Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
T?oSi
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Vol. 62, No. 71

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DOUG CASE
THREE BLACKS TAKEN INTO CUSTODY
... arrests made in Tigert Had Thursday

Nixons Message Pushes
Crime, Pollution Spending

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon proposed in his
State of the Union message to
Congress Thursday the most
expensive programs in history to
combat pollution and crime.
While his prepared message
dealt extensively with the need
for greater federal economics to
fight inflation, the President told
a joint session of the House
and Senate that crime and
pollution were two areas in
which he would recommend
REITZ UNION'S first
floor includes billiards,
barbers and business all
wrapped into one ... page 4
Classifieds 12, 13, 14
Editorials.... 8
Entertainment 18
FSU News 6
Letters 9
Movies 12 & 13
Orange and Blue ..15
Small Society 6
Sports 20
Whats Happening .5

FLAVETS: JUST A SMOKE SCREEN
OConnell Obscuring UAC Issues, Ball. Says

By MARY ANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writer
At a meeting sponsored by Florida Blue Key
Wednesday night, Thomas Ball, mayor of Flavet
Village and chairman of the mayors executive
committee accused UF President Stephen C.
OConnell of obscuring the real issues in the
University Activities Center (UAC) controversy with
the issue of the fate of the Flavets.
President OConnell, I charge you to stop
sending up a smoke screen on Flavet Village. There
are 2Q£QQ other students on your campus, Ball
said.

The
Florida Alligator

unprecedented spending.
Nixons first State of the
Union message also reported
prospects for peace in Vietnam
were far greater today than
they were a year ago.
Nixons assessment of the
peace outlook for the 70s was
even brighter. He said America
may have the best chance since
World War II to enjoy a
generation of uninterrupted
peace.
In a largely domestically
oriented message in which he
foresaw America as a society of
large expectations, the
Presidents dominant subjects
appeared to be pollution, crime
and inflation.
On pollution, he declared:
The program I shall propose to
Congress will be file most
comprehensive and costly
program in this field ever in the
nation's history.
He said the [dan, to be
submitted later to Congress, will
include a national $lO billion
clean waters program to put
modern municipal waste

THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

ON ASSAULT COUNTS
3 Students Jailed
In Dorm Incident

See related story, page 7
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Editor-in-Chief
Three black UF students were
arrested Thursday afternoon by
Alachua County Sheriffs
deputies and charged with
aggravated assault in connection
with an early Tuesday morning
incident in UFs Tolbert Hall.
Earl J. Wilcox, Ronald J.
Jackson and Joseph E. McCloud,
all freshmen, were being held in
the Alachua County jail late
Thursday night, on two counts
of aggravated assault each. Bond
was set at SI,OOO on each count.
The arrests, made in a Tigert
Hall corridor outside the office

treatment plants in every place
in America where they are
needed.
With reference to the fight
against the growing crime rate,
he said:
In referring to budget cuts,
there is one area where I have
ordered an increase rather than a
cut; the request of those
agencies with the responsibility
for law enforcement.
Nixon said that would involve
doubling in fiscal 1971 the
federal expenditure for aiding
local law enforcement double
the 1970 budget for this
purpose.
Discussing inflation, the
President declared that millions
of Americans are forced to go
into debt today because the
federal government decided to
go into debt yesterday.
Presenting and remaining
within a balanced budget, he
added, required hard
decisions.

I must protest the travesty of clouding the fix
dollar tuition hike with the fate of Flavet Village.
Had anyone bothered to check any of our bi-weekly
open village commission meetings, they would have
found that we villagers have known for months that
Flavets fate was sealed, regardless of this tuition
fiasco.
The issue concerning 20,000 UF students is not
the fate of Flavet Village, but the gross inequity of
putting a further tax on an already financially
over-burdened student CQmmunity. We already have
the eighth highest tuition in the nation for a state
university and at the rate were going, we soon will

of Coordinator for Minority
Affairs Roy Mitchell, followed
complaints filed by two white
UF freshmen, Bruce G. Schwack
and Robert L. Wessells.
Captain R. E. Stanley, in
charge of criminal investigation
for the Sheriffs office, said he
expected additional arrests to be
made. He would not elaborate.
At this point the situation
prohibits me from giving the
exact details, he said. Its a
state case and in all fairness it
would be harmful to release
details at this time/*
Larry Jordan, SG secretary
for minority affairs and a
member of the Black Student
Union, said efforts were being
made to obtain funds to post
bond for the three suspects.
Jordan said he expected the
money to be available later
Thursday night.
According to the Sheriffs
office, the arrests were in
connection with a reported
incident involving four white
students and up to seven
black youths on the fifth floor
of Tolbert Hall.
The Alligator learned
Wednesday that a group of
blacks had forced the white
students at gunpoint to clean up
trash strewn on the hallway
outside their rooms. The incident
took place around 4 a.m.
Tuesday, informed sources
reported.
The blacks reportedly left the
floor quietly after the white
students had cleaned up the
rubbish.
Wednesday, Jordan had
quoted two black students as
saying the incident was a
figment of a warped
imagination.
Mitchell said late Thursday
night he had contacted the
parents of two of the arrested
students and that steps were
being taken to collect about
S6OO necessary to post the
bonds amounting to $6,000.
We hope that we will be able
(SEE 'STUDENTS' PAGE 2)

be number one, Ball said.
Blue Key sponsored the meeting to coordinate
the opposition on campus to the Feb. 4 referendum.
Then a common pool of manpower and
conservative effort can unite the people to one
cause, said Greg Jones, Blue Key member.
The Blue Key executive council chose to back the
Committee to defeat the proposed UAC after the
chapter empowered them to take steps to
coordinate objections raised about the UAC. Jones
said the Blue Key office on the third floor of the
Reitz Union would become home base for the
(SEE "FBK" PAGE 2}

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Friday, January 23, 197 Q

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JOSEPH McCLOUD
... bail set at $2,000



Page 2

.Wm&lQrito AM4fMf, Fridv, January 23,1970

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
A 20-year-old UF employe was sentenced
Thursday morning to four years in prison for
draft evasion.
Jape H. Taylor was sentenced by Judge
Winston Amow in the U.S. District Court,
Gainesville.
Taylor said his lawyer, Samuel Jacobson, of
Jacksonville, plans to hie an immediate appeal in
the U.S. Fifth District Court of Appeals in New
Orleans.
The appeal could take from six months to a
year and a half, he said.
Taylor, who has worked in the computer
center on campus for two years, said the

FBK Headquartering UAC Opposition

fpBOM MGE ONeJ
committee for the next few weeks.
Jim Clark, chairman of the committee, explained
his position to the thirty persons present at the
meeting. We would like the students to understand
that we are not opposed to the UAC, but we are
definitely opposed to this specific plan.
We oppose this thing for three reasons, Clark
said. First and most important, the already
over-burdened student body simply cannot afford
any more tuition increases. Second, this proposal is
over-priced, and last, we have found this plan to be
not only under-planned but poorly planned.
A resolution passed by Blue Key and read at the
meeting by Jones encourages the state legislature,

Minority Affairs
Council Formed

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Editor
A University Council on
Minority Affairs has been
formed to deal with concrete
problems that arise in minority
affairs with the idea of getting
them solved quickly, Harry
Sisler, UF executive vice
president announced Thursday
afternoon.
The council will meet at 1:30
p.m. today in Tigert.
This was a planned step
forward that did not arise from
any particular incident, he said,
referring to the reported dorm
events of Monday night.
The Council resulted from a
MINI-POSTER
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ABOUT HIS AGE
a

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspapet of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter-at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and'to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not considet adjustments of payments foi any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run

Jan. 9 joint meeting of the
Committee on Disadvantaged
Students and the Advisory
Committee to the Office of
Minority Affairs. At that time,
the two committees
recommended the establishment
of such a council to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnell approved the
recommendation a few days
later, Sisler said.
The composition of this
council is not fixed. We can
expand or contract depending
on the nature of the problem,
Sisler said.
Sisler will be chairman and
other standing members will
include the registrar, director of
admissions, director of housing,
vice president for academic
affairs, vice president for
business affairs, chairman of the
committee on disadvantaged
students and the coordinator of
minority affairs.
Two or more faculty members
and two or more students will be
selected but the method is still
uncertain, Sisler said.
Theres no reason to believe
this council will be a panacea for
all minority problems, but we
hope it will solve enough to be
worthwhile.
We want people who can
help us solve problems but you
cant have a big public debate
every time you need to.

UF Employe*"
Given 4 Years
For Draft Evasion
university has assured him he will have no
trouble in keeping his job during the appeal.
I object to war. Its morally wrong and 1 m
not going to have anything to do with it.
I am basically a conscientious objector, but
the legal definition is biased toward the
conventional religions, such as the Quakers,
Taylor said.

BALL SAYS $6 FEE HIKE UNFAIR

the university administration, the alumni association
and other groups interested in having a coliseum for
one reason or another to live up to their
responsibilities and obligations and not try to
transfer them to the transient, already-burdened
student community.
The opinions of those present differed in their
reasoning, but not in their purpose. All were
opposed to the UAC.
I oppose this referendum because I dont
approve of the way theyre trying to ram this thing
down the students throats. The wording of the
referendum is wrong. It presents it as an either/or
situation, not giving me a choice. Youre either
against the university or youre for the UAC, said
David Depew, 2UC.

Three Students Arrested
In Dormitory Incident

[[ROM pace one^J
to assist the students in
obtaining the best legal aid
possible, he said.
Mitchell said he was alarmed
at the way the whole thing is
being handled.
He said he had not been
informed of the incident until
following a meeting between
Director of Housing Harold
Riker and David West, officer of
student conduct.
I thought that inasmuch as I
am the counselor for minority
groups I should have been
informed of this, also, he said.
Mitchell said the students
were arrested as he escorted
them out of his office. Im
concerned, he said, because I
feel they were not informed of
their constitutional rights at the
time of the arrest.
But, he said, the students
were informed of their rights
and advised of the charges filed
against them upon arriving at the
county jail.
Mitchell added he had
successfully appealed to the
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W PHA 471 Mathews: Meas. in P.E.
m 271 Sinacore: Health, A
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B PSY 411 Dixon: Intro, to Sta-
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B 611 Shaw: Theo. of Soc.
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306 Cartwright: Group
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1 PS 611 Jackson: Class. Elec-
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V PCL 207 Scott: Mexican Gov.
V in Trans.
543 Skidmore: Pol. in
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SLS 330 Buckman & Brady:
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1 of SLS
B SY 202 Horton: The Socio. of
of Soc. Prob.

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Approximately 20 members of the Gainesville
Society of Friends attended the sentencing,
according to W.H. Alexander.
Alexander, a member of the Friends, read
from the statement issued by the Quakers
regarding the present draft system.
We recognize the evil nature of all forms of
conscription and its inconsistency with the
teachings and example of Christ. Military
conscription in the United States today
undergirds the aggressive foreign policies and
oppressive domestic policies which rely on the
easy availability of military manpower...
We do not support efforts at draft reform,
for the issue is not equal treatment under
compulsion, but freedom from compulsion.

Having such a good business school, we
shouldnt have such a terrible financial mess. Why
dont they float a bond issue or something? I
wouldnt mind paying $6 for better education, said
Paul Dee, 4AS.
The school or administration has failed
completely to give students valid facts about the
coliseum. Some examples are the $6 per person
increase in tuition for the next 25 years. With our
predicted increased population, the amount will
accede this sl7 million they claim to seek, said
Lee Schillinger, representative of the student
American Civil Liberties Union.
They speak of sl7 million for the UAC and
they dont explain why the Flavets have wooden
fire escapes, Schillinger said.

judge conducting arraignment
procedures to lower the
suspects bond from $5,000 on
each count to $ 1,000.
Asked about the presence of
the students in his office at the
time of the arrest, Mitchell
replied:
One of the students works
on a program operating
temporarily out of my office.

Representative Irked
At Student Concern
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students who took their gripes to Tallahassee this week were
greeted with a cold shoulder by Rep. Cedi Bothwell.
Bill Seaman, who heads the Environmental Action Group at UF,
was addressing the House Agriculture and Public Health Welfare
Subcommittee on the dangers of pestiddes when Bothwell spoke to
the student.
1 resent your coming up here tying up our time, the Orlando
Republican said.
The position of students in a meeting of this sort is exactly the
same as it is on a campus. Their job is to go and learn from someone
who knows more than they do.
Bothwell left the meeting immediately after the motion to adjourn
was given and disappeared into his office.
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MARIONS
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The three of them are friends so
they were along.
He added that black students
generally gather around my
office. Im the only black person
here they have to relate to and I
encourage them to come at any
time they so desire, he said.
The charges carry maximum
penalty of five years
imprisonment on each count.



SG TREASURER ASKS

Funds: Students or States?

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Treasurer Jim
Roll addressed the Student
Senate Tuesday and discussed
the difficulties Student
Government has experienced in
requesting money for
expenditures through the office
of business affairs.
Its not clear whether

ACLU Presidents
Son Arrested

Michael Canney, the
Gainesville High School student
suspended in 1968 for wearing
his hair too long, has been
arrested on a narcotics violation.
Gainesville police arrested
Canney at 9:15 Wednesday night
under Florida Statute 404 which
covers narcotics.
Canney was suspended from
GHS in October, 1968, when the
length of his hair was said to be
disruptive of the educational
process. The suspension was
upheld by the Alachua County
Board of Public Instruction
following a hearing in which
both sides refused to present
evidence.
Canneys lawyer and the
School Board each said the other
had asked for the hearing and
should present the evidence that
might be available.
Robert B. Canney, Michaels
father, is a Foundations of
Education instructor at UF and
is president of the local

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Offer good only with this coupon at
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student body funds are state
funds or not, he said. This has
advantages and disadvantages.
No difficulty is incurred when
the expenditures are routine.
The difficulty comes in when
the expenditure is out of the
ordinary.
Because of this, he said, state
auditors are trying to establish a
uniform procedure for all
universities and junior colleges.

American Civil Liberties Union.
Canney will be arraigned in
the Alachua County Eighth
Judicial District Court at a later
date.

Nigeria Gets U.S. Aid
'As Long As Needed 1
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon Thursday ordered 40,000
tons of high protein food be shipped to Nigeria every month for as
long as it is needed to help prevent starvation in the former
successionist state of Biafra.
Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said Nixon acted after receiving a
request for help from the Nigerian government forwarded to
Washington by the U.S. aid mission in Lagos.
Ziegler said Nixon ordered the U.S. government to meet these
requests fully . In addition to the food, the United States will provide
airplanes to help distribute it, Ziegler said.
In addition to the foodstuffs, Ziegler added, the United States
would also supply 50 generators, 10,000 blankets and 10,000
hurricane lamps, all for use in hospitals.
To speed distribution, he said, the United States will transfer to the
Nigerian government four U.S. C 97 cargo planes now used by the
International Red Cross in Cotonou, Dahomey.
Two other aircraft, U.S. DC6 cargo planes now in Iceland, will be
loaned to the Nigerian government, Ziegler said.

