Roslyn Boyd,
speaking as minister of
communication for the Black
Student Union, said the arrest
was being used to cloud the
real issue of racist policies by
the university.
Mitchell, in a prepared
statement issued Friday, said, I
am appalled at the atmosphere
that prevails here at UF. These
atrocities against black people
must cease and desist now if our
goal of imp roving this
universitys image is to be
realized.
It is incumbent upon us that
we take a positive stand against
the racists, the bigots, and any
other persons who might stifle
our efforts in securing our
community, so that it might be
responsive to the needs, interests
and abilities of all of its people,
he said in a memo issued to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnell issued a statement
at noon Thursday in which he
announced increased security
measures in campus dormitories
in order to protect against
further incidents of the kind
reported.
OConnell also said steps were
being taken to insure
compliance with university
regulations which forbid
unauthorized use of firearms in
living areas on the campus.
The blacks, however, see the
issue as one of race rather than
firearms.
This is just a continuation of
the racist policy that this
university has been perpetrating
since OConnell came here,
Larry Jordan, BSU leader,
quoted a black involved in the
incident as saying.
David West, UFs attorney for
the Committee on Student
Conduct, which would hear the
case if the university presses
charges, declined to comment.
More arrests are expected this
week by the sheriffs office,
which arrested the three
suspects, pending positive
identification of the other
individuals.

Rep. Andrews Optimistic
About Legal Maneuvers

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Representative William B. Andrews spealcing at a
John Marshall Bar Association luncheon Friday,
expressed optimism about the outcome of the legal
proceedings filed against him and his investigate
of the Governors Club.
Introduced as the man who Governor Kir
values at one million dollars, Andrews said,
think theyll come out with the authonty to
investigate.
The chairman of the House elections committee
discussed what he termed the-who-gave-it-who the-who-gave-it-whogot-it
got-it the-who-gave-it-whogot-it law, emphasizing the high cost of being a
candidate for public office. The astronomical cost
results in the candate making committments to

NO OTHER MEANS. SAYS RESOLUTION
Interhall, FES Approve UAC

Resolutions favoring the
passage of the Feb. 4 University
Activities Center referendum
were passed by both Interhall
Council and the Florida
Engineering Society (FES)
Thursday night.
A similar resolution was also
passed last Monday by the
Freshman Council with an
amendment that student control
of the activities center be

| Chi Phi House Burns |
A fire in the chimney of the Chi Phi fraternity house about jjj
1:30 a.m. Sunday resulted in about SSOO worth of damages and C;
ij no injuries. J
: The blaze was still under investigation Sunday afternoon, said $
a spokesman for the Gainesville Fire Department. |
i| Fraternity members reported the fire broke out when %
ft building materials on top of the chimney ignited. jjj
$ The $265,000 house is under construction at No. 1 ij:
>: Fraternity Row.
James Okula, rush chairman, said he had permission from the ij:
jjj contractor to use the fireplace.
jjj I asked if there was any reason we could not use it and he $
said if the fireplace wasnt going to work, itd be best to find ij:
j:j out now, Okula said. jj:
UF Board Studies Possible
Retirement System Change

By ROBIN ADAMS
Alligator Writer
A new Florida Retirement
System bill, which places normal
retirement at age 65 rather than
the current 60, is the topic
scheduled for discussion by the
U n iversity C omrai ttee on
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
today.
The bill would permit earlier
retirement with benefits reduced
by 5 per cent a year if
retirement is prior to age 65.
It also changes average final
compensation and provides for
social security coverage and a
partial cost of living adjustment.
Faculty who currently
subscribe to other retirement
systems would be permitted to
continue their membership but
would be denied the benefits of
any of the changes proposed for
the new system.
The university committee will
meet at 3:30 p.m. in room 361
Pmtorsitu 3Ji'(m'lrrs
Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair /r
Diamond Setting /Ty
0 Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophies plaques
0 Florida crest jewelry Tr
0 Lavaliers JtJ
0 Class rings
0 Engraving
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub
BECK" BECHTOLD 373-1025

established by referendum.
The resolution passed by
Interhall stated in part:
Whereas, the Interhall Council
feels that it is wrong that
students must support a
complex of the type of the UAC
at a state-supported,
state-owned, state-run
institution, it is nevertheless
obvious to the Council that
there is no other means of

of the Reitz Union. All
interested faculty members who
have suggestions for
improvements or changes in the
system are invited to present
them at the meeting.
Rep. Ralph Turlington, a
member of the House committee
concerned with retirement, will
be at the meeting.
Osier Wins Scroll
David Osier, a senior in
journalism, will receive a Hearst
Foundation scrdll for placing
12th in the William Randolph
Hearst national writing contest.
The award is for a Veterans
Day editorial which ran in the
Alligator.

I a womans role in society I
1 is our concern. I
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I womens commission I
I 8:00 pm room 347 I
reitz union j

people rather than issues, Andrews said.
He called for a law to reduce the cost of
campaigning in state, district and county offices.
There is no logical and reasonable way to limit
spending accept to limit the amount of funds
available to the candidate by limiting the amount of
contributions, Andrews said.
Andrews explained his case against the
Governors Club and quipped, If my answers to
your questions about the Governors Club are
evasive, its because Buck Curton from the
Governors auditing office is recording this speech. I
think theyre preparing a new suit.
Andrews mentioned a possible investigation of
the Appreciation Dinners given for candidates for
public office.

acquisition for this type of
facility.
The FES passed its resolution
after hearing talks for the
referendum from Dean Fred
Cantrell, dean of university
relations and James Roll, UF
student body treasurer.
Arguments against the resolution
were given by Steve Uhlfelder
and David Jackson of Florida
Blue Key.
The FES resolution was
passed by a margin of 3-1, with
one-fourth of the membership
voting. Karl Shadowski,
president of FES, said that an
informal poll of the rest of the
membership showed the same
ratio in favor of the resolution.
Canney Not
ACLU FVesident
The Alligator reported
incorrectly Friday that UF
instructor Robert B. Canney is
president of the local American
Civil Liberties Union. He was
president of the ACLU of
Florida two years ago and was
also chairman of the Brevard
County ACLU. He is a member
of the local unit.
Canneys son Michael was
arrested Wednesday on a
narcotics violation.
MINI-POSTER
I STOP THE WORLH
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! iM 6om tv ee sick
4



Nixon Assures Israel'Aid As Needed

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon said Sunday the
United States would supply
more arms to Israel as the need
arises to offset arms shipment
by other powers to Middle East
nations.
Nixon said in a message read
to Jewish conference: We
would prefer restraint in the
shipment of arms to this area the
Middle East.
But we are maintaining a
careful watch on the relative
strength of the forces there and
we will not hesitate to provide
arms to friendly states as the
need arises.

Chicago Conrad Hilton Fire
Claims Two Lives, 16 Injured

CHICAGO (UPI) Two persons were killed and
16 injured Sunday when a fire broke out on the
ninth floor of the Conrad Hilton Hotel.
Hundreds of other guests in the 3,000-room
structure escaped the blaze by using fire department
ladders, stairways and fire escapes.
The names of the dead were not released, but a
hotel spokesman said they were members of a group
of students from the Jacksonville, 111., School for
the Deaf.
One of those injured was an unidentified man

Drug Battle Hits Home
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) John Patrick Cahill, son of the recently
inaugurated governor of New Jersey who had pledged a battle against
narcotics during his election campaign, has been charged with
possession of marijuana.
A highway patrolman who noticed the youths small foreign car
pass a South Philadelphia comer several times Saturday stopped
Cahill.
Police said a search of Cahills pocket turned up a hand-rolled
marijuana cigarette and a quantity of what they said was marijuana in
a glass vial.
Booked at the narcotics unit headquarters, Cahill was taken before
a magistrate for arraignment. A hearing date was set for Feb. 4.
Cahill was released early Sunday when Paul Sherwin, New Jersey
secretary of state and confidant of Gov. William Cahill, posted a S2OO
bond*
The governor, who was sworn into office last week, had no
comment on his sons arrest, according to a spokesman.
A former congressman and FBI agent, Cahill, 57, a Republican, was
elected last November by a wide margin over former Gov. Robert B.
Meyner.

NOW AVAILABLE
The Most Modern And Largest Engraving Machine In
Central Florida. We Will Be Pleased To Be Os Service
To All Students Staff Faculty.
Free On-THE-Spot Estimates Os All Watch & Jewelry Repairs.
KNOW YOUR WATCHMAKER A STATE LICENSE IS A MUST!
| Seiko Automatic Watches \ Florida Crest Jewelry Jewelry|
| Jewelry| Timex Electric Watches n \ -Uflhters Mugs Gifts
f Trophies
Diamonds > Plagues
Watch Bands ? Greek Lavaliers
Lighters U J OosJ
NOTE: Bob Will Engrave Any Item Regardless
Os Where It Was Purchased
! BANK AMERICARD ?B It lb t ItP
!MASTER CHARGE w ,V f V
| 'Free 15 Min. Parking 1802 W. University Ave.
i Adjacent to King's Food Host 'Beck* Bechtold Owner 373-1025

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The Soviet Union has been
supplying military equipment to
Arab belligerents in the Middle
East conflict and France, against
U.S. wishes, plans to supply

TO OFFSET ARAB SHIPMENTS

who jumped from the ninth floor to a fifth floor
room offset, breaking both legs.
It was definitely and positively miraculous that
there was not more loss of life, said Fire
Commissionerobert J. Ouinn.
Quinn said the fire started in a storage area near a
bank of elevators on the ninth floor.
The 31 deaf mutes, who shared rooms in the area
where the fire started, were being questioned to see
if they saw anyone near the area during the time the
fire broke out, Quinn said.

