Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 68

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FLAVET'S WOODEN FIRE ESCAPES
... one of more than 400 fire safety deficiencies at UF discovered by State Fire Marshal

FBK Denies 'Slapping Charges

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writar

Slapping UF President
Stephen C. OConnells hand for
meddling in the students
decision to finance the planned
activities complex wasnt what
Florida Blue Key had in mind
Friday when it passed a
resolution opposing the plan.
Steve Uhlfelder, chairman of
Blue Keys Executive Council,
late Monday said statements
made by former Interfratemity
Council President Steve Zack at
last Fridays meeting
concerning OConnells being
slapped, are Zacks feelings, and
not those of Blue Key.

' LAMBORN

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs law school may be
censured or expelled from the
Association of American Law
Schools (AALS) as a result of
the dismissal of four employes
who refused to sign loyalty
oaths last year.
One of the four, Assistant
Law Professor Leroy Lambom,
wrote to members of the AALS
and requested they investigate
the matter, according to UFs
law Dean Frank E. Maloney.
The AALS is a professional
organization of law school
professors, similar to the
American Bar Association,
(ABA), Maloney said.
Both the AALS and tjfce ABA

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Cainesville

Open Meeting Wednesday
The proposed activities center complex will be the subject of
discussion Wednesday night at a Florida Blue Key sponsored
meeting between proponents and opponents of the facility.
Blue Key is holding the meeting at the Reitz Union, Rm. 349,
at 7 p. m. for the purpose of organizing opposition to the
upcoming Feb. 4 Student Government referendum on the
subject.

We didnt pass the
referendum to go against
OConnell. We respect his
opinions.
Uhlfelder said the reasons the
leadership fraternity voted
against the prospect of students

UFs Law School Awaits
Possible Censure By AALS

have the power to accredit law
schools.
M aloney said the
requirements for accreditation
by the AALS are stricter than
those for the ABA.
If the law school is censured
or expelled, which I just cant
conceive of, it would have no
effect in terms of students
taking the bar exam or getting a
job, he said.
However, Maloney said, the
action would have an effect on
the faculty.
The standing of the school is
important to the type of faculty
which it attracts, he said.
The decision to investigate the
dwmissals was made at the
annual December AALS
conference in San Fnmsisco.
Lamborn,.. two. ;/ other.

IN NEW RESOLUTION

Tuesday January 20, 1970

having to pay $6 every quarter
for the next 25 years to help pay
for the facility are contained in
the resolution.
Reasons given include,
t Student monies are needed
in academic and socio-economic

professors and a clerk in the
journalism library were fired
Nov. 26 when they failed to sign

Shepherd Vetoes Bill
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
(See Editorial Page 8)
A bill which would have created an artificial quorum on Student
Senate committees was vetoed Monday by student body President
Charles Shepherd.
The bill, passed Tuesday, Jan. 13, stated that members of the Rules
and Calendar Committee would be permitted to sit on other senate
committees as voting members when necessary to fulfill a quorum.
Shepherd, in a memorandum to Student Senate President Jack
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

DAMPIER, GREEN AGREE
Fire Station
Needed At UF
By MARGO COX
Allifator Special Writer
A fire station on campus?
The question becomes relevant in the light of a recent inspection of
the UF campus by the State Fire Marshals office.
T. W. Burkhart, deputy state fire marshal made the inspection last
summer and released the report to the UF in December.
The UF is the first state university to have a comprehensive fire
safety inspection and because pf the recent report, the state has
directed other state universities to follow suit.
Burkhart found more than 400 deficiencies in campus structures
which were violations of the National Fire Prevention Associations
code of safety for educational buildings and the Florida State Statutes
pretaining to fire prevention.
Gainesville Fire Department Chief Johnny Dampier Jr., and Calvin
Green, director of UF Physical Plants Division, both answered yes to
the question of relocating a fire station on campus and indicated the
matter is under study by the UF and the City of Gainesville.
Green is in agreement with the idea of a city station on campus but
feels a separate station run perhaps by the state would be a dreadful
mistake because of the possible conflicts with other departments in
fighting fires on campus.
Dampier is in favor of relocating a fire department on campus and
says there is a definite need for one especially with the addition of the
largely populated newer buildings and housing areas
The station would serve the surrounding community as well as the
UF, Dampier said.
I have received a recommendation form the Southeastern
Underwriters that we relocate Station Number Two from the 400
block of Northwest 10th Street to a location on or nearer the
university, Dampier said.
The proposal would include a ladder company because the UF is
beyond the recommended distance of travel for the present ladder
company housed on South Main Street.
However, the Gainesville Fire Department sends at least two
pumpers and the ladder company to every call we receive on campus,
he said.
The station would be suitable for a pumper and a ladder company

programs where they will have
more effect on the standing of
the university.
Transient students will not
get as many long term benefits
as will the Athletic Association
and the Alumni Association.
i This method of financing
sets a bad precedent for
financing the future needs and
construction of facilities.
However, the resolution also
said the university and the rest
of the state would benefit from
the construction of this facility,
and that Blue Key would
Wholeheartedly support all
activities that seek to find
methods of funding and
promote interest in a coliseum.

the controversial oath.
Maloney said all faculty
(SEE 'CENSURE' PAGE 2)

MALONEY

and the planning would be for at
least a three-base station (three
engine companies) with plans to
allow for growth, Dampier said.
As for the plans of who would
staff it and where the money
would come from for land,
building and equipment, there
are no concrete answers.
There are two or three
alternate sites for the station
because the original one was not
proven feasible, Green said.
Flavet HI has a volunteer
department for its area but for
obvious reasons, the equipment
would not be entirely adequate
for fighting a fire in any of the
UFs classroom buildings.
Presently, the UF is served by
three city stations: No. One at
South Main Street, No. Two at
Northwest 10th Street and No. 4
in the 3400 block of West
University Avenue.
Besides plans for a fire
station, the GFD is already
working on a pre-fire plan of the
whole UF campus in order to
better familiarize the members
of the department with all the
campus buildings.
We feel there are some
buildings which are not as
accessible in areas as we would
like them to be. After our own
inspection, we will possibly have
some more recommendations,
Dampier said.

niaMi
VICE PRESIDENT Lester
Hale tells SMC he will
do nothing to prevent its
recognition .. page 2
Classifieds 8
Editorials ... 6
FSU News.. 2
Letters 7
Movies 8
Orange and Blue 5
Small Society 6
Sports..-. 1C



Page 2

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 20,1970

Hale Advises
Recognition
Os SMC

Censure Possible

Rfbom PACE OHEj
members, including Lambom,
were given notice they would
have to sign the oath if they
expected to be paid.
He said the notices purposely
did not state employes would be
fired because the university did
not want to appear to be trying
to intimidate anyone.
But Lambom obviously
knew he would be fired because
in die request for an injunction,
he stated threatened dismissal as
one of the reasons he believed a
restraining order to be necessary.
Lambom has said professors

Student Senate May Override
Shepherd's Quorum Veto
Vaughn, said he was vetoing the bill because it negates all the sound
assumptions of the legislative process.
However, Senate Majority Leader Sam Poole said Shepherd was
making an issue out of something that was not that significant.
The bill is not going to help anyone that much, Poole said.
There are many ways someone amibtious could move things his way
without this bill.
Poole would not say whether he thought the senate would override
Shepherds veto, but said that there may be some strong feeling that
this was an internal matter of the senate in which the executive
branch should not interfere.
Shepherd argues, however, that there are several compelling
reasons why the bill should not become law.
In the wrong hands, it provides a convenient mechanism for an
ambitious majority leader, aided by an equally ambitious whip, to
make a sham of the Student Senate, Shepherd said.
Poole said this argument was one brought up in the senate but it
was passed anyway.
Shepherd said the reports of senate committees should be
judgements of the committee itself, as representatives of the student
body, without the imposition of the Rules and Calendar
Committee.
news
By FSU FLAMBEAU
MARS: Florida State meteorologist Seymour Hess has been
appointed leader of a scientific team involved in the United States
197 S expedition to Mars.
The NASA expedition, called project Viking, will attempt to orbit
an unmanned space craft around Mars and land an instrument packed
vehicle on Mars surface to make first hand observations.
MUSIC FESTIVAL: John K. Arnold, University vice president of
student affairs, yesterday informed student government officials that
he would not approve a student allocation of $40,000 for a rock
music concert. The concert, scheduled for late this quarter, is modeled
after this years homecoming program.
Preliminary plans called for appearances of at least four top name
entertainers, a student government spokesmen said. The concert will
probably be held and financed by private donors.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale told the
Student Mobilization Committee
Monday he would recommend
their recognition.
The announcement came at a
meeting between Hale and the
SMC steering committee and
followed a SMC letter in the
Alligator which accused Hale of
political harassment.
As long as you understand
what is expected of all
organizations, said Hale, then
I will not interpose any
objection about your (SMC)

with liberal or left-of-center
views have been deliberately
discriminated against in terms of
salaries, promotions and tenure.
Maloney said he knows of no
one who was denied tenure or a
promotion on the basis of his
views, with the exception of
Lambom.
Because the AALS only meets
once a year -in December a
decision could take another two
years, Maloney said.
Lambom is one of 11
plaintiffs who have taken the
loyalty oath case before a
specially convened three-judge
federal district court in Orlando.

