Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
a WERE
MM DESTROYING j^HMIBRSjk
IT I
mBW auditorium to discuss this cwisis nifwHai
Jgw qfeggH
PHIL BANNISTER
EAG AND DDT
More than 500 people are expected at UF's Environmental Action
Group's (EAG) meeting Tuesday night at 7:30 in Walker Auditorium
to discuss the DDT controversy; arguments pro and con will be
presented along with a film which documents the entire case against
DDT.
Atty. General Picked
For Students 9 Defense
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff WrHar
Honor Court Chancellor Craig Lawrence announced the
appointment of a new student body attorney general and chief
defense counselor Friday.
Richard Lazzara 4LW, from Tampa, was appointed attorney
general.
Lawrence said the attorney general is, in effect, the district
attorney for the student body. He gathers evidence and decides
whether or not the evidence is sufficient to prosecute.
Because of the wide latitude which he is allowed, the position is a
very important one, Lawrence said.
Lazzara is a member of Alpha Delta Gamma legal fraternity and has
worked with the honor court for several quarters. He was chief
investigator, assistant attorney general and president of the Honor
Court Bar Association. He graduated from Loyola University, New
Orleans in 1967.
William Scott Gabrielson, a law student from Orlando, was
appointed chief defense counsel.
The duties of the chief defense counsel are those of public
defendent for the student body, Lawrence said. He represents
students accused of honor court violations, and is head of the defense
administrative staff.
Gabrielson was president of Sigma Phi Epsilon social fraternity. In
law school, he has had law review experience and had the best brief in
2nd Round Moot Court. He has also been active in the honor court
for several quarters. Gabrielson is a member of the Honor Court Bar
Association and was also chief investigator and assistant chief defense
counsel of the honor court.
Alan Greer, the former attorney general has graduated and is now
practicing in Miami.
Former Chief Defense Counsel Jack Klausner is now in the U.S.
Army.
We are pleased to have individuals of this caliber to take over.
They are both excellent law students, as well as having devoted a great
deal of time to the honor court, Lawrence said.

UF UNDERGROUND PAPER SURVIVES
'Hogtown Orifice Escapes Past Problems

s; foie Goto* j
GAJNESVILLE'S Suicide and
Cobs Intervention Center is
combating suicide among
college students.; page 5
CanptM Crier 10
ninnii it
Editorials...; 8
FSU News 3
Letters 9
Movies 11
SaaaSociety 6
SpOffl %effae? .f. f f f
HflnpOlMF f.f f f 9 f ff v y

By HELEN HUNTLEY
AlHoetor Staff Writer
UFs latest underground
newspaper has thus far escaped
some of the major problems that
plagued past attempts to found a
second campus paper.
The Hogtown Orifice, begun
last quarter by 16 members of
the Florida Experimental
College (FEC), will continue
publication this quarter, hoping
to expand to eight pages and
aiming for twice-a-month
auHication
The Orifice had an
4 4 # v * f 4 A s 4 -.-

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 67

BY BLUE KEY

$6 Fee Hike Opposed

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
Following heated debate and
intense questioning of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Florida Blue Key members
approved by a 26-21 vote a
resolution Thursday night
opposing the Feb. 4 referendum
on the University Activities
Center.
The resolution stated that
Blue Key encourages the State
Legislature, the University
administration, the Athletic
Association, the Alumni
Association and other groups
interested in having a coliseum
for one reason or another to live
up to their responsibilities and
obligations and not try to
transfer them to the transient,
already-burdened student
community.
While maintaining that Blue
Key does support construction
of an activities center, arguments
were advanced against the
referendum on the grounds that
it allows for a vote on
increasing tuition and does not
provide the opportunity to vote
singularly on having a coliseum.
In another vote, Blue Key
members empowered the
organizations Executive

Tanner Elected
SGP Chairman

See related story, Page 3
In the midst of a charge of a
fixed election and a walkout by
one of its members, the Public
Functions Authority Friday
chose a new chairman and vice
chairman for Student
Government Productions (SGP).
Leonard Tanner, 4JM, won
the chairmanship over Tom
Nash, 7AS. Nash was then
nominated for vice chairman and
lost by one vote to Caron
Balkany, 2UC.
Between the two votes,
Authority member Sue Johnson,
president of Interhall, walked

opinionntertammeiit format
for its first two issues,
containing little news or
obscenities (compared to many
underground papers). Douglas
Tedaids, one of the founders,
calls it a timid approach.
It really doesn't qualify as an
underground paper, he said.
New UF regulations on the
distribution and sale of literature
have helped put the Orifice
above ground." Previous
second student newspapers, such
as The Crocodile several yean
400, had many problems with
!Hie**J)ip ffom the

University of Florida, Gainesville

Committee to take an active role
in opposing the referendum in
behalf of the chapters
membership.
The chapter also established a
committee to search for
alternate ways of financing the
activities complex. But,
according to former
Interfratemity Council President
Steve Zsck, the committee will
not become active until after the
Feb. 4 referendum.
The resolution also argued
that the referendum results
might be used by the State
Legislature as an argument for
raising tuition while not
guaranteeing that $6 would be
set aside for the center.
O'Connell focused his
comments before the chapter on
the benefits of such a complex
and his belief that the
referendum was the only
plausible manner of raising funds
insight.
If what has been proposed in
the way of facilities is needed
and you are not satisfied with the
way of obtaining it, you have
the responsibility to find
another way to do it, he told
Blue Key. Dont be a negative
organization. You tell us the
right way.

out of the meeting.
I think it (the election) was a
gross injustice, she said. The
majority of the people made up
their minds before they went in
there... I just feel that since I
didn't know either person
(Tanner and Nash), I was making
an impartial judgment.
Authority chairman Carol
Brunson said the election wasnt
fixed, but agreed with Miss
Johnson that some people had
decided who they wanted before
they went in. They had not
heard anything about Mr. Nash.
Part of the confusion was

administration and difficulty in
distribution.
The new policy, signed by UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell
last April, allows students to sell
or distribute non-commerical
literature on campus, as long as
it i registered at the Student
Activities Desk.
Kegtstranon involves wgning
a statement to the effect that
the seller is responsible for the
contents therein, said James
Hennessey, assistant to the vice
president for student affairs. An
QSpnfeation may register its
publication once for the whole

Monday, January 19, 1970

OConnell added Blue Key
members had a poor
understanding of whats being
proposed. It is an activities
complex, not a coliseum to
replace the old gym, he said.
For the future of this
university and its standards, this
will do more than anything else
to determine its status and the
extra rewards offered students
here, OConnell said.
Opponents of the referendum
said that for some students an
extra $6 each quarter would
constitute a hardship and make
the UF a rich man's school.
Zack said the chapter's
resolution had slapped hard
O'Connell.
FBK has traditionally acted
only as another arm of the
administration, Zack said. It
has never taken a stand contrary
to the wishes of the
administration.'
I feel this is a sign of a 'New
Blue Key, Zack added, one
pi ore responsive to student
needs.
Zack said he and other
opponents of the referendum
are going to use Blue Key
resources to coordinate an
anti*referendum movement.
mm
LEONARD TANNER
... elected amid controversy
caused by Nash's late application
for the job. It was at the last
minute, he said.
(SEE 'ELECTION' PAGE 2)

year.
The administration does not
censor or restrict distribution,
Hennessey said. Any charges of
obscenity would be left for the
courts to decide.
The Orifice has a staff of
about IS members and is
looking for more. The staffs of
past undergrounds have
consisted of as few as two
people putting out the paper
alone.
One of the problems of the
larger staff, however, may be
onanizatkm. These is no
(see UNDEMROWNP' PAGE 2)



Page 2

\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 19,1970

jbf|-i rit ~*,. yiMfl Hk
KS
-wwff jC., *> 9SwniMfe.i?
<<: -y gx >;& jg tfafafrfcyA.
k I B IHL^^fIHP
__
b& Hi
jH B
i K
n
WHO'S WHO? PH L BANN,STER
It's hard to tell when the rain is coming down as hard as it did last
week. Umbrellas together with books, purses and raincoats prevent
any friendly exchanges, shy smiles or sexy winks.
Election Fixed,
Johnson Says

No one knew this other
candidate was running until an
hour before the election,
Tanner said. Tanner said he had
spoken to several
the authority before the election
and asked them to vote for him.
Miss Johnson felt Nash was
better qualified for the job.
He is a PhD candidate in
theater and has worked for more
than 10 years in various aspects
of the theater, including stage
management, box office,
technical, acting and directing.
He was house manager for the
University Theatre at
Washington State University for
a year and was manager ot a
touring company for a year. He
is a member of Florida Players.
He also said he has some few
professional contacts in New
York City.
Some members of the
authority didnt think Nash was

drugs 9 abortion 9 birth control 9 family roles 9 sex 9
job discrimination 9 women's rights 9 day care center
Highly relevant issues for women
Womens commission
is
for women
Come to Your meeting
Monday
January 19, 1970
7:30 PM
J. Wayne Reitz Union
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida -Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction mut be given before the next
insertion,

qualified because this is only his
second quarter at UF. He isnt
acquainted with the system,
Miss Brunson said.
Nash said he had heard of the
charges that the election was
fixed, but I wasnt witness to
this, so I dont think it would be
fair for me to make any
comment.,
He said he had no major
complaints about the way SGP is
being run just my interest in
the fine arts.
The new SGP chairman has
been working in SGP for the
past year as production manager
and house manager. He was also
chairman of Interfratemity
Council productions for the past
year and co-stadium control
director for Gator Growl last
year. >
Miss Balkany, the new vice
chairman, was publicity director
for SGP. She is a member of the
Association of Women Students,
the Student Government
Communication-Service Bureau
and the University Activities
Center publicity committee.

Underground Paper Free
From Financial Problems

[T^ge^
and there is some disagreement
among staff members as to the
direction the paper should take.
Tedards hopes the paper has
less of a political slant and
hopes to run conservative views
side by side with those of SDS
members.
Another staff member, John
Sugg, hopes it has more of a
poitical content.
Most of the staff has very
definite ideas about social
change. We plan to implement
the Orifice to help achieve that
change, Sugg said.
The paper has received mixed

Shrine Opens Today
The new Freedom Shrine in Little Hall displaying such
documents as the Monroe Doctrine, the Bill of Rights and the
German Instrument of Surrender in World War II will be
formally dedicated this morning at 11.
in World War II will be formally dedicated this morning at 11.
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale will make the
main address, speaking on The Freedom Shrine and Its
Meaning. He will be introduced by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
Accepting the shrine for the UF will be Winston W. Little,
former dean of University College, and Franklin A. Doty,
current UC dean.