The United States is
prepared to supply
military equipment
necessary to support the
efforts of friendly
governments, like Israels,
to defend the safety of
their people.
Richard M. Nixon

Libya with planes. The United
States has shipped jet fighters to
Israel.
The United States is
prepared to supply military

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0 Book and Supply H
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I SCHOOL SUPPLIES H
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PARKING IfJ
\qwsy
Excellence in Food

equipment necessary to support
the efforts of friendly
governments, like Israel's, to
defend the safety of their
people, Nixon said-
His statements were read as a
message to the National
Emergency Conference on Peace
in the Middle East sponsored
here by the Conference of
Presidents of major American
Jewish organizations.
The message said: We are
convinced that the prospects for
peace are enhanced as the
governments in the area are
confident that their borders and
their people are secure.

f J ~ STCAK $HA K
1 Student Spadal #
(With Th# Coupon)
| R9ulor 93< StoakburgAr
| Lunchaon And Any 15< Drink
I $1.06 Value Only9o{ plus tax |
| Steak n Shake
l ftJ3th St Gainesville
Prisei's Anniversary Special
PORK TENDERLOIN SANDWICH
APPLE PIE
2035 N. W. 13th Street, Gainesville 378-2304
Meet Bob Taylor Bob will be operator of the
NEW HERMES ENGRAVING MACHINE at {
University Jewelers. Bob has ten years experience I
engraving precious metals. f

1

He also attempted to reassure
the conference delegates that the
United States would not attempt
to negotiate the terms of peace
in the Middle East in any
conference held by the Big Four
powers.
It will not impose the terms
of peace, Nixon said, We
believe a durable peace
agreement is one that is not
onesided and is one that all sides
have a vested interest in
maintaining.
He also said the United States
considers negotiations die only
possibility for peace in the
Middle East.

Page 3



Page 4

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when yen pat ell the pieces together
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The Temptations, Dionne Warwick, The Association, The Young Rascals, The Credence
Clearwater Revival, The Tijuana Brass, The Jefferson Airplane
Those groups all cancelled appearances at the University of Florida during the past year. Os
course, if you were one of these groups would you want to perform in Florida Gym?
Seating 5100 (for over 25,000 students, faculty and
staff)
Poor acoustics (of course it's better to be near an
exit, but then you sacrifice being able to hear, don't you?
Lighting (here is where everyone in the audience
should light a match so they can see.)
Temperature Control (The only gym in the country
with an automatic sweat filled pool.)
Or a national speaker in University auditorium:
s
* V
Bring your own fire extinguishers.
Bring your own portable airconditioning unit.
Get there 3 hours early to hope you get one of the
1100*1200 seats.
' .. ",- r ;
This facility can only be built by joint efforts not by any one group or organization
Won't you join together with others to make this a really first rate cultural Univpmtx/?
Help build the University Activities Center. Ty
Help build the Impossible Dream.
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Vote Ves On February 4
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PAID POLITICAL AD



Kitchen
Biggest
Jailbreak?

FOR ALACHUA COUNTY
Dimes March Goal $12,000

The 1970 March of Dimes
campaign is on its way to
reaching its goal of $12,000, set
this year by the executive board
of the Alachua County Chapter
of the March of Dimes.
This county goal must be met
to meet the rising costs of
research and hospital care for
children bom every two minutes
with a birth defect. $150,000
was issued last year for research
grants to the UFs Birth Defects
Center.
The March of Dimes campaign
is conducted each year to attack
the national health problem
inherent in statistics that
250,000 American babies are
bom each year with birth
defects, and hinds collected by

j
\ of the J. Wayne Reitz Union 4th Floor j
V FEATURED SPECIALS /
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Baked Puerto Rican Sweet Potato B
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By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The greatest jail break in history will be when women
break away from their kitchens.
Thats what Linda Jenness told her sometimes agreeing,
sometimes disbelieving audience of about 80 Wednesday night.
About an equal number of men and women were at the
Womens Liberation Forum in the Reitz Union Auditorium^
The enlightened Socialist women will knock the hell out of
the inefficient, antiquated system, she told them. Women
liberated from the kitchens will become die companions of free
men.
Those strong words came from a little woman 5-foot-2
with eyes of blue, just like the song! The 29-year-old Mrs.
Jenness looked closer to 19 and completely feminine, with long,
curly brown hair and a soft pink blouse and brown suit. But
there was no softness or room for compromise in her demands:
Equal pay for equal work
Free day care centers
Open admissions to women at all universities
Legal abortions

the March of Dimes are spent on
medical care programs, including
assistance to polio victims,
professional education, public
education, research institutions
and clinical study centers.
Greeks who recently helped
with publicizing a cocktail hour
sponsored by United Liquors
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
MUG SPECIALTIES J, IQ)
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ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS RING SIZING
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- 24 Hr. SERVICE
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1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-8585
*

were the Tau Epsilon Phis, who
distributed flyers all over the
campus.
Tuesday the Mothers of
Gainesville will march on behalf
of the March of Dimes.
Residents living in student
housing will be contacted at this
time also.

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Folding C uttma
Stapling Paste up-
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Preferential hiring for women
The former socialist candidate for mayor of Atlanta, Mrs.
Jenness related progress for women with progress for socialism.
A demand for equal pay for equal work would wreak havoc
on a capitalistic society, she said.
The forum was sponsored by the Student Peace Union with
the Young Socialist Alliance, an affiliate of the Socialist
Workers Party Mrs. Jenness belongs to.
Men came in for criticism.
Even the best of men are products of society, she said.
They have male chauvinist attitudes.
Later she added, It will take much longer to convince
individual men not to be male chauvinists than to have a
socialist revolution.
She also said she thought it would be possible to have a
socialist revolution during her lifetime.
Haying traveled in Cuba five weeks last year, Mrs. Jenness
praised the advancement of women in Cuba. She said the Cuban
government is assuming the responsibility of Cuban children by
setting up day care centers and feeding facilities. Preferential
hiring for women is also practiced, she said.

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FALLS 00% Human Hair 22 in. $39,801
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WIGS Straight Taper with part $35,001
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Service Sun 6 a.m. to Mon. 6 a.m.
MARIONS
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Home of the Happy Cup of Coffee
207 N.E. 16th Ave. 378-0600
and
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Monday

Page 5



Page 6

I, TVm Florid* Alligator, Monday, January 26,1970

{heio/tf W&kliws)
J&flJWShk I cHocoWe cake I
appealj
JVo
Weight Watchers
Watch Their Diet
By DANIEL N. LOWE
Alligator Correspond ant
All you need for membership in this club is at least ten pounds to
lose. If you have finally made up your mind to lose them, then you
can join Weight Watchers International, Inc.
Weight Watchers has designed a unique way to not only take
weight off overweight people but to maintain that weight loss, said
Mrs. Ilene Solberg, Gainesville represenative of Weight Watchers.
The program consists of carefully planned eating schedule and
regular attendance at weekly meetings at 1015 W. University Ave. in
Gainesville.
The Gainesville chapter of Weight Watchers organized in October
1968 has approximately 100 members. About one third of these are
college students.
The initial fee for the class is $5. This includes a $2 fee for the first
week of class and a $3 registration fee. Several classes are offered each
week and after payment of your fee you are entitled to attend a many
classes during a week as you care to attend after the first week, the
cost is two dollars per week.
Before each member begins they are given a weight loss goal. If a
member reaches his goal weight he is awarded a free lifetime
membership for as long as he maintains his goal weight within two
pounds, Mrs. Solberg said.
At a typical Weight Watchers class, the members are weighted in
individually p private and their weight loss for the week is recorded. All
records are kept confidential.
A trained Weight Watchers lecturer then speaks to the members on
problems of weight loss and self-discipline, Mrs. Solberg said.
The principal purpose for the Weight Watchers program is to teach
members to eat sensibly and to lose weight without starving, said Mrs.
Solberg, who has lost 37 pounds herself since becoming a member of
Weight Watchers.
Hey
Its your $6.00.
What do you want?
Open
Coliseum Forum
Speaking for student assessment
frof. Reid Poole
Ralph Glatfelter, Student
Speaking against Student assessment
Prof. Herbert Schwartz
Greg Jones, Student
4:00 Jan. 27 JWRU
Sponsored by the JWRU

the small society

-O
THAT£ MtfT £HA£i^MA*

Polls Arranged
The on-campus polling places for the Feb. 4 referendum will be
Reitz Union lobby, Library colonnade, Graham Hall lobby, South
Hall lobby, Jennings lobby, Broward Hall lobby, Yulee Area front
porch, Hume Hall lobby, Fletcher K study lounge (Murphree),
Spessard Holland Law Center colonnade, Walker Auditorium
colonnade, Stadium Gate 3, and Towers commons lobby.
The off-campus locations will be Deamon Village study lounge,
Village Park recreation room, Gatortown recreation room, Corry
Village wash house, Flavet 111 recreation hall, Theta Chi fraternity
house, AOPi sorority house, Gator Groomer, and Points West laundry
room.
In order to vote, students must present their picture ID card and
their validated (blue) fee card. There can be no substitutions. Drivers
licenses will not be accepted as proof of identification.
Students who have lost their fee card may obtain a duplicate at the
Hub.
The Polls will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on election day.