recognition.
SMC steering committee
member Dennis Rockway
contended that SMC had still
suffered harassment.
No other group is required
to spend the time and effort we
did to insure they understand,
he said. It was red-tape
harassment aimed at a left-wing
group.
The SMC press release stated:
The administration has
denied recognition from none
but organizations actively
engaged in changing unjust and
undemocratic policies of
minority administrations (be it
that of Nixon or of OConnell

Volpe Cancels|
President Nixon has :
assigned another 5
engagement to U. S. :
Secretary of Transportation :
John Volpe on the date he :
was scheduled to speak at j
Accent 7O. :
Volpe cancelled his j
appearance through a letter
received Monday by the j
Accent staff. j
He said Walter Mazan, :
Undersecretary of ;
Transportation, would be in j
Florida the week of Feb. 8-14 :
and might be able to speak in j
his place.
Bob Martin, Accent j
speakers chairman, said he
may contact the
undersecretary or possibly
appeal to Volpe through Sen. j
Edward Gurney. ]

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Special for^E-T"
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Cocktail hours - V.A. Hospital personnel
o 7.30 Med. Center & Shands personnel
END THE DAY ON A CHEERFUL NOTE!
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JUJHrtaIeF Organizations, who
by their passivity support such
policies, are not politically
questioned as to campus
recognition.
In any event, SMC members
regarded Hales statement as a
victory.
It was a clear victory for the
democratic process and the
rights of students to organize
themselves to fight social
injustice, said Ray Morrison,
steering committee member.
Kris Loken, SMC Treasurer,
said: We stood our ground and
it all came easy. Our strength
and determination, not the
administrations benevolence,

Nixon Nominates Carswell
To US. Supreme Court
WASHINGTON (UPI) Again turning to the South, President
Nixon Monday nominated U. S. Appeals Judge G. Harrold Carswell of
Tallahassee, Fla., to fill a long-empty Supreme Court leat. The judge
was described as a moderate conservative who lives almost entirely
on his judicial salary.
Carswell, 50 and boyish-looking for his years, has been a member of
the New Orleans-based sth U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the past
seven months. Before that he served in Florida as a U. S. attorney for
five years and as a U. S. District judge for 12 years.
He has a good judicial record, an outstanding background and he
is young, the White House said in announcing President Nixons
choice to replace Abe Fortas, who resigned May 15 following
disclosure of his dealings with imprisoned financier Louis Wolfson.
Nixons attempt to replace Fortas with another southerner, U. S.
Appeals Judge Clement F. Haynsworth of Greenville, S. S., failed in
November when the Senate rejected him after disclosure that he had
financial connections in his court, the 4th U. S. Circuit Court of
Appeals.

won out.
Several steering committee
members attributed their
success, at least in part, to
publicity and to the use of a
united front program to fight
political repression.
Brook Rood, also of the SMC
steering committee, said:
We still plan to carry on the
fight against the loyalty oath
and the resultant firings as well 1
as against politically repressive
laws. We hope to involve a large
portion of the university
community in this fight.
Final recommendation of
Hale has yet to be made to
President Stephen C. OConnell.



JFK MURDER REPORT
"fr
Insert Implies Conspiracy

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Richard B. Russell,
D-Ga., a member of the Warren Commission which
investigated the death of President John F.
Kennedy, believes Lee Harvey Oswald was not alone
in planning the assassination, the Washington Post
reported Monday.
Although Russell appeared to agree with the
commissions findings that Oswald fired the shots
that killed Kennedy, he said too many
things... caused me to doubt that he planned it all
by himself, according to the newspaper.
The Post story was based on one of a series of
taped television interviews to be broadcast next
month by television station WSB-TV in Atlanta.

Court Defiance
Pondered By
Gov. Kiric
WASHINGTON (UPI) Gov.
Claude Kirk asked the Supreme
Court Monday to reconsider its
decision ordering total
desegregation of many Florida
schools by Feb. 1.
Kirk warned that if the court
refused, he would have to delay
its implementation in Florida
until September.
He said he would do It by
executive order, directing
affected school boards not to
change the school calendar or
take any action which would
close the schools during midyear
in order to transfer pupils or
teachers. He also would order
them not to incur any expenses
for which current funds are not
available.
He said with all due
humility he did not want to
defy the high court but that it
was impossible for the counties
to meet the deadline without
doing irreparable harm to
students and the state budget.
He also said that schools would
have to shut down for from a
week to two weeks.
Kirk appeared in person,
Monday at the high court to file
papers on behalf of Florida. He
said the state cannot carry out
the order without an increase in
its budget.
EAG Meets Tues.
EGC 300 Technology,
Civilization and Man will
have a guest speaker Tuesday
and visitors are invited.
Dr. Joseph Simons, retired
professor of chemical
engineering, will speak on the
topic Our Natural Resources
How Long Will They Last at the
Rate Were Using Them? and
What Will We Do Then?
His lecture will be in the
engineering Auditorium at 1:25
pm Tuesday.
9 TEXTBOOK ARRIVALS I
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ft Lift 188 Weddle: Techniques ft
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INTERFACE
Its where you find a career greater
than a single company can offer.
Interviewing on campus
January 28-29:
accounting degree
candidates
. i
Ask your placement office to set up an appointment.
HUMBLE OIL ft REFINING COMPANY
and other affiliates of
Standard Oil Company
(New Jersey)
Equal Opportunity Employers Y
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Russell, one of seven members of the commission
headed by Earl Warren who was then chief justice of
the Supreme Court, said his doubts led him to insist
on an insertion in the final report before he would
sign it.
The insertion said that because of the difficulty
of proving negatives to a certainty the possibility of
others being involved with either Oswald or Jack
Ruby who assassinated Oswald cannot be
established categorically, but if there is any such
evidence it has been beyond the reach of all the
investigative agencies and resources of the United
States and has not come to the attention of this
commission.

Draft Laws Violated
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court ruled Monday that
draft officials have no authority to declare a registrant delinquent and
order his induction because he violated Selective Service laws.
The court held that youths who defy the military service act are
subject to criminal prosecution by the courts but not to
reclassification or other punishment.
The decision came in a criminal case involving David Earl
Gutknecht of Taylord, Minn., who claimed his induction was speeded
up because he dropped his draft card at the feet of a U.S. marshal.
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Tuday, January 20,1970, Tha Florida AMgator.

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 20,1970

Forum Will Discuss Law
Law enforcement 'in Gainesville and Alachua County will be
deliberated by the Citizens Forum at the Gainesville Public Library
tonight at 8 p.m.
The public affairs interest program is open to the public.
Gainesville Police Chief William D. Joiner and Mr. Ronald Stanley
of the Alachua County Sherrifs office will be the guest
commentators. Both speakers have agreed to answer questions from
the audience.
The topics of contemporary concerns are selected for the monthly
programs from suggestions made by persons attending the meetings.
The February forum will review local public health needs and the
Alachua General Hospital controversy.

Albert Camus
Symposium
Scheduled

FSA To Hold Convention

By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida colleges, public and private, are being
urged by the UF student government to drop their
national student government affiliations and band
together to form a statewide student association.
George Seide, director of Inter-University
Relations, said Monday a constitutional convention
will be held on the UF campus in early March to
form the constitution of the Florida Student
Association (FSA).
The UF student government committee sent
questionnaires to SO Florida colleges, junior colleges
and universities requesting information on the
formation of a statewide student association, and 30
have replied.
Os the 30 received, 26 favored the formation of
an association, four did not. Os the four, only two
said they wouldnt support an association when it

I I
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I .AriEt l yui) Os J"J"iJEJiE
I jfWriL-&JW7 /bJJ'JiE JilviE.
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1 S

Albert Camus, the late author of The Stranger and The
Plague, is the subject of a symposium to be held Jan. 29-30 in
the Reitz Union.
Three specialists on Camus will speak on different aspects of
his work and participate in a panel discussion on the Problems
of Camus Research moderated by Dr. Raymond Gay-Crosier of
the department of romance languages and literatures.
The purpose of the symposium is to clarify the present
evaluations of his work, to indicate new directions of criticism
and to present the need for a detailed biography of Camus,
Gay-Crosier said.
Referring to the large quantities of material on Camus, he
claimed the present research was out of control. A lot of it
repetitious.
The symposium will be an attempt to get teamwork in

comes into existence.
The questionnaire revealed that 27 student
government organizations are already members of a
national or state organization.
There is no statewide organization for all
colleges. They place limits on membership such as
junior colleges, state colleges or private
institutions, Seide said.
The questionnaire shows the dissatisfied attitude
of state schools with respect to organizations they
belong to.
It seems evident changes have to be made,
Seide said. The private schools dont even have a
statewide organization of their own.
Seide says he has already found a better insurance
program for students than the one offered by the
National Student Association (NSA).
The UF student government withdrew its
membership from the NSA after a two-month
membership.