IN ACCENT 70
Toffler To Appear

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Writer
Man must design
future-shock absorbers for
society or he will face severe
confusion, anxiety, hostility,
senseless i
violence and
self-destructive HjL
and social critic TOFFLER
Alvin Toffler sees for the future.
Toffler is to present his views at
UF on Feb. 13 as part of Accent
70.
Tofflers article, Future
Shock, appears in this months
Playboy Magazine. This is a
forerunner to his book of the
same name, now in the process

SPECIAL SPECIAL
MONDAY ONLY
LON PON BROIL
with FT, Salad Bowl
BLACK ANOUS *4 *9
with F.F., Salad Bowl
w ncjvujA :::r am
1225 W. UNIV. AVE.
. 372-6666

reviews thus far, Tedard said.
Typically we get the same
encouraging response from
people in philosophy ... and
some hate mail from other
people, he said.
The only published criticism
was a letter written by UF
journalism Prof. Hugh
Cunningham to the Gainesville
Sun. As a Presbyterian, he
objected to the Orifice being
distributed through the
Presbyterian Student Center.
I felt it was not a publication
that was representative of the
church that Im a member of,
he said.
Cunningham said the paper

of being published by Random
House.
Toffler is author of The
Culture Consumers and The
Future As A Way of Life. He is
a former associate editor of
Fortune Magazine and author of
numerous magazine articles.
Describing himself as a social
futurist, Toffler has served as a
consultant to A.T.&T., Xerox
Corp., 1.8. M. Corp. and the
Rockefeller Brothers Fund. He is
a former visiting professor at
Cornell University.
Toffler says a new society
superindustrial, fast-paced,
fragmented, filled with bizarre
styles, customs and choices is
erupting in our midst. Society is
running too fast for its own
good and man will be pushed
beyond his adaptive tolerances.

was politically oriented and I
dont think a church should be
in the business of being on one
side or the other. He also
objected to vulgarities and
blasphemies against God.
In the first issue, God was
listed as one of the staff
members of the paper.
Cunningham said he did not
object to the paper being sold on
campus as long as it is within the
law.
The Orifice will now be
distributed through the Tedards*
apartment, Tedards said.
Were in the business of
publishing the paper, he said.
We dont raise a stink with
anybody. He said, however,
that Rev. John Talmage
specifically asked us to go
ahead and use the space if we
wanted it.
Tedards also disclaims any
financial problems with the
Orifice. I think as long as we
keep as tight a budget as we are
now, we wont run the risk of
any kind of financial problems.
The next issue of the paper will
contain advertising. Other
revenue is obtained by sellingthe
paper at 10 cents a copy.
He said the paper is not
printed in Gainesville, but
declined to reveal the name of
the printer.
The last underground paper
before the Orifice was The
University Report, which lasted
seven months, and then died for
lack of staff and finances.
Scott DeGarmo, the Reports
last editor, called the paper a
quixotic adventure, lancing at
windmills.
X f MINI-POSTER
visit CAUfbfollAS
foCIfIC COAST
For suTsamd and
Sll&ffiX DILUffeP dL
o a



iS,£'X{,' '~ r r'v
'v r'v $ W
, ' |
' /£%' i %k < * &£.. : ; JvX^^h^H
yiyprr' > i ir i i b i 'i^'^v. 1 ,v; -
v I mM
'
v HjLk J .
PETE KNOCKE
DON 7 LOOK NOW
Dr. Richard S. Hildebrandt of the UF Medical Center draws blood
from a brave student for free measles tests being given in the Reitz
Union this week.
SGPs r Super Show
Planned By Tanner
See related story, Page 1
A super show is in the planning stage for UF sometime in
mid-May, Student Government Productions (SGP) new chairman
Leonard Tanner said Sunday.
The five-to-six hour show will be on Florida Field and will feature
three or four big artists.
Major revisions in next years culture series are also being planned.
The last one was overloaded in one particular area, Tanner said.
He said there were too many musical programs. We should have a
broader entertainment line.
Next year he hopes SGP will bring Ravi Shankar, the National
Ballet Company, a Broadway play, several pianists and soloists and the
Zagreb Philharmonic, a Yugoslav symphony.
He is seeking student ideas and asked that students call him or send
a post card to the SGP office in Room 305 of the Reitz Union, if they
have any ideas on what type of entertainment to bring to campus.
Applications will be available Tuesday through Friday in the SGP
office for students interested in a position with SGP. The following
chairmanships are open: finance, booking, production, publicity,
ticket manager and executive secretary.

flppeDQijloo)
\ 'A Pleasure In Eating /
\ ALa Carte Buffet /
\ 11:30 AM Mon- Fri §
I soups I
sandwiches deserts 1
m salads \
t entrees \
/ AT MODERATE PRICES V
/ The Arredondo Room is available for reservations \
I for groups, meeting, special events, parties, etc. JllmslSV kJI# I.J[JkIU 1
I Call Mrs. Doris Sasser at 392-1628 for further v> I 1
I information. 4tH FlOOr KOltZ I
1 Park Frn For for 2 HOURS I
\ ( (?\ \ Parking I Lot | J

COMPLAINTS INDICATE
PassFail System Hazy

By SUE CUSTOOE
Alligator Writer
Students complaints to
Student Government indicate
that both students and teachers
may be misinformed about how
the pass-fail system should work
atUF.
According to Henry Solares,
SGs secretary of academic
affairs, some teachers are grading
tests of students who are taking
>ass-fail courses by the

WHAT'S HAPPENING 1
i By BRENDA QEVERTZ ~ n n I

TWINKLE, TWINKLE: Dr.
Graeffe will speak on astrology
as part of the Campus Speaker
Series this evening. The program
is in rooms 122-123 of the Reitz
Union at 7:30 pjn.
UPING THE DOWN
STAIRCASE: Students who are
nervous about interning have an
opportunity to question fellow
students whove been through
it already. In the Union on
Tuesday evening from 7-9, the
program is sponsored by the
University Student A.C.E. and
F.E.A.
BLOW-UP BUST: A panel
discussion on Inflation How
to Fight It will be presented at
the Gainesville Municipal
Building on Tuesday at 8 p.m.,
in the 4th floor meeting room.
The program is sponsored by the
American Association of
University Women.
IF AT FIRST YOU DONT
SUCCEED: The Arrendondo

letter-grade system.
This, Solarcs said Sunday, is
like grading by a double
standard. He said instructors
should indicate pass or no
pass on tests instead of the
usual letter grades. This is
especially important, he said,
because it is up to the individual
instructor whether a grade of
D is considered passing or
failing, and students need to
know exactly where they stand.
The purpose of the pass-fail

room is open again for all to eat
lunch. The buffet line is from
11:30-1:30 Monday through
Friday.

news fc|^ if
By FSU FLAMBEAU
CAMPAIGN: A newly formed campus political organization, the
Independent Student Party, has launched a petition to the NCAA to
lift its two year disciplinary probation from the FSU basketball team.
The partys six member executive committee announced plans to
distribute the petition on campus beginning this morning. The
petition calls for a reassessment of the punishment so only those
guilty of recruitment violations are punished, and the careers of
innocent players and the athletic program at FSU will not be
damaged.
CAMPUS POLL: The university administration this week admitted
spending $25,000 for a campus opinion poll being conducted this
month by Louis Harris and Associates.
Tom Mack, who is supervising the poll, said that a random sampling
of persons connected with the university had been made.

Monday, January 19,1970, Tha Florida AMpMor,

system (officially called the
satisfactory-unsatisfactory (S-U)
grade option) is to allow
students to take courses outside
their majors without
jeopardizing their grade point
average.
Hours for grades taken
pass-fail are not computed into
the grade point average, but are
recorded on the students
official transcript.
To be eligible to take courses
by pass-fail, a student must be
classified as an undergraduate,
must not be undo: any kind of
academic probation and must
have the approval of the proper
officials.
Generally, this means
approval of the dean of the
students college well as the
dean of the college in which the
course is being offered.

Page 3



Page 4

\. Thr Florida Alligator, Monday /January 19,1970

Kirk Attempts School Desegregation Delay

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov.
Claude Kirk plans to fly to Washington
today to personally file a motion in the
U. S. Supreme Court aimed at delaying
school desegregation in Florida.
The governors office announced
Sunday Kirk would appear in the office
of the clerk of the Supreme Court at 9
ajn. to file a motion to intervene on
behalf of the State of Florida and to ask
for the opportunity to be heard on the
matter of deferring the implementation
in Florida until the end of the present

Education Expected lo Be
Big Issue In 91st Congress

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Picking up where it left off when
it quit for Christmas, Congress
returns to work today trying to
give the Nixon administration $ 1
billion more than it wants for
education.
With President Nixon drawing
the battle line by threatening to
veto the $19.7 billion
appropriation bill, that issue was
certain to dominate the first
days of the second session of the
91st Congress.
On Thursday, the President
takes center stage with his first
State of the Union address,
delivered before a joint
congressional session from the
House chamber and broadcast
live to the nation. He was
expected to make it a quality
of life speech putting much
stress on issues of the
environment and pollution.
In the Senate, Democratic
Leader Mike Mansfield
welcomed the clash of wills on
spending on education. He said
he would immediately call up
the House-passed $19.7 billion
bill carrying funds to run the
Labor and Health, Education
and Welfare departments, the
poverty program and 12 federal
agencies.
The showdown would then
Qwa&id
a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

school year of the courts mandate.
A governors aide said Kirk is seeking
to intervene in his capacity as Floridas
chief magistrate and chief budget
officer.
He wants to demonstrate the
financial and other consequences of
the Feb. 1 deadline for complete
desegregation, the aide said.
The Supreme Court already has under
study a petition for delay filed last week
by IGrks legal aide, Gerald Mager. The
petition pleads that the Feb. 1 deadline

come in an attempt to override
the Presidents veto, which
requires a two-thirds vote in
each chamber.
Despite the popularity of
federal aid for education, it
seemed unlikely that enough
Republicans would abandon
their leaders in the House to
provide the 290 votes required
to override. Democrats enjoy a
245-189 edge over Republicans
in the House, with one seat
vacant.

