Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I?*L

Vol. 62, No. 66

CHARGES 'HOSmmr
Holland Criticizes
Desegregation Order

See Related Story Page 2
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Spessard L. Holland
Thursday charged the U.S.
Supreme Court with reacting in
a hostile manner and going
overboard in ordering the
complete desegregation of 14
school districts in five southern
states by Feb. 1.
Holland made the comments
following an address in McCarty
auditorium.
I think its a matter of the
court just losing its patience in
' Inside
The Gator ;
SPECIALIST TELLS UF
students that the birth
control pill still isnt
perfected page 3
Classifieds 11, 12, 13
Editorials 8
Entertainment 14
Letters 9
Movies 16
Orange and Blue 15
Sports.. . 17
Whats Happening 6

1
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igUte $ ;.-k ;: -'^|^HH^HB^^HH|HB
;:: HP &PHHBHHH HP

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

I think its a matter of
the court just losing its
patience in the matter they
just went overboard.
Sen. Spessard Holland
'AVAV.^.V.VAWiV/IV'.CvXCCvXv;'
the matter, they just went
overboard.
Holland, who has nominated
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell to fill a vacancy in the
Supreme Court said OConnell
may have reacted differently
than some of the present justices
who handed down the order.
I hope Steve (OConnell)
would have opposed the order,
and think that he would, but I
realize he would have made the
proper decision.
The one-time UF student
body president added, I dont
like to think for others; Im sure
hed do what he felt was right.
Floridas retiring senior
senator is asking the public to
exhibit patience, law and
obedience in complying with the
Supitme Court decision.
I wouldnt support a
classroom boycott of any type. I
deplore this type of activity
along with violence in the
streets.
Wednesdays order followed a

University of Florida Gainesville

temporary one on Dec. 15 in
which southern districts were
told to prepare for complete
desegregation by Feb. 1.
Florida attempted to delay
the order until the end of the
school year, but in a decision
late Wednesday night, the court
denied the request.

vvvv%VrVV/r/i
Accent Features
Jeanne Dixon
Jeanne Dixon, well known prophetess, will speak at Accent 7O on
Feb. 11.
Mrs. Dixon, nationally syndicated columnist, has become notable in
recent years for her predictions of world events. She claims to have
predicted the assasination of President John F. Kennedy, the great
New England blackout of 1965, and in 1967 to have tried to warn
Senator Robert Kennedy of danger to his life.
She is also author of the book Jeanne Dixon: My Life and
Prophecies which has recently been released.
After speaking in the University Auditorium she will dedicate a
time capsule in the Plaza of the Americas. The capsule is to be buried
until the year 1984. It will contain a copy of George Orwells 1984,
some predictions about 1984 by Jeanne Dixon, and articles considered
of todays environment such as a gas mask, a sample of
pure water, and so forth.
Beginning Feb. 1 for one week tables will be set up around campus
where students can make predictions about the year 1984. For
twenty-five cents the predictions will be micro-filmed and enclosed in
the time capsule.
Many large exhibits will also be shown at Accent by major
industrial firms. Chevrolet, for example, will be showing three of its
experimental cars of the future along with a series of films and
lectures on the future of car development.
The Atomic Energy Commission will present several films. Also :
slated to have exhibits are Allied Chemical Corp., Union Carbide, 3M,
the Tennessee Valley Authority, R.C.A.,Pratt and Whitney, and the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

CHESS TOURNEY
TENSIONS

PHIL COPE
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| STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
x ... "educate not exercise"
i-i;

John Rash, 2UC, (left) concentrates during a
chess tournament being played at the Reitz Union,
room C-4, through today, Saturday and Sunday.
Below, other masters" prove that chess is truly a
"thinking man's" sport.