... by Brickmon
the small society
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THB&E Vicl Ot)4
W>iMw|tei'i Stef Swct> **^

Camus research, he said.
Speeches will be given in room 349 of the Union. The first
speech will be at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 29, the second at 10 the next
morning and the last speech at 2:30 that afternoon.
According the Gay-Crosier, 35 to 40 specialists on Camus are
expected to attend. All have published either a book or articles
on Camus.
Admission is free and anyone wishing to attend is invited to
do so.

U of F Student Insurance
Enrollment Period
On r K| Deadline-
C Sunday, Jan. 25
SPONSORED BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
COVERAGE
Until Sept. 1970
Pays infirmary expense
Hosp., Doctor and Surgical Bills
PREMIUM
Student premium $14.80
Student and Spouse premium $31.25
Student, Spouse and Children $47.50
Student and Children $31.25
Optional Major Medical $5 per personal additional
You may pick up Brochures and Enrollment Forms from
the Infirmary, McGriff Scarborough and Student
Government.
McGriffScarboroagk t Associates
P.O. Box 1407
115 N.E. 6th Avo. Ph. 376-8393



Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Campus
Notices Calendar

GENERAL NOTICES
INDIA CLUB celebrates 'The
Indian Republic Day" on Sat.,
Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Baptist Student Center (W. Univ.
Ave.). Program: Open discussion
on religions in India today, a
cultural program, snacks, and
films on India. All are welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, co-educational
honorary service organization,
will be holding its winter
membership social Jan. 29, at
7:30 p.m. in room 123, Reitz
Union. Students interested in
doing service for the University
and community are invited to
attend. For more information,
call Richard Spool, 378-0529.
JAPANESE STUDENTS
interested in the John W. Hill
Fellowship for advanced studies
in Public Relations at Colombia
University during academic year
1970-71 are asked to see Col.
G.A. Farris, International
Center.
PEACE CORPS
RECRUITERS will be on
campus Jan. 19-23 outside the
Games Rooms of Reitz Union.
NEW FOREIGN STUDENTS
and their wives are invited to a
winter quarter welcoming dinner
in the church hall of First
Baptist Church (425 W. Univ.
Ave.), Fri., Jan. 23, at 7:00 p.m.
If transportation is needed,
contact International Center.
AMERICAN STUDENTS are
invited to consult the 1970
Directory of Overseas Summer
Jobs at International Center.

_ for your next car 10an... &
jf' l t / "" Try our low cost auto financing Interest Tpl
MftT /f ris computed each month on the unpaid
=> ] balance and do you ever save when you
before signing papers anywhere else.
Payroll deduction available for share and
loan payments.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f| A
sth Aynw at th comrofJ2thjtrt JjourgK)Oojn._-_3j3og : : _MowdoyJ^^>^Fridajr______.^^_

PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June & August grads,
unless indicated otherwise.
** Indicates U.S. Citizenship
required. Degrees: B-Bachelor's,
M-Masters, D-Doctorate
Jan. 26: Howard, Needles,
Tammen & Bergendoff;
Baltimore Contractors, Inc.;
Hystron Fibers, Inc.; Lockheed
Aircraft Corp.; Eastfield College,
Dallas, Texas.
Jan. 26-27: Westinghouse
Electric Tech, and Non-tech.;
McDonnell Douglas Corp.; U.S.
Atomic Energy Commission.
Jan. 27: Swift & Co.
(Chicago, 111. & Winter Haven);
Pan American World Airways,
Inc.; Square D Co.; The Ceco
Corp.; Armour-Dial, Inc.;
Westvaco Corp.
Jan. 27-28: Procter 8t Gamble
Distributing Co.
Jan. 28: Automatic Sprinkler
Corp. of America; Hughes
Aircraft Co.; First Union
National Bank.
Jan. 28-29: Fairfax County
Public Schools; Humble Oil &
Refining Co.
Jan. 28-29-30: Radiation, Inc.
Jan. 29: Liberty Mutual
Insurance Co.; American Sugar
Co.; Babcock & Wilcox Co.;
Union Oil Co. of California
Pure Oil Div.; Honeywell, Inc.
Jan. 29-30: Owens-Coming
Fibergias Corp.
Jan. 30: Air Products &
Chemicals; ITT Co.; Scott Paper
Co.; State Highway Dept of
Georgia; Associated Coca-Cola
Co.; Sperry Micro-wave; General
Dynamics Electronics Div.;
Hooker Chemical Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Jan. 28: Stonerock,
Hollingworth and Simonet
Jan. 30: Electronic
Communications, Inc.

BLUE BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 20
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Scabbard & Blade Rush Smoker,
121 Union, 7:00 p.m. Dress:
Dress Green.
Alpha Zeta Meeting, 346 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Lecture: Joseph Heard,
Union Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C&D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Cox's Furniture Company,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Faculty Concert,
Two Pianos, Four Voices,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, January 21

Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
am 4:30 p.m.
Union Lecture: Dialogue with a
Theoiogue, Rev. Robert
Smith, "Does Organized
Religion Have A Future?"
122 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Sigma Nu Fraternity Meeting,
362 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Architecture and Fine Arts
Dames Meeting, Flavet Rec.
Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Befrienders Meeting, Bring your
own Dinner, 1823 N.W. 2nd
Ave., 5:30 p.m.
Scabbard & Blade Rush Smoker,
121 Union, 7:00 p.m. Dress:
Dress Green.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m.
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 pm
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 pm

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday, January 20,1970, Thu Florida AWpitor,

Thursday, January 22
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby Union, 9:00 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
Union Cafeteria: "Cape Cod
Feast," 4:30 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organizational
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Association for Childhood
Education, Speaker: Mrs.
Maud Watkins, 347 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 150
C Union, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, Speaker: Dean
Cantrell, "Activities Center,"
133 Bless Aud., 7:30 p.m.
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
and Fan Club Meeting, 150 F
& G Union, 8:00 p.m.
Baha'i Association Meeting, 150
A Union, 8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller: "Biff Rose," 8:30
& 10:30 p.m.

Friday, January 23
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Muslim Student Association
Prayer, 123 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Union Movie, "Barbarella,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 8i
10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Muslim Students Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller: "Biff Rose," 8:30,
10:30 8t 12:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: SGP:
Florida Symphony. Audubon
Wildlife Films, Single Adm.,
U. of F. Students, SI.OO, GP,
$1.50, HS Students, $.50;
Series of 5 films, U. of F.
Students, $4.00, GP, $6.00,
HS Students, $2.00. Biff
Rose, $l5O.

Page 5



Page 6

I, Th World* AlWptor, Tud*y, January 20,1970

EDITORIALS
Sustain Veto

Student Body President Charles Shepherd,
in vetoing the amendment to the Student
Senate Committee Law, may have kept the
senate from making a grevious mistake.
It is a mistake we dont believe they want
to intentionally make.
The bill placing members of the senates
Rules and Calendar Committee on any
senate committee in order to establish a
quorum, was vetoed by Shepherd Monday.
We support Shepherd in this action, and
we ask the senators to reconsider the
implications of this far-reaching lever to
political power.
Perhaps, with the leaders the senate now
has, the fear of making a sham of the
Student Senate is not applicable.
That is to our credit and good fortune.
But what if...
The majority leader or whip were men
seeking far greater power, and sought to
accomplish this by placing themselves on the
right committees at the right times.
Certain factions decided to ram-rod a
bill through a committee with the least
opposition possible and report it favorably
to the senate as a whole.
It can happen without this bill, true. But
the point is, the bill will give such people
virtual legality.
~AI committee quorum is an intricate part
of the legislative process. It is not a
mechanism for rigged votes and false
representation of the student body.
The bill is not necessary. It is potentially
dangerous.
Shepherds veto should be sustained
because it is legitimate.
We ask you, the representatives of this
student body, to take a look beyond this
- year, and if you can see the worst happening
someday because of your actions, then
sustain this veto.