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
REMEMBER THE LAST TIME YOU WERE IN FLORIDA GYM?
THERE WONT BE ROOM NEXT TIME.
"It's nice to be here in the World's Largest Garage." Bob Hope's humorous phrase in Florida Gym in 1966 is no longer a laughing I
matter.
The pinch has already been felt for other entertainment scheduled for the University of Florida. The word is fast getting around i
among talent agencies not to sign at Gainesville the facilities are inferior and inadequate.
Now we approach a basketball season, hopefully with as much success as the Football Gators. Isn't is a shame that we will have to I
bench 85% of the student body?
For almost a year, student, faculty, and administrative leaders have studied this problem anxiously.
There is hope.
a H
A proposed 17.5 million dollar University Activities Center can be built here.
But it is only fantastic fantasy without student support.
Over 11.5 million of the needed funds can be raised from state, private, and municipal sources. This leaves some six million short I
of the funds needed to begin construction.
A yes vote on February fourth (4) will raise exactly the six million necessary. University of Florida students can take an active I
and aggressive action to implement their dream by raising student fees six dollars ($6.00) per quarter.
The University Activities Center will be a four part construction. It will contain a coliseum seating 16,000; a natatorium seating I
5,000; a performing arts center seating 2,000; and an amphitheatre seating 6,000. These facilities will accomodate the complete I
range of student activities in the finest possible manner.
Why shouldn't students be afforded the same facilities as students at the Universities of Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama? j
Won't you join in this endeavor?
THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM?
VOTE YES ON FEBRUARY 4
PAID FOR BY THE FLORIDA FOUNDATION FUND I
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT A NON -jfjn

FLIES TO WASHINGTON TODAY

Operation Fails
HOUSTON (UPI) Roger A.
Burke, Jr., 34, of New Castle,
Pa., the worlds 153rd heart
transplant recipient, died
Saturday night when his body
rejected the new organ, the
hospital said Sunday.

will result in financial chaos and some
counties might have to close schools
because they lack funds.
Kirk met Friday with Education
Commissioner Floyd Christian and
school board attorneys from 11 of 17
counties facing the possibility of having
to totally desegregate their schools by
the first of the month.
The closed meeting came to no
definite decisions, according to
education board officials, but might

Committee Opposition
Hits Nixons Tax Plan
WASHINGTON (UPI) A demand is coming from the liberal end
of the political spectrum for a long string to be attached to President
Nixons no-strings plan for sharing federal tax money with the
states.
Rep. Henry S. Reuss, D-Wis., and Americans for Democratic
Action (ADA) are opposing the administration plan unless it includes a
requirement for modernization of state and local government.
Thus, one more obstacle is being raised to approval of the revenue
sharing project, which most governors have regularly endorsed over
the past five years.
Nixons proposal went to Congress in August and to the House
Ways and Means Committee, which has not yet given it a hearing.
From a modest start, it called for allotting $5 billion a year annually
to the states after five years, to be spent without restrictions.

lead to cabinet consideration next week
of a resolution aimed at avoiding school
disruption.
Rivers Buford, general counsel to the
Cabinet Board of Education, told
newsmen he may recommend a
resolution for cabinet approval.
I dont think it would directly
involve further court action, Buford
said. It would simply be attempting to
comply with any court orders with the
least possible disruption.



'/ JUST DONT WANT
TO LIVE ANYMORE

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
I just dont want to live
anymore.
Does that bring to mind someone
you know, a friend or classmate over
pressured by grades and personal
relationships, looking for help?
A person seriously contemplating
suicide is reaching out for a reason to
keep going. As he vacillates between
the will to live and the desire to end
it all, he tries to leave the decision up
to some future situation or personal
encounter.
A potential suicide might, for
example* set limits for himself. If I
dont make a good grade.. or if
he hasnt called by 7:30..
Suicide is the third leading killer
among college students.
Alachua County holds a record of
21 suicides per 100,000 in
population compared to the national

Administrators
Endorse
Coliseum
Endorsement of the proposed
University of Florida Activities
Center was voted unanimously
by the Universitys
Administrative Council during
its monthly meeting last week.
Dr. J. C. Dickinson Jr.,
director of the Florida State
Museum, made a personal pledge
of SSOO toward the proposed
$17.5 million complex and
initiated a motion approving the
concept of the facility.
The center will include a
16,000 seat coliseum, 1,800 seat
performing arts theatre,
natatorium and 6,000 seat
amphitheatre as separate units,
along with additional academic
space.
Dr. Dickinsons motion urged
the entire university community
of faculty, students and staff
support the effort to provide an
Activities Center financially and
in other ways.
The council numbers 50
administrators, faculty members
and students.
i
University students will vote
Feb. 4 on a referendum item
seeking a $6 per quarter tuition
increase to fund about $6
million of the Activities Center
construction cost. The revenue
bonds would be sold for a
25-year period if the referendum
is successful.
g TEXTBOOK ARRIVALS 1
-M Alth.
1 CAMPUS SHOP t BOOKSTORE I
S 3Y 201 Inkeles: Readings in m
W Modem Sociology; 203 Landis:
Building a Successful Marriage; g
V 331 Kitano: Japanese American; U
EH 310 Banter: End of the Road;
Murdoch: The Union or The
Severed Head; 331 Chekhov: The W
W Cherry Orchard; 685 MLA: MLAg
Style Sheet; BLY 560 Watson: g
g Molecular Biology of the Gene;
M Caseret: Radiation Biology; PPY
214 Domhoff: Who Rules
g America?; 212 Kurtz: Moral
Problems in Contemporary
Society; ART 380 Rhodes: Clay g
& Glazes for the Potter; 314
B Levzinger: Africa: Art of the K
Negro People; PHA 261 Sinacore: a
Health: A Quality of Life

rate of 10 per 100,000. There were
18 known suicide deaths in the
county last year.
The people who gamble with
death in the Gainesville area are the
special concern of the recently
established Suicide and Crisis
Intervention Center serving both the
university and the community. The
center is manned by people who
care, ordinary citizens willing to give
their time and energy to save lives
and solve crises.
Volunteers at the Crisis Center,
called Clinical Associates, receive 30
hours of extensive training before
manning crisis lines (376-4444) at
the center 24 hours a day, seven days
a week.
y
Clinical Associates now operate on
three-hour shifts, excluding the night
watch from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. The
night shift is the least difficult to fill,
said Miss Joyce Beuerlein, associate

...
. ... I
ia-* .. mi

Mifaftggft 18.4 W.
STUDENT VOLUNTEER PH,L BANNISTER
... Dale Fowler, 7AS, takes a call

director of the center.
The Crisis Center is handling
suicide case number nine at the
present time, Miss Beuerlein said, and
crisis case number 47. We have had
over 250 calls since we opened the
lines before Christmas, she said.
The Suicide and Crisis
Intervention Center does more than
handle the immediate critical need of
a caller anonymously over the phone.

Monday, January 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

It acts as an intermediary agency,
keeping close contact with each
caller and transferring him to
community agencies that could best
help him.
A new training session for clinical
associates will begin in mid-February
or Mar. 1 and interested students are
urged to call 372-3659, the business
office telephone.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Algator, Monday, January 19.1970

KDPi Application Open
Kappa Delta Pi, a national honor society in education, will be
accepting applications for membership during this week.
Undergraduates with at least 14 quarter hours in education, or
graduate students with at least 18 quarter hours in education, are
eligible.
Applications must be made in person in Norman Hall, either in
room 280 Monday morning or in room 310 Tuesday or Thursday
mornings, Wednesday from 34 p.m. or Friday from 10:30 a.m.
4:30 p.m.

WANTS SPECIALLY SKILLED STUDENTS
Peace Corps Recruiting Here This Week

By ROBIN ADAMS
Alligator Wntar*
For seniors considering
Peace Corps service after
graduation, the time to apply is
now, say Peace Corps recruiters
who will be at the UF today
through Friday.
The Peace Corps is interested
in recruiting specially skilled
students for the coming summer.
Most wanted, said recruiter
Charlotte Hutchison, are
agriculture graduates or those
who were brought up in a rural
community. The number of
| Committee j
Bolsters
1 UF Spirit |
5}
Much of the credit for the
S display of spirit at UFs
$ football games must be g
ijj attributed to the spirit $
§ committee, created by c
Student Government. $
$ Over 26,000 spirit shakers |
jij have been distributed at no
| charge, since the creation of
| the committee a year ago.
* These were financed by SG, iji
>| the Athletic Association, UF
| President Stephen C. g
| OConnell, the Alumni §
>: Association, the cheerleaders >
>: and Interhall Council.
: A banner contest was
| staged for the first time. The |
;j: organization, fraternity or |
: sorority creating the best $
: banner was awarded 50-yard $
i* line bloc-seating for the
J* Homecoming game. Also,
: hundreds of students were :
allowed to line up on the |
| field to welcome the Gators %
: back after halftime. |
: Contact Ronnie Bloom in :
$ the SG offices if you are
| interested in heading or |
% serving on the Spirit |
Committee. s
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people ere taking to the
sky...young and old.. .some Just for the tun
of It. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
iUSt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road

requests made by countries for
agriculture graduates exceeds the
total of all agriculture graduates
in the United States each year.
Miss Hutchison indicated that
the Peace Corps was also
interested in graduates in
science, math, business
administration, economics,
accounting, civil engineering,
architecture, nursing and
education.
Liberal arts students are
certainly still welcomed, Miss
Hutchison said. Seventy per

1 SERVOMATION j

Announces t
J This Weeks \
j LUNCHEON BUDGET SPECIALS \
t
X Your Choice of any X
10< Drink FREE!
J
j MONDAY 76< I TUESDAY 86{
Ham and Rice Casserole R?** Turkey Combreed Dressing
Tossed Salad Bowl Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce
: f Roll end Butter Choice of One Vegetable or Mashed Potatoes
Choice of .10 ct. Beverage Rol Butter
Cafeterias only Choice of .10 ct. Beverage
Cafeterias or.ty
J WEDNESDAY 96< THURSDAY 81<
$ Sauteed Chicken Livers on Rice with Sauce Baked Beans and Franks
Tossed Salad Bowl Cole Slew
Roll end Butter Roll and Butter
Choice of .10 ct. Beverage Choice of.? 0 ct. Beverage
Cafeterias only Cafeterias only
X FRIDAY 76< snack bar specials
Fried Fillet of Perch Tarter Sauce Evsry Day
French Fried Potatoes Or Mashed Potatoes
Roll Rirttwr Soup of the Day Home Made Chili Con Came
lOrt Beveraae Getor Burger withSeltines
$ Cafeterias only French Fried Potatoes Tossed Salad Bowl
Choice of Free 10 cL Beverage Choice of Free 10 ct. Beverage
J Remember 'Jennings Carry-Out Market' <

.... by Brickman
the small society
\i RJfJNY...
c, -7 NtgyZT &V-, u E
(IT f

cent of all volunteers are liberal
arts students.
UF is ranked third in the
nation in the number of
graduates volunteering. Since
1963, an estimated 263 UF
graduates have joined the Peace
Corps, according to Miss
Hutchison.
Peace Corps volunteers are
now working in 59 countries,
speaking 150 languages, and are
working in 312 job areas.
The pay for a volunteer is a
minimal living allowance in

addition to a readjustment
allowance of $ 1,800.
Recruiters will be on the
ground floor of the Reitz Union
next to the game room and at

WIGLETS 0% Human Hair 10-12 in. $9.80]
FALLS 100% Human Hair 22 in. $39.80]
SYNTHETIC apered Curly Straight >22.00]
ui IQC Straight Taper with part $35.00|
THE WIG BOX
378-8366 376gW__j

the breezeway between the
College and Research libraries.
They will also be available to
speak in any class at instructors
request.