In order for the student body at
UF to retain its economic
autonomy and flexibility, he
said, SG will have to adhere to a
realistic monetaiy policy.
A bill was also passed
which authorizes ACCENT 7O
to sell tickets to all indoor
functions of ACCENT Week.
The tickets will cost 25 cents for
students and faculty and 50
cents for all others. Those events
featuring David Brinkley and
Jean Dixon will cost 50 cents for
students and faculty and a dollar
for all others.
A resolution recommending
to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell that SSOO be
allocated to the Comer Drug
Store to enable two members of
its staff to attend a symposium
in San Francisco was also passed.

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Q. Is the University Activities Center just an athletic center?
A. Definitely not. The complex is planned to provide facilities for
academic, cultural and social activities in addition to a mass-seating
coliseum featuring a sports arena. The complex includes a minimum
of four facilities linked together by a common plaza; an 1,800 seat
performing arts theatre; a 6,000 seat amphitheatre; a natatorium to
house indoor swimming and diving activities, and a 16,000 seat
coliseum with a sports arena, plus academic and faculty office space.
The complex will have ability to serve multiple needs none of which
are adequately accommodated on UFs campus at the present time. It
will serve as a focal point for campus and community social, cultural
and athletic events, providing space for university-wide convocations,
regional conventions and other meetings of interest to UF, the
community and the state. In a letter to Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, Jan. 14, 1970, UF President Stephen C. OConnell
stated, The University of Florida Activities Center is committed to
the involvement of all segments of university life in the cultural,
social, recreational and athletic activities that this university should
and will have.
Q. What contributions can be expected from the alumni, the
county, the state and the city?
A. It is planned to finance the University Activities Center by a
combination of student and faculty participation, Alachua county and
municipal support, state and federal appropriations and contributions
from alumni and other friends of the university. Money for
preparation of architectural studies already has been made available
by the Board of Regents, which will make final selection of the
architect. Commissions of the City of Gainesville and Alachua County
have indicated that they want to cooperate in the project. The Alumni
Association and the University of Florida Foundation, Inc. have
pledged their support in raising funds for the project as have many
other organizations interested in locating such a facility on the
campus.
Q. Will approval of the referendum be used by the Legislature as a
reason for increasing student tuition an additional $25?
A. No. The referendum is for a specific figure, for a specific
purpose, for a specific time. It is chi an increase in the activity fee at
the rate of $6 per quarter, per student for a period of 25 years. The
registration fee for all universities in the state system is the same
amount and is set by the Board of Regents.

Friday. JJanuary 23,1970. The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

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A.A Wont Forget
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Feature Editor
Maybe you wont have too much active loyalty to the Gators after
you graduate, but the UF Alumni Association on the Reitz Union
Ground Floor wont forget you.
In fact, it hires a secretary full-time just to keep up with alumni
changes-in-address!
Among die students and alumni
Other A.A. activft^^SHJjSS^!^^campaign, keeping
up-to-date files on personal data on alumni, giving office space to
student organizations, and sponsoring the Florida Cicerones, a UF
hostess organization. It also publishes a monthly University of
Florida Magazine, with articles of interest to both alumni and
current students and faculty.
Action Center
By BUCK POPPELL
Alligator Correspondent
On an average day about 450 people will use the facilities of the
game room in the Reitz Union, said Patrick J. Day, recreation
supervisor for the union.
It depends on the day of the week, and whatever else is happening
on campus.
Business always slacks off during finals or when there is a big social
event such as Homecoming or Fall Frolics, he said.
Biggest attractions are the bowling lanes and the pool tables, but
chess, checkers, cards, ping pong and a television are also offered.
All of the equipment is regulation size and grade, so it can be used
for intercollegiate competition.
Were a member of the Association of College Unions
International (ACU-I), and we take turns hosting regional playoffs in
events like snooker, billards and bowling, Day said.
Day said that union equipment is in such demand that a time limit
has been placed on the bowling alleys, the ping pong tables and the
pool tables.
The game room is open to students, faculty, staff, their guests and
family, alumni holding alumni cards, students with valid ID cards
from other four-year colleges, and people on campus in an official

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff
Over 70 per cent of the UF graduating class uses the services of the
placement center on the ground floor of the Reitz Union.
There has been a tremendous upsurge of student traffic in the past
three years in this office, the number has more than ou e
Placement Director Maurice Mayberry said. r
Out of a graduating class of over five or six thousand, the omce
dealt with over 4,000 active participants during the 1968-69 year.
The Placement office acts as a coordinating agency in matching
students with employers who come to campus to recruit.
Lately the number of employers coming to campus has fallen,
Mayberry said.
About 48 of 500 employers scheduled this fall cancelled out.
There seems to be a parallel between the level of the economy and
the amount of recruiting activity on the professional level, he noted.
The situation is not bleak, only more competitive, he said.
More than 1,000 employers recruited at theUF in the 1968-69 Fall
and Winter quarters.
These employers have lessened a demand for jobs at the top level,
particularly in the Ph.d. area in the Physical Sciences.
But even with this reduction we dont see any crippling effects,
he said.
The competition has resulted in more enlightened and energetic
efforts on the part of job seekers. Many employers look less at the
students record of grades, than at how he has developed his career
goals, Mayberry said.
Physical expansion of the placement office is a necessity, Mayberry
said.
Like many other organizations which have reached maximum
space, his office is looking to the proposed activities center for future
help.

%ssS6s&SsoSS6&Gfflt
I 'Give Me Lots Os Hair I
5: v:

i
£ By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
?:
V
§ Give me lots of hair, long
jj beautiful hair.
i*j Just the words to the song,
Hair, or a plea from
S short-haired guys for the longer
S variety?
j| Neither. Its the cry of barbers
jg all over the country to trim the
locks of the long-haired youth,
and the Reitz Union Barber
8 Shop offers no exception.
| Our business is largely
(students with a small number of
faculty and staff, said manager
Wayne Barker about his ground
iji; floor establishment.
He has observed no lack of
§ business due to longer hair styles
j| since he took over the barber
| shop two years ago. In fact,
iji; when he took over the shoo
1
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* HpBBPp
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S|p J
h 5/ ( f ;fls ilir
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lllimi IlSk.-.. I ; I PHIL COPE
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i
there were only two other $
barbers; now there are eight. $
Prices at the Union Barber $
Shop are comparable to town
shops. Regular haircuts are $2; $
razor cuts, $3; styling, $5; and $
straightening, $7. $
The Union Barber Shop $
contributes heavily to student
activities. $
We help sponsor dances and >:
refreshments for dances and :j
recreation parties for student
groups. This is our means of :j:
advertising, Barker said. :j:
Operating on a year-round £
,basis, the shop is open 8-5:30 £
pm. weekdays and 94 p.m. $
Saturdays. §j
About $7,000 a year rent £
money is put back into the $
Union, Barker said. He is the :j:
former director of Barber :j:
Sanitary Commission for $
Florida. £
I



Student Services
Find Europe Jobs

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Writer
The American-European
Service, located in Vandez,
Liechtenstein, a small country
between Italy and Switzerland,
is a non-profit student work
opportunity organization that
will find employment
opportunities for college
students in Eurbpe.
Several Central European
countries are participating in the
program, including Germany,
France, Austria, Switzerland and
Leichtenstein.
Several fields are open to male
students in all five countries.
Farm, light construction, and

WHAT'S
I HAPPENING
NO PETAL PUSHER: Biff Rose will be singing in the Rathskeller
this weekend with appearances tonight at 8:30,10:30 and 12:30. On
Saturday night, there will be only the first two performances.
TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON AND A PURPOSE:
Aquarius is in its house and all followers should attend the midnight
meeting tonight. The Aquarius meeting will be at 1823 NW 2nd Ave.
AFTER THE FIFTH AND BEFORE THE SEVENTH: Greg Albert
and the Sixth Hour will make a special guest performance at the
College Life meeting sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ. The
Sunday meeting will be at 9:13 p.m. at the Alpha Tau Omega house.
SPORTS OF SORTS: All cricket players who played on the team
last quarter, and any others interested in playing this quarter, should
attend practice Saturday afternoon at 2 on the ROTC drill field. For
more information, call 376-7746.
TRIPLE TREAT: Step right up students without a cause, females
without freedom, and pickets without signs. Now you can have a
choice of causes to fight for or ideas to believe in. This Sunday at
4:30 the Young Socialist Alliance Women's Liberation Fraction will
meet to discuss mass actions in rooms 355-356 of the Reitz Union. At
6 pm, the Young Socialist Alliance general meeting will convene.
Sponsored by the Student Peace Union, the groups meets in rooms
355-356 of the Union how convenient! Still searching? The
ever-ready SMC has schleduled a meeting for 8. Big (dans are
underway for the Cleveland antiwar conference. Travel to rooms
361-363 for this one.

Alumni Plan
Jax Meeting
Members of the UF Alumni
Association's Executive
Committee will meet in
Jacksonville Saturday to plan
1970 activities.
Association President James
Ade, a Jacksonville attorney,
said the session will begin at
10:30 am at the Sheraton
Hotel. The Greater Jacksonville
Alumni Club will host
committee members during a
luncheon at the hotel.
In addition to Ade, die
committee includes
President-elect Doyle Conner,
Tallahassee: Executive Secretary
William J. Watson, Jr,. Treasurer
W. A. McGriff and University
Relations Dean Fred Cantrell, all
of Gainesville; Peter Fay, Miami;
James Kynes, Leonard Levy and
Thomas McDonald, all of
Tampa; Doyle Rogers, Palm
Beach; J. B. Walters,
Jacksonville, and George Wolly,
Orlando.
Ade said the initial association
program of the year will be a
club officials convention on
campus, Feb. 13-14.
Buy a gator ad.
Well fit you In.
2 i

forestry workers live in camps
and receive no wages, but there
are social activities and sports.
There are also some more
specialized opportunities.
Girls are offered opportunities
in child care as governesses and
counselors.
There are openings in large
hotels for porters,
chambermaids, waiters,
waitresses and dishwashers.
Room and board will be free.
All working conditions are
controlled by the individual
country's labor ministries.
For further information
contact Wiliam Scruggs, UF
coordinator at 392-1704.

2^
Qww- a
By l k
If fl
With a John Roberts
' class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I THE WINNER! I
1 MBS?W |Ph mtt
JfeQp JjgjP
BB Jpi ' x % v Mfll
I B uk Wf* I
I a#K. M mn&LM m "/* v
f y jf
IraBBET' Tv? : A K
I c fvj^n
if 'tL? m
jigg* WSbp' BjPBBgjHR mbb|
I|f|!!|||| 'ip* ?:

MHBHBWiPBfiiBHHBk I
.;tW b.
H Lemer Shops collection of the tunic or the tunic look is
the greatest.
Shirley has chosen the coolest the furn'c look, a one
piece dress in solid and tweed a paisley tie for the finishing
touch. mt
H Be a winner with your own selection of 3 piece tunic Bi
H styles, dress with tunic vest, or the tunic pants dress look.
Shown $15.99

Htmtr Kga^nwrffyiwWi

Page 5



Page 6

, Tha Florida Att(rtor, Friday, January 23,1970

Jafgg ' 9tif (ft l?' f yi6 UF Hosts Andrews
J State Rep. Wiffiam C. Andrews, D-Gainesvffle, will speak today at
the second of a series of luncheons scheduled each week by the John
Marshall Bar Association.
Andrews will discuss the investigation of the Governors Club now
being conducted by the elections committee of the House of
Representatives.
Andrews said Wednesday he will generally talk about the
difficulty weve had legally speaking in procuring the dubs records
and will give an explanation about laws regarding expenditures and
contributions.
Forty to fifty people are expected to attend the 12:30 pm.
luncheon at the Holiday Inn on 1-75. Any interested persons are
invited to attend. The charge is $ 1.75.

By MARY McBRIDE
a aat
Alligator VYniof
Phi Delta Kappa will soon
invite other recognized campus
organizations to join its
pressure campaign to force
revision of the University
Senate.
A resolution calling for
reorganization of the Senate was
passed Jan. 14 by Beta Xi
Chapter of PDK, an educational
leadership honorary of more
than 100 members.
In its present form the

from...JB^rSU

By FSU FLAMBEAU;
ARNOLD John Arnold,
vice president for student affairs,
denied approval Wednesday to a
student senate package approval
of seven campus organizations,
including SDS and YAS.
In memorandum to President
of the Senate Wayne Robinas,
Arnold said the legislation
imposed conditions not
completed on the expression of
regulations governing student
organizations.
SDS Testimony ends today
in the SDS injunction hearing.
No decision is expected from
Leon County Judge Ben Willis
for at least a week.
Defense attorney Richard
Wilson summed up his case
saying that FSU facilities are not

b V*V rZ7
Jr fejf J*
"I Couldn't Afford A Valentines Card
BUT
NEW UGHINNG DELIVERY!
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE
TAKING ORDERS FEB 3 A 4
HERFF JONES
you are invited... i. '
.. .to inspact your new, exclusive rings

lOIMS OTHER GROUPS
Group Pressures For Senate Change

University Senate cannot
represent the true, best interests
of the University of Florida,
the resolution reads.
By going through democratic
and legitimate channels we can
bring about the changes
needed, said member Walter
Mickter,7ED.
The first complaint is the
large size of the Senate which
limits efficiency, according to
the resolution- The Senate now
has 600 seats.
Composition of the Senate
does not adequately represent

the private property of the
administration or the private
property of the students, but
public property. \
SCOPE H
Recruiting
The Federal Water Pollution
Control Administration will be
on campus Saturday to interview
students who are interested in
serving on the nine-member
Student Council on Pollution of
the Environment (SCOPE).
Interested students should meet
in the Reitz Union at 9 a.m.
SCOPE is being organized
both locally and nationally to
give students a voice in the
decisions on environmental
problems affecting their homes
as well as the nation as a whole.

the small society

I |tfPLY£ANN<3T g_ ~M
GO Ofi UVIH& IN THMS
aamrTMfitefMJ?*
60C\BTY 17 vcm&z ME

all ranks of University
personnel, the resolution states.
Mickler said that of the 600
seats, 550 are held by full
professors because of their rank.
Assistant and associate
professors have less than 10 per
cent representation.
Mickler also said some
colleges include students in the
senate, while the University
Senate does not. Whether the
plan for reorganization will call
for student members depends on
tiie decision of the convocation
of organizations, he said.