Happy And Sad: Goodbye To The Village

I was returning to the village for the
last time.
The dolmus was chugging its way
along the narrow, twisted road toward
the town which had harboured me for a
year. My body bounced to the rhythm
of the jeeps jerky movement, but my
mind wandered outside amid the orange
groves and cotton fields, amid the
minarets and mountain tops, amid the
village sounds and the childrens cries.
1 remembered the first time 1 had
travelled this dusty road. I remembered
with what awe my eyes had greeted the
surrounding greenness, the camels on
the road, the moustached villagers with
their wide, yellow grins and wide-eyed
stares. I remembered how sights and
sounds and even smells became
suddenly important to me. I had
rediscovered my senses.
It had been six weeks since I left the
village to go on vacation in Greece. Now
I was returning to sell my furniture and
say good-bye. 1 was moving to the city.
When I had left to go on vacation, 1
had fought with some of the teachers in
the school... so I left without saying
good-bye to them. But now, as I was
returning to say good-bye for the last
time, there was a letter waiting for me.
It was from Necati, one of the teachers
in the school. It was written in English
(I had taught him from time to time)
and it read:
Hello Joe:
You had mad me before go out from
the town. Even if you didnt say
good-bye to me. You can mad me, but

we lived good and bad days together.
Didnt we any fight with you?
God saw me after you and Im going
to the army after Ist or 15th October.
Ill go the town 25 th August and come
back after ten days.
Now 1 am in Bursa. If you write me
or if you come to Bursa when you come
back Ankara, IU be glad. You can stay
9ome days in Bursa.
Im waiting you or your letter. If you
dont write, Ill only sad. What can I do?
I want to see you again very
much... home-sick (Joe-sick). Do you
understand?
I wish to you good luck and success
for the feature.
(Signed) Your friend (may-be-mi?),
Necati.
The Doktor Bey had kissed me on
both cheeks, said Hos Geldiniz and
asked me about my trip. It felt good to
be back, but it wasnt until I read
Necatis letter that I felt I was really
home.
1 went to my local barber for a shave,
stopped at several small shops, closed
out my bank account, checked for mail
at the post office and played a game of
tavla at the coffee-house. Everywhere
people welcomed me bade as if I were a
long lost relative. My students tipped
their hats ( if they were wearing one)
and said (in English) Welcome, Mr.
Torchia. Friends invited me to dinner.
Everyone inquired about my trip and
asked if I liked Greece. Yes, I said,
then they wanted to know if it was
better than Turkey. I said they were

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

You puzzle us, brothers of Florida Blue
Key.
Twenty-six of you have voted to oppose
the Feb. 4 coliseum referendum.
Thats fine, we would ordinarily say.
You are certainly entitled to your opinion.
But, let us pause and examine some of the
facts* on which you based your resolution:
You cited a nebulous minority that has
supposedly deemed it politically
expedient to give our student body an
ultimatum ... which allows only for a vote
on increasing tuition and does not provide
the opportunity to vote singularly on having
a coliseum...
The fact is, brothers of Blue Key, that in
1967 the student body made it quite clear in
a similar opinion poll that it wished to have
a coliseum, and that it would be willing to
hike its own tuition $5 to pay for it.
Your resolution is fully cognizant of this
fact. But, either by mistake or by design,
you chose to label the opinion poll a
referendum. The difference, as we are
certain you realize, is significant: An opinion
poll is merely an expression of sentiment,
while a referendum is a formal statement of
approval, a commitment.
You further argued that the 1967 opinion
poll (you continued to call it a referendum)
was one of the arguments used in the
legislature for a subsequent tuition increase
but none of, the resulting increase was in
actuality allocated to the coliseum.
The fact is, brothers of Blue Key, that the
1967 tuition hike applied to all state
universities, and not only to the UF as you
obviously infer. (A careful search of our
files, incidentally, failed to reveal any
arguments from 1967 to date for a tuition

Check Your Fads

The Adventures Os
Joe Torchia
Peace Corps
Volunteer
both beautiful, but in different ways.
I passed the word around that I was
selling my furniture and the next
morning at 9 there was a knock at my
garden gate. One hour later there were
more than 30 people in my house, most
of them women.
It was like a one-act slapstick
comedy, and it felt good to be on the
other end of bargaining. This time
THEY were trying to get prices reduced
and I felt a sudden surge of sympathy
for every merchant in town.
They used every means possible to
get prices reduced. One woman said,
But were neighbors... for eight
months we... Another man wanted
to buy the desk: But its for
Mehmet... to study English... * And
there were others: But its faded (or)
Look! Its tom!(or) I like
Americans... Now, about that
dresser...
By late afternoon, everything was
sold. I lit a cigarette and took an aspirin

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Increase based on the results of that opinion
poll.)
You go on to say. that since 1967 our
tuition has jumped 75 per cent.
The fact is, brothers of Blue Key, that
tuition increases have amounted to about
half of the percentage you cite.
The fact is, in short, that those of you
who chose to support the anti-coliseum
referendum resolution did nothing more
than put forth a series of half-truths and
innuendoes that did little to advance your
argument and a lot to obscure the issue.
We could choose to simply dismiss your
arguments as another politically-inspired
move to benefit from what has become a
highly emotional issue. But we wont.
Certainly, there are some within your
ranks whom we feel are doing just that. An
example is former Interfratemity Council
President Steve Zack, admittedly a candidate
for student body president and one of your
outspoken critics of the referendum.
But we likewise believe that a significant
number of those of you opposing the
coliseum referendum are honestly, although
perhaps mistakenly, concerned about the
students* welfare.
The question, we think, is not whether
the students want a coliseum. That was
established in 1967. The question is whether
the students are willing to help construct it.
Ambiguities and expedient double-talk are
only roadblocks on the path to obtaining an
honest answer to this basic question.
Thus we ask you, brothers of Blue Key, to
clear up the obscurity in your stand and let
us know just where you are, and why you
are there.
Your chapter and our student body
certainly deserve no less.

for my headache, then sat in the
emptiness of my house. I was now
spread out all over the village and there
was a strange satisfaction in it, and a
strange hollowness.
Then I walked outside for a special
good-bye. I kicked the rooster for the
thousandth time and scattered the
clucking hens in my path. I stood there
for a long moment looking at the little
wooden building with its creaky door.
That night I stayed at another
teachers house because I had no bed.
The next morning was spent with
good-byes and, when I walked to the
dolmus in the afternoon, there were
over 40 people to see me off. I shook a
lot of hands and kissed a lot of cheeks.
As I jumped on the back of the jeep,
it started to rain. Hhan handed me my
last piece of baggage and said:
Even the clouds are crying for you.
It was sloppy and sentimental and I
hated myself for enjoying every
moment of it.
The ignition was started and we
pulled away from the village. I watched
the windshield-wipers making their
pre-destined journey back and forth
across the streaked glass. I lit a cigarette
and listened to the empty rattling of the
dolmus as it hobbled its way out of the
cobblestoned village. I felt very happy
and very sad at the same time, and it
wasnt until then that I realized how
much the place meant to me.
As the green jeep bounced down the
road for the last time, the clouds
continued crying.



.--OPEN FORUM:-^
( Alltl mI Diiftfr
Activities Center:
Impractical Dream

MR. EDITOR:
In the interest of balance of
opinion on the proposed
University Activities Center,
would you please run the
enclosed article I am submitting?
There are several facts and/or
opinions that I feel the student
body should be exposed to
before the referendum February
4, 1970. It is hoped that you
will give adequate if not equal
coverage to those less
enthusiastic about the proposal
to raise tuition to support a
structure of that kind.
* *
Very few people question the
need here at UF of a new
auditorium and an activities
center. I question very strongly
however, die wisdom and value
of spending $17.5 million on a
structure of this kind or
magnitude.
You are urged to vote No on
February 4, 1970, not because
you reject the idea of an
auditorium or activities center,
but because after consideration
of the following facts you
demand a more feasible, less
expensive, (dan.
Consider for a moment
what 17.5 nriffion dollars has
built on die UF campus:
million
Reitz Union Complex $5.7
New Florida Museum 2.5
Twin Towers 33
Research library 1.8
little Hall 1.4
Aerospace Building 1.2
New Music Building 13
Be advised that the entire
Miami Beach Convention Hall
cost only 143 million dollars.
The Dade County Auditorium (a
fine civic structure for concerts,
etc.) cost only 1.25 million
dollars.
t Auburn University had a
similar structure built on its
campus last year for $6 million.
For $17.5 million you almost
build three entire Reitz Unions.
That is why I consider this
proposal to be a rather wild one.

Law Center Named To Honor Holland?