, . ; if
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Yan*ij? sanus,sgns.
i Trgi.i
i TTirij in
SOUP
That ;: '
Here's a recipe for those chilly winter nights,
guaranteed to put some fun and maybe even I Ltl I tKMEN
romance! in em. I ft
1 phonograph |l L
1 Traces/Memories" album by the Lettermen
(accept no substitutes!)
1 blazing fire
people HHHHHIHIIN
Trace*/Memoriae. Anothar fina al- /
... bumhythaUtlannan, from Capitol
Mix well. Dim lights and serve. Plan for extra ~ ***
helpings. *cordpaopla.
a

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Studio Passports
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"Why Pay More"
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Phone 372-2512



Greek'Week:
70s Rededication

she theme for this years
Greek Week is rededication to
the challenge of the 70s.
There will be the traditional
fraternity serenade, the soap-box
derby, Presidents council, talent
show, Panhellenic barbeque,
Frolics, greek games and the god
and goddess contest.
New events this year will be a
house-mothers bridge party and
a scholarship banquet honoring
top greek scholars, sponsored
by a Gainesville civic club.
An evaluation of the entire
greek system is planned through
questionnaries.
There will be a service project
similar to last years Gainesville
clean-up.
The slogan for the week will
be You cant beat greek!
Students are needed to work

By BRENDA GEVERTZ
YOUVE COME A LONG WAY: The womens commission meets
tonight at 8 in room 347 of the Reitz Union. Dorm interaction groups
will be formed and everyones invited.
WATER BIRDS: The Naval information team will be outside the
Union games room all week from 9 4:30 p.m.
MAKING WAVES: The Swim Fins, UFs synchronized swimming
dub, invites all interested girls to meet with them each Tuesday
evening at 7 by the University pool.
A CALCULATING RISK: Topic for discussion at the meeting of
the Florida Engineering Society will be Engineer In Training Exam
and Professional Registration. The meeting is at 7 p.m., on Tuesday
in room 310 of the Electrical Engineering Building, South.
DOLLAR POWER: An open forum on the coliseum question will
be held Tuesday afternoon at 4 in the Union Auditorium.
news
from...jP*ii i SU
By FSU FLAMBEAU
ACTION: Action Party Saturday night nominated the current
Student Body Vice President Wayne Rubinas, to head its ticket in the
up-coming presidential campaign.
Action has controlled the top spot in Student Government for the
past three years.
Rubinas will face two other candidates in the Feb. 4 primary.
BROADCASTING: Dispelling notions of low priority being placed
on radio and television by the university administration, President J.
Stanley Marshall said that he has vigorously argued for a budget
increase for the 1970-71 fiscal year.
Gome Heal-
Gert
GeH: Belnannc.- former
millionaire, divorcee,,
cooold-loe suicide and pagan
sbe knu>s because
she S ba.s rtf abocrl* every
can, make i
Awlhop of
-Tfce Lrte Liz"
ReKsion-In-L.+e $
Un.ve4y Lu4hemn CKurcK
I " j

in all areas of the program.
Those interested should contact
John Cosgrove at 378-6646.
fl
JOHN COSGROVE
seeking volunteers

f r f over v P hr fi fV?
week
all week
Monday Tuesday
M FREE you buy
-jm M a membership card.
\W?W 50< members
75< non-members
Wednesday
MOVIES
Thursday - Saturday
75< members %
non-members
H/ I V Jf \ YOU DONT HAVE TO BE

I Miss Seminole I
applications may be I
picked up in I
Student Publications I
office- tbey must be I
returned February 6 I
with 8x lO photo and I
$5 entry fee. I
oiqooq £ | I
rnuiol musailoO I
Entering organizationsl
can sponsor one I
o Wm
candidate.. I

Monday, January 26, 1970, Tha florid* Alligator,

Page 7



I, Tm

Page 8

Camigras Tax: Rural Wisdom?

Students cannot live by cotton candy and buttered
popcorn alone.
That is, we can live without Camigras.
Gator Loan Fund, which benefits financially from the
once-a-year carnival held on campus, can live without
Camigras, too.
But the question remains, why should we have to?
Especially when it is merely to please the Gainesville city
bureaucracy.
City Commissioner Ted Williams admitted the city
ordinance taxing carnivals in the form of a required
license to operate within the city limits was almost
punitive.
What he didnt say was who was being punished and
why.
0 The carnival will bring undesirables to Gainesville.
0 The carnival fosters the awful sin of
gambling... the vast sums put on the line ranging at
times even up to a quarter.
0 The carnival is evil; the people are vile; the practices
it encourages are immoral.
And so the City of Gainesville, in all its rural wisdom
seeks again to levy a tax on this charitable event so as to
keep us safe.
We should thank them for their concern in our affairs.
And we would if we werent so disgusted at their
reasoning.
Camigras has been held on the UF campus twice, each

Pawns

Another View s

Richard Nixon; Good, Bad, Or Indifferent?

Now that Richard Nixon has resided at 1600
Pennsylvania Avenue for one year, many people
have stopped to consider what he has done while in
office. A lot of people (61 per cent in the latest
Gallup* Poll) support him, some oppose him, and
many feel that he really hasnt done anything
particularly good or bad, so theyre neutral.
I think our President has made many mistakes in
nis tenure to date, and I would like to try to
explain why I do not support him and why I
disagree with him on many vital issues.
His main mistake, I believe, has been in his
handling of the Vietnam War. I think his so-called
vietnamization policy is merely a continuation of
attemptsLlj in.the jyar by military
means, with the only difference being that more
Vietnamese will die instead of Americans.
I think Nixon should have announced an
immediate, unilateral, total American withdrawal,
coupled with a final request to the present South
Vietnamese government to have new elections as
soon as possible that would include neutrals,
communists and anyone else who wants to run in
die elections.
. I feel that Nixons plan to end American
involvement in the war will cost thousands of lives,

time raising money for the GLF, thereby providing
scholarship monies for needy students.
This is what we are thinking about, not the evils
nickel and dime gambling.
The first time Camigras was held the city did not tax
the event. Later this was attributed to a slip-up.
We tend to think the city fathers began to see dollar
signs dancing in front of their eyes, and dream at nigh o
how to get their hands in the pot.
Well, last year they milked Camigras of $1,200 m tne
guise of license fees which were suddenly imperative an
all-binding.
It took the generosity of several Gainesville
businessmen for the GLF to see the money again.
But that was last year. This year there will be no
Camigras.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd said Sunday
there is no way we can afford to hold the carnival this
spring.
We hope you are happy, Mr. Williams. We hope your
provincial cronies are happy.
But we cant help but wonder why the Jaycees annual
carnival is of higher caliber than ours? It, too, must bring
all the work of the devil himself to this City of
Progressive Ideas.
We guess this is different, though, Mr. Williams et al,
because you never seem to mention gambling and other
immoralities then.

MR. EDITOR:
There has been a lot of controversy lately on the
subject of freedom of the press. I for one feel the
criticism of the press is well-founded.
Vice President Agnew has finally done something
that no other public figure has had the guts to do
speak out against a liberal press.
Agnew knows well indeed what distortions of the
facts are. From election time until now Mr. Agnew
has been critisized for everything under the sun just
because he is not a left-wing radical.
The 6:30 news on national networks every night
is an illustration of the flagrant continuing abuse by
the press.
A news hour implies to me just that facts.
Facts on the national news are slanted toward the
liberal point of view. In other words, these
il&wscasters are interpreting the news for the thirty
million Americans that watch every night.
This situation is a gross injustice to the
conservative or the middle of the roader in
America.

needlessly. I think all concerned doves must keep
the pressure on Nixon, otherwise the war will
continue to drag on.
Another major area of disagreement 1 have with
the President is over his attempts to bring us
forward together to achieve a more just and free
society.
Because of the nomination of Clement
Haynsworth, the attempted dilution of the 1965
Voting Rights Bill, the unprecedented action of
having Justice Department lawyers siding with
Mississippi segregationists and opposing the
NAACP on a desegregation case, and the
incorporation of the Southern Strategy to woo
Wallace voters and leaner* Into the Nixon camp, I
feel i that Nixon is not working to really give the
black man a better deal.
In fact, I think that his actions and statements go
exactly counter to what should be done for the
black American. We should press for an
enforcement of past Supreme Court decisions
outlawing segregation in the public schools and in
housing and public services, we should continue to
press the drive to get more Negroes involved in the
political process; we should not appeal to racism
and bigotry from our highest office.