Frosh Council
To Discuss
Activities
Center

RECENTLY HELD HEBE
Scientist Lauds Uranium Symposium

A nuclear scientist has lauded
the recent symposium on
uranium plasmas at UF.
Dr. Hans Von Ohain, who
works with the Aero Space
Research Laboratories in
Dayton, Ohio, attended the
three-day meeting of nuclear
scientists and engineers hosted
Jan. 7 through 10 by the
Department of Nuclear
Engineering Sciences and NASA.
I was really overwhelmed by
the excellence of the program
and by the high caliber of the
participants, Ohain said. The
presentation was excellent. I
believe this is the first time in 10

Self-Study Nominations
Deadline Set For Jan 26

Deadline for submitting
nominations for membership on
the UFs 12 principal
committees involved in a lu-year
self-study is Jan. 26.
These dozen university-wide
committees which will work
with the Steeling and Goals
Committees, are organization
and administration, educational
program, financial resources,
faculty, library, student
personnel, physical plant, special
activities, graduate program,
research, planning for die future
and service role of the
University.
University President Stephen
C. OConnell suggested
membership include faculty,
students, administrators and
staff.
Nominations should be sent
to Self-Study Office room 334,
Tigert Hall.
The study will involve
committees at the college and
departmental levels as well as
various non-academic units.
Nominations to the college and
departmental committees should
be sent to the respective dean or

I ENCOUNTER GROUPS
The University of Florida Counseling Center is
conducting its second encounter group series at the
times listed below. Interested students should call
392-1578.
Group! Mini-Marathon Mon., Jan. 19,1970 6:00 PM 12:00 AM
Follow-up Mon., Jan. 26,1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
.
I Group 2 Mini-Marathon Wed.. Jan. 21,1970 6:00 PM 12:00 AM
Follow-up Thur., Jan. 29,1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
I Group 3 For Graduate Thur., Jan. 22,1970 7:00 Ill'Ll?*
Students Only Fridey, Jen. 23,1970 1:00 PM 3:00 PM
I Group 4 Weekly, starting Tues., Jan. 20,1970 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
I Group 5 Weekly, starting Tues., Jan. 20,1970 3:00 PM 5:00 PM
I GroupS Weekly,starting Thur., Jan. 22,1970 3:00 PM -6:OOPM

By MARY ANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writer
A Freshman Council meeting scheduled for
tonight will see Ralph Gladfelter discuss the pros
and cons of the University Activities Center.
The meeting will be at 8 pjm. in room 346 of
the Reitz Union.
We are trying to unite the freshmen, said
Council President Jeff Crane, but we need an
issue.
Freshman Council has some very competent,
energetic people working on it, said Student
Body President Charles Shepherd. Its done a
very good job in representing the freshman point
of view to all segments of the university.
After a lapse of five years, Freshman Council
started up again at Shepherd's recommendation.
The senate passed die recommendation during
the 1969 summer quarter.
The 25 council members were elected
proportionately from the dorm areas by the
freshman in a general election in October. Three

or 12 years that such a meeting
has been held in this country.
We have many smaller meetings
but never an all-embracing
symposium which considers all
of the advanced factors as this
one has.
The researcher was one of
nearly a hundred who came
from all parts of the United
States and from Europe to
consider the future route of
development in the generation
and use of nuclear power.
While the proceedings of the
meetings were technical in
nature, Ohain offered some
indications of their importance

department chairman.
The self-study program is
preparatory to the 10-year
accreditation inspection by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools.
In the initial announcement
of the study in December;
OConnell said the program will
De Clercq
Awarded
Hugo De Clercq, graduate
student in history, was
pleasantly surprised when he
learned last week he had been
awarded the Woodrow Wilson
Dissertation Fellowship.
De Clercq was the first UF
student to be granted this
fellowship and one of
approximately 200 students in
the nation.
The fellowship awarded by
the Woodrow Wilson National
Fellowship Foundation in
Princeton, N. J., enables De
Gercq to carry out research for
his dissertation and complete the
work for his Ph.D.

to the world and its changing
technology.
The prime interest of the
symposium was the employment
of uranium in gas form for fuel
in space exploration. Scientific
and engineering data exchanged
might well result in new and
better controlled nuclear power
systems for space vehicles and
for space stations as well as more
permanent installations of the
moon and, later, on distant
planets.
Aside from the pursuit of
outer space, Ohain views the
space programs as an
international effort and an

cover the entire institution. The
SACS inspection is expected to
come in the fall of 1971.
It is our intent to make the
1970-71 self-study the first step
in a continuous planning
operation that should guide the
University toward academic
distinction on a national basis in
the next decade, the president
said.
Dr. Linton E. Grinter, former
dean of the Graduate School, is
chairman of the effort; Dr. Gale
Nevill, chairman of engineering
science and mechanics, and Dr.
Irving Goffman, economics, are
associate directors.
m JOHNSTON
ill PHOTOGRAPHY
Valentine Special
for duo Sweetheart
portraits only. Two Bxlo
duo portraits for the price
of the first one! Black &
White Toned Natural
Color.
Johnston Photography
1915 N.W. 13th St.
PHONE 372-2512

off-campus representatives will be appointed by
Shepherd.
At the first meeting of the council-in early
November, officers were elected. Crane is
president, Gary Nevis, vice president and Toni
Simms, secretary-treasurer. Two other students,
Scott Lewis and John Gillespie, were elected to
the executive council.
The purpose of the council, Crane said, is
to promote spirit in the freshman class and
represent the class opinion to the senate. Until
the class sees the benefits of being governed, the
33 council members must give the freshman an
idea of their potential.
The councils charter approved by the senate is
a very loose one and a committee headed up by
891 Gilmore, lUC, is now working on
tightening up loose ends and providing a more
workable charter, Crane said.
Two student senators, Marvin Sylvest and
Kevin Davey, are helping with the revision.

automatic deterrent to war in
the future.
You know, he said, space
explorations are frequently
poo-pooed, considered
somewhat crazy by a lot of
people, .but actually it brings
Russia and the U. S. much closer
together. It detracts from wars.
Its a psychological truth. We
cannot afford the space program
but we always do things we cant
afford. This (space exploration)
fascinates people and brings
them together.
In Antarctica the Russians
and Americans are working
together in peace. Russian
fellows work on the American
teams there and Americans work
on the Russian teams. Antarctica
is like space, in a sense. It
doesnt belong to anyone in
particular.
What the world can expect
from nuclear power in the future
was broadly defined by Ohain.
Nuclear power is good for
giant power plants and is
economical by present standards
of cost when thousands of
kilowatts of energy are needed.
I cant make a qualified
statement but I am led to believe
there is a great deal more
uranium resources than there are
in coal or other fuels.
Nuclear fusion, as opposed to
presently employed fission, wilL
open the way for inexhaustible
supplies of energy, Ohain added.

"look at it this way, at least our Class Rings from
Herff-Jones have a life-time guarantee
NEW LIGHTNAIG DELIVERY!
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE
TAKING ORDERS FEB 3 & 4
HERFF JONES
you are invited... Wjffiay
.. .to inspect your new, exclusive rings
II I. ... n i,
Monday, January 19,1970, Tha Florida AHiarty,

Tha Uan4aaJaa Mart
no i*mnNNar iwwi i
240* so 13H vma Sonata
Everyday bargains
Towels 49c to $1.89
Sheets, bedspreads, etc.
Open Mon Sat 9-6
Sunday 1-6
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters for
MUG SPECIALTIES
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
e ENGRAVING e TROPHIES
e NAME TAGS e RING SIZING
e DESK PLAQUES e SIGNS
e RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
e CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 37>-aSS
CO EDS NEEDED
to participate in
the
INTERNATIONAL
TALENT SHOW
It's Exciting,
challenging and new.
Call 373-2469
After 5 P.M.
h.'
CENTRAL AUTO
SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RINGS & VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS
FRONT END WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
BRAKE JOBS
Mon.-Sat. 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Free pick up & Delivery in City
1027 S. MAIN.
378-4943

Page 7



l, Tm Florida Algator, Monday, January 19,1970

Page 8

mg
HP
credit Kaleidoscope /LNS

Activity Center : Pro

MR. EDITOR:
Either youre part of the
solution or youre part of the
problem. Eldridge Cleaver.
Now, just what in heavens
name has that got to do with the
proposed University Activities
Center (UAC)?
UAC is a solution. Its
coliseum will end the lack of a
decent mass seating facility for
graduations and basketball
games, symphony and indoor
track, Frolics and intercollegiate
competitions of all sorts.
UAC is a solution. Its
amphitheater will give us a
chance to enjoy music under the
stars, needed and relevant
political debate, and summer
theater at its best.
UAC is a solution. Its
auditorium will provide an
excellent forum for
distinguished speakers,
renowned musical soloists,
campus theatrical companies and
homegrown performers.
UAC is a solution. Its
natatorium will give all of us a
place to swim indoors and it will
make Florida a national
swimming power. Sauna and
weight rooms will be open to all.
But most of all, UAC will go a
long way toward making ours
the University it should be.
Make no mistake, a
contemporary University cannot
compete, either on the playing
field or in the classroom, when it
calls a 1940s barn its sole mass
seating facility. Professors,
believe it or not, look to a
communitys cultural and
recreational life before coming
to any institution of higher
teaming. And without UAC we
can have no truly notable
program of indoor sports and
culture.
Without UAC we lack one of
the many components of a great
University.
Certainly the argument can be
made that UAC is not the
solution to all of our problems.
Without doubt, our state short
changes us at every turn.
But we must, each of us, do
our utmost to make up the

deficit and begin building for
our Abna Mater so that she can
bring each of us the respect we
so much want for the time we
spend here.
If the people of the State of
Florida wont build UAC
without our help, and they
wont, then we must lend a
hand.
Lets face it. We can gripe
about the old folks all we
want. All the gripes
notwithstanding, are we not like
our elders if we too refuse to
pay a few dollars each year for
progress?
Are we not part of the
problem that problem of
inertia and restraint when
momentum and courage is
required if we refuse to
become part of the solution by
building a great University for
this state?
All the great voices of our
time have told us that it is we
young people who must ipeet
and tackle the old problems. We
have been asked to ask not for
ourselves but to do for others.
It was we who cheered a
young President when he asked
us to ask not for ourselves. We
understood.
So, to those of you who
would solve the worlds
problems I say begin by helping
your University.
To those of you who say Let
Joe do it, I say the buck stops
here.
No is an easy word. It is a
word of fear, reaction,
complacency and small minds.
Yes denotes the ability to try
new things and the desire to
travel new highways.
That is why my Society,
University of Florida Omicron
Delta Kappa, wholeheartedly
supports UAC.
We tackle new problems. We
build for those who come after
us. We innovate.
We stand foursquare behind
UAC and at the forefront of the
UAC student team which we
organized last November. This is
our course because we know
that if those who came before us
cared only for themselves there

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

would be no University at
Gainesville today.
Be part of the solution. Vote
YES on Februrary 4.
JOHN DeLANCETT
VICE-PRESIDENT
UFODK

Activity Center: Con

MR. EDITOR:
Upon reading your front page
article, on Thursday, Jan. 15,
concerning President OConnells
guarantees to students, I was
very stricken by this mans
condescending attitude. WOW!
Its really nice, if we pay for the
Activity Center it can be our toy
too. He will even let students
have one third say in what
happens at the Center. Thats
damn nice of him. Like a dogs
master, hes throwing us bones
to keep our loyal tails wagging.
To me this appears like
alumni through tax deductible
contributions, along with the
state through funds, again using
strings to make the students
jump when said strings are
pulled. This reverse bribery
disturbs me.
I thought this Center was for
the University community, not
for whoever pays for it as
OConnell implies. Suppose the
Mafia were to contribute enough
for controlling interest, one
would suspect they would
determine what the Center was
used for. That would really aid
the students.
If this Center is for the
students, then it should be their
Center. This should be their
University, not Alumni and
State pushing buttons and
student robots carrying out
orders. Robot Shepherd has
already come to OConnells side
on his stand; showing again his
lack of interest in the students
welfare. The strings must be
pulling hard, I guess after awhile
he jumps out of habit.