# r . ; >;' j
. .' I
o M- V} -*
. - "* ; i .. ; .?

The Senate is greatly
malapportioned among divisions
of the University, the
resolution also states. On this
point Mickler cited the Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, which holds 25 per
cent of the seats while it
represents six per cent of the
student body.
PDK is not the first group to
call for reorganization of the
Senate. The governors task
force of the Action Conference
proposed reorganization and

by Brick man

listed the same points in March
1969.
The Senate sat on that
proposal for nine months until
active support died, and then
voted it down, Mickler said.
Were not calling for any
massive demonstrations, he
said. We just,want a show of
support.
PDK will send letters to
honorary, leadership and general
organizations on campus calling
for a general convocation to be
held in the very near future.



Dorm Security Beefed Up For Protection

By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Editor-in-Chief
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Thursday
Tuesday mornings incident in
Tolbert Hall does not
constitute a crisis on this campus
and none will be permitted to
occur.
If any person or groups of
persons attempt to create one, it
will be dealt with promptly,
firmly and fairly, OConnell
said in a statement.
He said the UF had increased
security measures in living areas
in order to protect against
further incidents of the kind
reported.
OConnell said he had been
informed of the incident
Wednesday.
Upon learning of this
incident shortly after it
happened, OConnell said,
officials in the Office of
Student Affairs and Student
Housing immediately
commenced an investigation to
determine the facts of the event
and the identity of the persons
involved.
The investigation is still
underway, OConnell said.
He added that the UF will
bring charges for violations of
University regulations against
any students involved.
Those students who were
threatened and intimidated are
afforded the opportunity to file
criminal charges with the
appropriate law enforcement
agencies against the offending
persons, whether they be
students or non-students,
O'Connell added.
Steps are also being taken to
insure compliance with
University regulations which
forbid unauthorized use and
possession of firearms in living
areas on the campus, he added.
If any additional action is
found to be necessary to protect
the safety and welfare of the
inhabitants of the campus,
OConnell added, it will be
taken promptly.
| Todays
I Special §
vi
The Arredondo Room will
£: feature a catfish and
$; hushpuppy luncheon special
$: today from 11:30 a.m. until
I I P- |
Complete meal is 95 cents
§ and half-portion is 50 cents. Si
S $
join the fun!
THESWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
aky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
jUSt $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
ig Waldo Road
MwwtwT

OConnell added:
The University fully
recognizes and will perform its
responsibility to insure the
safety and freedom from
intimidation by any person on
the UF campus.
Neither the administration
nor any of the thinking members
of the University community
condones any person or group of
persons attempting to settle
grievances, real or imagined, by
their own actions with the use of
force or intimidation of any
kind. There are adequate
provisions for the airing of
charges and for the settlement of
grievances by all persons on our
campus.
The UF administration,
faculty and students view with
great seriousness the events
which have been reported to
have occurred. The use of force
or threats of force by any person
or group of persons, students or
non-students, against other
persons is intolerable in any
community but is particularly so

todays button-downs ...
Great fashion when they're dis distinctively
tinctively distinctively Gant. Take this im impecably
pecably impecably tailored swagger stripe
shirt. No-iron Fortrel poly- nI
ester/cotton oxford, at 10.00. 5
The 4" wide tie, of course
/Mam S/wfAm 1
GAINESVILLE MALL >3

in a university.
Reason and respect for the
rights of others are die principles
which must prevail on campus if
the University and all that it is
supposed to represent is to
survive and prosper.
All members of the

Total Commitment 9 To Solve Crisis
Sen. Muskie Tells Publication

NEW YORK (UPI) Sen.
Edmund S. Muskie believes the
successful solution of Americas
urban crisis lies in a willingness
to make a total commitment of
our resources, our energy, and
our will to do the job.
The Maine Democrat, his
partys vice presidential
candidate in 1968, expressed his
views in City, the publication of
Urban America Inc. Among the
points he made was the need to

University community
students, faculty and staff alike
must be able to live and work
in an atmosphere free of fear
and in which they are able to
pursue the intellectual life in
accordance with their own
interests and their own needs

call on the resources of suburbia
. to help solve the problem of the
inner cities.
The problem of the inner
city is the problem of the entire
area, he said. Without the
/ city, the suburb cannot exist.
Residents of any community
are reluctant to commit
resources beyond their own
needs, but if a higher taxation of
the suburbs is the answer, then it
must be levied. We must develop

/Mam Bhct/tm
GAINESVILLE MALL
Crazy Horse does
its part with the
pantset thats as
natural as nothing.
Long, lean cotton
knit that speaks the
body language of
navy/red or
red/navy at 25.00
Maas Village Shop

THERES A
NEW LOOK
IN THE
I VILLAGE SHOP i i
m.mmiu M. m m .m m -J

Friday, W 23,1970, Tha Flogda A'Ma*o(.

without intimidation or threat
of violence.
It- is the duty of the
University administration to
take all possible steps to provide
such an atmosphere and we will
continue to do so, he
concluded.

public services and public
institutions that have relevance
to the entire metropolitan area.
Muskie concluded by saying:
Our urban crisis our national
crisis is not crime, or
discrimination, or
unemployment, or obsolete
housing, or polluted air and
water and eroded land. These are
the results. The crisis is a lack of
commitment.

Page 7



Page 8

V-MKNK*
r XMuFloodiJUUgator,

. The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is The exercise of responsibility.

- I %&. \ y S'" x S\& ''' * "'
RAINDROPS ARE FALLING PETfc A
As students run for shelter to hang up dripping
umbrellas and dry wet shoes, rain softly leaves its

Reallocate Fees For UAC

MR. EDITOR:
In reply to those who ask why the students
should not pay for the proposed Activities Center, it
must be pointed out that each student is already
paying $15.50 per quarter out of his tuition for
building construction. Part-time students pay 15%
of their fees.
These figures are from the current Board of
Regents Operating Policy Manual, which also states

Flavet Ilk A Disaster Waiting To Happen

EDITORS NOTE: The following editorial is
reprinted from the January 19 Gainesville Sun.)
The Harmer House was nearly as fireproof as
one can get, said Ohio State officials.
They keep saying it, even after fire swept the
modem nursing home a week ago and snuffed out
the lives of 23 old folks, precisely half of those
living in the single-floor building equipped with a
fire alarm system
Whenever anything like that happens, we think
about Flavet 111 at the University of Florida. And
we were doubly reminded of the on-campus
community when the fire marshal reported the
Universitys 447 fire code deficiencies Friday.
Persons numbering 1300 live there, all of them
married students with their wives and children. The
428 apartments rent cheap, less than S3O monthly,
and they meet minimum fire standards which
include a vertical ladder climbing the rear walls
But there is a certain inescapable conclusion.
The buildings are two-story temporary flimsies
originally serving the Army during World War 11.
They were re-installed on the UF campus and have
served almost 25 years. They are highly flammable
wood coated with innumerable layers of paint.
For fire protection, volunteer villagers operate a
1942 fire truck augmented by the Gainesville fire
Department, which has a station about 15 blocks
away.
Flavet 111 is not nearly as fireproof as one can
A M
get.
It's obvious that sooner or later somebodys
blood is going to be on somebody elses hands. The

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

fleeting impressions among the fallen leaves with
geometric patterns in a pond.

all or any part of these fees may be waived by the
Board of Regents.
Would it not be a fairer plan to have the Regents
reallocate, or waive, a portion of these fees to help
pay for the Activities Center, rather than tax the
already overburdened student with a $6 tuition
increase?
LARRY ROHAN, 4LW

One would expect President Stephen C.
OConnell to wave his magic wand and ban a
fire-trap which endangers 1,300 souls. It is not that
easy for the very simple reason that the students
defend Flavet 111 because they cannot replace the
housing for S3O monthly.
The issue takes an odd political turn too, because
President OConnell wants very badly to build a
$17.5 million coliseum and student activities
complex. The coliseum (1) is to sit splat-dab on the
current site of Flavet 111 and (2) cant be financed
unless the student body votes favorably Feb. 4 to
tax itself an extra $6 per student per term.
Understandably, married students see their
cherished cheap housing being replaced with a
magnificent sport-oriented edifice of marginal value
to them.
They also are questioning priorities if a head
tax on students can finance a coliseum, why has it
not been used to finance married student housing?
And they want to know why a day care center for
their kids has been so slow in coming, and why cant
the University Infirmary provide medical care for
wives and children.
Given his wishes, were sure President OConnell
would provide these things. Undoubtedly, red tape
and financing cripple such worthy endeavors.
The Gainesville Sun has endorsed the sl7 5
million coliseum and activities center, which we
interpret as vital if the UF is to grow in greatness
But we are not blind to the logic of the married
students, and were inclined to the view that
1 * '* ~ 1.1 *, 9 f h? r must
meef such needs as the day care center and

mtrsmr ~
Blue Bottle Fly
Rep. Cecil Bothwell has got to be putting us on.
With all the gall of a house fly, this representative of the
people stook up in the legislature of this state and told a
student speaking on the dangers of DDT that he resented
the expenditure of his time.
The position of students in a meeting of this sort is
exactly the same as it is on a campus, the legislator
drawled. Their job is to go and learn from someone who
knows more than they do.
Perhaps this fine Southern gentleman is correct.
Perhaps he could suggest to whom we could listen, for we
find it hard to believe he could be suggesting we listen to
him if we want to learn anything.
Except how to speak when he shouldnt on something on
which he knows nothing.
Rep. Bothwell has distinguished himself. As a man of
shallow mind and atrocious manners. A man who is
dangerous to the future and fortune of this state because he
apparently fears both youth and their ideas.
It is not as if the student who was speaking did not know
what he was talking about. He was Bill Seaman, head of
UFs Environmental Action Group.
And he was not speaking only for himself. He was
speaking for each and every one of us who will have to live
in the wastes of this planet long after Rep. Bothwell and his
kind are rotting in their graves.
And, what is perhaps more important, Seaman was
speaking before the representative body of this state which,
along with 49 others in this union, declares itself a
democracy.
What kind of democracy silences the voices of its citizens,
(yes, even students are citizens), on the premise that all
knowledge rests with they who teach and govern?
No kind of democracy we have been taught to respect,
Rep. Bothwell, and none we shall ever respect because you
and other demagogues like you do not deserve it.
Perhaps it is you who have a lot to learn, sir, because you
betray utter stupidity by your inane remarks.
But your stupidity is your problem. We doubt you shall
ever take it out of the legislative halls of this state because
you could never make it any higher.
So rest there in peace, and keep your rusty little mind
locked tight so you will never have to fear the seepage of
knowledge inward.
It would probably cause your heart to fail, and that
should never be the fate of a Southern gentleman so fine as
you, Rep. Bothwell.
But do not try to silence the youth of this state.
We have a lot to learn, sir, and we cannot learn it from
you. So please be quiet so we can hear those who care
enough to try and teach us.
And as we continue to learn we will continue to speak
out because we care.

mm
expanded Infirmary service.
But Flavet 111 is another matter. It is a disaster
waiting to happen. To force its preservation is to
prepare a bath of blood for President OConnell
upon whose head the condemnation would rain.
Flavet 111 has run its term and must be dismantled,
even if the site becomes nothing more glamorous
than a parking lot.
This year, Flavet 111 is a straw man which aroused
students could use to kill off the $17.5 million
coliseum. Next year or shortly tnereafter, Flavet 111
will be razed.
How s that for using a guillotine to cure an
earache?
Alligator Staff
Karen Eng Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
eature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686. 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681. 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
the* editn XPreS f e u ,I ? e 1 rida Alligator are those of
of tfa i r f writer of the article and not those
ot University of Florida.



SGP
Election
Unfair

MR. EDITOR:
In answer to John De Lancetts opinions as expressed in Mondays
Alligator:
The Proposed University Activities Center is a mistake, not a
solution.
U.A.C. is a mistake because UF students cannot and should not be
asked to raise tuition. Well over 50% of UF students already require
financial aid to attend college, and with our present tuition already
one of the highest for a state school in the entire United States,
another increase is out of the question.
U.A.C. is a mistake because it is grossly overpriced. $lB million is a
staggering figure to spend on facilities of this type when you take into
consideration the fact that we are short of badly needed academic
facilities.
U.A.C. is a mistake because it is underplanned. Verly little definite
thought and planning has gone into this proposal. Certainly the
UAC:
The Debate Continues
Were All For It
(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a copy of a letter sent to Mr.
Steven E. Rohan, Director of Project SCAT).
Dear Mr. Rohan:
On January 14, the Student Agricultural Council voted unanimous
support for the UF Student Activity Center.
We feel that students, alumni, and citizens of Florida have a
tremendous need for a cultural, athletic, and educational coliseum at
this great university.
We feel that Agricultural students as well as all students and friends
of UF will benefit from its use and Activity Center will be yet another
Step in malting our alma mater the number one school in the nation.
Therefore, we, the Student Agricultural Council, ask all students to
join us in demonstrating our support for the Activity Center by voting
for the increase in activity fees February 4.
JOHN D. HOOKER
PRESIDENT
STUDENT AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL
50 Cents Per Car?
MR. EDITOR:
Why should we vote to raise our tuition when the money could be
raised by some other means? For instance, a small fee of even 25 or
50 cents per car could be levied against the people that park in the
drill field at the home football games.
If we vote to pay for the new field house (which we will never get
to see while we are here, if ever) out of our own pockets, what is to
stop this from becoming a habit and an incentive to other states to let
the students bear the burden?
* abim *** * %Zno w i
t - drtfc*

No Is Our Word Os Outrage

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to clarify my misgivings concerning the SGP elections
at the Public Functions Authority meeting Friday.
You can call an election fixed, rigged, bribed or what have
you and have all sorts of connotations spring forth in ones mind: but
the essence of my gripe about this particular election is that, in my
opinion, some members of the authority had closed minds on the
subject because their objective was to politically get two people
elected to these positions, regardless of qualifications of other
applicants.
The fact that Mr. Nash has been at UF for only two quarters could
be an important enough factor to even out the qualifications for
diairmanship between him and Leonard Tanner
However, I will never ever justify the authority's not recognizing
this mans talent and background and thus electing hhn vice chairman.
If I had to say the election was fixed anywhere, this is where I
would make such a charge.
I think that if some members of this committee were truly
concerned with the best interests of the students and really wanted to

student body had no say as to needs and desires of specifications of
the complex.
In this case NO is not a word of fear, reaction or complacency. No
is a word of outrage at a proposal that seeks to raise the tuition of an
already overburdened student when it is not necessary.
No is a word of those who have educated themselves about this
proposal and have found it to be not in the best interests of the
student body. No is a word that will show both the Administration of
this University and the present officers of Student Government that
UF students will not swallow a poor proposal just because we all want
an Activities Center.
Yes, however, is a word of the anxious and gullible who will be
caught up in the flowery emotionalism of the campaign being waged
by Student Government. Yes is a word that will allow SG to ramrod
this overpriced, underplanned, Crystal Palace through.
A NO vote will get this university a GOOD Activities Center, not
just an expensive one. A NO vote will stop a needless tuition increase.
If you really care about UF and at the same time your wallet, lode
a little deeper, past the meaningless rhetoric spewing from SG. Look
at the facts and logical arguments. Then youll know why there is only
one way to vote February 4,1970 and that is NO.
Dont be a part of a giant mistake. Demand and get a better plan.
JAMES K. CLARK, 3BA
CHAIRMAN
COMMITTEE TO DEFEAT
THE PROPOSED UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER

Greatness Is More Than
Lots Os Big Buildings

MR. EDITOR:
Re: John DeLancetts letter of January 19
I am sure that Mr. DeLancett is sincere in his
desire to, as he put it, become part of the solution
by building a great university for this state.
Certainly the same can be said for President
OConnell and former Regents chairman Chester
Ferguson who on prior occasions (orientation 67
and the education convocation that fall) spoke of
UF's call to greatness.
They too invited the students to play their part.
The message seemed to come across thusly: Be
nice kiddies and don't make waves so that the
legislature will appropriate the funds necessary to
make UF great.
Like O'Connell and Ferguson, Mr. DeLancetts
index of greatness seems to be a function of such
things as the size and quality of the physical plant.
Now, no one denies that these things are
necessary for a truly great institution, but I am of
the opinion that most students also recognize that
these things are not sufficient.
According to this formula, the completion and
dedication of the Spessard L. Holland Law Center
last year was an important step on the path to
greatness.
Os course, the measure of a law school or any
other institution of professional training is the
recognition accorded its graduates within the
professional training is the recognition accorded its
graduates within the profession. For law schools,
one form this recognition may take is membership
in good standing in the Association of American
Law Schools.
As of this writing the AALS is investigating the
UF law school in connection with the firing of four
members of the faculty and staff for refusal to sign
the loyalty oath last fall.
'"he AALS has the power to censure the law.
- &fedPbr w &SIH> o tt ftm* which 1

provide this university with some outstanding talent with which to
plan these SGP programs, they could not have passed up Mr. Nash.
I further think that the student body would be surprised to know
which of its representatives did vote NO on this man for the vice
chairmanship.
Also, I am disappointed that some members of this committee who
shared my view (at least as fur as the vice chairmanship is concerned)
and who took the time, prior to the election, to point up the fact that
outside forces determined this election, have not had the courage to
admit it.
I know politics is, in one sense, the art of persuading others to agree
with your point of view or in this case, nominee. However, there are
times when an individual should have enough intelligence and
common sense to know something of value when he sees it.
My gripe is not against Leonard Tanner. 1 am sure hell do a fine
job. In the midst of politics where politics shouldnt be, some eight or
nine students passed up the chance to make use of the knowledge and
resources of a valuable man. And I dont think you can justify that.
SUSAN JOHNSON

Friday, January 23,1070, ThaFtorida APfftor.

would be tantamount to taking away its
accreditation. You get the point.
I doubt that many students would object to a $6
a quarter tuition increase on grounds of parsimony
alone. But until the questions concerning UAC
usage raised by Mr. Kramer in his letter are
answered in a fashion which guarantees that a
student group would not be denied UAC privileges
because of political dissonance vis a vis the
administration, my answer to tuition funding of
UAC or any like proposal will be NO.
RUSSELL TAYLOR, 3AS
My Lai Guilt
MR. EDITOR:
In response to the January article by Mr. Smith:
the American people are not throwing the
complete blame on a twenty-six year old First Lt.
for the My Lai incident and we should not
assuage our guilt over My Lai with humane
sympathy for Calley because he has been made the
scapegoat.
LOIS INGLES3AS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters mutt:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the right to edit all letters for
WflHl-g'azb ybbcternos no ad ol gniog zi boold

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 23, 1970

' O>of WO--.
* .*% #*< *#* ** *,%. *x.mm.fm.t. a* aar-aw* m * 1 *- r ~.
togetherness
a I
What a beautiful word.
V- t f
Maybe we can make it work.
m
Here.
Students, city officials, legislators, county officials, private contributors and UF
alumni have gathered together in a positive endeavor to build a University Activities
Center JUA C) complex on our campus.
While on other campuses divisive efforts have been successfully made to tear things
down, we here are leading efforts to build things up.
UAC's Coliseum structure will be used only eleven to thirteen (11-13) days out of
the entire year for basketball because that's all the home games there will be!
The UAC complex is more than a Coliseum, it includes:
9 16,000 seat Coliseum*
9 2,800 seat Natatorium**
9 1.800 seat Performing Arts Center
9 6,000 seat Outdoor Amphitheater
* (includes 220,000 sq. ft. academic space)
** (includes indoor Olympic Pool for recreation,
intercollegiate and intramural activities)
On the remaining 352-354 days, all the facilities will be used for cultural and social
programs the likes of which simply cannot be presented anywhere on this campus. For
example:
9 Convocations
9 Graduations
9 Speakers and lecturers of national and international prominence
9 Plays (touring companies for Broadway productions HAIR
and HELLO DOLLY)
9 Musical concerts
9 Nationally known singers, comedians and other entertainers
(The Fifth Dimension, The Rolling Stones, Blood, Sweat & Tears, etc )
But students cannot do this alone nor are they being asked to.
Students can show they desire this facility and are willing to pay a share
in the cost of bringing it into reality.
>..
Other concerned groups of city, county, state, university, and alumni
officials, as well as private citizens each alone, independently, cannot
begin this massive projects,
BUT TOGETHER WE CAN.
*
And wa will.
Won't you help join others to bring this much needed cultural center
here?
Help Build the Impossible Dream.
Tilt Impossible Dream?
V t
Vote Yes On February 4
,> v ;' v*. .
Paid Political Advertisement



McCarthy 'Deeply Disturbed f

CHICAGO (UPI) A leader
of the Vietnam Moratorium
Committee testified Wednesday
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy was
deeply disturbed about
possible confrontations between
antiwar demonstrators and
police at the 1968 Democratic
National Convention.
And so, said Samuel W.
Brown Jr., a McCarthy-for-
President staff member in 1968,
two antiwar groups agreed
before the convention that if it
appeared McCarthy had a good
chance to win the nomination
they would reconsider public
demonstrations.

Rider College Coed....
ROTCs r Adventurous l Recruit

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
United Press International
TRENTON At a time
when military things are the
cause of much militancy on
many a campus, there is a
beautiful little exception at
Rider College.
She is Jean An Samowski. She
has long chestnut hair, big blue
eyes, measures a wisp under five
feet, has been around just 20
years and has just joined 78 men
students in Riders ROTC.
Both in and out of her
fatigues, which are very baggy
because as she explained they
are cut strictly for men, Miss
Samowski is all girl.
She plays a good guitar, likes
to curl up with The Prophet
and other books, attacks the
typewriter from time to time
producing respectable prose and
an occasional verse.
She shops a lot for clothes of
conservative mod. And when
she graduates a year from June,
shell be on the hunt for a
fashion buyers job in New
York.
Though she could pull an
officers rank in the WACs

Don t miss Arhy's An Alty'S & A Shake
ML WINTER
Arby s
Jutt South o( the UiJrpa
W n . r ,. .. ..jHHjj^HKmJBKBSHWWWMaMWaMaMSMMMM**^
SOMETIMES ADVERTISING IS THE ONLY WAY TO GET PUBLISHED
A ,AmwM^w/.v.w

ON 1968 DEMONSTRATION

A mixed bag of witnesses,
including an underground
newspaper editor and a priest
from Pittsburgh, testified for the
defense Wednesday in the
Chicago Seven riot conspiracy
trial.
Alan Datzman, an editor of
the New York City underground
newspaper the East Village
Other, told the jury he was
beaten by men he thought were
policemen Aug. 28 in Lincoln
Park.
Seven defendants are on trial
for conspiring to incite riots
during the convention. The
defendants have charged city

because of her ROTC stint, shell
have none of that. Lets not
carry this thing that far, she
said in her low, melodic voice.
So why did Miss Samowski
join ROTC? Because shes a
highly adventurous female. She
drives motorcycles, is learning to
fly a plane, skydives, and she hit
the experts slopes the first time
she skied.
This fall she needed an
elective course, and on a whim
she asked Lt. Col. Jack Meyer if
she might join ROTC. You
could have knocked me over
with a noodle, she said. He
said Sure, Id be welcome.
So now she can salute, shes
learning to shoot, and in general
shes having a ball, particularly
during classroom sessions.
Theres no chance for flirting
on the field, Miss Samowski
said. Its very strict when we
drill.
But inside, theres another
story. There were, for instance,
many eager hands to ease her
puzzlement in learning to
disassemble a big M-l rifle.
And, yes, she said, a lot of
the guys have asked me out.
Everyones really been very nice,

and federal official were
responsible for the violence by
denying parade permits and
encouraging police actions.
Msgr. Charles Rice of
Pittsburgh testified he had
participated in peace marches
with defendant David T.
Dellinger and had asked him
prior to the convention if the
peace movement would turn
violent in Chicago.
Rice said Dellinger replied:
It should be able to be kept
nonviolent because those of us
who have direction have always
said violence would be
self-destructive. Were
determined to be nonviolent.

even after I turned every one
down. I have a boy friend. Hes
in the National Guard.
Still, ROTC is very
demanding, so its not all fun
and games for the girl soldier.
The 30 inch steps demanded in
drills are difficult for her short
legs. Momentarily theyve
slowed the pace to
accommodate. her, but
ultimately shell be expected to
keep up with the boys.
Very soon now, shell be
expected to disassemble the M-l
in four minutes flat. I dont
know what Im going to do!
she said.
And soon after that, shell be
asked to fire the heavy M-l on
the Ft. Dix shooting range.
ROTC has also presented a
problem in the area of her love
life. Her steady doesnt like
her enrollment in ROTC. We
had a big fight, she said, and
he finally admitted he was juSt
jealous. I told him that was
downright unfounded, plus very
selfish because after all Im
having fun.
So to make up, her boyfriend
gave her a present polish to
shine her brass buttons.

BIRTH CQNTRQL
'The Pill Safe T
HEW Tells Congress
WASHINGTON (UPI) A federal population expert testified
Thursday that birth control pills pose no serious health hazards and
that the government had sufficient reason to label them safe.
Dr. Louis M. Heilman, assistant secretary of Health, Education and
Welfare for population affairs, defended the pill before a Senate
subcommittee investigating oral contraceptives.
But a former practicing physician, now a lawyer, charged that the
pill had been deviously promoted to take attention away from its
harmful side effects and accused Heilman of promoting it himself with
irrelevant analogies and misstatements of facts...
Heilman conceded that the pills cause certain body chemistry
changes affecting such organs as the liver, thyroid and adrenal glands,
and can cause high blood pressure and even alter the blood vessels.
Nevertheless, he said, there is no evidence at this time that any of
these drug-induced metabolic alterations pose serious hazards to
health.

Army Expecting
Communist Attack

SAIGON (UPI) lntelligence
reports Thursday warned of a
major Communist attack on Da
Nang and allied commanders
imposed an alert pn thousands
of American and South
Vietnamese troops defending the
city. Heavy fighting erupted far
to the south in the Mekong
Delta.
Predictions of a sustained
assault on Da Nang, South
Vietnams second largest city,
coincided with the release of
casualty figures for last week
indicating that North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
forces were generally avoiding
contact, perhaps to prepare for a
Jlmtarsitu Hji'faclrrs
Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair ff
Diamond Setting
Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
§ Charms soldered
Trophies- plaques
Florida crest jewelry r
Lavaliers le
Class rings
Engraving
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from "Hub
"BECK BECHTOLD 373-1025

Friday, January 23, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Casualties on all sides dropped
in the week that ended last
Saturday as major Communist
forces apparently pulled back
into the jungle. Eighty-four
Americans were killed, 14 less
than the previous week.
Allied military sources said a
North Vietnamese colonel
captured last week in the Da
Nang area planned an
offensive around the city of
300,000 persons prior to and
following the Tet lunar new year
holiday which begins Feb. 6.
Da Nang, 380 miles northeast
of Saigon, is protected by about
50,000 U.S. and South
Vietnamese troops.

Need Printing?
48 Hour Service
Collating Composition
Folding C uttuui
Stapling Pa ft- up
Ewing Photoprint
305 N E Ist St Gmnewillr
378-2436

Page 11



v *
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE I
1969 HONDA 50 cc. Like new. Less
than 300 miles. Need money. Best
nffer. Call 392-8949. (A-68-st-p).
WOW! 3 litters AKC Champion sired
German Shepherd pups. Parents
gentle, obedience trained, OFA
certified. 372-0276, 378-3817.
(A-67-st-P)
Vespa 125 cc only 1 year old. Under
1200 miles must sell by February.
Only S2OO or best offer. Call
373-1412. Ask for Scott or Laurie.
(A-67-st-P)
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
GIBSON B-25 acoustic guitar wl,
case. Excel!, cond. Asking S9O. Must
be seen. Call 373-2513 evenings. Ask
for Kathy. (A-3t-69-p)
AKC Doberman male 5 mos. Shots,
ears trimmed, black and tan. Very
affectionate. SIOO. Call 378-6029.
(A-3t-69-p)
305 Honda S-H. CUSTOM scram
bars-frnt shocks, roll-pleat seat. Ex.
mech. cond.l Make offer. 378-4775
early morn late night!!!IIM111111I
(A-3t-69-p)
Martin 0018 C guitar & hardshell case
$175. Sherwood fm tuner 75
Lafayette 160 watt amp 80 two ar4x
speakers 90 german lute 150
372- after 5. (A-st-69-p)
4-drawer file cabinet good cond. S2O.
175 cc Buttaco campera 67 a steal at
$225. 813 S.E. 2nd Ave. Apt. A.
(A-st-69-p)
DUAL QUADS with manifold for
283 or 327 Chevy. SSO. 373-2912
Evenings. (A-70-lt-p) i
THIS WEEK ONLY 10% OFF TO
STUDENTS! Our prices are always
lowest but this week save additional
money on purchase of used or
standard typewriters. Royals,
Underwoods, Remingtons & SCMs.
Fully guaranteed. From $29.50 to
$139.50. JR Office Furniture Co.,
620 S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-st-C)
FI REWOOD DELIVERED BY*
THE CORD. CALL 378-2784
OR 376-5624. (A-61-3t-c).
MAKE A BEAUTIFUL DESK OR
TABLE CHEAP! Formica on steel
finished tops. Last a life time. In
walnut & assorted colors. Values
from $35.00 to $87.50. NOW
WHILE THEY LAST $17.50 to
$32.50. JR Office Furniture Co. 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-70-10t-C)
SONY 530 TAPE RECORDER.
Excellent condition. s2op. Phone
373- (A-70-3t-p)
Size 8 white velvet wedding gown,
with detachable train, veil and
headpiece and accessories for SIOO in
cash. 378-5115 after 5 p.m.
(A-70-3t-p)
Self-contained travel trailer, has hot
and cold pressurized water, gas stove
w/ oven, and gas-electric refrigerator
and heater. Extras. 372-7332.
(A-70-st-p)
12X46 MOBILE HOME 2 bedroom
close to campus. SSB. 19/mo. Make
equity offer. Take over payments. On
lot. Call 378-9795 or 376-7559. May
rent. (A-70-3t-p)

km 4 1 fflww^idMfc^Li.All.M. I i "T-i 1 HUB
J[^^^^7^s2^^COSSFO!^>i^MA^
SUNDAY JAN FROM THE MALL R J K
Wm c^'- E AND bum I 1 1 IHBr adm i 50^
ADM. 1.50 Bm BULLITT" H IHf Z
Ime | .; g j

FOR SALE
i V
y.SSV.WAVA'AV^wXw/XvXvlvV"'''"
HONDA 305 1969, Superhawk.
Crash Bar Helmets like new. S6OO
373-1242. 1806 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Student. (A-68-st-p).
66 Mustang 289 4-barrel, 3-speed.
Chrome reverses, wide tires, jacked
up. Never been raced. Excellent
condition. New brakes. 378-4554
after 6. (A-3t-69-p)
1970 HONDA MINITRAIL. Brand
New Factory Warranty. $250. Call
373-2912 Evenings. (A-70-2t-p)
KEEP carpet cleaning problems
small use Blue Lustre wall
to wall. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-71-lt-c).
STEREO COMPONENTS ADC
speakers, 75 watt AM FM
Stereo receiver, two months old,
call 378-6 761 after 5.
(A-71-3t-p).
38 SPECIAL 3*/4 In. Barrel,
nickel plated, holster and box
of ammo. Asking $65.00 Call
378-7953. Ask for STEVE.
(A-71-3t-p).
SONY HP 15 0 A Stereo
phonograph. 14 mos. old.
Excellent condition. Can be
used as AMP. Call 378-5954
sth per. or after 9 P.M.
(A-71-2t-p).
G.E. TELEVISION with Stand
2l Screen B&W
Good Condition s4O Call
378-9344. (A-71-3t-p).
SAVE A BUNDLE SPECIAL!
Your portable typewriter
cleaned, adjusted, lubricated,
heavy duty ribbon installed, &
guaranteed for 30 days. Regular
$22.50 NOW $12.50 Limited
time only. JR Office Furniture
' Co., 620 S. Main St. Phone
376-1146. (A-70-30t-c).