Give 'em Heil, Spiro!

EDITORIAL

I sat down to watch the Democratic National
Convention but all I saw was Walter Cronkite
talking about the protestors outside. It seemed to
me there was more attention given to these
marchers than was given to the convention. But
again, to the liberal this was great because it verified
his belief that these protesters were Gods gift to
mankind.
I think protesting is a great right but I dont think
it deserves national TV in convention time.
It is my opinion that the press should give both
sides of an issue or neither. These liberal newscasters
were not elected by the people, but chosen by the
owner of a network to speak the news. They have
no right to pervert the news by giving their own
fouled-up opinions.
If you can call being fair to all people by giving
facts alone or both sides of the issue censorship,
then you are a fool.
I think Spiro Agnew is doing a brave deed and I
am all for him.
RONNIE CLARK, 2UC

I also dont like or agree with many of the
Presidents political appointees. John Mitchell (and
of course, that dear woman Mrs. Mitchell), our
curb the free media and get those effete snobs
Vice President with the household name, and the
many old Goldwater supporters, like Jerry Leonard
and Richard Kleindienstedt in the Jusitce
Department, fall into this category.
Briefly, 1 believe the Administration has also been
wrong in the ABM battle (it is as well as being a
waste of money), militarily and financially
dangerous, the hard-line attitude on drug usage, the
reappointment of Otto Otepka to government
-Service, the forced resignation of Robert
'Mttganthau, the worthless public relations style
black capitalism plans, and the composition of
the government staff to investigate the killings of
Blade Panthers by police.
Basically this is why I would give an extremely
unfavorable rating to Mr. Nixons first year in
office. I hope that he might do things a lot
differently in his next three years. It will be very
disappointing to me if he can indeed build and
solidify the supposedly emerging Republican
Majority.

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

By Mike Hittleman*



Black Student Union:
Our Position
Yesterday three of our brothers were arrested by the Alachua
County Pig department and charged with aggravated assault in
connection with an incident alleged to have happened Tuesday
morning in Tolbert Hall.
We say that the black students arrested are guilty of nothing more
than being black on a racist white college campus. This is their only
crime.
They are being used as scapegoats to cloud the real issue here on
this campus, an issue that has been intensified by the racist policies of
the current administration at UF.
The real issue on this campus is whether or not black people have a
right to live, study and work on a predominately white campus
without having their pride, their dignity their very humanity
threatened by the racist attitudes of many at UF.
Last quarter, in December, the Black Student Union brought before
the University Housing Authority, and substantiated charges that
white students in the campus dorm living areas were creating excessive
and unnecessary work for the black janitorial staff. White students in
these dorm areas were engaging in various acts of vandalism that black
students feel create dehumanizing conditions.
Housing promised the black student union that something concrete
would be done to eliminate these conditions.
To this date, nothing has been done.
We feel that Housings response to this situation created the
incident which occured last Tuesday morning. And that furthermore,
UF President Stephen C. OConnells handling of the black student
issue on this campus has perpetrated the kind of volital atmosphere
that now prevails between black and white students in the campus
dorm areas.
We wonder what prompted OConnell to make such a hurried
statement on the incident. Whenever whites are intimidating blacks on
this campus he remains silent.
But, whenever blacks are supposedly intimidating whites he is
always quick to respond. Where was OConnell and this university
when:
Brother Steve Baker was almost run down by a drunken white
student;
Brother Ron Harper was intimidated by campus pigs at a football
game;
Brother Spencer Boyer, the first black law professor at UF, was
forced to leave because the white racists who inhabit this place
threatened his life;
Brother Fred Kanali, an African brother who came to UF
because he wanted to see what a white southern school was like, was
spat upon by a white racist student;
Brother Ernest Johnson, a black resident advisor in a dorm area
was intimidated by the white students on the floor where he lives.
Where was OConnell just last week?

my
. | f aww f/.
IfYoTThink Intelligently?*
Nazis Werent Totalitarian

MR. EDITOR} u 1
I was delighted logic
at long last in the pages of the Alligator. 1 refer
specifically to Richard Braren, ILW, and his
devestating put-down of Mike Hittleman s
clutch-mindedness.
Had you applied intelligent thought to your logic,
Mr. Hittleman, you would see, as Mr. Braren does,
that:
Fighting totalitarianism is not totalitarian
(Brarens statement)

' The>Nazis once fought.;., 9
.(WoifcUVar II),,)/ ayig yfhiai oJ giuvhow ton *> mr/jt
fergo, the Nazis were not totalitarian.
I hope you see the error of your ways, Mr.
Hittleman. It would appear that Spessards Storm
Troopers have scored another intellectual victory
over us (a) stupid, (b) clutch-minded, and (c)
mentally disordered liberals:
RON ARGENT ATI, 4AS

OPEN FORUM:^^
f Aina ml Vitimt j
np hope for tht> compla ( erl
We say that the black students arrested are guilty of
nothing more than being black on a racist white college
campus. This is their only crime. They are being used as
scapegoats to cloud the real issue here on this campus, an
issue that has been intensified by the racist policies of the
current administration at UF.
Where was OConnell? Where was the administration of this school?
UF would have us deny that racism exists on this campus, when the
president is a known confirmed, racist. Stephen C. OConnell, while
he served on the bench of the Florida State Supreme Court, concurred
in the original suit brought by a black student when he was denied
admission to the UF because of his race.
The opinion OConnell concurred in denying this student admission
to UF because he would create, in the words of the dpinion, a public
nuisance.
In light of his past record and the current practices of his
administration, black students can view OConnell with nothing but
contempt. He is a racist. And he is behind the obvious attempt now
being carried on to rid UF of black students who are considered bad
niggers by his administration.
Black students on this campus have decided that we will take these
kinds of injustices no more. We are prepared to take a stand. We say
that from this minute on the blact students are at war with UF and its
racist president, Stephen C. OConnell.
Our brothers in jail are not guilty of any crime. And we shall work
to insure their speedily release.
Right ON!
BLACK STUDENT UNION

gSSS Staff Writing
i Numbers Game
!! 1
** Cl
By Charles Trentelmanwi
Americans are hung up on numbers.
Every time you turn around someone is asking you for your
number: Bank account, checking account, social security, student,
telephone, address, age, etc., etc.
Most of the time these numbers are necessary. An evil, yes. A pain,
yes. A necessity, also yes.
Right now the United States is engaged in the biggest numbers
game the world has ever seen: integration. By Feb. 1 all the public
schools have to have the right number of black students as opposed to
white students. In order to accomplish this, black students will have
to be bused to black schools.
Children are going to be bused outside of their own neighborhoods.
They are going to be jerked out of familiar surroundings and
deposited in a strange school in a strange neighborhood in the middle
of the school year. They will be expected to learn their lessons as
though nothing had happened.
This may make the Supreme Court feel good. It may make many
government officials feel good. It may even make a lot of parents
both black and white feel good.
Look!" theyll say. See how fair we are. Our schools are
integrated.
But the black children who have been bused around will still have
to go back to a jiome in an all black neighborhood. At school their
friends will probably all be black. Their grades will probably suffer
becaiise of the switch of schools.
WouldnS it be a lot better if the parents Qf 4 these blaOk children
could* live close enough to the white school so their kids didnt have
to take the bus?
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed 300 words.
§ Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer shows just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters for space.