Editorial
Tuition Solution
Floridians will hear more about tuition equalization
before the 1970 Legislature convenes. We consider it an
excellent way to save taxpayers* money and offer higher
education to more young Floridians.
As everyone knows, tuition fees are higher at our states
private colleges and universities than at those built and run
with tax dollars. The gap will widen with rising costs.
This puts the private institutions beyond the reach of
many high school graduates. Those with limited means must
go to a tax-supported junior college or university.
Mounting enrollment at the public institution demands
unceasing enlargement of physical plant, faculty and
equipment at heavy cost to the taxpayers.
Private universities and colleges are built and operated
without charge to taxpayers. They have room, or can make
room, for thousands of additional students. But few can
afford the expense.
The answer is tuition equalization. It works thus:
A student who is a resident of Florida may qualify for a
tuition equalization grant. First, he must be accepted by the
private college or university of his choice. Then the College
Scholarship Service must certify the students need for
money to meet the cost of attending the institution.
The student must pay a sum equal to the fees in the state
university system. Then the state will pay the rest of his
tuition up to a limit of $ 1,200 a year. The grant will be for
tuition only, not room and board.
The saving to taxpayers is obvious. The state gets the use
of existing institutions built at no cost to taxpayers. The
cost per student of the tuition equalization grant is less than
the tax cost per student in the state university system.
The Florida plan has one unusual feature. It would
encourage independent colleges and universities to increase
their numbers of Florida students.
Altogether, the plan would save tax money and give
young Floridians a freer choice between public and private
higher education.
The Miami Herald

I am voting NO on Feb. 4;
because, I am tired of the
administration trying to attach
strings to students, and take
away minds, replacing them with
programmed batteries. I feel
more extensive research should
be done on the Center
financially, and wool being
pulled over our eyes again,
stripped away. Time for a little
communication between student
and administration, not just
outlines set down for us to
follow.
There is no doubt that the
University needs many of these
facilities. The student knows
little of the facilities plans in
terms of finances. Elaboration of
the Centers make-up is
beautiful, but more is needed. It
should be noted that the Center
would not benefit the student if
the other two thirds interest
wanted something different.
The financially burdened
student should not have to pay
six dollars per quarter tuition
increase, for something he might
not get to use.
Somebody is pushing this
overpriced Center. Question:
Who? I < would like to see

financial data pointed out to the
students. OConnell said the
students would be involved in
planning construction, Im
waiting to see this happen. Why
have OConnell and Shepherd
found it necessary to obtain
radio coverage? To close the
widening communication gap
between administration and
students, these questions must
be answered.
THE SWORD OF
DAMOCLES SHALL FALL!!
M. ANDREW KRAMER, 4AS
LETTERS POLCIY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
§ Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld
only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the
' right to edit all letters for
space.



SPEAKING OUT

Case Against Calley

Thomas M. Smith recently
wrote a Speaking Out column
in which he came to the defense
of Lt. William Calley, stating:
Im not condoning what took
place at My Lai just as I dont
condone the war. Nobody in
their (sic) right mind wants it.
But its there.
Mr. Smith seems to think
that, like Mount Everest, the
war and its atrocities are to be
accepted because ITS THERE.
However, I think that an
individual is responsible for his
actions, including acts of
murder, and Id like to inform
Mr. Smith of some facts
recorded by Seymore M. Hersh
of the Dispatch News Service, as
printed in the Miami Herald,
December 3,1969:
A former member of Capt.
Ernest Medinas company, in a
letter made public Tuesday, said
some men in the unit had turned
into wild animals two days
before My Lai (Pinkville),
beating children and stomping a
friendly peasant woman to
death. The letter was written
March 20,1968, by Sgt. Gregory
Olsen of Portland, Oregon and
was mailed to his father.
Medinas company entered
the Pinkville area six miles
northeast of Quang Mgai on
Saturday, March 16, and,
according to participants and
eye-witnesses, deliberately killed
as many as 370 men, women,
and children. The Army has
charged Lt. William L. Calley,
Jr., Olsens platoon leader, with
the murder of 109 Vietnamese
civilians in the incident. Another
member of the platoon, Sgt.
David Mitchell, is under
investigation for assault with
intent to murder.
Olsen wrote: On their way
back to (landing zone

Statement of the SMC Steering Committee:
SMC is currently being considered for official
UF recognition by the university administration.
We originally applied for recognition at the
beginning of last quarter.
After the Committee on Student
Organizations voted (6-2) in favor of recognition
of SMC, our application was forwarded to Vice
President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale.
Hale had three requests of SMC, two of which
were technical in nature and which we readily
complied with. The third request concerned the
Board of Regents policy on disruptive activities.
In a written statement to Hale, SMC officers
clearly stated our belief in the democratic
process. We pointed to our history which has
been one of organizing mass, peaceful
demonstrations. We indicated that it was our full
intention to continue in the future as we have
done in the past.
The Committee on Student Organizations
requested a further meeting with SMC officers
Thursday, Jan. 15.
At this meeting we advised the committee that
SMC had voted not to comply with Hales
request for reasons cited below. The Committee
on Student Organizations representatives told us
to make our decision known to Hale.
We subsequently made an appointment with
Hale Monday, Jan. 19, 3 p.m., to take place in
Hales office in Tigert Hall. We urge SMC
members to attend.
Hale has requested SMC to sign a statement in
support or agreement with Board of Regents
rules and Florida statutes.
Even a quick glance at the Regents rules will
reveal a conglomeration of undemocratic and
unconstitutional edicts. The same is true of the
pertinent Florida laws.

SMC Charges Hale With Repression

Mil || ln |i
||JHUIH| II a I II II a
There is no hope
for the complacent man.
Dottie, the companys support
base near Pinkville), they saw a
woman working in the fields,
they shot and wounded her.
Then they kicked her to death
and emptied their (rifle)
magazines in her head. They
slugged every little kid they
came across.
Why in Gods name does this
have to happen? These are all
seemingly normal guys, some
were friends of mine. For a
while they were like wild
animals. It was murder, and Im
ashamed of myself for not trying

DAVID MILLER

to do anything about it. This
isnt the first time, Dad, Ive
seen it many times before. I
dont know why Im telling you
all this, I guess I just want to get
it off my chest.
Im afraid, Mr. Smith, that the
Vietnam (undeclared) War is not
a team effort to combat
Communism; it is, rather, a
campaign of genocide waged
against the Yellow Peril.
Jean-Paul Sartre wrote in
1967: Now we can recognize in
those dark and misled souls the
truth of the Vietnam war: it
meets all of Hitlers
specifications. Hitler killed the
Jews because they were Jews.
The armed forces of the United
States torture and kill men,
women, and children in Vietnam
merely because they are
Vietnamese.
Donald Duncan, a Green
Beret for six years, has written:
The American people are upset
arid angry with the Songmy
massacre. We are always upset
and angry when something
happens to expose that we are
not as we would have others
believe. The massacre at Songmy
is not an isolated incident in the
war in Vietnam. We, the U. S.,
have been involved in such
incidents many of them far
worse ever since we started
interfering in that country.
Finally, I shall quote Carl
Davidson: The final touch on
these just-another-days-work
manners practiced in Songmy
was added by the American
Divisions chaplain, Lt. Col.
James E. Shaw: We should be
proud of our country because
the American Divisions rules of
engagement are based on
Judaeo-Christian traditions and
are moral, unlike those of the
enemy.

For example, the Regents or the UF
administration can declare an act disruptive ex
post facto and summarily suspend students,
faculty and staff, pending a later (how much
later?) hearing.
Hale admitted to us several Regents considered
just such a course of action in regards to last
Octobers Moratorium.
They reasoned that asking students to miss
class was disruptive. Os course, it is OK for
President Stephen C. OConnell to call off classes
for something as important as Homecoming.
It should be clearly understood that SMC has
never interfered with any students rights. If we
can organize the great mass of the university to
strike against the war, then this is a democratic
act not a disruptive one.
The SMC Steering Committee states that,
while we are quite cognizant of all the rules,
regulations and laws pertaining to students,
faculty and staff, we find no law that requires an
oath of allegiance to the bodies that make these
rules nor any UF rule requiring such a written
statement. While we disagree with these
reactionary and archaic means of political
repression, we also realize the violent force at the
disposal of the university administration to
enforce these rules as was done at FSU last
year.
We should note two things further:
First, UF requires this type pledge from none
but left-oriented groups. If the administration
contends that we intend violence or disruption,
then the administration has the burden to prove
this allegation.
No action in our past indicates that we intend
violence so the administration must show cause
why they believe we will be disruptive in the
future.

Whose Ad Was It?
MR. EDITOR:
January ISths Alligator carried an ad on page five urging students
to vote YES on Feb. 4 for the proposed University Activities Center.
The ad carried no identification of its sponsor.
Am I to conclude that it was paid for by the students themselves
through their support of the Alligator; or put another way, was the ad
actually an effort on the part of the Alligator staff to promote the
proposed center? Would you please answer this question in print.
I happen to be opposed to putting out money for the center, but I
am more opposed to masked support through our student paper, if
indeed that is what the ad was.
BRUCE ERGOOD 7AS
I
(EDITORS NOTE: The ad was paid for by the Florida Foundation
Fund.)

The administration has denied recognition
from none but organizations actively engaged in
changing unjust and undemocratic policies of
minority administrations (be it that of Nixon or
OConnell and Hale). Organizations, who by their
passivity support such policies, are not politically
questioned as to campus recognition.
Second, SMC is the largest student
organization at UF with a membership of
between 400 and 500. Nationally, it is the largest
student organization in history, numbering over
200,000.
We would like to state that we are fully
prepared to bring suit against the university if
they once again seek to trample on the rights of
students, faculty and staff to assemble and
organize themselves in the community of which
they are an integral part.
We feel, in view of the loyalty oath firings and
other authoritarian measures of the
administration and Regents, it is time for the
university community to organize and fight this
type of political repression and harassment.
Therefore, we call on representatives and
members of all student, faculty and staff groups
(recognized or not) to attend the SMC meeting
Sunday, Jan. 25 in the Reitz Union, room
361,2,3, at 8 p.m.
At this time, concrete plans will be laid to
form a united group of the university community
to fight the three outstanding examples of
political harassment: the loyalty oath firings, the
SMC (and other groups) recognition battle and
the reactionary laws and rules.
MARILYN FAHRER BROOK ROOD
. KRISTIN LOKEN DAVID ROSSI
RAY MORRISON JOHN SUGG
DENNIS ROCKWAY