Friday, January 16, 1970

i O'Connell: |
Reconsider |
P.E. Decision |
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer ::
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, in a memorandum
issued Wednesday,
recommended the University
Senate and Student Senate
I
reconsider the proposal for
voluntary physical education. :£
The recommendation of ::
v the University Curriculum ::
Committee, which was passed
: by the University Senate :£
Sept. 25, said:
: The University :$
Curriculum Committee
.V
; recommends that physical :g
\ education as a specific
ji curricular requirement be jij
: dropped. Instead, each $
: baccalaureate degree student jij
: shall earn six quarter hour jij
: credits in personal $
j: development courses of a j:j:
: participatory nature.
The tentative list of $:
i %
courses which could be
|i substituted for physical £
: education include: MSC 170, £
: University Orchestra, MSC £
: 171, Choral Union, MSC 172, £
! Mens Glee Club, MSC 173, £
Womens Glee Club, LY 201, £
: Use of Books and Libraries, :£
SCH 101, Parliamentary
j Procedure, SCH 201, Public :£
i Speaking, ISE 350, Digital £
: Computer Programming and :£
: JMIOI, Publications :£
: Laboratory.o :£
However, OConnell said, £
; though he realizes there are £
: some problems with present
: physical education courses, :£
: they can be improved. £



Page 2

;Th Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16.1970

Regional Sensitivity Conference Begins At UF

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writar
Counselors, educators and psychologists as well as
students will explore Sensitivity: I and Thou
together at UFs Tenth Annual Conference for
Personality Theory and Counseling Practice.
The regional conference started Thursday night
with the theme Black-White Sensitivity and six
drama workshops experimenting with audience
participation.
More than 500 paid participants have registered
for the conference which lasts through Saturday
afternoon.
Any students wishing to attend one of the
conference lectures Friday in the Reitz Union
Ballroom will be admitted on a first-come first-serve

>i| jB i>
ft V
SEN. SPESSARD HOLLAND $
I I
( Holland j
| Praises {
1 Agriculture j
$ s
U.S. Senator Spessard L. ::
Holland told a group of:*:
i; agriculturel students and ::
I*: faculty Thursday, their ::
£ industry faces a fight this
$ year in Congress.
Holland, who received the >:
Man of the Year award at a A
noon luncheon with UF
A President and Mrs. Stephen C. §
OConnell,expects battles on;:;
:j: price support for cotton, |i;
| wheat and grain.
The senator parised UF
students entering the field of
agricultural studies.
Im glad to know its an
jj: honorable calling to be in :j
j: agricultural studies. just ;j;
wish we could multiply by
| four or five all the students ;j;
we presently have in the :
5 program. :

CAMPUS SPEAKER SERIES
ASTROLOGY
Monday, LMingg 122
DR. GRAEFFE
-
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
. advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
jiMUyyiQU. j' .

MORE THAN 500 PARTICIPATING

Biafrans Surrender, Pledge Loyalty

LAGOS, Nigeria (UPI)
Biafra formally surrendered to
Nigeria Thursday and pledged its
loyalty to the federal
government in exchange for an
amnesty for its people. The act
officially ended the 214-year-old
Nigerian civil war that claimed
an estimated two million lives.
The pact that also terminated
the breakaway African states
secession was signed after three
hours of armistice talks between
a five-man delegation of Biafran
leaders and the Nigerian leader,
Gen. Yakubu Gowon,
Maj. Gen. Philip Effiong, who
took over as leader of Biafra
following the flight abroad
Saturday of Gen. Odumegwu
Ojukwu, signed on behalf of the
secessionsits. Gowon signed for
federal Nigeria.
In a statement issued in
Geneva, Ojukwu charged the
Nigerian government intends to
exterminate Biafrans by
preventing relief supplies from
MINI-POSTER
WORRY:
AIRPLANE OK
POES NoT CONTAIN
aahmn
o

basis after paid participants have been seated. There
is no fee,
Only paid members can attend the Saturday
morning conferences, and the performance of the
play The Heaven Mother by the Academy
Theatre from Atlanta, this morning.
Dr. Arthur W. Combs, professor of education,
will speak on Sensitivity: The Base for
Communication today at 9 a.m. Assistant
Professor in Psychology Ham Van De Riet, and
Graduate Research Professor of Anthropology
Solomon Kimball will also discuss the topic.
Interpersonal Sensitivity in Counseling,
Empathy, Warmth, Genuineness will be treated at
2pm by UF Visiting Professor Charles B. Truax.
I am Black and Comely is the theme for a
poetry and color photography session by Dr. Didier