Miiniayt iFlorida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
Martin 0018 C guitar & hardshell case
$175. Sherwood fm tuner 75
Lafayette 160 watt amp 80 two ar4x
speakers 90 german lute 150
372- after 5. (A-st-69-p)
4-drawer file cabinet good cond. S2O.
175 cc Bultaco campera 67 a steal at
$225. 813 S.E. 2nd Ave. Apt. A.
(A-st-69-p)
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut & assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
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(A-70-10t-c)
SONY 530 TAPE RECORDER.
Excellent condition. S2OO. Phone
373- (A-70-3t-p)
Size 8 white velvet wedding gown,
with detachable train, veil and
headpiece and accessories for SIOO in
cash. 378-5115 after 5 p.m.
(A-70-3t-p)
Self-contained travel trailer, has hot
and cold pressurized water, gas stove
w/ oven, and gas-electric refrigerator
and heater. Extras. 372-7332.
(A-70-st-p)
FIREWOOD DELIVERED BY
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
STEREO COMPONENTS ADC
speakers, 75 watt AM FM
Stereo receiver, two months old,
call 378-676 1 after 5.
(A-71-3t-p).
38 SPECIAL 3V4 In. Barrel,
nickel plated, holster and box
of ammo. Asking $65.00 Call
378-7953. Ask for STEVE.
(A-71-3t-p).
SONY HP 15 0 A Stereo
phonograph. 14 mos. old.
Excellent condition. Can be
used as AMP. Call 378-5954
sth per. or after 9 P.M.
(A-71-2t-p).
G.E. TELEVISION with Stand
2l" Screen B&W
Good Condition s4O Call
378-9344. (A-71-3t-p).
THIS WEEK ONLY 10% OFF TO
STUDENTS! Our prices are always
lowest blit this week save additional
money on purchase of used or
standard typewriters. Royals,
Underwoods, Remingtons & SCMs.
Fully guaranteed. From $29.50 to
$139.50. JR Office Furniture Co.,
620 S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-st-c)
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon installed, &
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$2 2.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-c).
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER
1969 2,200 miles $625 or best
offer call 378-5192 after 5 or
weekends. (A-71-st-p).
12X46 MOBILE HOME 2 bedroom
close to campus. SSB. 19/mo. Make
equity offer. Take over payments. On
lot. Call 378-9795 or 376-7559. May
rent. (A-70-3t-p)
HONDA 305 1969, Superhawk.
Crash Bar Helmets like new. S6OO
373-1242. 1806 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Student. (A-68-st-p).
Seiberian huskeys for sale I
378-3568. (A-69-3t-p)
12 STRING BY MIGUEL HEIS made
them for Feliciano and Fred Neil.
S6OO. Call Paul at 378-7943.
(A-72-st-p)
1969 Honda CL9O like new. Must
sell. $250 or best offer. Call Paul
372-0672 or see at 210 NE 10th Ave.
(A-72-3t-p)
COMP STEREO SACRIFICE Craig
Deck, Dyna amp, criterion speakers,
36000 ft. scotch tape cost SSOO in
Aug., sell for $375. Perfect Call
Mac 373-2394. (A-72-3t-p)
1967 Honda 90 Excellent
condition S2OO. Call 372-9167
after 5 p.m. Ask for Bob. (A-72-2t-p)
gayjgirl for a whirl
ajjfter cafceMwith prtyfi
pferft elflctrjfc sdrnpooer sl.
llowryinirnftur* C 9. (A-7*-lt-c)
FOR RENT |
,yw-v.v-v.v-vi-r
Sublet: Beautiful 2 bd. turn,
apt., AC & heat carpeted. $155
mo. or will consider 3rd male
roommate (grad pf) Come to
835 N.E. 4th Ave. after 6
P.M. (B-71-st-p).

X-SXXS-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-W-WX-X-X-X-X-X-W-Viv-.
FOR RENT |
v
.vX*X<*X*X*X*XX*X*X?*WXX*X*X*X*X*X*X-Xs'£
4 Bedroom house in N.W. area,
central air and heat, fireplace,
S2OO. Call anytime 373-1747.
(B-71-st-p).
Unique one bedroom apt. Panelled
walls. Mediterranean furniture.
Private patio. Central A C. In country
setting IV2 mi. from Med. Center.
Rent slls. Couples only. 378-3571.
After 5 please call 378-0969.
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student couple only. $55 per month
for long-term tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 372-9903.
(B-70-st-p)
Male roommate needed to share
a well-furnished 2 bdrm. apt.
Apply in person at French
Qtr. 81. (B-69-4t-p).
Sublet till June 15. Lg. 2 Bdrm. Apt.
Central Heat & A.C. (Very) close to
campus. ($145. mo) Call EMMY
378-7467. (B-68-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
S6O per month tor room AND
board. Collegiate Living Organization.
117 N. W. 15th St., call 376-9420 for
the secretary. (B-68-st-p).
Jr-'X'X-X-X-X.SSrX-X-X-X-X-X-SVX'X-X-XC-X-K
WANTED I
Nx-wxrx-x-x-x-x-x-x-:-:.wx-x-x-x-x-x-;-xx -j-
Roommate wanted to share large
home distant from UF. Heat-but-heat
proof. See at 2110 NE 12th St or call
Danny for details. 373-1670. $64
mo. (C-72-st-p)
Summit House one male roommate
needed for 2 bdr. apt. Jan rent free.
Central air and heat. $43.50/mo. Call
Herb 376-6361. (C-72-st-p)
1 roommate near campus, wtr. and
spr. qtr. 538.75/mo. Central AC &
heat. Starlight Apts., 809 S.W. sth
Ave. Call Mike, 372-4168.
(C-4t-69-p)
Wanted 1 or 2 male roommates to
share two bedroom apt. $44 + util.
Unique. Call after 6. 372-9849.
(C-4t-69-p)
1 male roommate needed for
modern olympia apt. IV2 blks
from campus. Immediate
occupancy., Jan. Rent Paid.
$45. P/Mo. Call Tom, 372-6678
after 7 PM. (C-71-2t-p).
Roommate wanted: Plush
University Gardens apt. Sin City
Immediate Occupancy. Furnished.
Pool. SSO. a month. 378-7649,
372-5978. (C-71-st-p).
Female roommate wanted to share
two bedroom apt. Landmark no. 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-70-st-p)
Coed needs room with kitchen in
N.W. section. Walk to ca. -'is. 1
$35/mo. Please call Trisha,
Must move immediately. (C-70-3t-p)
USED FILE CABINET. Need
desperately. Please call 372-9307. D.
Longenecker. Also need old furn. for
poor local family. Donations
accepted. Phi Taus. (C-70-3t-p)
I Steve McQueen
LASTAQAYS |
Hk' Caminetiastier Wings
in high style ~ N Y. T imes I
mm
l PtKSONS UNOtH 17
BUTCH CASSIDY WED.

Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 26, 1970

I WANTED i
~2 roomies to share campy newl2X7o
mobile palace. Private bdrm., central
heat/air, pool, stereo, color TV. $65,
split utilities. Jan. free. 372-1702.
(C-70-st-p)
Female roommates to share 3
bedroom house. NW section. Own
room. Central heat and air. Car
necessary. SSO/month. 373-1027.
(C-70-4t-p)
Gatortown Female Roommate $45.
mo., Good-study environment, Jan.
rent paid. Immediate occupancy. C&ll
376-7993. (C-67-st-p)
1 male roommate wanted to share
trailer with 1 other student.
J individual bedrooms, carpeting,
stereo, TV, air, nicely furnished. 60/
mo. Call 376-2789. (C-68-st-p).
The Program office, J. Wayne
Reitz Union, is trying to locate
old recordings of songs popular
in the twenties and thirties for
a program scheduled this Spring.
Contact Pat ONeill, 392-1655.
(C-71-3t-p).
MALE Roommmate needed for
Mt. Vernon Townhouse apt.
Jan. rent paid, the best in
stereo and original artwork.
$56.25 per month. Call
378-4072 NOW! (C-71-2t-p).
HELP WANTED 1
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT in
Yellowstone and all U.S. National
Parks, booklet tells where and how
to apply. Send SI.OO to Arnold
Agency, 206 East Main, Rexburg,
Idaho 83440. ...oneyback guarantee.
(E-72-6t-p)
AUTOS
Triumph TR 4, 1964 Blue
w/wire wheels, good top,
tonneau, radio, demountable
luggage rack, & roll bar: Very
good cond. Call 372-7980.
(G-71-st-p).
1966 Karmann Ghia convertible.
Runs perfectly. AM-FM radio, new
brakes and tires. (Has a great
personality) SBOO or best offer. Call
378-0156 and ask for Larry.
(G-st-69-p)
1965 Chevy SS, automatic, air
cond., power steering, brakes.
Only 34,000 well kept miles.
Call 372-6652. (G-71-st-p).
LAST 4 DAYS
WALT DISNEY J
PRODUCTIONS' J*
LAST 4 DAYS
MKIMH y l,K|
l wi w. w. im, s*. VyllCZgfc
if FMOOTjJym
//FAR MORE!
I James ]
\rrrrrn ****** P/
coLy coLy-1
-1 coLy-1 Diwihwi Wmvlllt [
llviHliMl
I 111 W. Uminnity Av. |4. Vg/
!* "Makes ML
$ } Mfhfc} 1 ?
l Playboy |£
* Penthouse % j/
\ look like I
a nursery
* school!" |:;
-ABC-TV
THE JIBERTINE"

ftwwwtop ncDoaooaoooaodtLa.Q.cw ocoocooe*
| AUTOS J
1967 Sprite. Excellent condition.
Tonneau, 22,000 miles, radio,
$l,lOO. Call 378-9004. (G-st-69-p)
Must sell 1967 Pontiac Catalina
Convertible full equipment with withair,
air, withair, best offer takes it!
3 73-2747 373-1573 422 S.E.
Bth St. Apt. D. (G-70-st-p).