Monday, January 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida AWgator, Monday, January 19,1970

n Campus! Crier
I SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
PRESIDENT TO ADDRESS SENATE
Student Body President Charles Shepherd will make a comprehensive report to the Student Senate tomorrow
night covering the following topics:
CAMPUS RACIAL PROBLEMS
RESULTS OF FOOTBALL SEATING COMMISSION AND POLICE COMMISSION WITH APPROPRIATE
RECOMMENDATIONS
ACADEMIC CHANGES AND CURRENT RELATED PROGRAMS
i STATUS OF THE RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
i FINANCIAL POLICIES FOR THE COMING YEAR
STUDENT SERVICES AVAILABLE TODAY AND TOMORROW
Anyone interested in hearing the president's address is welcome!
STUDENT HEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE
:i '* -.-
One of the most valuable and beneficial programs offered students at the University of Florida is the Student Health Insurance
Plan. This program is now in its thirteenth year, providing students and their families away to avoid unexpected and burdensome
medical expenses.
The program covers you whether or not you are in school or during vacations. There is a program for coverage of student wives
and children as well as the standard single student policy. If you withdraw from school, your insurance will continue for the full
period for which you have paid your premium. However, if you withdraw from school to enter military service, the insurance will
terminate on the day you withdraw and a pro rata refund of premium will be made on written request.
You may pick up brochures and enrollment forms at the infirmary, student government offices, or McGriff-Scarborough &
Associates, or call 376*8393, and a brochure will be mailed to you.
For coverage beginning this quarter through September 11,1970, the premiums are as follows:
Student $14.80
Student and Spouse $31.25
Student, Spouse and Children $47.50
Student and Children $31.25
No Maternity
Optional Major Medical $5.00 per person
WOMENS COMM, FRESHMAN COUNCIL AND SKI CLUB MEET THIS WEEK
The Women's Commission meeting is tonight from 7:30 to 10:00 in room 347 of the Union. This is an organizational meeting
and all interested women are urged to attend. For information, call Kathy Spellman at 392-1665 or Kathy Waldman at 392-1681.
The Freshman Council will meet tonight at 8:00 in room 347 of the Union. This is a special meeting concerning the University
Activities Center. Don't miss it.
" s
The Gator Ski Club meeting is Jan. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in room 346 of the Union.
WHO WILL BE THE NEXT SPIRIT COMM CHAIRMAN
Applications are still being taken for those wishing to serve on the Spirit Committee. This staff controls
the distribution of the orange and blue spirit shakers, organizes pep rallies, conducts the annual Banner
Contest, and creates new ways to boost school spirit. It's a lot of fun and doesn't take much time.
FRESHMAN REGISTERS
All freshmen requesting freshman registers can purchase them at the activities desk, 3rd floor of the
Union. They are available in softback edition for $4 or in hardback edition for $5.
>
IDS FOR STUD. SPOUSE ARE HERE TOO
Any student requesting an ID for their spouse can pick it up at the activities desk, 3rd floor of the
Union. You must present your ID.
. V
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
(
~v J V
V j
. r V j
Bulletin board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material 20
copies of each sheet, to student government offices and you will get free publicity for your organization.
No personal material will be posted.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE THEIR
INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT
TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
' \ STUDENT GOVERNMENT



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
r track car stereo by automatic radio,
mit only. Brand new, has only one
half hour playing time on It. $55.
Cali 378-5002. (A-67-3t-p)
well kept carpets show the results of
reaular Blue Lustre spot cleaning.
Rent electric shampooer. sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-67-lt-c)
German Shepherdfk weeks old AKC
from best of champion German
stock, show or pet quality. 372-4653.
(A-7t-62-p)
Used 5 pc. Dinette sets formica top
$15.00 Cash & Carry. Florida
Furniture Co. 713 S.W. sth Ave.
Located one block south of Alachua
Gen. Hospital. (A-65-3t-p).t-p).
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3 Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
Honda 50 good condition S9O. Black
& white with aprons. 372-0333.
(A-67-lt-P)
WOW! 3 litters AKC Champion sired
German Shepherd pups. Parents
gentle, obedience trained, OFA
certified. 372-0276, 378-3817.
(A-6 7-st-P)
Vespa 125 cc only 1 year old. Under
1200 miles must sell by February.
Only S2OO or best offer. Call
373-1412. Ask for Scott or Laurie.
(A-67-st-P)
Wedding gown of lace over satin with
chapel train. Size 7. Also have blonde
wig for sale. Like new. Call 372-5166
after 3 PM for Info. (A-66-st-p).
SUPER FANTASTIC STEREO!
Component set, 125 W. Garrard SL
95 tt. Altec sp. systems. Come &
look. Call Bob 378-7479.
(A-65-st-p).
64 Dodge Dart GT, loaded, 4 speed,
red, chrome rims, bucket seats, new
brakes and ball joints, really sharp.
$825, 373-1634 evenings, student.
(A-65-st-p).
1967 Honda 90Excellent condition.
Helmet Includedsllo. Call
392-9891. Also 1 yr. old
stereo-General Electric. Beautiful
walnut speakers3s watt amp ampflawless
flawless ampflawless turntable. Must sell I $95.
(A-65-4t-p).
Shopping for components? Pay cash
for new equipment and save 15% or
more of list price. Examples: Dual
1209 or Garrard SL 95b with Shure
M9l E-$l 15; Sony 355 tape
deck-$lB9. Most major-brand stereo
components. Call Jay at 376-9583
after 5:00 pm or on weekends.
(A-65-st-p).
CAMERA Konica 35mm fully
automatic w/ 52mm & 135 mm
lenses. Original cost $425, now $325.
Call 378-5192 after 5 or weekends.
(A-3t-59-p).
1968 DTl 250 Yamaha Scrambler
2700 miles. condition.
Two helmets, buddy seat. $575. Call
Brad or Gary 376-8524. (A-64-st-p).
Pugs, coffee table, washing machine,
air-conditioner, queen size headboard
and nightstands, baby stroller,
playpen, scales, infant seat, books,
odds and ends. 1302 N.E. 14th Terr.
(Off N.E. 16th Ave.) After 5:30 PM.
(A-64-st-p).
FOR RENT
I
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
FOR RENT: Room In private home
near law col. Pleasant surroundings
meals if desired. Call 378-4952 After
6 P.M. (B-66-2t-p).
Must sublease one bedroom apt. at
1824 N.W. 3rd PI. no. 45, close to
campus. Rent $125, available
immediately. Call 372-5522 after
6=oo PM. (B-66-4t-p).

rn o ss -* jw
r W H -CAN So
I ? &S** V MERKIN EVER Wf O I
1 nl forget...?" m G rZi J
o St 'V l| 7:001 0;55 W "40*
'c ..-ft'll "BIRDS IN PERU" I SS/ 4(j^
a I 9:00 ONLY l\

'MtMee s: %v.y.vwwvww<3w.:<.v.
jl FOR RENT I
Sublet new 4 brm. Townhouse apt., 2
blcks from campus. Call 373-2202 or
378-7933 ANYTIME. (B-65-3t-p).
SUBLET: 1 bedroom furnished apt.
6 blks to campus ln student
quarter. Rent $75 mo. Includes most
utilities. Lease thru June. Call
372-5041 between 5 & 7 and after 10
PM. (B-66-st-p).
Concrete block 2 bedroom florida
room kitchen furnished central heat,
air, family preferred. 1410 N.W. 55th
St. $135 monthly. 376-5826.
(B-65-3t-p).
2 bedroom 2 full bath, Mt. Vernon
Apt.; AC, Heating, dishwasher,
tantalizing decor, only $2lO per
month; Call 373-2759. (B-64-st-p).
| WANTED
Female Roommate for one bedroom
Landmark Apt. January rent paid.
Contact 376-3873. (C-67-st-p)
Gatortown Female Roommate $45.
mo., Good study environment, Jan.
rent paid. Immediate occupancy. Call
376-7993. (C-67-st-p)
Established rock group needs
manager to secure bookings. Call
Ricky 378-3755. (C-67-3t-p)
One Male Roommate to share new 12
x 60 mobile home. Central heat/air.
T.V. No lease. Your own room. $55
mo. plus utilities. Call 376-4138. Jim.
(C-67-st-p)
Female Roommate for Frederick
Gardens. Immediate occupancy Jan.
rent free. $41.25 month. Call
376-7925 or 378-8272. (C-67-st-p)
Female roomate share one bedroom
apt. Village Park $65./mo. Avail.
Feb. Ist. Phone 378-9072, after 5
p.m. (C-66-3t-p).
FEMALE: Full time cashier and
waitress openings. Must be neat.
Good hourly wage. Apply Kings
Food Host. 1430 SW 13th St. PM
only. (C66-ts-c).
Female foommate wanted French
Quarter 2 bdrm, $45 per mo. Call
before 12 noon or after 6 p.m.
376-0613. (C-64-st-p).
Research Assistant Wanted. MA in
psychology, speech, linguistics or
related field. Fulltime. Working in
psycholingulstic research. Contact
Dr. Scholes or Col. Lauer,
Communication Sciences Laboratory.
392-2046. (C-64-st-c).
Fantastic deal
needed for plush village park apt.
occupancy Call 373-2394, no.
114, 1001 S.W. 16 Ave. (C-66-3t-p
WANTED: one or two roomates only
$42. per month. Contact Fred Village
Park apt. 77. If not there leave a
note. (C-64-st-p).
Three male students need one
roommate to live at La Bonne Vie
apts. Call 378-8286. (C-10t-59-p)
HELP WANTED I
Sv.wy-wcco
Collection Supervisor, male or
female, salary open. Campus Credit
Union. Call Mrs. Decker. 392-0393
for Interview, apt. (E-61-10t-c).
trader Toms needs T-shirted
waitressesfor more Info, contact TT
at 2212 S.W. 13th St., Call 376-7070
or 372-9350. Open for business at 6
P.M. (E-65-st-p).
MALE & FEMALE: Part time noon
and evening openings. Must be neat.
Good hourly wage. Apply Kings
Food Host 1430 SW 13th St. PM
only. (E-66-ts-c).
PARTTIME; Reliable Male; Honest;
Dependable, auto required; periods 4,
5 6 open; Permanent job. Call
FRASER; 376-4912. (E-66-st-p).