MR. EDITOR:
I am writing this letter in response to the speech by Senator
Spessard Holland concerning the U.S. Supreme Court order
demanding desegregation of public schools in the South.
Holland said, I think its a matter of the court just losing its
patience in the matter, they just went overboard.
What is Senator Hollands concept of patience? The original
Supreme Court decision outlawing segregation of public schools
(Brown vs School Board of Topeka) was handed down in 1954.
It has been almost sixteen years, sufficient and ample time for the
states and local school boards to comply with the decision. If
anything, the court should be condemned for not acting soon enough
and for ignoring the rest of the nation by limiting the desegregation

No
Lets cut the proposal down to
size and put it back in the scope
of reality.
Also, students are already
suffering from a 1969 $25 per
quarter tuition increase, and
they must know that
ANOTHER $25 increase is
planned by the Florida
Legislature in 1971. In
September, 1971, if you pass
this proposal, you might well
pay sll tuition per quarter.
Considering that over 50% of
the UF students receive, or have
received financial aid, over 50%
of our student population
cannot afford any more tuition
increases.
Only if this proposal is
strongly supported and if the
Florida Legislature goes along
could bonds even be issued in
late 1971 or early 1972. If those
bonds are thep sold, we might
see the structure built by 1977.
So why commit yourself right
now to this giant mistake? Why
not wait and demand a better
plan so those students now in
high school, junior high school,
elementary those not even
bom yet who could be affected
financially, will get their
moneys worth?
Lets study this plan some
more. Dont be so anxious and
gullible as to believe this is a well
planned proposal. Dont commit
yourself and this student body
to a giant, ill-devised mistake.
We as a University cannot afford
this proposal, and you
personally cannot afford it
either.
Sure, we need an activities
center, but we also need better
pay for professors, new
instructional buildings and
equipment and books for the
libraries. Lets get both by
rejecting this plan for a more
down to earth proposal. Vote
No February 4,1970.
JAMES K. CLARK, 3BA

fjsfw if
The State Will Pay Too

MR. EDITOR:
The following letter is
addressed to Richard J. Nielsson,
7 AG, who wrote a letter, Why
Should Students Pay? printed
in the January 15 Alligator.
You are quite right when you
say that students should stand
up and let their wishes be
known. But, lets get some facts
straight first.
Contrary to what you imply,
the State of Florida will be
asked to appropriate
approximately 2.6 million
dollars to assist in the
construction of the Activities
Center. Under state law, the
Legislature will appropriate
capital money for academic
space only, leaving facilities like
the Union, stadium, or the
Activities Center, to find

Stoff riti ng s
Its Another Commie Plot
* a
By CtldHoS Tf O fl l6 l lTl Q fl

Citizens, beware! There is a
new Communist plot afoot.
Those same pinkos and fellow
travelers who instigated the
insidious flouride in our water
and unleashed Spiro Agnew on
an unsuspecting and helpless
press have found another means
to whittle away at the
foundation of our great nation.
It would appear, fellow
patriots, that these sabateurs
have infiltrated one of the oldest
institutions in the land and are
now doing away with one of our
most cherished and- time
honored customs, a custom
brought over on the Mayflower
and long considered as American
as apple pie.
It would seem, Americans,

order to the South.
Holland accuses the court of acting in a hostile manner. It
appears to me that the states and local schoolboards, by filing last
minute appeals to delay implementation of the court order, are acting
in a hostile manner, not the court.
It seems incomprehensible to me that the College of Law was
named in honor of an individual who terms the Supreme Court
impatient and hostile for implementation of a decision handed
down almost sixteen years ago. But .then we must remember that this
is Florida where racism is a prerequisite to political success, and
Senator Holland has been very successful in Florida politics.
.'M LARRY TROPP, 2UC
/ .* . ,\ ,%v

construction funds elsewhere.
No matter what your feelings
may be regarding the
appropriateness of the States
building the entire Activities
Center, it just wont happen
not this century.
There are numerous
precedents in which students
paid for such facilities. At
Alabama, Auburn, and Illinois,
mass seating facilities were all
particaliy funded by student
fees. In fact, the University of
Alabama secured their bonding
program by a student fee pledge
of $6.25 per student per term.
At Tennessee, the entire
complex was built by a donation
by Stokely-Van Camp.
On another point, President
Shepherd has already made a
personal pledge to Dean Fred
Cantrell of $150.00 per year
over the duration of the bond

that the insidious communist
planners in far off lands have
found away to keep Americans
from sleeping in church!
Admit it! When was the last
time you saw anyone sleeping in
church?
What is the significance of so
seemingly small a phenomenon?
Surely the answer is obvious!
Sunday has long been one of
the few days in the year when
anyone, from president to the
lowest ditch digger, could take a
day off and engage in such
all-American pastimes as going
on picnics, eating apple pie,
playing baseball, and mowing
the lawn. Indeed, Sunday is an

TuMday, January 20,1970, The Florida Avatar,

Yes
issue, either twenty or
twenty-five years. This amounts
to over three thousand dollars,
far beyond his salary as
President of the Student Body.
The February 4 referendum
should stand on its own merits,
not on collateral issues. I hope
that after listening to all of the
arguments you will join the
many students who will vote
yes on February 4.
WALTER L. MORGAN
SG VICE PRESIDENT

American institution which must
be protected.
Imagine, then, what wOl
happen when people can no
longer build up their energy for
these activities, by catching forty
winks during the sermon on
Sunday morning. People wi
lose valuable sleep.
Parents, instead of happily
lunching on milk and cookies
with the kiddies are doing the
yard work, will become tired
and irritable. Family life will
break down as fathers decide
theyre too tired to do anything.
Every day pinko preachers are
making their sermons so short
and interesting that no one even
has a chance to get to sleep!
Already the unrest spreading
throughout the nation shows the
extent to which this conspiracy
has spread. Lacking a wholesome
family life the youth of the
nation is in revolt. Respect for
authority has deteriorated to
almost nothing.
Now is the time to fight back.
Even now the plot is spreading
to our college campuses where
students are finding themselves
unable to sleep in classes. The
next time you go to church, go
to sleep. Dont even wait for the
sermon to start; cork out during
the opening hymn and stay that
way right through the final
blessing. Remember. The future
of America depends on you!

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE ||
1969 HONDA 50 cc. Like new. Less
than 300 miles. Need money. Best
offer. Call 392-8949. (A-68-st-p).
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent Electric
shampooer SIOO Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-68-lt-p).
FLUTE: Reynolds. Excellent
condition; case Included. $75. Call
392-7801 anytime. (A-68-3t-01.
8 track car stereo by automatic radio.
Unit only. Brand new, has only one
half hour playing time on It. $55.
Call 378-5002. (A-67-3t-p)
German Shepherd: 6 weeks old AKC
from best of champion German
stock, show or pet quality. 372-4653.
(A-7t-62-p)
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
WOW! 3 litters AKC Champion sired
German Shepherd pups. Parents
gentle, obedience trained, OFA
certified. 372-0276, 378-3817.
(A-67-st-P)
Vespa 125 cc only 1 year old. Under
1200 miles must sell by February.
Only S2OO or best offer. Call
373-1412. Ask for Scott or Laurie.
(A-67-st-P)
Wedding gown of lace over satin with
chapel train. Size 7. Also have blonde
wig for sale. Like new. Call 372-5166
after 3 PM for info. (A-66-st-p).
SUPER FANTASTIC STEREO!
Component set, 125 W. Garrard SL
95 tt. Altec sp. systems. Come &
look. Call Bob 378-7479.
(A-65-st-p).
64 Dodge Dart GT, loaded, 4 speed,
red, chrome rims, bucket seats, new
brakes and ball joints, really sharp,
$825, 373-1634 evenings, student.
(A-65-st-p).
1967 Honda 90 Excellent condition.
Helmet includedsllo. Call
392-9891. Also 1 yr. old
stereo-General Electric. Beautiful
walnut speakers3s watt amp ampflawless
flawless ampflawless turntable. Must sell! $95.
(A-65-4t-p).
Shopping for components? Pay cash
for new equipment and save 15% or
more of list price. Examples: Dual
1209 or Garrard SL 95b with Shure
M9l E-$l 15; Sony 355 tape
deck-$lB9. Most major-brand stereo
components. Call Jay at 376-9583
after 5:00 pm or on weekends.
(A-65-st-p).
CAMERA Konlca 35mm fully
automatic w/ 52mm & 135 mm
lenses. Original cost $425, now $325.
Call 378-5192 after 5 or weekends.
(A-3t-59-p).
1968 DTl 250 Yamaha Scramble
2700 miles. PERFECT condition.
Two helmets. Buddy seat. $575. Call
Brad or Gary 376-8524. (A-64-st-p).
Rugs, coffee table, washing machine,
alr-condltloner, queen size headboard
and nightstands, baby stroller,
playpen, scales. Infant seat, books,
odds and ends. 1302 N.E. 14th Terr.
(Off N.E. 16th Ave.) After 5:30 PM.
(A-64-st-p).
HONDA 305 1969, Superhawk.
Crash Bar Helmets like new.. S6OO
373-1242. 1806 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Student. (A-68-st-p).
FOR RENT
V V
V>:w>:*:-x*x-nn^s*k-x-x-'-X*x-x-v.w.-x*;-;-:^-
S6O per month for room AND
board.Colleglate Living Organization.
117 N. W. 15th St., call 376-9420 for
the secretary. (B-68-st-p).
2 bedroom 2 full bath, Mt. Vernon
Apt.; AC, Heating, dishwasher,
tantalizing decor, only $2lO per
month; Call 373-2759. (B-64-st-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet,-a/C, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-tl-c).