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
baldwin^^A
I STARKE, FLORIDA '^gji
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAjNESVI^PHON^T^IO^N^IM^^PPOWTMENT
~ ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadlmn -100 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
M n
i pi| 1| | £
S T 3 :x s 55

< 2 A Tl 3 ~ ~ >1
ca C Q) B a i ID
____ 3 3
z
ui C*3 no
__ __ ___ 9- Qu O. a. q. o
3 B Q) fl) flj 2
. __ jsj t/> m i/i X
S 5 g. J_* | O
a-o o O s
f; it c
§ § 8 Z
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3 3
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(A Z
(A H
_ i ~ =*
mmmmmm
)V DO n! 5 £
!:O!DC SgDijemiistil 19D Ot I S
- ~ ip
N m
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AUTOS
A;v:*:*:*:*>:<<< 1964 COMET Caliente, 3 speed
6 cyl. Extra clean throughout
drafted make offer call
376-0336 (G-7 l-st-p).
6 5 MG Midget, Radio, new
battery, top and paint 6 mo.
old, $875. Call Roger 378-0782.
(G-70-2t-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
| A
1065 Impala Conv. Red r-h a-c new
too new paint. $875. Call 378-6292
ifter 2:00 Mon. thru Wed. Not in on
Thur. thru Sun. (G-72-3t-p)
1065 Comet Caliente 4 speed mag
and chrome reverse wheels 289 4
harrel $995. Notify Brad Lohmann
_ 1 3 Frat Row Call 376-9271.
(G-72-st-p)
PERSONAL
*
' !'KWWWiy
Travel in Europe for academic credit.
6 weeks, 7 countries, jet crossing,
private Coach, excellent
accomodations, low cost, loans
available. Small U F group lead by
highly experienced graduate couple.
Arrangements by World Academy.
Call for booklet. 372-5489.
(J-70-6t-p)
Foosoall? Foosball! In the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament is worth a cast If
vour good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-tf-cK
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress & Sportswear by KATHLEEN
OF YORKSHIRE, Phone 378-0320.
(J-st-69-p)
An experience not to be
forgotten Hear GERT
BEHANNA at University
Lutheran Church, 1826 W.
Univ., Tues. Jan 27, 8 P.M.
(J-71-3t-p).

uanauyffl* |
HT SHOWING Wj-, THI ECU NIE Wf q^M
s!" ADM $1.50 j f i ft]
SW^II SItVE color V V l
' I P6T6ROTOOLe V HICCUEEN hits 11||HB!illS| .i
BkPJHARIN6 H6PBURN Fr | n jj 1 |
Kiiifpnr.K ING CHAIR ... U
jj^SEATING^
PATRONIZE
KTO ADVERTISERS?
II 'HP T here are lots of good reasons. They are a special I
aroup of people, who advertise in our Gator be-
I cause they like doing business with UF students,
I I they deal in the goods and services that we spec-
II ificolly want, and they know this is the best way
| i to get their message across to us. M st f N
II their advertising contributes to The Alligator s
I success, so they are as much a part of The All.-
II gator gang as the editor and the staff. If we, the
l| students, are the backbone of the university news
I paper, then the advertisers are the life s blood.
II So do business with them. They're on our side.

I PERSONAL 1
5 *
*4 ........ *..... .........
GIRLS!! Do YOU have what it
takes...? If so, you may be
eligible to be a TIDY TIGER!
The maid service of last
quarter is now expanding. Due
to copyright, problems, we're
now the Tigress Co-ed Maid &
Hostessing Service. Call Nancy
or Lisa for details. 373-2760.
(J-70-st-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-S4OB. (J-ts-64-c).
8 Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-10t-p).
Chatterbox 4551 N.W. 6th
Street. Two Happy hours every
day 5:30 6:30 AND 9:00
10:00. 12 oz Draft of Bud
or Miller 20c. (J-70-3t-p).
' THE BIG WHITE HOUSE on
the corner will haunt you once
youre inside Strong brew is
their clothes, silver rings,
posters, leather bags, ruanas,
mod hats, peace and strobe
candles, zodiac novelties and
many other things. 1642 W.
Univ. Ave. Open Mon Sat
10 AM lO PM. (J-70-2t-p).
U of F Students only. 10%
discount on anything in our
shop this Fri. and Sat. Bring
your Student card. SPANISH
MAIN 1642 W. Univ. Ave.
372-0667. (J-70-2t-p).

Monday, January 26,1970, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL I
> a
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates In
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-68-10t-p).
60 day tour of England,
student organized, and
unchaperoned, Food, and shelter
plus round trip air fare limited
enrollment $615 Phone
372-8841. (J-71-st-p).
JEANNIE, why stop at a phone call?
The months have passed but the lines
are still open. Ed. (J-72-3t-p)
German shepherds 9 weeks AKC
best champion stock. Show or pet
quality. $125. 372-4653. (J-72-st-p)
Captain Louies Is now delivering
chicken, shrimp, fish, oysters, frog
legs, and other great treasure chests
on campus. 4 to 9 p.m. Call
372-3546. (J-72-st-p)
LOST A FOUND |
iwywvwW'W.y.v^v.w.wXvXv
REWARD: Persian cat white &
silver. 1806 Vi NW 2nd Ave. area.
Please return to address given.
(L-70-3t-p)
FOUND: Male puppy about 10 wks.
old area of sth Ave and Bth St.
Call 373-2513. (L-72-3t-nc)

Page 11

| SERVICES ]
HORSES BOARDED Stalls with
pasture or paddock 8 miles west of
the university. 372-3452 372-2182.
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th Street 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-71-3t-p).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-C)
Alternators-Generators-
Starters-Electrlcal Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603
SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-72-ts-c)
ORANGES
$2 bushel
U-Pic-#m
MODEL HOMES
Orong Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143 ___

Open 7 days
a wee *<
lm cfi
Clip the
Pizza Inn yB&
Buck vsl
bo low for a special treat! \ 17 /
R*dmabU with th JJ Ak
SjSsJht / \ p urc * * "y
find! I W * Y jmfk
fe T or 2 modium puzat.
it 1 Pi**a Inn ot
ar por fomily yT7i Tho Piio Inn fc*
>ffer good \ ( / 316 S.W. I*th Are. /W*jwn\
Bth
EJIZZA INN^BUCK]^^
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
I MONDAY I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I
I BAKED CHOPPED STEAK I
I Mushroom Gravy "TA I
I Hash Brown Potatoes / f Q |
I TUESDAY I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I
I Vz BROILED CHICKEN I
1 $lO9 I
I GAINESVILLE MALL. I

SERVICES I
>x.wssvw:wv.w; K oww*
Happiness is getting your
eyeglasses at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive
your own waiting room to
University Opticians at 519 S.W.
4th Ave. Across from
Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-P).
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically,
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES AH ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 26, 1970

| Campus Crier
ACCENT WEEK IS ALMOST HERE
1) Accent wishes to announce the commencement of their ticket sales for all ACCENT speaking events at
the "service booth" across from the Hub from January 29 February 6,10 a.m. l2 a.m.; 1 p.m. 3p.m.
2) As part of the dedication of ACCENT '7O time capsule, which will feature famous prognosticator Jeane
Dixon, students and faculty may make their contributions to the future. These contributions should take
the form of predictions and should be confined to three or four lines. Paper will be provided by ACCENT.
Each contribution will cost 25 cents and may be made at the following stations on campus:
a) Ground floor of the Union
b) General classroom building (Little Hall)
c) Service booth
d) Libraries
These booths will be set up starting February 1. The 25 cent charge will go toward defraying microfilming
cost.
3) Applications are now being accepted in the ACCENT office for those interested in serving as a host
and/or drivers for the guest speakers of the program. Applications can be made at the ACCENT office and
the deadline is January 28.
I Also dinner escorts may apply in the same manner at the ACCENT office.
.. 0 -r /
1 -* v
4) A detailed schedule of speakers, time, and location is forthcoming in the Alligator Campus Crier. Also
such information will be available wherever tickets are sold.
STUDENT BABYSITTERS AVAILABLE
Married students needing babysitters and babysitters needing married students can call student
government to make their contacts. We have the file and it is up to you to make all final arrangements.
Applications can be filled out in our offices, third floor of the Union. Any questions, call us at 392-1665.
WHO WILL BE THE NEXT SPIRIT COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
Applications are still being taken for those wishing to serve on the Spirit Committee. This staff controls
the distribution of the orange and blue spirit shakers, organizes pep rallies, conducts the annual Banner
Contest, and creates new ways to boost school spirit. It's a lot of fun and doesn't take much time.
I ANNUAL GATOR BASKETBALL TELEVISION BANNER CONTEST
I January 31
I at
I 1:00 p.m.
I Open to all Fraternities Sororities Dorms
Bring Banners to the game!!!
Hang up Bankers must be in place by 12:00!!!
Winners will be announced at halftime!!!
On Television, throe winners, three prizes!!!
i J3WU
. STUDENT GOVERNMENT IS EVERYWHERE
H
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE THEIR
INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT
TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
- STUDENT GOVERNMENT