Monday, January 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

I AUTOS I
1967 V W radio heater low milage,
excellent condition. Call 378-6933.
$llOO. (G-67-2t-p)
Porsche 1968 912 5 speed. Air cond.
AM-FM short wave radio, crome
wheels, NEW tires, tinted glass like
new. $4495.00. Call 378-1668.
(G-67-st-p)
1968 E. Ford Cortina GT. Bought
new In *69. Excellent condition,
radial tires, warranty $1,650. Call
378-4889. (G-66-3t-p).
1963 Dodge Dart GT. Good
condition. Interior like new.
Standard WW tires. $550. Call Cathy.
373-2727. Will transfer insurance.
(G-65-3t-p).
PERSONAL $
> v
27 year old engineering student
Interested in meeting mature Jewish
co-ed. Please call Bill after 11:00
P.M. 372-4921. (J-64-st-p).
Foosball? Foosball! In the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament Is worth a case If
your good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-ts-c).
Wow, what a weekend! Thank you.
Now were open daily at 11:30 a.m.
The Bench and Bar 1222 W. Univ.
Ave. Good Sandwiches like you
wouldnt believe. (J-67-lt-p)
Happy Hour daily 5 to 7 for the
serious drinkers. Wines galore, try our
house speciality at The Bench and
Bar, Gainesvilles Happening.
(J-6 7-lt-p)
I would to thank all those who
helped when my room caught fire,
especially the girls on Ist north.
Nance rm 247. (J-67-lt-p)
Mr. Pilcher. You are being noticed
and sought after. The sparkle must be
gone but Its a chance worth taking.
Call. (J-67-lt-p)
Dear Michael, Two years down and a
lifetime to go. Love you whole
bunches! Ilene. (J-67-lt-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
patriotic message. Anytime day or
night. LET FREEDOM RING. 16
N.W. 7th Ave. (J-66-st-p).
Have you tried reaching out? T. F.
you have youll understand.
392-9372. 392-9373. (J-66-2t-p).
To the girt from Graham with the
wet turkey sandwich, Im sorry.
Youre adorable. (J-66-3t-p)
8 Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna- 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-10t-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-c).
I LOSt" A FOUND j
S i linen g g 99 9C(ieoeees4OTiiwMMiMi3.a.B.B.w
LOST A small tan dog with white
spot on chest. Wearing old flea collar.
Answers to Booger. Call 378-7953.
ASK for LARRY OR STEVE.
(L-66-3t-p).
Found Plain gold wedding band.
Found outside Little Hall lnitials
CWP to DCD lO-18-63. Call
392-1518. (L-3t-64-nc).
yii MM wwwwwmmmm mr V
I" SERVICES J
Color, Conformation,
Temperament: Aquarius! Reg.
Appaloosa Stud. $75. introductory
fee. Book Now. 376-9020 or see
at Horse Show Grounds.
(M-10t-60-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED. 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38t-59-p)

Page 11

K SERVICES
HAPPINESS Is getting your
eyeglasses at the smallest eyeglass
office in town. Drive your own
waiting room to University Opticians
at 519 S.W. 4th Ave. Across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
BABY CARE 311 N.W. 15th Terr.
(Infants under one year old). sls per
week also by the day or hour.
Experienced, reliable, Christian
home. Phone 376-2072. (M-64-3t-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERSFrank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance, Is now at McCreas
Sunoco. 1320 N. Main St.
Gainesville. Frank has 12 years
experience on Imported cars and
specializes in repairs and tune-ups on
these cars. Come in and see Frank for
one week from the date of this
publication, tickets will be given to
imported car owners good for free
lubrication. (M-62-st-p).
| m. <4 Ir H L
NOW AT ...
1:38 3:41 5:34
Mh(S) 7:50 9:58
|g||HHt Daniele Gaubert
llalwMd through
AUDUBON FILMS
RkNiWISION
TBCHNICOLOK*
Pinsons unots ir
wMmm w,u or f ADM,TTt
Camille lias her flings
in high style !- N.Y. Timms j
PAUL NEWMAN (S
BUTCH CASSDV

MORRISON'S CATETERuP
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
Mushroom Gravy
Hash Brown Potaloos f f
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
'A BROILED CHICKEN
<^p' UkmUm $lO9
Wt jfTZI GAINESVILLE MALL g
C JI

ywiiiDHnnniinTnrinnniTnunnffffnrrm "ttiti
I SERVICES I
jUwwawiillllllwww rawing!
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically,
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
HOUSEWIVES: will do Ironing in
your home and repair. One week's
ironing for two persons 52.50 a
week. Call before ten oclock p.m.
372-5269. (M-62-lt-p)
- JL
Volkswagen Parts and Services.-
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.,
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
WOVER
'jriiUFifiSit
/P4RODT!JJ>A
//FAR
I James Bond#* HI
ft mil
LAST 4 DAYS
4 FROM THE
* PRODUCER
The OUimeti Film... bjliussMtftr
LAST 4DAYS
.* Honrnan K joimi;
I Jfc ?
rarreWMsMary!:
*e e



The
Florida
All i^ator

THREE STARTERS FOUL OUT
Gators Downed In Overtime, 88-87

Two last minute goal-tending
calls against junior Earl Findley in
the last minute of overtime,
helped the West Virginia
Mountaineers overcome the
Gators, 88-87 Saturday
afternoon in Morgantown, W.
Va.
The Gators managed to tie the
score at the end of regulation
play, on a short jump shot by
sophomore forward Tom Purvis.
Jumping out to a six point
lead in the overtime period UFs
Jerry Hoover made an easy steal
and scored, followed almost
immediately by Findleys theft
and goal, plus two free throws.
Three Gators fouled out
before the end of the overtime
period colling off the scoring
attack. Senior forward Andy
Owens fouled out in the last
minute of regular play but not
before scoring 11 of his 16
points in the second half.
Jerry Hoover junior guard and
sophomore forward Dan Boe
both fouled out late in the
overtime period further hurting
the Gator scring effect.,.
The first goal tending call
against Findley came with 34
seconds left as he knocked the
ball off the rim allowing UWV to
tie the score 85-BS.
Again Findley blocked a shot
with 16 seconds left only to be
called the second time for
goal-tending, over the strong
protests of head Gator coach
Tommy Bartlett.
The last goal tending call
allowed the Mountaineers to go
ahead permanently.
When interviewed after the
game Bartlett commented, I
protested strongly at the time
because of the way the referee
made the call.
The Gators improved their
Held goal shooting over 45 per
cent from the floor and again
did well in foul shooting sinking
25-31.
Despite a nine point half time
deficit and trailing by 11 points
midway through the second half
the Gators roared back behind
the shooting of junior forward
Tom Purvis who sank most of
his 15 points during the late
Gator rally.*
With a little consistency we
could have won, Bartlett said.*
I thought both teams played
erratic, with each team playing
good for a while and then
playing badly. I think one of the
things that hurt us the most
was having three starters sitting
on the bench at the end of the
game.
Os course/* Bartlett
continued, Owens missed too
many good shots in the first
half, he*s normally a good
shooter.
Bartlett did not like the way
Jluiiirrsttu 3jrfurlrrs
Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair jTt
Diamond Setting jfo'
t Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered //A
Trophies- plaques 4^\
Florida crest jewelry Vs
Lavaliers M
taoa W. Unhr... 2 Blks. from Hub
"BECK" BECHTOLD 373-1025

GATOR SPORTS


HHHEmsI
PHIL COPE
GATORS' DAN BOE
... fouled out in overtime

AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
r
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.

Open 7 days
\ C a week
Wnh-||i
Clip the
Pizza Inn Hrajl
Buck V?|3
below for a special treat! |||ty /
gNN~ D~OUGH~ NdTTWj\
V 9 MmhioUi wilti Iht JJ -*yL
. pwrdlOM of any Aft
I \ Wry* iis pisia
"* M / Th* Wiiolnn i GET
*- -A l /3U S.W. 16th A/../W* T nN
z ZA

the Gators played in overtime
saying simply We deserved to
lose.
One more incident of protest
occured with 23 seconds left in
regulation play. UF called a
timeout while UWV was

shooting a foul shot in protest
over the awarding of an extra
shot to the Mountaineers.
Eventually UWV got only one
extra shot following the Gator
time out.

| 1
Student Special
Any car or color!
| |
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665

The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 19,1970

Page 12

SAVE!
mmm
1 STARKE, FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLI^HON^372^KI^NnmM^Y^APPOINrrMg^
JML l STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
1500 Northwest 16th Avenue
VILLA RAVINE
Luxury Apartment
Residences
HERE are apartments that feel as bid and as private as a
home! Space that flows through unde glass sliding doors
onto a balcony that over looks the ravine, the fountains
and the hillside.
VILLA RA VINE is secluded in North West Gainesville
with easy access to town and the shopping mall Mrs.
Linda Langford, our manager, is available at your
convenience to show you the ultimate in apartment living
Phone 378-8521.
. ' ".O' V
Professional Management By: I
CHI ERNEST TEW & ASSOCIATES, IWC.

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor
£



' H mm
lit. WM
Ik
BRUCE WILLIAMS
... 100-yd. freestyle winner

Swimmers Overtake Florida State

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sport* Writer
TALLAHASSEE Junior
Mark McKee and Freshman Gary
Chelosky led the Gators to a
strong 61-52 victory over arch
rival Florida State, Saturday in
Tallahassee.
It was only the 10th time in
29 meetings that the Gators have
been able to master the
Seminoles.
The Gators pulled some
switches on the Seminoles that
apparently threw them off. FSU
had hoped to capture both
relays like Tennessee a week
earlier, but the Gators opened
up the meet by swimming Bruce
Williams, Bill Strate, Steve
McDonnel and John Plemons in
the medley relay. The Gators
WttKM
"new YORK^I)-How the
top 15 college basketball teams
fared during the week:
1. UCLA beat Bradley
61-56; beat Loyola (111.) 94-72.
2. Kentucky beat Georgia,
72-71; beat Tennessee 68-52.
3. South Carolina beat
Virginia, 6342; beat Furman,
59-56.
4. St. Bonaventure was idle.
5. New Mexico State beat
Hardin-Simmons 83-75.
6. North Carolina beat
Clemson 96-91; lost to Wake
Forest 91-90.
7. Jacksonville beat Virgin
Islands 114-66.
8. Houston was idle.
9. Davidson beat East
Carolina, 91-76; lost to St.
Josephs 90-81.
10. Marquette beat Southern
Illinois 67-57.
11. Ohio U. beat Miami (0.)
81-61; beat Toledo 88-79.
12. Illinois beat
Northwestern, 101-80; beat
Michigan 75-73.
13. Washington lost to
California, 84-64; lost to Oregon
St. 6047; beat Oregon 5347.
14. Columbia lost to
Georgetown 72-68.
15. U. Texas El Paso beat
Arizona 73-59; beat Arizona St.
108-64.
ORANGES
$2 bushel
UPicem
Model Homes
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143

J§ Kk
Jh
V
Mr?
amp,,?.
MARK MCKEE
... first in 200-free

won the event in a new meet and
pool record time. The time of
3:38.6 was six seconds off the
Gators record.
The Gators then left McKee
out of the 1000 free and Greg
Hardee substituted with a first
place. Bob Appleget finished
third.
McKee then won the 200 free
in 1:48.9. Steve Hairston
finished second in the 50 free
and Gary Chelosky won the first

*'> \
: wKjk Ml
r ;t4. **.
Am
..* -! r

<

la
808 LINK
.. second in diving

of two events with a 2:02
clocking in the 200 individual
medley. Jamie Murphy came
through with a third in that
event.
Following a third in the one
meter diving by Bob Link and a
Steve McDonnel second in the
200 fly, the Gator lead was cut
to 31-30. At this point the
Gators poured it on.
Bruce Williams won the 100
free, Bill Domey and Bill Strate

m | I w*
I JRr^BHs'' ill
i 3§ir
$ %. ! '^Bp %
j|f *PBF-4 >ss&
EM
TtyPlPllp
V Jgp; X vt
GARY CHELOSKY
... victor in 200 l-M

finished first and second in the
200 back, Mark McKee and Greg
Hardee finishd first and second
in the 500 free and Gary
Chelosky and John Plemons
finished first and third in the
200 breaststroke. At that point
it was 58-39 and a second place
by Bob Link in the three meter
diving ended the Florida scoring.
Bill Domeys 2:02.2 docking
in the 200 back was not only a
new meet and pod record but

Monday, January 19,1970, Tha Florida AIKSor, I

" §rc&£&&giHV
BL
BILL DORNEY
... record in 200-backstroke

also broke the Gator varsity
record set by Blanchard Tual in
1965. Dorney is only a
sophomore.
The Gators once again
combined a balanced scoring
attack between the veterans and
the younger swimmers on the
team. The Gators take a week
off before preparing for tough
North Carolina State and North
Carolina in the Tar Heel state
Jan. 30-31.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 19,18)0

* .<;..' if .I liMrwwrtPTOffiMpwggMMiil^B
r* *
111 111
||k
K 8 |i B
R -IB
~. / ~ '
M '~*~ '* /r.t-' i.n^r
GATOR HIGH JUMPER RON JOURDAN
... sets sights on the world indoor high jump record
OLYMPICS HIS GOAL
~
Jourdan Eyes Indoor Mark

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Correspondent
The present cover of the UF
telephone directory displays a
picture of Gator high jumper
Ron Jourdan sailing over the bar
wearing one sock.
But Jourdan has a perfect
explanation for the oddity.
I use one sock usually
outdoors when its hot,**
Jourdan said, especially on my
takeoff foot (left) so I dont
have to worry about my foot
slipping in a shoe soaked with
perspiration.
I really dont have much
trouble with it so its really not
necessary.
With one sock or none at all,
the 6-foot-l, 165-pound
Pensacola product has his sights
this year on the world indoor
record of 7-414.