N.W. 13th St 372-9523 -
from the mallA w^mw
fit \Ki 4 A|f J|
fi W "CAN HERONYMOUS IHf 7 -So 71
I ? fr.O'* MERKINEVER V |3
1 ,M II FORGET...?" m G O r yt-0 W m
o osjA> II If ~ M
L ll //-US f M
J|Hb uO* .p''w ff
ii§ p > p "BIRDS IN PERU" I Jdlfc-
I ft

IFOR RENT I
seeeMeeoeomoHooooeoM4oMMee>;*K*
SUBLET: 1 bedroom furnished apt.
6 blks to campus ln student
quarter. Rent $75 mo. includes most
utilities. Lease thru June. Call
372-5041 between 5 & 7 and after 10
PM. (B-66-st-p)*
Unbelievable one large bedroom apt.
1605 N. W. 4th Ave. 373-1217.
student. 5 minute walk from
Campus. (B-68-2t-p).
Sublet till June 15. Lg. 2 Bdrm. Apt.
Central Heat & A.C. (Very) close to
campus. ($145. mo) Call EMMY
378-7467. (B-68-st-p).
Must sublease one bedroom apt. at
1824 N.W. 3rd PI. no. 45, close to
campus. Rent $125, available
Immediately. Call 372-5522 after
6:00 PM. (B-66-4t-p).
Lg. pvt. furnished bdrm. In lg. house,
kchn. living rm washer + dryer 3
blocks fm campus. Gall 392-354> 9
A.M. 5 P.M. Ask for Robin.
(B-68-2t-p).
Sublet one apt. 3 blocks from
campus. AC split level Quiet Call
373-1070. 125/mo. plus utilities.
(B-68-lt-p).
/x-x-xx-x.vx-x*x-x-x-x-x-x-J*v-*-wy Xi Xv
WANTED i
5
Female roommate needed for
Landmark Apt. Feb. rent paid. REST
OF YEAR'S RENT NEGOTIABLE.
Call Linda 373-1219. (C-68-3t-p).
1 male roommate wanted to share
trailer with 1 other student.
Individual bedrooms, carpeting,
stereo, TV, air, nicely furnished. 60/
mo. Call 376-2789. (C-68-st-p).
Fantastic deal
needed for plush village park apt.
occupancy Call 373-2394, no.
114, 1001 S.W. 16 Ave. (C-66-3t-p
WANTED: one or two roomates only
$42. per month. Contact Fred Village
Park apt. 77. If not there leave a
note. (C-64-st-p).
Female Roommate for one bedroom
Landmark Apt. January rent paid.
Contact 376-3873. (C-67-st-p)
Gatortown Female Roommate $45.
mo., Good study environment, Jan.
rent paid. Immediate occupancy. Call
376-7993. (C-67-st-p)
Established 'rock group needs
manager to secure bookings. Call
Ricky 378-3755. (C-67-3t-p)
One Male Roommate to share new 12
x 60 mobile home. Central heat/alr.
T.V. No lease. Your own room. $55
mo. plus utilities. Call 376-4138. Jim.
(C-67-st-p)
Female Roommate for Frederick
Gardens. Immediate occupancy Jan.
rent free. $41.25 month. Call
376-7925 or 378-8272. (C-67-st-p)
Female roomate share one bedroom
apt. Village Park $65./mo. Avail.
Feb. Ist. Phone 378-9072, after 5
p.m. (C-66-3t-p).
Research Assistant Wanted. MA In
psychology, speech, linguistics or
related field. Fulltime. Working In
psychollnguistlc research. Contact
Dr. Scholes or Col. Lauer,
Communication Sciences Laboratory.
392-2046. (C-64-st-c).
Three male students need one
roommate to live at La Bonne vie
apts. Coll 378-8286. (C-10t-59-p)
lI>QIIOIMtM^""WWWM;MWWWWW't
NaP WANTED I
Collection Supervisor, male or
female, salary open. Campus Credit
Union. Call Mrs. Decker. 392-0393
for Interview, apt. (E-61-10t-c).
Trader Toms needs T-shirt ed
waltresse-4or more Info, contact TT
at 2212 S.W. 13th St., Call 376-7070
or 372-9350. Open for business at 6
P.M. (E-65-st-p).

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 20,1970

| HELP WANTEP^J
PARTTIME; Reliable Male; Honest;
Dependable, auto required; periods 4,-
5, 6 open; Permanent job. Call
iMwseiwaMsoooooooooeeftoi^^
AUTOS I
iSi-Bwtnji.fliMflSQSCoooeeeeeoMi;yi!i>oflCo6Bm
1968 E. Ford Cortina GT. Bought
new In *69. Excellent condition,
radial tires, warranty $1,650. Call
378-4889. (G-66-3t-p).
1967 V W radio heater low milage,
excellent condition. Call 378-6933.
$llOO. (G-67-2t-p)
Porsche 1968 912 5 speed. Air cond.
AM-FM short wave radio, crome
wheels, NEW tires, tinted glass like
new. $4495.00. Call 378-1668.
(G-67-st-p)
%v-x-x-x-x-x-x<<*x-x*x-x*x-x-x.x*x%^
PERSONAL
iV.v...v; x-x-x-x-x.vx x*x-X-x-x.f.rw x*x x<-*
CENTER OF MAN wants to meet
you Thursday, 8:00 pm, for a
celebration of man with folk
singing >, poetry, being, and
Leonardo Ricci. Catholic Student
Center Lounge. $1.50 or 75c
students. (J-68-3t-p).
SINGLE STUDENTS: Meet more
members of the opposite sex at UF
through N. D. S. All dates In
Gainesville. For free detail and
questionnaire write: Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-68-10t-p).
27 year old engineering student
Interested In meeting mature Jewish
co-ed. Please call Bill after 11:00
P.M. 372-4921. (J-64-st-p).
Foosball.' Foosball! In the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament is worth a case if
your good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-ts-c).
Dear Michael, Two years down and a
lifetime to go. Love you whole
bunches! llene. (J-67-lt-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
patriotic message. Anytime day or
night. LET FREEDOM RING. 16
N.W. 7th Ave. (J-66-st-p).
8 Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna' 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-10t-p).
To the girl from Graham with the
wet turkey sandwich, I'm sorry.
Youre adorable. (J-66-3t-p)
Hiccup ... come back to (hiccup) see
us ... (hiccup) again. The Bench and
(hiccup) bar. 1222 W. Univ. Ave.
Happy hour 5 to 7 dally. Judy rides
again! (J-68-lt-p).
One month ago today The start of
an era. Hope the rest are as happy!
Love you always baby. BBN.
(J-68-lt-p).
Mustang*^.
MOHII HOMES <3!
1970
ALTAI R
51X12
2 BEDROOM
FRONT KITCHEN
CARPET
DELUXE APPLIANCES
3895.00
4820 N.W. 13th St. 378-1346

ENCOUNTER GROUPS
The University of Florida Counseling c#frtr
conducting to second encounter group sanes at the
times listed below. Interested students should call
392-1578.
Group 1 Mini-Marathon Mon.. Jan. 19.1970 6: PM M
Follow-up Mon.. Jan. 26,1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
Group 2 Mini-Marathon Wad., Jan. 21,1970 6:00 PM J 2 =
Follow-up Thur., Jan. 29,1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
Group 3 For Graduate Thur., Jsn. 22,1970 7:00 PM
Students Only Fridsy, Jan. 23,1970 1:00 PM 3:00 PM
Group 4 Weakly, starting Tuss., Jan. 20,1970 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
Group 5 Weekly, starting Tuas., Jan. 20,1970 3:00 PM 5:00 PM
Group 6 Weekly, starting Thur., Jan. 22,1970 3:00 PM 5:00 PM
ROBBIE'S
For The Best In
Meals &
TV & BILLIARDS^!
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I 'On The Gold Coast I
I*. lit. SI. at 23rd RD'J fl l
NOW!!
Steve McQueen
"The Reivers"
BUTCHcSs^^^D^
THE SUNDANCE KID
Ppwa7T^s^^"|
" 3:40 5:34 7:50 9:48
I "AN EYE DAZZLER. SEX EXCITER!
RHk I The scenery, photography-and all
tap those mirrors-put this one in big- (X)
time class!" -Ank*, wmst*. n. r. rsst
persqns
m. UNDER 17
H not admitted
age proof
REQUIRED
ad i#t lfo
1 O' JB
Xn*A6tmA*ct



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL |
j.
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-c).
| tOST 6 FOUND
Lost: One brown billfold. Reward.
Call 392-8911. (L-68-3t-p).
Lost Black Wallet: Initials T.G.G.
Vicinity of Martinizlng near Krispy
Kreme. Return to union Lost and
Found or Call 372-6237 please.
(L-68-2t-p).
LOST A small tan dog with white
spot on chest, wearing old flea collar.
Answers to Booger. Call 378-7953.
ASK for LARRY OR STEVE.
(L-66-3t-p).