I
I TECHNICOLOR' I
I .WENDELL BURTON H
| iiaiteUgiSiK
PLUS OCC
I rarlmreiia I
m PANAVISION TECHNICOLOR B

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 23,1970

Page 12

FOR SALE
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER
1969 2,200 miles $625 or best
offer call 378-5192 after 5 or
weekends. (A-71-st-p).
jyoooo o "
| FOR RENT
Sublet till June 15. Lg. 2 Bdrm. Apt.
Central Heat & A.C. (Very) close to
campus. ($145. mo) Call EMMY
378-7467. (B-68-st-p).
Sublet: Beautiful 2 bd. furn.
apt., AC & heat carpeted. $155
mo. or will consider 3rd male
roommate (grad pf) Come to
835 N.E. 4th Ave. after 6
P.M. (B-71-st-p).
4 Bedroom house in N.W. area,
central air and heat, fireplace,
S2OO. Call anytime 373-1747.
(B-71-st-p).
Unique one bedroom apt. Panelled
walls. Mediterranean furniture.
Private patio. Central A C. In country
setting IV2 mi. from Med. Center.
Rent slls. Couples only. 378-3571.
After 5 please call 378-0969.
Two bedroom unfurnished duplex
apartment on Archer Road opposite
Stengel Field Airport. Married
student couple only. $55 per month
for long-term tenant. Water
furnished. Phone 372-9903.
(B-70-st-p)
Male roommate needed to share
a well-furnished 2 bdrm. apt.
Apply in person at French
Qtr. 81. (B-69-4t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
S6O per month for room AND
board. Collegiate Living Organization.
117 N. W. 15th St., call 376-9420 for
the secretary. (B-68-st-p).

....-...j.j.5X.v.v.*... X
WANTED |
1 roommate near campus, wtr. and
snr atr. 538.75/mo. Central AC &
heat. Starlight Apts., 809 s w | th
Ave. Call Mike, 372-4168.
(C-4t-69-p)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
large 2 Bdr trailer for winter Quarter.
$55 plus V 2 util. Call 373-2750
between 5 and 11 p.m. (C-3t-69-p)
Need two male roommates at
Summit House Apts. Call Rick or
Steve. 378-8688 after 5 p.m.
(C-3t-69-p)

I Get a good grip I
I on your popcornl I
B- : I
tk jf IMI I
I JV |JJ : *mfi'
I
f youve never seen one of THOSE* movies... I
findm Keepers... I
iCVci's Weepers! I
I H; ¥JB S *% 1 a v f j V g |T|
Hf *j v
V jjUk ... ....."..1. a ||l

WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
OC> 3 9mes SI.OO
wO V Sat 9 am- 6pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA



GATOR CL.ASSIFIRDS

f WANTED I
|jnmti>iWitfr-inn~nn n nr nTTHTtfirnni mw :
Wanted 1 or 2 male roommates to
.h>re two bedroom apt. $44 + utli.
Unique. Call after 6. 372-9849.
(C-4t-69-p)
1 male roommate needed for
modern olympla apt. lVz blks
from campus. immediate
occupancy., Jan. Rent Paid.
$45. P/Mo. Call Tom, 372-6678
after 7 PM. (C-71-2t-p).
Roommate wanted: Plush
University Gardens apt. Sin City
immediate Occupancy. Furnished.
Pool. SSO. a month. 378-7649,
372-5978. (C-71-st-p).
Female roommate wanted to share
two bedroom apt. Landmark no. 85.
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(C-70-st-p)
Coed needs room with kitchen in
N.W. section. Walk to campus.
$35/mo. Please call Trisha, 372-6625.
Must move Immediately. (C-70-3t-p)
USED FILE CABINET. Need
desperately. Please call 372-9307. D.
Longenecker. Also need old sum. for
poor local family. Donations
accepted. Phi Taus. (C-70-3t-p)
2 roomies to share campy new 12X70
mobile palace. Private bdrm., central
heat/alr, pool, stereo, color TV. $65,
split utilities. Jan. free. 372-1702.
(C-70-st-p)
Female roommates to share 3
bedroom house. NW section. Own
room. Central heat and air. Car
necessary. SSO/month. 373-1027.
(C-70-4t-p)
Female Roommate for one bedroom
Landmark Apt. January rent paid.
Contact 376-3873. (C-67-st-p)
Gatortown Female Roommate $45.
mo., Good study environment, Jan.
rent paid. Immediate occupancy. Call
376-7993. (C-67-st-p)
One Male Roommate to share new 12
x 60 mobile home. Central heat/alr.
T.V. No lease. Your own room. $55
mo. plus utilities. Call 376-4138. Jim.
/C-67-st-p)
Female Roommate for Frederick
Gardens. Immediate occupancy Jan.
rent free. $41.25 month. Call
376-7925 or 378-8272. (C-67-st-p)
1 male roommate wanted to share
trailer with 1 other student.
Individual bedrooms, carpeting,
stereo, TV, air, nicely furnished. 60/
mo. Call 376-2789. (C-68-st-p).

r^^JH^^nTlEirOVE^^>CmfAYS
mmmm .AT ...1:68 3:53 5:48 7:48 9:48
I I
|jgtl| nSV Steve McQueen plays Boon
Mfflfcjl AT. . 1:38 3:41 6:34
OVER! 7:60 9:58
I f '4||ft A ... ..--.
# x j^PP||^^p : '^M|jjij|^>- :^p|||j|j|^ | : : : ; x : : :: : : : : : : :v: : : : : : :
- -m*..'-*. -**... ...- '' ~ lr ... rT1 ...: u ~:

Friday, January 23,1970, The Florida Alligator.

I
MALE koommmate needed tor
Mt. Vernon Townhouse apt.
Jan. rent paid, the best In
stereo and original artwork.
$56.25 per month. Call
378-4072 NOW! (C-71-2t-p).
Female roommate wanted
French quarter 2 bdrm. $45
per mo. Call before 12 noon
or after 6 p.m. 376-0613.
(C-64-st-p).
The Program office, J. Wayne
Reitz Union, Is trying to locate
old recordings of songs popular
in the twenties and thirties for
a program scheduled this Spring.
Contact Pat ONeill, 392-1655.
(C-71-3t-p).
| HaP WANTED ""l
yyrti q 1 *hn nn r
WANTED: Listeners for listening
sessions. Mothers who have baby
under 18 months old. $2 hr. Call
Joan Bruno, Ext. 392-2049.
(E-10t-69-c)
PARTTIME; Reliable Male; Honest;
Dependable, auto required; periods 4,
5, 6 open; Permanent Job. Call
FRASER; 376-4912. (E-66-st-p).
I AUTOS 1
WBCBQBiiii;iB^ 1963 Spitfire. Engine rebuilt, soft
top black with black interior. Cash
sale. Call 372-7293 after 5 p.m.
(G-3t-69-p)
Porsche 1968 912 5 speed. Air cohd
AM-FM short wave radio, crome
wheels, NEW tires, tinted glass like
new. $4495.00. Call 378-1668.
(G-67-st-p)
Triumph TR 4, 1964 Blue
w/wlre wheels, good top,
tonneau, radio, demountable
luggage rack, & roll bar: Very
good cond. Call 372-7980.
(G-71-st-p).
Must sell 1967 Pontiac Catalina
Convertible full equipment with
air, best offer takes It!
373-2747 373-1573 422 S.E.
Bth St. Apt. D. (G-70-st-p).
1962 Porsche AM-FM radio, fog
lights, luggage rack, very good
condition. Reduced for quick sale.
Call John at 378-3323. (G-3t-69-p)
1966 Karmann Ghla convertible.
Runs perfectly. AM-FM radio, new
brakes and tires. (Has a great
personality) SBOO or best offer. Call
378-0156 and ask for Larry.
(G-st-69-p)

Page 13

&6&C%RASOAQ!9O I OOOOOOOOOiMMVMMOOt9##9tt
[ AUTOS I
>WtnmMuoaiaaaaiaiiMsissTOBPcccooff
196/ Sprite. Excellent condition.
Tonneau, 22,000 miles, radio,
$l,lOO. Call 378-9004. (G-st-69-p)
1964 COMET Callente, 3 speed
6 cyl. Extra clean throughout
drafted make offer call
376-0336 (G-71-st-p).
1965 Chevy SS, automatic, air
cond., power steering, brakes.
Only 34,000 well kept miles.
Call 372-6652. (G-71-st-p).
6 5 MG Midget, Radio, new
battery, top and paint 6 mo.
old, $875. Call Roger 378-0782.
(G-70-2t-p).
| PERSONAL |
Jeanne, please reconsider and
. remember what this means to us
both. I love you ABCDEFGHIJKLM
NOPQRSTUVWXYZ that Is what
you mean to me. Bob. (J-70-2t-p)
Travel in Europe for academic credit.
6 weeks, 7 countries, jet crossing,
private Coach, excellent
accomodations, low cost, loans
available. Small U F group lead by
highly experienced graduate couple.
Arrangements by World Academy.
- Call for booklet. 372-5489.
(J-70-6t-p)
SIP-IN 1970. The latest in protests
for singles and the most fun tool
This Friday afternoon protest
anything, but do It at the SIP-INI
Lamplighter. 5:30-7:30. (Must be at
least 21). (J-69-3t-p)
This Sunday go treasure hunting only
12 miles from Gainesvillel A real old.
fashion auction. Antiques & nice
used merchandise all going at low
prices to high bidders. Drive to
Archer, turn left, one block to big
auction house. FUN FOR
EVERYONE at 2:00 p.m. SUNDAY.
(J-70-2t-p)
You asked for It! Giant movie
posters! Best buy around! Get 'em
now at the Dragon Dr. In Snack Bar.
All originals, no copies! (J-st-65-p)
Distinctive Custom Made Personal
Dress $ Sportswear by KATHLEEN
OF YORKSHIRE, Phone 378-0320.
(J-st-69-p)
Foosbail? Foosball! In the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament Is worth a oast If
your good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-ts-c).

ryjj Presents
yMVnited i ts
Liquors Newest
LOUNGE
.
/&<$ ycrt£oet* /c
£>/SCQTH£QU£
WARM ATMOSPHERE]
Hot SOUNDS £
Featuring "RUDI"
The HOTTEST D.J. in Germany,
Direct from Hamburg m
NOW OPENI 1611 S.W. 13th St. J|
11 SH3SEES23
WATT A A
WAIJDISNEY
~,mw
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't TECHNICOLOR -f
MORE H/FLYING HI LARITY
IT^^IOOOii^ECHHICOWr^
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2% The LIBERTINE
~ff 7riil Jn[ COMES ACROSS
*9fl| INCREDIBLY
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HUMOR
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Huptr 't Strut
up,,..}, V^m
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with entry...utul VT look like u
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I the I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| PERSONAL |
An experience not to be
forgotten Hear GERT
BEHANNA at University
Lutheran Church, 1826 W.
Unlv., Tues. Jan 27, 8 P.M.
(J-71-3t*p).
Better late than never: To
rooms 114, 121, Vi of 113 in
Graham, Elaine, Rick and jc.
Thanks for the cake. Love you
all lots. Dab. (J-71-lt-p).
Powamy Girl, steak or pizza,
what will It be. Bushwackers to
organic An Opel today, maybe
a Porsche tomorrow with you.
Your P.D.B. (J-71-lt-p).
Chris Love Is being together
for more than a weekend! Five
months and all will be
happiness. I love you. Now and
forever. Linda. (J-71-lt-p).
SALLY! Youre groovy!! Im
not very poetic but go out
with me the 31st and Ill try!!
TIM. (J-71-lt-p).
REB: Happy 21st Looking
forward to our groovy
celebration. Well make It your
most bestest ever. All My
Love, Charley. (J-71-lt-p).
Is existence getting you DOWN?
Searching for some real
answers? A REAL purpose in
life? Come to COLLEGE LIFE
this Sunday night at the ATO
house, 9:13 P.M., and hear and
meet 200 students and faculty
who have found something
exciting enough to change their
lives and who want to share It
with all of UF. (J-71-lt-p).
GIRLS!! Do YOU have what It
takes...? If so, you may be
eligible to be a TIDY TIGER!
The maid service of last
quarter is now expanding. Due
to copyright, problems, we're
now the Tigress Co-ed Maid &
Hostessing Service. Call Nancy
or Lisa for details. 373-2760.
(J-70-st-p).
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates In
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-68-10t-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-c).
8 Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-10t-p).
THE BENT CARD COFFEE
HOUSE is open 9:00 Fri
Sat 1826 W. University Ave.
Free coffee Music Movies
featuring this weekend the
Fandango Blues Duo. (J-71-lt-p).
60 day tour of England,
student and
unchaperoned, Food, and shelter
plus round trip air fare limited
enrollment $615 Phone
372-8841. (J-71-st-p).
Chatterbox 4551 N.W. 6th
Street. Two Happy hours every
day 5:30 6:30 AND 9:00
10:00. 12 oz Draft of Bud
or Miller 20c. (J-70-3t-p).
THE BIG WHITE HOUSE on
the comer will haunt you once
you're inside Strong brew Is
their clothes, silver rings,
posters, leather bags, ruanas,
mod hats, peace and strobe
candles, zodiac novelties and
many' other things. 1642 W.
Unlv. Ave. Open Mon Sat
10 AM lO PM. (J-70-2t-p).
U of F Students only. 10%
discount on anything In our
shop this Frl. and Sat. Bring
your Student card. SPANISH
MAIN 1642 W. Unlv. Ave.
372-0667. (J-70-2t-p).
MOW HOMES *3!
1970
ALTAI R
51X12
FRONT KITCHEN
CARPET
DELUXE APPLIANCES
3895.00
4820 N.W. 13th St. 378-1346

Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday. January 23,1970

gowwwwiywwoootowwccM< 6 a ra.y.svx
I LOST 8 FOUND |
REWARD: Persian cat white 8i
silver. 1806Vz NW 2nd Ave. area.
Please return to address given.
(L-70-3t-p)
LOST BLACK LABRADOR PUPPY,
white cross on chest, tan collar,
reward offered, John Lamplla.
376-9129. (L-70-2t-p)
LOST: All black collared kitten N.W.
3rd Ave. l7th st. Aging children
owners tearful. Dlsproportlate
reward. 373-1112. (L-70-2t-p)
| SERVICES jj
HORSES BOARDED Stalls with
pasture or paddock 8 miles west of
the university. 372-3452 372-2182.
(M-68-st-p).
Rubys ALTERATIONS 195E
N.W. 4th Street 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-71-3t-p).
Happiness Is getting your
eyeglasses at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive
your own waiting room to
University Opticians at 519 S.W.
4th Ave. Across from
Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Cali
376-0710. (M-ts-57-C)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38-59-p).