Hadl And Chargers
Key To All-Star Win

HOUSTON (UPI) Balding
John Hadl, who backed into his
role in the American Football
Leagues final fling the
All-Star game was quick to
reverse that pattern once he got
there.
The San Diego quarterback
had not had a very good season
as he and his mates had to play
third fiddle behind Super Bowl
Champ Kansas City and Oakland
in the AFLs Western Division.
But, when Kansas Citys Len
Dawson and Oaklands Daryl
Lamonica had to pass up the
game because of injuries, Hadl
got a rush call to come to the
Wests rescue. He did so with a
flourish.
Hadl and his Charger
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

lve got the world indoor
record on my mind, admitted
Jourdan. If I come around well
enough, the record is certainly
within my reach.
Jourdan, fresh from a
first-place victory at 6-10 in the
Boston Knights of Columbus
Invitational, last Saturday,
claimed his form still needs
improvement for any world
record hopes.
Ive been working on
strength and speed but Ill be
working the next two weeks on
technique, the senior said. Ive
had a little trouble with my
trailing back leg.
Jourdan reached the
seven-foot marie in his first meet
of the current campaign at the
Dec. 9 Memphis Liberty Bowl
Invitational. However, since
then, the former Pensacola High

teammates, receiver Lance
Alworth and running back Dick
Post, pushed the West into a
13-0 first quarter lead and that
was enough for a pull-away 26-3
final victory.

U of F Student Insurance
Enrollment Period
OPEN
SPONSORED BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
COVERAGE
t Until Sept 1970
Pays infirmary expense
Hosp., Doctor and Surgical Bills
PREMIUM
Student premium $14.80
Student and Spouse premium $31.25
Student, Spouse and Children $47.50
Student and Children $31.25
Optional Major Medical $5 per personal additional
You may pick up Brochures and Enrollment Forms from
the Infirmary, McGriff Scarborough and Student
Government.
McGriffScarborosgh l Associates
P.O. Box 1407
115 N.E. 6th Avo. Ph. 376-8393

wonder who was leaping 6-7 as a
prep junior, has reeled off four
straight 6-10 efforts.
In his last 33 competitive
jumps, Jourdan has cracked the
seven-foot plateau 22 times. His
best leap has been 7-2, which he
cleared twice last year.
At one point last year, he
went over seven feet in nine
consecutive meets.
Jourdan jumps into action
next at the Philadelphia Track
Classic on Jan. 24.
But there is an event still two
years away which is crossing his
mind the 1972 Olympics.
Going to the Olympics
would be just as rewarding as
setting a worlds record, said
Jourdan. Its been a childhood
dream for me to go. Win or lose
it would be a great feeling.
60lF>Mlt 60
DRIVING RANGE
mm GOLF CLUBS RENTED
IShL, # CLUB HOUSE
mM* electric carts
iuljf* LESSONS AVAILABLE
, f%*t#OPEN 7 DAYS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

| UFs Percy Beard jj
1 Receives Award
Percy Beard, veteran UF Assistant Director of Athletics, received a
special award in Washington, D.C. at the annual NCAA Convention.
Beard was honored with a plaque presented by the College Athletic
Business Managers Association (CAMBA). The plaque commemorates
his charter membership in this organization, which was formed in
1950.
Vug
Excellence in Food
T STAS SHRKjE !
1 Student Special 1
| WCPiMW (With The Coupon) |
I VWm&J Our Regular 93< Steakburger
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90{ plus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
\J6 10 SJV. 13th St. ___ __ Gainesville |
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1 1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771
I 376-7657|
Ro-Mo makes I
Huge Posters I
from your own I
photographs!!! I
Decorate your I
h M
pad now I
with several!!! I

ONLY $ 4 SO each



I Wr
fSp jiff -1
rfi M J&' '&L kFH m, i M '*'£ ?' .TF% > / 'rs.??*' :V, v,-, 1 /-'' v*F. *-* t, ,*
''''tMimmi' iTitfr v. : :V & jggas KSk*
, \, *v .-VLji .;v ;-, J,- t -.*
. W*r.
ri W 0.-
m if
Pi. ,>
! --r. *-'-- I>. 'HR s
BONANZA TREAT PH,L CO,,E

Members of the Gator football team dig into a
free meal at the Bonanza Sirloin Pit. The restaurant
sent a telegram to the Gators prior to their clash

PRO CAGE ROUNDUP

Pistons Upset Los Angeles

By United Pres* international
Dave Bing hit 27 points and
Otto Moore added a career high
of 25 Sunday in leading the
Detroit Pistons to a 106-100
upset over the Los Angeles
Lakers snapping a two game
losing streak for the Pistons, in
the National Basketball
Association.
Bob Netolicky scored 30
points Sunday afternoon to lead
the Indiana Pacers to a 129-111
American Basketball Association
victory over the New York
Nets.
The Pacers led at halftime
56-51 when Netolicky sparked a
pair of streaks to lift Indiana to
an 84-69 lead.
Henry Finkel and John
Havlicek combined for six points
in the last three minutes Sunday
afternoon to give the Boston
Celtics a 109-102 victory over
the New York Knickerbockers in
an NRA game,.
The Celtics overcame a 31
point effort by New Yorks
Willis Reed when the game was
tied 101-101 with two minutes
left. Finkel score; the go-ahead

Special
cheese sandwich
mm CREAM PIE
W (Chocolate or Coconut)
L- COKE or COFFEE
2035 N. W. 13th Street, Gainesville 378-2304

basket on a layup with 2:34 left
to play.
Walt Hazzard scored a
season-high 40 points and passed
off for 24 more Sunday to lead
the Atlanta Hawks to a 125-107
romp over the Chicago Bulls in
the afternoon NRA game.
Hazzard, who hit 18 of 25
shots from the field, had plenty
of help on the Hawk back line as
Lou Hudson chipped in with 27
points.
Hal Greers 27 points topped
a balanced Philadelphia scoring
attack Sunday as the 76ers
trounced the Cincinnati Royals
141-116 in an NBA game.
Cincinnati managed to stay
with Philadelphia only in the
first period. The 76ers scored
the last eight points of the first
period to go in front 34-38. The
Royals trailed 44-38 with 8:51
remaining in the second quarter
but then the 76ers reeled off 11
straight points for a 55-38 lead
and the Royals never got closer
than 15 points the rest of the
game.
The Milwaukee Bucks built a
26 point lead in the third
quarter, then withstood a San

with Tennessee in the Gator Bowl, telling them
"Beat Tennessee. But win or lose we will feed the
whole team." The team collected last Wednesday.

Francisco rally for a 123-107
NBA win over the Warriors
Sunday.
The Bucks, with 3 players in
double figures, led the cold
shooting Warriors 58-39 at the
half, but San Francisco was
without the services of center
Nate Thurmond and had trouble
following through on their shots.
ra rw-v a * mm w w *u|
w Guns Guns Guns w
over 450. Buy
- Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
* gun dealer, Micanopy.
K 466-3310. _H

I Pntbensiig jil|np I
W 1620 W. University University Plaza K
SALE SAIE
I REDUCTIONS UP TO 50% I
1 VISIT US BETWEEN CLASSES |
| Across From the new Library I
| in University Plaza |
8 SHIRTS: SERO, CREIGHTON, ENRO ft
H LONG-COLLARS, BODY SHIRTS R
0 REDS, BLUES, GREENS R
8 C.P.O. SHIRTS g
8 KNITS D
| SUITS & SPORTCOATS: college hall, r. grassi B
g DOUBLE BREASTED R
H TRADITIONAL R
S SWEATERS: RINGLE OF SCOTLAND, MUNSINGWEAR B
0 i V-NECK B
a BELTS: canterbury, harness house R
B PANTS: WRIGHT, LEVI'S R
a BELL BOTTOMS, FLARES R

SEC Standings
Conference All Games
WL PF PA W L PF PA
Kentucky 5 0 434 341 13 0 1211 985
Auburn 5 1 505 433 9 5 1093: 1039
Georgia 4 1 350 317 5 6 818 796
Vanderbilt 4 2 512 499 8 6 1224 1153
LSU 2 1 269 248 8 4 1103 1070
Mississippi 2 3 342 387 6 6 913 931
Florida 2 3 359 395 5 8 959 999
Tennessee 1 4 279 301 7 5 748 705"
Miss. State 0 5 334 414 3 8 805 861
Alabama 0 5 372 421 3 10 989 1083
mvVaV/^^/nwAVAVAVaVAW???9Wy | & | y | wQ I WOQvQWB I O^wQ II SiV*WVAWBxiV%V
JANUARY ONLY!
Closing Out Our
Office Supplies Dept.
Most Prices Reduced
50 to 75% or More
U( issz's
OFHCE EQUIP. CO.
STUDENT FACULTY SENSITIVITY GROUPS
These groups have been organized for members of the university
community who are interested in improving student-faculty
relationships. The groups are designed to promote understanding
and sensitivity to students and faculty as individuals outside of the
structured roles of teacher-pupil. Group meetings will focus on a
free expression of attitudes and feelings to provide the opportunity
to know each member as an individual. Three groups are being
organized to meet at the times listed below. Each group will bo
composed of a maximum of 14 members. Those interested should
call 392-1578. The program is jointly ponsorsd by the Counseling
Center and the Mental Health Service.
GROUP 1 WED. JAN 21. 3to 8,7 to 10
Following week to be arranged
GROUP 2 THURS. JAN 22,3 to 6,7 to 10
Following week to be arranged
GROUP 3 FRI. JAN 23,3 to 6,7 to 10
Following week to be arranged

Monday, January 19,1970, The Florida-Alt gator.

Page 15



Page 16

l, Th Florida AlMtoy, Monday, January 19,1970

1970
s e m i n o 1
dawning |L
of* Hpil
(3§e 0f (3<|aris>
on sale now at
little hall 6-booth opposite hub
or anywhere you see
THE SOM OF AQUARIUS