FOOD NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

getting through to them. He said
Biafra had been starved into
defeat and warned that unless
food can get into Biafran
mouths in the next 72 hours, it
will be too late to save his
people from starvation.
American sources in Geneva
said Ojukwu was flown out of
Biafra in an American aircraft
along with his aides, their
families and the Biafran leaders
white Mercedes car.
The report said the flight was
arranged by U.S. Intehgence
but the American Mission in
Geneva denied any knowledge of

White House Bans Jetport.'
New Site Planned by 1980

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
White House disclosed today a
permanent ban on construction
of a jetport in Floridas
Everglades National Park.
The federal-state-local
agreement on the ban was
described by President Nixon as
an outstanding victory for
conservation. His statement
was released by the White House
while he was at Camp David,
Md., working on the fiscal 1971
budget.
The agreement said federal
and state authorities will
cooperate in finding another site
for a jetport to be completed
before 1980.
Interior Secretary Walter
Hickel, Transportation Secretary
John A. Volpe and Gov. Claude
Kirk of Florida will meet in the

§ TACO | GAtO* SPECIAL B
Regular 99< Q
Rj Our delightful Mexican dinner includes NOW # C S 3
H Tamale^ cheese lettuce M H
M : -Whwed Mexican beam & cLe H
Ivl Mexican Salad Our own snnriai wA
corn Tortillas (Across from Sin City) W
***

Graeffe of Humanities.
Director of the Institute of Therapeutic
Psychology at Santa Ana Calif., Dr. Everett L.
Shostrom, will speak on Sensitivity I, along with
Dr. Franz R. Epting, assistant professor of
psychology and Assistant Professor of Clinical
Psychology Dr. Mary H. McCaulley, at 8 p.m.
Saturdays conferences will treat Sensitivity in
the Sexual Relationship. Speakers include Dr.
Sidney Jourard, professor of psychology, and Dr.
Thomas Hanna, head of the philosophy department.
Immediately after the conference, Center of Man,
a privately organized institution in Micanopy for
new approaches to growth of the Self, will offer five
encounter groups running overnight through
Sunday. The encounter groups have already been
filled to their maximum of eight persons each.

the U.S. cooperation in
Ojukwus departure.
In the surrender pace signed
in Lagos, Biafran authorities
said We accept the authority
of the federal government. We
accept the existing
administrative arrangements for
running the whole country and
pledge our total loyalty to the
federal government.
Effiong and Gowon emerged
together from the armistice
talks. They smiled, embraced
and clapped one another on the
back.
Effiong had originally

Dade County courthouse in
Miami Friday to sign the
agreement with the Dade
County Port Authority, the
White House said.
Contracts for the disputed
jetport in the big cypress swamp
near the Everglades west of
Miami were let in 1968 and one
runway had been completed by

broadcast she Biafran surrender
decision Monday from the jungle
radio that had operated as Radio
Biafra during the war of
secession. In the broadcast he
had appealed to Gowon for
armistice talks with federal
officials and asked that the
Nigerian advance through Biafra
halted.
Early Thursday Gowon
ordered the Nigerian Army
columns to halt their advance
and a Nigerian plane flew the
Biafran leaders to Lagos for the
formal surrender.

the time the Nixon
administration stepped in.
Under the agreement, the
single completed runway will be
used for flight training, with the
federal government retaining a
right to discontinue training
operations if it is determined
they endanger the Everglades
National Park or other resources.
McGuire Trophy & Engraving
University headquarters
MUG SPECIALTIES OS
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS t RING SIZING
DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
t CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 378-8585