The
Florida
Alligator

PLAY OLE MISS TONIGHT
Gators Conclude Road Trip

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
The Florida Gators, after
dropping a 79-77 decision to
Mississippi State Saturday,
conclude a three game road trip
MHasi
Shorts
By KEN McKINNON j
Alligator Sports Writer
Chris Patrick, head trainer at
the University of Kentucky since
March of 1967, has joined the
UF athletic staff, replacing
Brady Greathouse who resigned
as Gator head trainer last week.
Patrick, a graduate of the
University of Tennessee, has
authored many booklets on
training and served as trainer of
the Grey squad in the annual
Blue-Grey football all-star game
in Montgomery, Ala.
# *
Brevard Junior College
claimed Floridas Baby Gators as
their 17th straight victim in a
Saturday night 97-64 victory in
Cocoa.
Brevard, No. 6-ranked junior
college team in the nation, pulled
away from a 14-all deadlock
after six minutes of play and
were never threatened again.
Royer Peace hit 18 and Mark
Thompson 15 for Florida, now
7-5 on the season.
* *
UF track coach Jimmy Carnes
is looking for officials for this
years home track schedule.
We need at least 100 officials
for this season, Carnes said. If
anyone has any interest in officiat officiating
ing officiating they can get in touch with
me or anyone at the track
offices on the west side of the
stadium.
Cames is looking for timers,
experienced inspectors and
officials. He said that much help
is needed for the Florida Relays
to be played March 27.
111 JOHNSTON
Ul PHOTOGRAPHY
If congratulations are in order
for your recent engagement, and
now is the time for your
announcement, call
Johnston Photography
for your engagement portrait.
1915 N.W. 13th St.
PHONE 372-2512
j <

GATOR SPOTS

tonight when they play Ole Miss
in Oxford at 7:30 p.m. CST.
Both teams hold identical
24 marks in SEC play, with
Mississippi golding the edge
overall, with a 6-7 record to the
Gators 5-9.
Florida will be playing
without the services of
sophomore right wing man Cliff
Cox who had to return to
DeLand Saturday upon learning
of his fathers death.
The Rebels, despite Tom
Butlers 20 points, lost to
Georgia Saturday night, 96-84 as
three Bulldogs scored more than
20 points.
Other big guns for Ole Miss
include Ron Coleman and
Duaine Boucher who scored 18
and 16 points against Georgia.
Andy Owens continues to
lead the Gators in scoring with
the third highest average in the
SEC.

tea SERVOMATION sSs I
|H I UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE l Mr j
J LUNCHEON BUDGET SPECIALS
i |
Your Choice of any t
IOC Drink FREE! \
I
l MONDAY 76t TUESDAY 91< I
Baked Tuna Tetrazzini Two- Seafood Cakes Tartar Sauce
$ Choice of one 15 cents Vegetable or Salad Choice so any two -15 cents Vegetables
A Roll Butter Roll Butter
J Choice so 10 cents Beverage Free Choice so 10 cents Beverage Free
[WEDNESDAY 79< THURSDAY 66(
v* Baked Tomato and Rice au Gratin A
on Two Slices of Toast Choi.ofone l^VegeUble
9 Tossed Salad Bowl 2
9 Choice of 10 cent Beverage Free Choice of lOf Beverage FREE
I
i FRIDAY r£64ri/i SNACK BAR SPECIALS f
9 90C Every Day 70t X
Baked Macaroni Milanese
I Tossed Salad Bowl Soup of the Day Home Made Chili Con Came 9
9 Ro Bu.ter _2* *!? 9
4 Choice of 10 cents Beverage Free French Fried Potatoes Toned Salad Bowl I
9 Remember Jennings Carry-Out Market

. > a
Owens dropped in 32 points
against Mississippi State, but the
two points he needed to win the
game fell short as the final
buzzer sounded.
The Gators led in that game
by three points, with 1:45 left
on the clock.
A goal tending call was then
called against 5-foot-ll Jerry
Hoover on a jumper by Donnie
Black and the marging was cut
to one point.
Jack Bouldin then put in two
consecutive baskets while
Hoover sank one free throw to
set up the winning tally.
Mississippi State had four
players hit double figures with
Bouldin leading the charge with
25 points.
Earl Findley followed
Owens in scoring for the Gators,
as collected TO points. Hoover
and Dan Boe added nine.

Monday, January 26,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

PHIL BANNISTER
GATORS' EARL FINDLEY WINS JUMP
... scored 10 points against Mississippi State

Sam Pepper 7
Sports Editor

Page 13



Page 14

t. The Mondey.ifahuwv 26.1*70

Tickets On Sale
For Graves Banquet
A banquet honoring Coach Ray Graves will be held Feb. 18 at 7
pm, at the Reitz Union in the Ballroom, sponsored by Kappa Alpha
Theta sorority.
Featured at the banquet is Dick Stratton, sports director of
WJXT-TV in Jacksonville handling the emcee duties.
Both Stratton and Graves are planning a program to show highlights
of the Gator football team plus some added surprises.
Tickets for the banquet are $4 for students and $6 for adults. The
tickets are on sale at the Stag and Drag stores in the Mall and
downtown, at the Union and at the Theta house.
All proceeds are at the request of Graves being given in his name to
the University Activities Center planning fund.
The banquet is planned to give the students at UF a chance to show
their appreciation for the outstanding job that Coach Graves has done
for the past 10 years in being the winningest coach in Gator history.

FOR UF IN 1970
45 Baseball Games Slated

The UF baseball team,
Southeastern Conference
Eastern Division champions a
year ago, begin practice today,
following the announcement of
a 45-game schedule for 1970,
announced Saturday by Director
of Athletics Ray Graves.
The schedule indudes a
17-game slate against SEC
members in the Eastern Division
and tough series with nationally
ranked clubs such as Southern
Illinois* Clemson, Florida State
and Miami.
Coach Dave Fullers dub wiD
launch the season against
Stetson on Friday, Feb. 27, in
Gainesville and end the season at
home hosting Florida State on
May 29-30.
Fuller begins his 23rd year at
the helm of Florida baseball and
brings with him an excellent
record of 418-218, three
conference titles and three
division crowns. He has turned
out four All-Americans and 42
All-SEC performers.
The 1970 squad includes six
regular off last years squad that
gained a 28-16 mark dong with
three pitchers that saw regular
duty.
Back for their senior years are
veteran All-SEC performers Guy
McTheny and Glen Pkkxen.
McTheny, a centerfidder, led
the Gators in batting last season
with a .320 mark.
Pickren, a righthander, led the
SEC in pitching two years ago
with a 10-3 record and a 1.29
ERA. Last season the fireballer
suffered a sore arm and managed
a 4-4 mark. Once again, his arm
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is healthy and is expected to
lead the Gator moundsmen.
Other returning pitchers are
Larry Sheffield, who posted a
2-2 mark and Wayne Rogers,
who had a 3-2 record.
Returning starters indude
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All-SEC Eastern Division Rod
Wright (.316) at third, Tommy
Blankenship (.313) at short,
Leon Bloodworth (.228) at
second, Tony Dobies (.236) in
right, McTheny in center, and
WHI Harman (.302) in right.

51 UF Gridders
Awarded Letters

Varsity letters have been
awarded to 51 members of the
UF 1969 football team, Gator
Director of Athletics Ray Graves
announced today.
Thie list includes 25 seniors
who helped guide the UF to a
9-1-1 record and the Gator Bowl
championship over SEC king
Tennessee, 14-13.
Florida football lettermen by
classes:
Seniors (25) Tom
Abdelnour, Joe Agee, Skip
Albury, Skip Amelung, Alan
Cole, Bob Coleman, Hank Dunn,
Jack Eckdahl, Mark Ely, David
Ghesquiere, Wayne Griffith, Kim
Helton, Tom Kennell, Bill Lee,
Paul Maliska, Guy McTheny,
Mike Palahach, Gunnar Paulson,
Robbie Rebol, Nick Sinardi,
Britt Skrivanek, Mac Steen,
Steve' Tannen, Jim Welch and
Larry Williamson.
Juniors (10) Jack Bums,
Ted Hager, Mike Kelley, Jim
Kiley, Brad Powell, Jerry
Vinesett, Garry Walker, Donny
Williams, Jack Youngblood and
Hunter Bowen.
Sophomores (16) Carlos
Alvarez, Jimmy Barr, Richard
Buchanan, Andy Cheney, Harvin
Clark, Bill Dowdy, Tommy
Durrance, Bob Harrell, Dale
Hutcherson, John Reaves, Mike

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Rich, John Schnebly, Doug
Sorenson, Danny Williams, Jim
Yancey and Richard Franco.
Manager letters went to James
Stabile, Perry Stones, William
Sharkey, John Magnusson,
Gerald Wilson and Roy Shipp.
Trainer letters went to Ernie
Golin, Gary Briggs, J.D.
Comstock, David Silva and
Sandy Ellison.
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Maravich 68 Points Short Os Record

ATLANTA (UPI) Louisiana
States imcomparable Pistol
Pete Maravich is expected to
ford basketballs rubicon this
week especially if he keeps his
footing in the Tennessee
turbulence tonight.
The bayou bomber, who is
averaging a fantastic 47.6 PPG,
needs a total of 68 points in
LSUs two home games this
week against Ijie Tennessee
Vols tonight and against Ole
Miss on Saturday to become
the no. 1 major college career
scorer in the history of
basketball.