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Vi BROILED CHICKEN
r*..... $lO9
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER

Remember the year you fell in
love, or blew your grades
because there was too much to
do, or finally graduated?
Remember the year you
started to look around you
because you began to realize
that nothing ever stays the
same?
Remember the year you began
doing funny little things

SERVICES I
The Bench and Bar keeps serving and
pouring. Try us for lunch. Bagels and
! r r al! Watch nikkl spread that
*2* I C he f se! 1222 W. Univ. Ave.
(M-68-lt-p).
BABY CARE 311 N.W. 15th Terr.
(Infants under one year old). sls per
week also by the day or hour.
Experienced, reliable, Christian
home. Phone 376-2072. (M-64-3t-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERSFrank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance, is now at McCreas
Sunoco. 1320 N. Main St.
Gainesville. Frank has 12 years
experience on imported cars and
specializes in repairs and tune-ups on
these cars. Come in and see Frank for
one week from the date of this
publication, tickets will be given to
Imported car owners good for free
lubrication. (M-62-st-p).

Remember
1969-70?
Theyre making
a book about it.

Tuesday, January 20,1970, The Florida Alligator.

because you were afraid
you'd forget how?
We remember.
And we saved as much as we
could so you'd remember
where you were.
1969-70
seminole
It's about yoti.

I SERVICES |
Color, Conformation,
Temperament: Aquarius! Reg.
Appaloosa Stud. $75. Introductory
fee. Book Now. 376-9020 or see
at Horse Show Grounds.
(M-10t-60-p).
WoVER
jcujjjcwirvfosn
ifftooT!
//FAR MORE!
I James BriJ§|i )]
II oo7 r hwei mil
usn DAYS
4 FROM THE
* PRODUCER
I "VIXEN" hHIH!
The UUimaU Film... bjf Mass Mt/ftr
last's days
4 Dwstin H
> Harman is John!
I jM

Page 9

jf "' m SERVICES j
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
HORSES BOARDED Stalls with
pasture or paddock 8 miles west of
the university. 372-3452 372-2182.
(M-68-st-p).

JML < STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11 :00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter,, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dead Km -300 pm. 2 day* prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* <*> n
| I ri DPI o DnDDDD >
J 5. O y> mmm
_
y> c 5) a) a. j a> w
| £
a o
_ Z
V m 1
o
>
... ai .pk co n>
cl a a a o. 2
" 03 0) 03 03 03 2 ***
$ 3 H 22 ?
O CL CL C
_ I If 2
< ' C c
Q
| G > 3 z
32 c >
< 2 o j
2 m m
R 2
i
==== f IP
n r
1tt,1.1L., t ( V .

I SERVICES I
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED. 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38t-59-p)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)



The
Florida
Alligator
l m

BAHAMA ATHLETIC DIRECTOR KEITH PARKfeR
Track Star Works On Masters At UF

Floridas Baby Gators keep
the Bahama Islands director of
physical education and
recreation awake at night.
Keith Holland Parker, 37, an
international athlete, is freshman
football team counselor in
residence at the UFs Yon Hall.
Parker, on leave of absence this
year from the Bahamian
Ministry of Education, is
studying for his masters degree
in physical education from the
University.
After international acclaim as
a track star and Olympic
contender for Great Britain in
the, 19505, Parker is, in a sense,
on his first athletic scholarship.
In addition to counseling the
freshman football team and
playing on the University soccer
squad, he hands out pointers as a
staff member for track coach
Jimmy Carnes. He also holds a
graduate assistantship in the
College of Physical Educations
physiology laboratory.
Great Britain, he points out,
has no paid coaches, no athletic
scholarships and no
money-making sports at the
college level. But on a given day,
most college students are too
busy competing to be spectators
- and even most small towns
have several different athletic
leagues.
Parker suggests that the star
system and spectator
sportsmanship may be keeping
the general level of physical
fitness lower for American
children than that in Britain.
On the other hand, the top
performance of your star
athletes is greater, he points
out.
Although Parker was an
outstanding college athlete, he
did not become a bona fide star
until a stint with the Royal Air
Force. Then he became
interested in the long jump
(broad jump), for which he still
holds the Northern England
record with a jump of
24-feet-3te-inches. This was just
inches short of the British record
at the time.
Parker worked from local to
state and national competition
in the long jump and decathlon
in the Commonwealth games of
1958, the world student games
in Paris, and international
matches in Poland, France and
the Netherlands. He was on the
list for the 1960 Rome Olympics
when he was offered and
accepted a teaching position in

STUDENT FACULTY SENSITIVITY GROUPS I
These groups have been organized for members of the university i
community who are interested in improving student-faculty
relationships. The groups are designed to promote understanding
and sensitivity to students and faculty as individuals outside of the
structured roles of teacher-pupil. Group meetings will focus on a
free expression of attitudes and feelings to provide the opportunity
to know each member as an individual. Three groups are being |
organized to meet at the times listed below. Each group will be
composed of a maximum of 14 members. Those interested should
call 392-1578. The program is Jointly sponsored by the Counseling |
Center and the Mental Health Service. |
GROUP 1 WED. JAN 21, 3to 6,7 to 10
Following week to be arranged f
GROUP 2 THURS. JAN 22. 3to 6,7 to 10 I
Following week to be arranged
GROUP 3 FRI. JAN 23, 3to 6,7 to 10
Following week to be arranged f

GATOR

Nassau.
He since has represented the
Bahamas in squash, field hockey
and badminton in the West
Indian Federation Games.
I was one of two whites in
competition. It was very
friendly. One couldnt mistake
Go, White Man, go, he grins.
Parker is president of the
Bahamas Basketball Association
and a past president of the
Nassau Squash Club. He also
drives race cars occasionally in
events such as Speed Week in
Nassau.
Now he is a one-man white
minority in his department at
the Bahamian Ministry of
Education. Hes also an over-30
minority member in Yon Hall.
Parker is astounded at the size
of American sports facilities and
audiences. The biggest
following achieved by my rugby
team at Loughborough College
- in a big national meet was
about 1,000, he muses.
Part of his responsibility as
director of physical education is
inspection of programs and
facilities for recreation all over
the Bahamas. Bahamian schools,
he reports, are woefully short
of facilities and are working to
improve teacher training in all
subjects.
The young administrator administratorathlete
athlete administratorathlete points out that of the
2,500 teachers in the Bahamas in
1968, 1,000 had no
professional training at all.
Students who graduate at age 14
are sometimes drafted as
teachers, he adds, and even then,
We are currently short about
200 teachers.
Immigration programs are in
effect with Britain, and
anywhere else we can find
teachers. Salaries for trained
teachers start at about $5,000,
relatively low in the United
States, but high for Britain
and there are no income taxes.
The racial mixture in schools
is about three blacks to each
white, he says, with little or no
racial trouble. Social life on the
islands, according to Parker, is
thoroughly mixed.
Parker is quietly outspoken in
his disapproval of use of the
athletic arena to vent political
*,
* Guns Guns Guns
+ Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
.gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

views, although I can understand
the temptation. He fells
athletic competition is away to
understanding.
On these grounds, he supports
the admission of South Africa to

m "JPZVEm*
KEITH PARKER (RIGHT) TALKS WITH JIMMY CARNES AND RON COLEMAN
.. Parker is working on his masters degree in physical education at the UF
MAAAMMi good tues. only
I Kentucky Tried tfh liken 1
M 214 N.W. 13th St. 114 SW 34th St. C
m 376-6472 372-3649 M
U 4|agv 2 m. m m. m K
I box Ouy i
Reg. 854 V
22T" BRING COUPON I
Truth is, it would be comparatively easy.
But we want somebody with more than a pat answer for everything. 1
We need electrical engineers, physicists, mathematicians and systems
analysts who can think creatively and speak their minds.
People who can think logically about solving communications, radar
or information systems problems for the defense of the free world. Or
technical men who can think creatively about solving problems in air traffic
control or urban mass transportation systems.
You wpnt find any yes men coming up with
the answers to these complex problems. JV/I I I k H
Get in touch with us.
A robot couldn tdo the job we have in mind. An equal opportunity employer I
Interviews will be conducted on campus January 20,1970
Sign up now at the placement office Or write for more information: J
Mr. F.O. Brown, The MITRE Corporation, 4000 Middlesex Tpke., Bedford, Mass. 01730
If we want a robot who answers
"yesall the time,well build one.
-
4) g: (A J

Page 10

international athletic
competition, adding that many
black Bahamians agree.
This is almost the only way
out of racial conflict exposure
of everyone to everyone else. I

Sam Pepper
Sports Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 20,1970

believe exclusion from the
Olympics was the biggest blow
yet to black South African
athletes, who viewed this as a
chance to show the world and
fellow South Africans.