++l persons under 21 and non-members welcome! [J
I tickets sold at Union BbxOffice, Record Bar, Q
w Don't Forget! TGIF tonight: reduced prices on all P
beer PLUS special discounts announced at the bar L M
for members. PP
Advertise
*
ITS GOOD BUSINESS
: -.-V * V. ii <
, l
3* '* * -r < '*'< ,* *? Os :
J v v
£ '? .
, ~ * j "t-j i v %
. / \ \ , t k\

| SERVICES I
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
|lS2b wThiVEASItTaVC.
; \ k \

MORRISON S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato



Orange

address campus calendar
notices to public functions
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative
Notices

GENERAL NOTICES
INDIA CLUB celebrates 'The
Indian Republic Day" on Sat.,
Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Baptist Student Center (W. Univ.
Ave.). Program: Open discussion
on religions in India today, a
cultural program, snacks, and
films on India. All are welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, co-educational
honorary service organization,
will be holding its winter
membership social Jan. 29, at
7:30 p.m. in room 123, Reitz
Union. Students interested in
doing service for the University
and community are invited to
attend. For more information,
call Richard Spool, 378-0529.
CRICKET PLAYERS are
invited to practice at 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Jan. 24, on the ROTC
Drill Field west of the Stadium
Building. For more information
contact Stanley Glasgow at
376-7746.
FOREIGN STUDENTS are
reminded of the Welcoming
Dinner to be given Friday night,
Jan. 23, at the First Baptist
Church Hall at 7 p.m. 425 W.
Univ. Ave.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA
CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION'S annual membership
meeting will be Tuesday, Jan. 27
at 8 p.m. in the Medical Science
Building Auditorium.
DEADLINE FOR
REMOVING OF "I" GRADES
is Jan. 23 for candidates for
graduate degrees to be conferred
at the end of the Winter Quarter.
GRE APPLICATION
DEADLINE DATE: Feb. 3 is
the last day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N.J. 08540, of the
Registration Form to take the
Feb. 28 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee. GRE application
booklets can be obtained in
Room 235, Tigert Hall.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM is Saturday, Jan. 31, at
8:30 a.m. in Room 207, Leigh
Hall. The exam is in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FERERAL CREDIT UNION
m O|LLS0 |LLS ? TAXES ? DEBTS ?_ A
7 It's ,ncome ax t me a 9 a n an( tJl s Y ear s even worse!
MJ 3. H J \ Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
IMAILH / rPfrL,, r/ enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces necesc=s=JHL
c=s=JHL necesc=s=JHL f tfbJs J I K sities of life! CONSOLIDATE all of those bills, pay
jA y your taxes and end up with less of a monthly output.
II V J x M I Come n t 0 talk '* over...we're specialist at solving
fiUZ. £J ,_J4Ajggtea-

PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June & August grads,
unless indicated otherwise.
** Indicates U.S. Citizenship
required. Degrees: B-Bachelor's,
M-Masters, D-Doctorate
-
Jan. 26: Howard, Needles,
Tam men & Bergendoff;
Baltimore Contractors, Inc.;
Hystron Fibers, Inc.; Lockheed
Aircraft Corp.; Eastfield College,
Dallas, Texas.
Jan. 26-27: Westinghouse
Electric Tech, and Non-tech.;
McDonnell Douglas Corp.; U.S.
Atomic Energy Commission.
Jan. 27: Swift & Co.
(Chicago, 111. & Winter Haven);
Pan American World Airways,
Inc.; Square D Co.; The Ceco
Corp.; Armour-Dial, Inc.;
Westvaco Corp.
Jan. 27-28: Procter & Gamble
Distributing Co.
Jan. 28: Automatic Sprinkler
Corp. of America; Hughes
Aircraft Co.; First Union
National Bank.
Jan. 28-29: Fairfax County
Public Schools; Humble Oil &
Refining Co.
Jan. 28-29-30: Radiation, Inc.
Jan. 29: Liberty Mutual
Insurance Co.; American Sugar
Co.; Babcock & Wilcox Co.;
Union Oil Co/of California
Pure Oil Div.; Honeywell, Inc.
Jan. 29-30: Owens-Coming
Fiberglas Corp.
Jan. 30: Air Products &
Chemicals; ITT Co.; Scott Paper
Co.; State Highway Dept, of
Georgia; Associated Coca-Cola
Co.; Sperry Micro-wave; General
Dynamics Electronics Div.;
Hooker Chemical Co.
. \
CANCELLATIONS
Jan. 28: Stonerock,
Hollingworth and Simonet
Jan. 30: Electronic
Communications, Inc.

BLUE BULLETIN

and

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus
Calendar

Friday, January 23
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
4:00 p.m.
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Union Movie, "Barbarella,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, Israeli Dancing
Afterwards, 7:30 p.m.
Muslim Students Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, "Biff Rose," 8:30,
10:30 & 12:30 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movies, "Up
Periscope," 9:00 p.m.;
"Revenge of Frankenstein,"
11:30 p.m.. South Hall Rec.
Room
... r
Saturday, January 24
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, Lunch served
Afterwards, 10:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "BarbareHa,"
Union Aud.,. 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
. Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Miss. State, State College.
Rathskeller, "Biff Rose/' 8:30 &
10:30 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movies, "Up
Periscope," 9:00 p.nu;
"Revenge of Frankenstein,"
11:30 p.m., South Hall Rec.
Room
Sunday, January 25
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
Guest Speaker, 11:00 a.m.
SGP: Florida Symphony
Orchestra of Orlando,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Union Classic Film Series,
"Shane," Union Aud., 7:00 8<
9:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.

Friday, January 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Monday, January 26
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs. Ole
Miss, Oxford
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Cicerones Meeting, 122 Union,
7:30 p.m.
A.I.E.S.E.C. Meeting, 357
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Women's Commission Meeting,
347 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 27
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 8e 4:00 p.m.
Committee to Defeat Proposed
University Activities Center,
346 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 7:30
p.m.
Public Relations Student Society
of America, Rush Smoker,
123 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Union Lecture, Coliseum
Fprum, 122 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: SGP:
Florida Symphony, $3.00,
$2.00 & SI.OO. Audubon
Wildlife Films, U of F
Students, SI.OO, GP: $1.50,
HS Students, $.50; Series of 5
films, U of F Students, $4.00,
GP, $6.00, HS Students,
$2.00. "Biff Rose," $1.50.
Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00.

Page 15



/ &-1970

Page 16

have something to say?
... then say It!
the UF Board of Student Publications is now accepting applications for
w
1971 Seminole Editor
(NOTE: Applications for Seminole Editor must be returned prior to 4 p.m., Friday, January 30.)
* I
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
V **- A #
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
1971 Seminole Managing Editor
(NOTE: Applications for Editor and Managing Editor of the Florida
Alligator and 1971 Seminole Managing Editor must be returned prior
to 4 p.m., Friday, February 13.)
- General Instructions

All applications aro to bo piclcod up and roturnod to Rm. #330, J. Wayno Reitz Union.
**
Each applicant must return an original plus two copies of his application.
Applicants should be prepared to appear before the Board of Student Publications
V'- > V,* v
for a personal interview.
1 ?' 'H
Watch the Florida Alligator for the announcement of B.S.P. interview meetings.
For Further Information Call Mr. Norm Going, 392-1680.



Specials Abound In
Next Weeks TV Fare

NEW YORK (UPI) There is
a fair sprinkling of special shows
in the regular television network
programming for next week.
CBS has an entertainment
special starring Danny Thomas,

Barbra Streisand
In Hello Dolly Flick

By VERNON SCOTT
UPI Hollywood Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD That
beautiful girl you see in Hello,
Dolly! playing Irene Molloy is
not Barbra Streisand.
Barbra portrays Dolly.
For contrast 20th
Century-Fox cast Marianne
McAndrew in the role of the
strikingly beautiful milliner
As was the case with Streisand
and Anne Francis in Funny
Girl, Barbra has few scenes
with Marianne in the new hit
musical. For whatever reason,
Here&There
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Chris
George, star of the defiinct Rat
Patrol television series, will
play a villainous sheriff in
Chisum, John Waynes new
western.
Don Rickies, who has built his
career insulting other people,
will train his sights on Jim
Nabors when he plays guest on
the latters show late this year.
Jim Hutton will {day the title
role in the pilot film of a
proposed television series,
Doug Selby, The D.A
Robert Hooks, so-starring in
Blood Kin, is writing a book
on Ira Aldrich, a tum-of-the tum-of-thecentury
century tum-of-thecentury actor and first Negro to
play Shakespeare in the United
States.
Faye Dunaway will star as a
fashion model in Universals
Puzzle of a Downfall Child.

t \
! fron tke worlds
! #1 chicken mmm
I salesman

a profile of a British artist and
the premiere of a new comedy
series starring Tim Conway.
A NBC special takes a look at
the new edition of the Ringling
Brothers, Bamum and Bailey

presumably the script, Barbra
rarely appears in a two-shot with
a stunning female.
Miss McAndrew is tall, slender
and endowed with flawless skin,
enormous brown eyes and
tumbling dard hair: classical
Irish configuration.
One is rather more apt to
notice her than anyone else in a
scene.
Still in her 20s and with a
promising career ahead of her,
Marianne has an aristocratic
appearance about her that would
indicate she is most suited for
the sort of roles played by
Deborah Kerr and Vivian Leigh.
Barbra and I have only two
major scenes together, and both
of them were easy. They went
well, she said.
We were seven months in
that picture and I cant say
Barbra and I became friends.
After our scenes wed go our
own ways. Barbra is a big star
protected by the various people
around her.
I wasnt sure if attempting a
friendship would be precarious
for me. So I didnt.
Two women appearing in the
same picture is somewhat
difficult anyhow. Its
competitive and hard to
explain.
It seems two females one a
great beauty, the other a huge
talent could safely become
friends in that one would not
threaten the other. Marianne is
not without talent, and there are
those who think of Streisand as
another Cleopatra excepting,
of course, the Egyptians.

Circus Tuesday. World traveler
Lowell Thomas has a New
Guinea documentary Thursday,
the life of the beaver is explored
on Friday and there is a special
Childrens show Saturday.
ABC has its seasonal premiere
of the returning The American
Sportsman series Sunday and
the Andy Williams golf tourney
Saturday.
Here are the details:
The American Sportsman
returns to ABC Sunday and
actor Andy Griffith and golfer
Sam Snead hunt snow geese in
Texas, pro football personalities
Pete Rozelle and Gale Sayers
fish for striped marlin off the
Mexican coast and golfer Tom
Weiskopf hunts in New Zealand.
The Mirror and the Image
on CBS is a one-hour special
examining the work of British
artist Graham Sutherland.
NBC covers play on final
holes of the last round of the
annual Bing Crosby pro-am golf
tourney at Pebble Beach, Calif.
CBS inaugurates a Sunday
news program with Roger Mudd
in charge,
Patti Page and Mike Douglas
head the lineup on Ed Sullivans
CBS show.
Ray Charles, comedian
George Gobel and singer Gloria
Loring are on the Glen Campbell
Hour for CBS.
Jo Van Fleet is the guest star
on NBCs Bonanza, as an
eccentric widow whose defiance
of the law on minor issues takes
a serious turn.
Bette Davis is guest star
Monday on ABCs It Takes a
Thief, playing a destitute jewel
thief whose aid is sought by
Mundy with surprising results.
The ABC Monday night movie
is Tennessee Williams
Suddenly. Last Summer.

A sports car built just for racing doesnt need a back
seat. So its engine can be mounted in front of the rear
axle, near the middle of the car.
That distributes its weight more equally, and gives it
a whole bundle of advantages over ordinary can.
We think its time you shared those advantages. So
were selling a couple of mid-engine cars you can drive
on the street.
They hold the road better, because the center of
gravity is lower.
They comer better, because theres no heavy front
end to steer and no heavy back end to slide out.
They brake faster and save tire life, because all the
wheels carry a more equal load.
And theyre safer. Because both front and back

t. *- J -f
ir '>. < ~ ~
vv v.|l y Jm\
vj
PINNA PERFORMANCE MOTORS, INC.
615 N. MAIN ST Phone 378-1668
TAKING ORDERS NOW!!

Come in and see a brand new Porsche.
With its engine in the middle.