Breaststroke Depth Keys
UF Swimming Chances

By BRUCE PAGE
Alligator Correspondent
This year the Florida
swimmers are preparing for their
biggest battle yet with
Tennessee, for the Southeastern
Conference Championship title.
Though its only January, the
Gators are already hard at work
preparing for the SEC meet in
March.
The tankers have many things
going for them, especially depth
in the breaststroke events. They
have reason to be optimistic,
since they have four of the finest
breaststrokers in the Southeast:
Jim Perkins, Marie McKee, Gary
Chelosky and John Plemons.
Perkins, a junior from
Gainesville, is one of the hardest
workers von the team. Since his
freshman year, he has steadily

Gator Wrestlers
I Post Double Win
i g
:jj The UF wrestlers continued their undefeated season by g
S knocking off both Florida A&M and Florida State in Tallahassee
| Saturday.
:|J In dual competition the Gators now boast a 3-0 record for g
their first season of competition as a varsity sport.
The FSU Seminoles fell 31-7 to mark the first time that the
Gator matmen have defeated the Seminoles in wrestling &
competition. *:
Both teams have competed previously on a club basis but
S FSU always managed to come out on top. j:j:
:£ Steve Shomion, Tom Derrough and Jeff Shaffner scored
:§ double victories having to wrestle in both the morning contest :j: ;
against FAMU and in the afternoon against FSU.
Dana Slocum, Gator freshman wrestler, managed a draw |
j|j against Tiederberg, who had previously been undefeated in two m
$ years of intercollegiate wrestling. |
Jonathan Barres, UF freshman, won a decision over Seminole
matman Worthington in what Gator wrestling coach Keith
:* Tennant termed an outstanding match despite a 19-5 edge in
:$ points to Barres. I
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SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE ROUNDUP

Maravich climbed into the no.
2 spot Saturday, passing Elvin
Hayes who scored 2,884 points
for Houston, by pouring in a
coliseum-record 55 points during
LSUs 109-96 loss at 2nd-ranked
Kentucky.
That gave Maravich, who has a
career average of 44.7 PPG, a
total of 2,905 points with at
least 15 games left to play and
left only Oscar Robertson, who
scored 2,973 points for
Cincinnati, still ahead.
Ordinarily, Maravich would be
a cinch to reach the score by

improved and last year was on
the All-American medley relay
team.
Jim feels that having four
good breaststrokers has helped
him, as he has had more
competition and has been
pushed harder.
McKee, who has been
breaking records all year in the
distance freestyle events, has not
had a chance to swim much
breaststroke. But in the
championship meets like SEC,
where depth is really needed, he
swims breaststroke like he has
been doing it all season.
Last year in this meet he took
a third in the breaststroke,
getting valuable points for the
Gators.
Plemons, a freshman from
Winter Haven, swam on the
record breaking medley relay
against FSU. His split for the

Saturday. But Tennessee is no
ordinary foe. The
defensive-minded Vols (who
have given up an average of only
58.6 PPG this season) held
Pistol Pete to less than half his
average in each of their four
previous meetings allowing
him 21,17,21 and 20 points.
A similar performance by the
Vols tonight would force Pete to
really come out gunning
Saturday against Ole Miss, a
team he scored 49 points on
when they last met last March 1.
Thats what the lanky,
tousle-haired Maravich did this

breaststroke leg was 1:01.6, the
fastest time the Gators have
turned in so far.
John is enthusiastic and also
likes having four good
breaststrokers. It keeps you on
your toes, he added, and
thats the only way to keep
improving.
Chelosky, a freshman
breaststroker from Delaware, set
a meet record of 2:15.5 against
Tennessee and a week later at
FSU he set a record again in the
breaststroke of 2:14.
Thus for the second time in
two weeks he has bettered the
qualifying standards for the
NCAA Championships.
Chelosky is also an excellent
individual medley swimer, but
says that My greatest potential
is in the breaststroke, and the
competition from my teammates
keeps me improving.
These four swimmers are one
reason the tankers are looking
forward to the SEC meet.
Another reason is, as Plemons
put it, Team spirit is great, with
everyone working hard so we
can make this the best year yet
in Gator swimming.

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past Saturday night when he hit
21 of 44 field goal attempts and
topped by four points the
previous Kentucky coliseum
high set by the Wildcats Cliff
Hagen 17 years ago.
But the Maravich barrage
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wasnt enough as Kentucky,
leading by as much as 20 points,
streaked to its 14th straight
victory of an unbeaten season
with Dan Issel (no. 2 SEC scorer
with 32.7 PPG) scoring 35
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Page 15



i, Tha Florida Alligator. Monday. January 26,1970

Page 16

Gator Steve Tannen
A Top Draft Prospect
NEW YORK (UPI) UFs star defensive back Steve Tannen is
expected to be a first round draft choice in pro footballs new
two-conference, 26-team league college player draft held Tuesday at
10 a.m.
The Pittsburgh Steelers, who tied with Chicago at 1-13 for the
worst record in pro football, will have first choice in the draft, whose
order was determined by the inverse standings of the teams.
The only exceptions are the Super Bowl teams, Minnesota and
Kansas City, which pick last. Pittsburgh earned its no. 1 listing in a
coin flip with Chicago.
The two-day draft, limited to players who have completed their
college football eligibility, will consist of 17 rounds. A time-limit of
15 minutes is in force for the first two rounds and five minutes for
each subsequent round.
The Green Bay Packers will have second choice, having sent three
players to Chicago on Wednesday for that right, and three American
Conference teams Miami, Boston and Buffalo follow.
Philadelphia picks sixth, followed by Cincinnati, St. Louis, San
Francisco, New Orleans, Denver, Atlanta and the New York Giants.
Houston has 14th choice, with San Diego and Green Bay, using its
own first pick, next. San Francisco has obtained Washingtons no. 1
choice and will draft 17th, followed by Baltimore, Detroit, the New
York Jets, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Dallas, Oakland, Minnesota and
Kansas City.
Coin flips were necessary to break ties involving 11 teams, who will
alternate choices every round.
According to a survey of the pro teams by United Press
International, most feel they will take the best player available
regardless of position. Pittsburgh has had its problems at quarterback,
with neither Dick Shiner nor Terry Hanratty able to generate an
offense.
The Steelers answer may lie with Terry Bradshaw, a
highly-regarded passer from Louisiana Tech, or Mike Phipps, Purdues
All-American quarterback. The Steelers are also looking for a running
back, with Heisman Trophy winner Steve Owens of Oklahoma and
Penn States Charlie Pittman high on the list, and an offensive
lineman.
Green Bay is seeking a defensive lineman, with Notre Dame
All-American Mike McCoy and Mike Reid of Penn State topping the
list. The Packers may also draft a quarterback, with Bart Starr aging
and no reserve available for Don Horn.
Miami is also in the market for defensive line help while Boston
claims it is looking for an outside linebacker, a quarterback and some
pass receiving help. The Patriots, however, may go for a running back
since Jim Nance has played out his option and Carl Garrett is subject
to the military draft.
Buffalo is looking for a top-rate quarterback and the Bills make no
secret of the fact theyre after Bradshaw. Should he be gone, the Bills
are looking for a tight end, possibly Jim Mandich, Michigans
All-America, and offensive and defensive linemen..
Philadelphias Pete Retzlaff says, Our order of priority will be on
offensive linemen, linebackers, backs and then tight ends.*
Cincinnatis Paul Brown says the Bengals are trying to shore up their
offensive line.
Cincinnati traded for offensive tackle Rufus Mayes Wednesday and
Brown adds, If the player we need is not available when we pick, we
will take a super star type of player if one is available. We will not
pass up a good prospect because he does not play a position we
consider to be necessary.
St. Louis will probably go for the best man available while San
Francisco will probably try to shore up its defense. Tom Fears of New
Orleans says he looks for the best athletes first, then worries about
positions while the Denver Broncos say their teams critical need is a
linebacker. A team spokesman said the Broncos were also interested in
a running back to team with Floyd Little and a defensive back and
tight end.

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' -7 7"
I_ TOM CROSSFIELO |
I TEAM LOSES
' Fred Shaw made all the
_ r *(',*** T points for the UFs Rugby iji
Club A team, even though
V the team the
vij v? to the Pensacola Royals at
In an afternoon game, the
m WA Lggjj clubs B team dropped a
6-5 contest to the Royals.
v 9 |j| Saturday's matches were
the final home events of the
season for the club.
' i&SBBBSE-. ** Approximately 200
'mm spectators watched the games
--- >-g in bitter cold weather. §
* 111 W
* A Arnkt. w3Bm
V A HBMhMbBhBSB
§ 4 PHIL BANNISTER 8

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