Clay Squares Off With Marciano
On Closed Circuit TV Tonight

NEW YORK (UPI) Cassius Clay and Rocky Marciano and a
computer gets together in 1,000 theaters around the country tonight
to do battle for a mythical all-time heavyweight championship
Marciano was 45 years old, only a month away from his death in an
airplane crash, and Clay was 27 when they met for 70 rounds of
sparring in a Miami studio last year. The sparring sessions, which
included seven possible endings to the fight, were then cut, spliced
and edited into shape for the final film as dictated by the computer
Although Marcianos bald spots were concealed by a wig and Clays
stomach protruded over his trunks, both fighters were in their prime
as far as the computer was concerned. Thousands of bits of
information about each fighter were fed into the computer to
determine the outcome of their mythical fight.
During his nine-year professional career, Marciano won all 49 of his
fights, including 43 by kayoes. He won the title by knocking out
Jersey Joe Walcott in 1952 and successfully defended it six times
against Walcott, Roland Lastarza, Ezzard Charles twice, Don Cockell
and Archie Moore.

IN NFL PRO BOWL
Gabriel Got The Job Done

LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Roman Gabriel got the job done
as he did for the Los Angeles
Rams in 11 straight games when
he came up with a perfect pass
Sunday that the West All-Stars
rode to a 16-13 win over the
East in the NFLs 20th Pro Bowl
Football Game.
Gale Sayers of the Bears was
voted the most valuable back of
the game but there were many
among the 57,786 in the press
box, where the balloting took
place, who felt Gabriel might
have gotten the honor if the poll
was taken after the game instead
of during the fourth quarter.
Subjected to a fierce charge
by Dallas defensive stars Bob
Lilly and George Andrie, who
was named lineman of the game,
Gabriel cooly threw the clincher,
a 28-yard pass to Carroll Dale of
the Packers with 72 seconds left
to win the game.
Winning West coach Norm
Van Brocklin of Atlanta and
losing coach Tom Fears of New
Orleans joined in praising
Gabriel for his clutch effort.
Youve got to give Gabriel a

Put on your
Get up. And go.
: Jjr*
a \
a M %
M
>v
'O- ji ,: -J§B|| :
Spend six weeks in Europe traveling this summer aiK * l
5-9 credit hours. With ell expenses paid, the cost is $895.
Cali 392-1855, J.W. Reitz Uniof^orrome^Room^lO^^

lot of credit, said Fears. We
put a powerful rush on him. But
that last pass was just a thing of
beauty. Theres no defense
against a perfectly thrown ball
and a great catch. And the West
got both.
East defensive coach Jack
Faulkner pointed out defensive
back Mel Renfro of the
Cowboys, one of the best in pro
football, had excellent coverage
on Dale but there was no way
the defender could keep him
from catching the ball in the end
zone.

Clays career, cut short when he refused induction into the army in
1967, won his 29 pro bouts, including 23 by knockouts. He won the
title in 1964 by stopping Sonny Liston and defended it nine times
against Liston, Floyd Patterson, Henry Cooper, Brian London, Karl
Mildenberger, Cleveland Williams, Ernie Terrell and Zora Folley.
In a computer radio tournament a few years ago, Clay was
eliminated by Jim Jeffries while Marciano went on to win the title.
For the insult, Clay decided to sue the tournament promoter, Murry
Woroner, and the suit was settled when Woroner promised Clay a
chance to redeem himself against Marciano.
Clay said last week he would not fight again.
The promoters can stop calling me now, he said. I wont even
answer the phone. Im not angry; I just want them to leave me alone.
For the first time in his career, Clay is not predicting a victory, but
in case he loses he claims he was cheated by an Alabama computer.
Id never say that I could beat Marciano, Clay said, and he
wouldnt say he could beat me. We respected each other as great
champions.

THe'SWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
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Page 11



Page 12

!. The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, January 20,1970

NBA ALL STAR GAME TONIGHT
Injuries Cast Doubt On West Chances

PHILADELPHIA (UPI)
With two of the Wests top
centers sidelined, the East was
favored to win the National
Basketball Associations 20th
ALL-STAR GAME tonight.
Wilt Chamberlains knee
injury a couple of months ago
indicated the West would be in
difficult straits. Now the squad
is minus the NBAs top
rebounder, Nate Thurmond of
San Francisco, who recently

NBA ALL STAR MATCH TONIGHT
... East favored to win over crippled West

IN FLOOD CASE
Attorneys Charge Libel

NEW YORK (UPI) Marvin
Miller, attorney for the Major
League Baseball Players
Association, Monday accused
presidents Joe Cronin of the
American League and Charles
Chub Feeney of the National
League of making libelous
public accusations in a
statement last week about the
Curt Flood case.
In their statement last
Saturday, Cronin and Feeney
said that professional baseball
could come to an end if, through
the suit which has been brought
by outfielder Flood in protest
over his trade from St. Louis to
Philadelphia, the reserve
clause in baseball players
contracts should be abolished.
The reserve clause is a
provision in the standard
players contract which gives the
club an option on his services for
the following year, thus binding
a player to the same club from
one year to the next. Flood
contends that the clause subjects
him to slavery in violation of
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injured his knee and confesses
even if he recovers before the
season is over this may be his
last campaign.
Coach Red Holzman of the
New York Knicks, the East
mentor, has a problem for
Tuesday nights game which may
have ramifications for his own
Knickerbockers.
New York center Willis Reed
was selected the starting
pivotman on the Eastern team,

the 13th amendment of the U.S.
Constitution.
Miller was particularly
disturbed by the statement of

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but his status depends upon a
series of medical examinations
Monday to determine if
recurrent stomach pains could
be an ulcer.
If Reed has a choice, he
would rather play and pass on
the pain to the Western all-stars.
The East has won six of the
last seven mid-season classics and
leads the all-star series 13-6. The
Wests 135-120 victory in 1967,
in which Rick Barry was named
the most valuable player,
interrupted the Eastern streak.
During this stretch, the great
center duel between
Chamberlain and retired Bill
Russell of Boston highlighted
the action.
Thurmonds post has been
filled by Bob Rule of Seattle,
leaving second choice Elvin
Hayes of San Diego the starting
center for the game at the
spectrum.
Jerry West and Elgin Baylor
of Los Angeles, Connie Hawkins
of Phoenix and Lou Hudson of
Atlanta are the other four
starters for the Western
contingent. Hawkins is a veteran
of all-star competition, but not
in the NBA. He made the
American Basketball Association
team when he played in that
league.
If Reed cannot start for the
East, Lew Alcindor of
Milwaukee will take center court
for the opening jumpoff. Billy
Cunningham of Philadelphia,
John Havlicek of Boston, Walt
Frazier of New York and
Cincinnatis Oscar Robertson,
the 1969 mvp, are listed as other

the two league presidents which,
he said, attacked the players
association as being in bad faith
for supporting Curt Flood.

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Eastern starters.^
Robertson and Baylor are
after Bob Pettits all-time NBA
all-star career scoring record of
224 points. Baylor, in his 11th
classic, and Robertson, in his
10th, each have scored 209
points. They need 16 to better
Pettits standard.
Playing in Philadelphia
doesnt leave Western coach
Richie Guerin of Atlanta with a
feeling he is in a city of
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brotherly love. There was
nothing'in 1960 when the East
rammed the West 125-115 in
Philadelphia.
The scoring record for an
all-star game is 42 points by
Chamberlain in 1962 during One
of the Wests rare triumphs.
From the players selected for
this all-star game there are a half
dozen players, under proper
circumstances, who could match
this figure.
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