Giveaway Millionaire
Signs Record Pact

NEW YORK (UPI) RCA
records announced this week it
has signed 21-year-old giveaway
millionaire Michael James Brody
Jr. for exclusive recording rights.
Brody, who made his debut as
a rock singer and guitarist on the
Sunday night Ed Sullivan Show,
signed a term contract Tuesday,
an RCA records spokesman said.
He said the oleomargarine heir
stated he would use all his
profits in the cause of world
peace.
Financial terms of the
contract were not announced.
Herbert Heilman, an RCA
records spokesman, said a single
LJP. record with Brody singing
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
MUG SPECIALTIES
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS RING SIZING
DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-858 S

The new Bench and Bar is introducing
some new things. Like lox or nova scotia on
bagels. Or a daily Happy Hour (5-7 PM) when
draught is $1 a pitcher or 20 cents a glass. Or
Bridge Night every Thursday. Os course, they
still have Little Judy of the Judy Miller Trio
from 10 to 2 Friday and Saturday. And
excellent sandwiches. At the new Bench and
Bar.
% %i)d) ari6
1222 W. University

M7O; Tib Florida AlSprtor,

ends are designed to absorb impact.
The 4-cylinder 914 model costa $3595. It has an
electronically fuel-injected engine, goes 110 mph and
does 0-60 in 13 seconds.
The 6-cylinder 914/6 model costs $5995, goes 125
mph and does 0-60 in 9.9 seconds.
t Both come with a built-in roll bar, removable
fiberglass roof, 5-speed stick or optional 4-speed
Sportomatic, two trunks, and the kind of
craftmanship expected from Porsche.
So if youre thinking about a true, two-3eat sports
car, think about this:
When you dont get a back seat, you should at least
get an engine in its place.

his own composition, The War
Is Over, on (me side and Bob
Dylans You Aint Goin
Nowhere on the flip side will
be issued soon.
Im not saying Brodys voice
is any better than other popular
singers but his song is poetic and
he expresses himself well,
Heilman said in explaining why
RCA records signed a youth who
was unknown a week ago.
We heard the record and
were convinced.
OverDressing
There are about 3,000
different salad dressings on the
consumer market.
wUNG'If
Excellence in Food

Page 17



Page 18

t, n Florida ANI gat or. Friday, January 23,1970

Thie
Florida
Alligator

Symphony
Performs
Sunday
The Florida Symphony
Orchestra will appear in concert
in the University Auditorium
Sunday at 4 p.m. in a
presentation sponsored by
Student Government
Productions.
The orchestra originally was
scheduled to appear in the
Florida Gym.
Subscribers with main floor
gymnasium seats (white tickets),
will use their same seat numbers
in the auditorium. Subscribers
with upper bleacher seating
(blue tickets) may pick up their
auditorium reserved seating
assignments at the door. Holders
of rear bleacher seating (green
tickets) will be seated in the
west balcony of the auditorium.
Despalj, who is conducting, is
the chief and founder of the
Belgrade Chamber Orchestra.
Majda Radic-Despalj, the mezzo
soprano soloist with the
orchestra, sang as guest at the
National Opera of Yugoslavia,
and in 1959 she became its
permanent member. She has
sung with great success a large
number of alto and mezzo
soprano parts in all Yugoslavian
Opera Houses. In 1967, Miss
Majda Radic was awarded
Yugoslavias highest musical
prize.
With the orchestra during its
20-week winter season are many
high-caliber musicians who come
South for the winter. Two
members come to the orchestra
from Mantovani. One directs the
RCA Victor Salon Orchestra.
Others with the orchestra have
performed with the American
Ballet Theatre and the Quebec
Symphony and Chamber
Orchestra of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation. The
orchestra also has one of the
countrys few female
percussionists. She is still a
student at the University of
Minnesota and has taken a year
off for some professional
experience.
Tickets are available at the
Reitz Union Box Office today
from 12:00 to 4:30 p.m. Ticket
prices are $3.00, $2.00 and
SI.OO. They will be available at
the door prior to the
performance.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
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ak I I |llf lu
1 STARKE*. 1 FLORIDA
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WEEKDAYS SAM 6PM
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GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

ENTERTAINMENT

The Libertine lts about just what you would think it would be
about. One of the reviewers said it made Hugh Heffner lode like a
nursury school or something like that. Someone else said it was
incredibly wry. The posters show some young ladys backside and its
a nice backside. The ad in todays paper shows her frontside and its a
nice frontside, too. It starts today at die Florida downtown.
* *
On Her Majestys Secret Service A new James Bond flick with a
new James Bond. Its supposed to be pretty good with the usual
tricky photography and good looking women. Its at the Center Two.
# *
The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes lt stars a kid who somehow
has become smarter than he was before whatever happened to him
happened to him. Dont miss the short, Its Tough To Be A Bird!
This sort of film is enjoyable in the same way that having buckets of
marshmallow creme poured over your naked skin would be enjoyable.
They start today at the Center One.
* *
The Reivers, lt talks about what it means for a boy to start
becoming a man. All of the people are lovable and all the scenery is
soft yet the movie shows a kind of brutality that gives it much of its
strength. Held over at the Plaza One.
* *
Camille 2000 It is a movie about people who are rich and
beautiful. The first part of the film works to make the point that if
youre rich and beautiful, that thats all you need and all wrongs will
be righted. The second part of the film tries to make the point that, in
effect, love is a thing that is greater than even money or beauty. The
first part succeeds at its point so well that it is hard to believe the
second part. The only real artist working on the picture apparently
was the makeup man who was able to hide all moles and blemishes
and make all the actors and actresses look like pieces of plastic.
Theres lots of skin. If all the erotic parts were edited together, it
would make an exciting 30 minute film. Its going into its second
week at the Plaza Two.
* *
Barbarella Jane Fonda is all trussed up and outfitted to swing her
bottom throughout outer space. There are some really funny parts
and sexual things so subtle that I am sure Miss Fonda didn't know
that they were funny. Dont miss the opening minutes. Its now
showing at the Reitz Union and at the Gainesville Drive-in.
* *
Sterile Cuckoo This is a story about learning about love and the
like. It's supposed to be pretty good. Its the other feature at the
Gainesville Drive-in.
* *-
Shane Alan Ladd was always a neat guy. Hes the star of this
picture. Its been called a classic western which means that there is
something in it which made it live on when most of the others didnt.
Van Heflin is in it, too. It runs Sunday afternoon and evening at the
Reitz Union.
* *
Young Evil Savage Jimmy-the-Prince, heres one for you and the
boys at the Handlebar Lounge. Many national magazines are getting
hip to the fact that some of the neatest cinema action ever was in

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Pag* 18,

these old (and new) motorcycle flicks. The chicks always wear stretch
pants, the bikes always glitter, and the ads always say, riding with a
half ton of hot steel between their legs. There are more, too. Bom
Wild, Wild Wheels, and Run Angel, Run. All this at the
Suburbia One, the big screen.
* *
The Graduate Dustin Hoffman learns to skindive. He falls in love,
twice. Its one of ours. Still at the Suburbia Two.
* *
Lion In Winter It has regality and Kathryn Hepburn. In the other
Penthouse at the Suburbia.

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Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 22,1970

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East Side ACL Depot
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Fast attention to insurance
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WRUF, Blue Key Team For Talk Show

By DAN VtMNING
A regularly scheduled
telephone talk show the first
in the area will begin Tuesday
night at 11 on WRUF with the
direction of Florida Blue Key
and with a senior in political
science as its host.
Dialogue, is the name of
the new show. It will be aired
two nights a week Tuesday
and Thursday beginning each
night at l 4 and lasting until 1
ajn. or until there is no more
discussion from die listening
audience.
The Comer Drug Store, the
new local youth-run help center
for people with drug problems,
will be the topic for discussion
for Tuesday nights program.
Present to answer from the
listeners concerning die Drug
Store will be three members of
the Board of Directors: Dave
Doucette, chairman; Gerry
Siegel, vice chairman; and
Barbara Eisenstadt, who is in
charge of the everyday affairs of
the house.
To Opon Mini Thoators
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Jerry
Lewis will open a string of
mini-theatres seating capacity
from 200-500 for
round-the-clock, automated film
showings.
MODERN SHOE
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1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
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Were hoping that we will
have a lot of questions or
comments called in, Doucette
said. The program offers a good
chance for us to talk to the
people of the community and
for us to talk to them, too, he
said.
Bob Moore, a four year
veteran in radio work at the
state-owned station, says he
believes the program will be
received well.
We want to have provocative
topics and informed speakers,
Moore said. Were sure that the
people will respond
enthusiastically and keep the
phone-in portion of the program
moving well, he said.
Each nights show will feature
one specific topic to be
discussed. Most nights there will
be an expert on the topic

Final Reductions I
In Stag n Drags I
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BEGINS TUESDAY NIGHT AT 11

available to answer the questions
of the listeners who call in. The
incoming phone calle will be
heard over the air as will the
responses of the host and the
speakers.
Florida Blue Keys part in the
program consists of production
of the show including
establishing in cooperation with
WRUF, the topics to be
discussed, arranging for the
appearance of special guests and
working with Moore to research
topics before each program.
Technical arrangements for
the program and the air time are
being taken care of by WRUF as
a public service project of the
station. Equipment includes
several new phones with group
receivers, several microphones,
and a control board for the
panalists microphones. The
show will be staged in WRUFs

newly remodeled news studio.
Moore said {dans as outlined
by FBK and the station include
some panel discussions of
important topics and some
on-the-air debates in addition to
the regular telephone listener
comments and single speaker
programs. He said also there may
be several state political figures
available for the show later in
the year.
The main thing Ill be doing
as host and moderator of the
show is working to keep the
thing rolling and to see that both
sides of an issue are aired,
Moore said. My own opinions
or those of Blue Key or of the
station management won't be
forced onto the listeners. We're
bending over backwards to keep
the show truly informative and
not a one-sided propaganda sort
of show, he said.

SPORTCOATS: I
REDUCED FURTHER J
WERE T 0 REDUCED TO I
$24.95 $19.99 $14.99 I
$39.95 .. $31.99 $28.99 I
$45.00 $35.99 $30.99
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[coats SSOO

Friday. January 23,1970. Th Florida AMfrtor,

Information from FBK says
that the program will attempt to
be relevant not only to the
university community but to
Gainesville as a whole.
I think what were all really
trying to do is give the public a
chance to learn new things about
controversial issues, to better
equip themselves as citizens,
Moore said.
There have been several of the
shows being started all over the
country. Many of the shows in
the bigger cities are on the air
seven nights a week with six or
more hours each night.
Some of the issues listed by
FBK as possible show topice
include birth control, mercy
killing, crime, capital
punishment, the UF code of
conduct, dreg abuse, and the
McCluhan theories of mass
media.

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

OLE MISS ON MONDAY

Gators Play MSU Saturday

The Florida cagers struggling
to get above the five hundred
mark face a tough road trip to
Mississippi this weekend, when
they meet the Mississippi State
Bulldogs Saturday afternoon in a
televised game and the Ole Miss
Rebels on Monday night.
The road weary Gators carry a

% aft m
' r V .SS:
MWi,
Hgs&^x.
i r If
, v ; .-Sp? |||pS .Ss <&i |B^^H;
PHIL COPE
SCORING ACE ANDY OWENS (45)
... battles for rebound against Tennessee
Baby Gators Begin
Florida Road Trip
While the Gator varsity travels to Mississippi, the Baby Gator
basketball team will take a trip of its own, when they meet Broward
Junior College in Ft. Lauderdale Friday night and Brevard Junior
College in Cocoa on Saturday.
Freshman Coach Jim McCachren plans to start Tim Fletcher (9.2)
at point, Tony Miller (14.9) and Bill Nagel (12.7) or Mark Thompson
(7.1) at wings, Roger Peace (14.0) at high post and Ken Van Ness
(8.9) at low post.
The Baby Gators are enjoying a 7-3 record.
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GATOR SPORTS

5-8 record and a 2-3 conference
mark to Mississippi State. The
Bulldogs own a 3-8 mark and a
0-5 record in league action.
The Gators have shown
improvement since the start of
the season and defeated
powerful Tennessee in overtime
last .week. Last Saturday Florida

lost to West Virginia in overtime,
88-87.
We are showing marked
improvement and Ive been
impressed with the extra effort
the boys gave against Tennessee
and West Virginia, said Florida
coach Tommy Bartlett. The
two Mississippi road games will
be very important to us.
Bartlett will start Jerry
Hoover (9.0) or Jeff Miller (4.8)
at the point guard, Ed Lukco
(7.0) at the right-wing, Earl
Findley (11.3) at the left wing,
Dan Boe (5.6) at low post and
Andy Owens (26.9) at high post.
Owens is one of the fop
scoring leaders in the nation and
is ranked third in scoring in the
Southeastern Conference. He
also leads the Gators in
rebounding with a 10.1 average
and with field goal and free
throw percentages.
Findley, a 6-foot-7,
185-pounder from West Palm
Beach has been a bright spot in
recent games. In the past six
games he has averaged 15.8
points a game and 11.5
rebounds. Against West Virginia
he scored a season high of 26
points.
The Mississippi State game
will be televised from State
College at 2:00 p.m. CST.

Mv
I The I
I Florida Symphony I
I Orchestra 1
i*En CBi
*H|i CSri
~K*< CBj
I Featuring i
jl m
I Paule De spa Ij, Conductor, 1
I and Mad/e Despalj, Mezzo Soprano 1
M Ij:
'Vli iis*,
,'X*
jK I jHf
,'B* CHli
8k Ik
( *V QWi
| will perform in the University 1
1 Auditorium on Sunday, 1
vK*
iW uC*
I January 25, at 4p.m. S
( 4'
jV
jVi v
( V<
J 'V SR
jl Tickets are $3.00 for IS
ij Main Floor seats, $2.00 for jl
I the General Public, and jm
sK 9 vH
Hi > f*- ,*Kc
il SI.OO for University Students 11
js with I.D.s I
jJH I

Page 20

...Mi mL.
! mm /& I^attSflw ~
,& Ijffi: ,s|- .'.jggJ-ry-
I & jH
PETE KNOCKE
GATORS' EARL FINDLEY
... bright spot in recent games

IPNAipiIES |
111 Book and Supply H
1712 w.^university
HI TEXTBOOKS
1 SCHOcJI SUPPLIES H
1 ART SUPPLIES H
HI ENGINEERING 9
PARKING ITjJ

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

), The Florida AHigator. Friday, January 23,1970

GOIF PAR 60
,*J? DRIVING RANGE
£ GOLF CLUBS RENTED
UHL, CLUB HOUSE
ELECTRIC CARTS
ilal LESSONS AVAILABLE
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RO. 373-2721



FfVrtS AMESONTArSATURDAT
LSU Looking To Break Kentucky Jinx

ATLANTA (UPI) The way LSU basketball
coach Press Maravich sees it, one of these nights his
Bengals are going to play some defense against
Kentucky and upset the Wildcats.
Press boys, led by his own son the
incomparable Pistol Pete have averaged 94
points per game in their last four outings against the
vaunted Wildcats; and havent come within a dozen
points of winning yet.
Next try comes this Saturday night when the
Bengals (84) come off a two-week layoff to tangle
with the 2nd-ranked, unbeaten Wildcats (13-0) up in
Lexington, Ky.
LSU has given it the offensive try the last couple
of years with the younger Maravich scoring 52, 44,
52 and 45 points for a hard-to-believe 48.25 ppg.
But Papa Press, in his three years at LSU, hasnt
figured out away to get Kentucky under the 100
mark.
Back in 1967, when Pete was still a freshman,
Kentucky beat LSU 102-72 and 105-84. The next
season, with sophomore Pete setting an NCAA

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record with his 43.8 average, Kentucky won 121-95
and 109-96. Last year, with Piston Pete
improving the NCAA record to 44.2 ppg, Kentucky
won 108-96 and 103-89.
The elder Maravich isnt likely to try a stall as a
means of slowing down the Wildcats since his son,
who is averaging a hotter-than-ever 47.0 ppg so far
this season, needs 35 points to move past Elvin
Hayes (2,884) into second place on the all-time
career scoring list.
And he cant expect any sympathy from
Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp since the Wildcats
need to win big to help themselves in their battle
with top-ranked UCLA for the no. 1 spot.
It looks like another shootout and its likely that
there wouldnt be enough room in the 11,500-seat
Kentucky Coliseum for all the fans whod like to see

Friday, January 23,1970, Tha Florida Algator.

the game if they sawed the seats in half.
There was only one game involving a major
Southeast team Thursday night. Florida State, one
of the top independents in the region with a 12-2
record that included losses only to lOth-ranked
North Carolina and 15th-ranked Southern Cal, was
host to Clemson.
Theres also only one game tonight Miami
(Fla.) at Florida Southern.
The Southeastern Conference, relatively quiet the
last couple of weeks because of mid-term exams,
heats up again Saturday when all 10 teams are in
action:
In addition to the Kentucky-LSU encounter,
GeorgiaL will be at Mississippi, Auburn at Vanderbilt,
Alabama at Tennessee and Florida at Mississippi
State;
Although only 6-6 over-all, Georgia, with a 5-1
league record, is only a half game behind Kentucky
(5-0) in the SEC standings. Georgias lone
conference loss was by one point, 72-71, to
Kentucky.

Page 21



Page 22

I, Th* Ffbrida'AriigMor.VHday.'JaihnlryZ^^TA)

MATMEN JOURNEY TO TALLAHASSEE
Varsity Wrestlers Begin First Year

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writer
In its first year as a varsity
sport, wrestling is finding itself
at a disadvantage because of the
difficulty in finding a good
schedule to match a low budget.
The first years budget for the
matmen is the smallest for any
of the intercollegiate sports at
UF.
The budget was designed to
allow the team to go to the SEC
wrestling tournament, Head
Wrestling Coach Leo Tennant
commented. It was later
modified to allow us to compete
with one SEC school, Georgia,
so the team could have some
SEC wrestling experience before
going into the SEC
tournament.
This year we dont have
anyone on scholarship but
beginning next year the team
will be allowed to have four full
scholarships.
Tennant has planned an
ambitious schedule for this year,
including matches against
Florida A&M, FSU and Georgia;

GATOR SHORTS

TrainerGreathouseesigns

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
The Alligator learned Wednesday of the
resignation of Head Trainer Brady Greathouse.
Greathouse, who had been Head Trainer since
1966, and with the Gator organization since 1962 is
reportedly working for the Alachua County School
System awaiting permanent placement according to
Norm Carlson, Sports Publicity Director.
Assistant Head Trainer Ernie Golin has assumed
the responsibilities of the position until head coach
Doug Dickey appoints someone to fill the vacated
position.
According to Carlson, Dickey has interviewed
several aspirants for the position of head trainer, but
has not made a choice.

First Draft Choice
Goes To Pittsburgh

NEW YORK (UPI) The
Pittsburgh Steelers will have first
choice next Tuesday in the
17-round Annual Pro Football
Draft of college players, the
National Football League
announced.
The Steelers, who tied with
Chicago at 1-13 for the worst
record in pro football, earned
the first choice in a coin flip
with the Bears. Chicago will
choose second as the teams pick
in inverse order of their final
standings.
The lone exceptions are the
Super Bowl teams, Minnesota
and Kansas City, who will pick
last.
A 15-minute time limit will be
used for each selection in the
first two rounds and five

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however, due to budget
.limitations the matmen have all
but one match and one
tournament in Florida.
Even with the limited
schedule we have a good chance
to have an undefeated season
and set a good pattern for the
future of wrestling at the UF,
Coach Tennant said.
After defeating the University
of Tampa wrestlers last weekend
the Gators will journey to
Tallahassee this weekend for a
morning match against Florida
A&M and an afternoon match
against Florida State.
The FAMU Rattlers have a
strong team featuring the
Roberts twins who are supposed
to be undefeated.
The FSU wrestlers are still a
club, as UF was last year, which
means simply the Seminoles will
not be as strong as the Gators
although the UF has never
defeated them in wrestling.
I plan to take two boys in
each class to Tallahassee and Ill
try and save the stronger boy in
each class to go against the

minutes for each round
thereafter in the draft, which is
limited to players who have
completed their college football
eligibility. No round will start
after 9 p.m. EST but once a
round is started, it will be
finished.
Miami will be the third team
to pick, followed by Boston,
Buffalo, Philadelphia,
Cincinnati, St. Louis, San
Francisco, New Orleans and
Denver. Atlanta has 12th pick,
followed by the New York
Giants, Houston, San Diego and
Green Bay. Baltimore picks
17th, followed by Detroit, New
York Jets, Cleveland, Los
Angeles, Dallas, Oakland, with
Minnesota and Kansas City
completing the first round.

When the Gator basketball 'team meets the
University of Georgia in Florida Gym at 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 31, all dorms, sororities and
fraternities will be competing for prizes in the
Annual Gator Basketball Television Banner Contest.
Hang-up banners must be in place by 12:00 p.m.
for the nationally televised game. Three winners will
be announced at halftime in the gym and on
television.
* *
The UFs Rugby Team will match its strengths
against the Pensacola Royals at Norman Field
tomorrow night at 7:30.
A B team match will precede the A team
match. Game time is 4:00 p.m.
Sunday the UF team will travel to Tallahassee to
meet the Royals on the Florida State Seminoles
practice field in a 1:00 p.m. match.

Seminoles in the afternoon
match, Tennant said.
We really want to beat FSU,
because this is the best
opportunity that weve had to
defeat them, Tennant added.
The Gators have a real future
in wrestling with freshman Tom
Darrough, who was runner-up in
the high school competition, and
Jeff Shaffner, who was collegiate
state champ last year in the 167
lb. class.
Almost the whole team with
the exception of two boys are
freshmen and we hope to keep
them with us for at least three
more years and have a lot of
success, Tennant said. The
sport never has caught on in
Florida but it is the fastest
growing intercollegiate sport and
we hope that it catches on at the
UF.
The northern colleges have
been recruiting in Florida the
past two or three years but now,
with our program, I hope that
the Gators will be able to keep
some of the Florida wrestlers in
the state, Tennant concluded.

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Dancing
Draught Beer
Sandwiches
i # lormarly Larrys
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I /
r* /
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\l
Former Packer Great
Offered Coaching Job
Head Football Coach Doug Dickey announced yesterday that
eight-time All-Pro offensive tackle Forrest Gregg of the Green Bay
Packers has been offered the offensive line coach position to replace
Jimmy Haynes, who was reassigned to the head freshman coach
position.
Fve been in touch with Gregg and have offered him the position,
Dickey said. He is seriously considering coming to UF.
Dickey said that a decision will be coming from the Green Bay
assistant coach soon.
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Closing Out Our
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BEGINS SATURDAY

UF Enters Track Classic

Floridas top ranked high
jumper, Ron Jourdan, and two
Gator relay teams will seek top
honors this weekend when they
journey to Philadelphia to take
part in the Philadelphia Track
Classic.
Jourdan, who is considered
one of the top high jumpers in
the world, has cleared the magic
seven foot barrier on two of six
attempts this winter. He jumped
seven feet at the Liberty Bowl
and Orange Bowl meets and
topped the 6-foot-10 mark in
the other four meets. Last
season he cleared seven feet 21
out of 27 attempts.
Coach Jimmy Carnes will
enter both his mile and two mile
relay squads in the meet. The
mile relay team consists of Jerry
Fannin, Bill Ballinger, Jim
Dyson and John Alvarez.
The nationally ranked two
mile relay team of John Parker,
Eamonn OKeeffe, Bob Lang
and Ken Bumsed are expected
to be one of the favorites. Two
weeks ago they defeated
Tennessee in Washington with a
clocking of 7:41.

ON WHEELS

Co-Driver Drags will be
featured at Gainesville Dragway
Sunday, while Bucks-or-Cup
racing will be initiated as a
regular part of the E.T. program.
Co-Driver Drag events,
which were recently approved
by the National Hot Rod
Association (NHRA), permit
drivers to take a passenger along
on each run.
This enables the racer to
take his girlfriend along, so that
she doesnt have to watch from
the stands, said Harold Springs,
public relations director.
It will give more people a
chance to see the strip and
staging area from the car.
Bucks-or-Cup racing simply
means that each racer will run
either for money or a trophy,
but not both.
In the past, explained
Springs, the professional E.T.
racers were winning most of the
trophies, while the average racer
was left out. This is an attempt
to separate the two.
The serious competitor will
still be able to run for cash while
the average driver will have an
GNTML AUTO
SHOP
major tune ups
minor TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RINGS & VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH jobs
FRONT end work
CARBURETOR rebuilding
BRAKE JOBS
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Pick up & Delivery in City
1027 s. main.
U 378-4943

Dragway Adds Events

Â¥ I .. B
UF'S 808 LANG
... 880-yard record holder

improved chance at winning a Gates open at 11 a.m. and
trophy. eliminations start at 2:30 p.m.
Low-Blockinganned
By NCAA Committee
SARASOTA (UPI) Imagine trying to block someone like Penn
States Outland Trophy tackle Mike Reid from the waist up. Those
who tried last season usually saw their ball carrier thrown for a loss.
High blocking on running plays still will draw the wrath of
offensive coaches next season but low blocking may be illegal after
that.
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Football
Rules Committee, at the conclusion of a three-day meeting
Wednesday, recommended eliminating below-the-waist blocking as a
way to halt the growing number of knee and ankle injuries to college
players.
Rules Committee Chairman John Waldorf said 36 per cent of the
injuries to college players last season were to the knees ; and ankles,
and the first consideration of this committee is for the safety of the
players.
If the knee and ankle injury problems continue, some action will
have to be taken, Waldorf added.
The 15-man Rules Committee said it would try some experimental
games with freshman teams next season in which below-the-waist
blocking would be illegal.
The committee also recommended the NCAA finance a research
group to study the blocking proposal and other ways of eliminating
ankle and knee injuries.
Road and Track Magazine (May 1968) says:
"The BMW 1600 and 2002
are the best sedan buys in
the
Next to BMW w :
themselves, professional critics
are the most enthusiastic .
endorsers of BMW P erform a A nc h e eh ] n 0 d U BMW ABMI
why five minutes after you re behind a BMW
wheel. Come in for a test drive today.
BAVARIAN
MOTOR WORKS
y
JCe lei* *r Av *\ 11 l r v \

808 THOMAS

INTRAMURALS
Kappa Sigs Win
STEVE ROHAN
FRAT BOWLING Kappa Sigma showed the rest of the Blue
League fraternities how to stem the Chi Phi tide by whipping the Chis
in the bowling semifinals, 1605-1495.
The Chis were never in this battle as the Kappa Sigs bulled their
way to a 76 point first game lead. John Moore paved the way for the
Kappa Sigs by rolling a 205 second game.
Delta UpsUon moved to within six points of second place. Pi Kappa
Phi with a 1554-1433 win over Theta Chi, can take second with a win
over Kappa Sig in the finals.
Former controversial sportswriter Chuck Partusch led the DUswith
a 184-339.
Bye Bye Beta! The bad news for Beta Theta Pi, currently leading
the Orange League by some 43 points is that by the end of the year
the Betas will not be in the top five of the league.
That may sound awfully harsh but the fact of the matter is that the
only sport that the Betas boast is softball. The Betas, however, will be
far behind by the time softball comes around. Any team in the league
has the capability of winning softball.
The Orange League will be won by either ATO, Sigma Chi, Pi
Kappa Alpha or SAE with TEP as the league darkhorse candidate.
LAW LEAGUE Roger Bolling tallied 27 as The Team wiped out
the Upsetters, 51-24. Stan Morris added 12 for the winners.
Bob Telfer' plowed in 17 of the 23 points scored by the DTs but it
was enought to curl the hairs of the Unnatural Acts as the DTs won
23-18 in a real offensive struggle. Officials agreed following the match
that both teams were extremely offensive. Bill Van Nortwich paved a
blazing trail for the Acts by leading the team with four points.
The Ball Busters gave Wayne Kruer and Frank Saier some time off
as Kevin Suffern and Bob Cook led the team to a tough 51-19 win
over the LA Lackers.
The game was closer than it appeared as the Lackers actually did
put five men on the court.
Suffern scored 18 points and Cook 14 in the debacle.
I A A
I i|fkiTlk 1232
W. Univ.
R SSTamoS I 376-7657
[ v
Ro-Mo makes
Huge Posters
from your own
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si siiiij
isl HU
I T J I

Ff May, Jfquery 23, The Florid* Afligeter,.

Page 23



i, Tho Florida Alligator, Friday, January 23,1970

Page 24

Campus sho|> & Bookstore EQUAUZiI
SIRLOIN PIT
i/check Our List | 1 "Congratulates the
V For Your Needs PLAYER of the WEEK player of the Week
Textbooks-New and Used . cnc r
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1 Toke Out 378-0946
p Somethins
| IKY UUK 8 Mark Mckee fishy at
?BE OP oJ?JSi!rl!: -" the WISHBONE
b|lb Bllfl o McKee, a junior from Newtown Square, #
-J I ||lU||J|| .e Pa., was instrumental in the Gators 61-52 f hirlftin nl/iro
Uj I IIWIIMI 5 triumph over Florida State. McKee won the VIIIvIVCII pIUVCe
f 200 freestyle event and the 500 freestyle.
O r
innifll Mark was awarded the NCAA All-American
t- 1 Mil lll 111 jj in 1968 for the 400 individual medley and And what it is is the best
<4 Dunniiu *"*"
_l m I authentic British
U P TACO BELL fe TACO tradition, this dinner
m /' I tc /\ Try them at 18) includes three pieces of
/.* / i?A P fresh cod filet generous
3 "ipinfc chunk of Idaho
if /> > I ip aiH|b potatoes, and a serving of
11 IT* Hdl* f crisp coleslaw. All this
dk d fr>r only 99 cents?
Jfj rirnn o S**"* pretty fishy...
O Pure Ground Beef, f
Zesty Sauce, pen 7 Days a Week p
H Tangy Cheese 10:30 am, to 12:00 pm 1
4 A Delicious Flavor Treat Fri. & Sat. til 1:00 AM £ 7045. W. 2nd AvaVlOth Ava. &S. Main WlSniMMie
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