r irth Control Pill In Need Os More Work

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
A specialist in the field of
obstetrics told about 500
students and faculty Wednesday
night that the birth control pill
needs more work.
Dr. Melvin Heine, assistant
professor of obstetrics and
gynecology at the College of
Medicine in an illustrated lecture
at Walker Auditorium on Sex,
Birth and Population, said,
No, the pill is not perfect, but
it can be used safely on certain
individuals.
What we need are pills
suitable for different people and
different populations.
During his lecture, sponsored
by Zero Population Growth Inc.
(ZPG), Heine asked for
volunteers to participate in
studies being made on the Mini
Pill which reportedly does not
cause vascular clotting. Female
students interested in
volunteering for the tests were
asked to contact him at the
Health Center.
The mini pill has no
estrogen, which causes side
effects like clotting, and vascular
problems.
Heine said British researchers
who have reported as many as
12 women in 100,000 dying
because of the pill, have also
FEC Opens
New Quarter
Winter Quarter catalogues for
the Florida Experimental
College (FEC) will be distributed
on campus today. About 30
courses are being offered in a
variety of fields from poetry to
potted plants.
Students wishing to register
for one of the courses should
call the discussion group leader
listed in the catalogue.
Registration fee is sl. Groups
will meet in members homes.
Lecture
j Set Today
: The University Religious :j
\ Center is sponsoring a lecture, :j
: The Churchs Role in Social :
: Change, Friday at 4 p.m. in
room 122 of the Reitz Union, j
: The lecture is the sixth in a >
,
series of lectures called A i
j: Dialogue with a Theologue. :
: Speakers for the lecture
: will be Harold Burris a :
j: Methodist minister from the :
: University of North lowa, :
j: and George Telford, pastor of ;
: Tallahassee Presbyterian >
i
; Church. >

IXiH HOLY TRINITY
'PI 7 EPISCOPAL
FOLK MASS
9:30 A.M.
SUN. WORSHIP
8,9:30,11:00 A.M.
CHURCH SCHOOL
9:30
NURSERY AT
9:30 & 11:00 A.M.
116 N£. Ist STREET
~.. 1 J

included in their studies women
who shouldnt have been given
the pill in the first place; they
were susceptible to clotting.
Research in this country, he
said, may show that only three
women in 100,000 die from
causes attributed to taking the
pill.
Heine covered the entire
gamut of contraceptives ranging
From the mechanical types to
surgical and oral methods.
The most commonly used
contraceptives are of the
mechanical variety. Intrauterine
devices are becoming more
popular, in fact, nurses at the
Health Center are wearing them
on their ears for earrings.
Surgical methods of
contraception are extremely
effective, but there isnt enough
hospital space for operations of
this type.
He said in India they have a
method of birth control which
requires placing a brass clip on
the sperm duct of the male.
In this country,. according
to Heine, the malbv wont
tolerate ligating his sperm ducts,

2t

A
Applemanship...for Teachers
is something more than cornering the apple market. It is cornering the best position in the
teacher market, too. As a teacher in New York City you do just that. Teaching in New York
offers a constant challenge and the chance to utilize talents and abilities fully.
In addition, there is an unsurpassed benefits program:
A salary schedule that ranks with the highest among the world's great cities; advanced salary
placement for experienced teachers orientation workshops and special programs for new new'
' new' comers tenure and security choice of health plans welfare fund social security cover coverage
age coverage pension plan allowing for increased take home pay promotional opportunities and
much moreHow do you like these apples?
For more information about teaching in New York City, please write, telephone or visit the
Office of Personnel, Bureau of Educational Staff Recruitment, Dept. 10
J New York City Board of Education
110 Livingston Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201
Telephone: *(212) 596-8060
r a-.: 4 -
Lj. .Vs *> *. **.*£. ..i -i =

SPECIALIST TELLS STUDENTS

even though this type of
operation has nothing to do with
his virility.
Another speaker, Mrs. Audrey
Herbert, an instructor in the
College of Nursing, told the
audience the U.S. needs to
concentrate more of its money
and efforts on birth control in
this country, and not overseas.
Instead of looking at Latin
America and Southeast Asian
birth control problems, we need
to do more here in our
country.
She said the reason we havent
done this is because very little
money is budgeted by our
national, state and local
governments for this purpose v,
Mrs. Herbert emphasized that
the following action needs to be
taken:
Open county health clinics

on evenings and weekends as
well as during the day.
Offer more courses in the
public schools in family
planning.
Liberalize the present
JluiiTcrsitu JJrftu'lrrs
Adjacent Kings Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair Jfj
Diamond Setting Jry
Ring sizing
§ Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophies- plaques
Florida crest jewelry r
Lavaliers it)
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub
BECK BECHTOLO 373-J025

WIGLETS 100% Human Hair 10-12 in. $9.80
FALLS 100% Human Hair 22 in. $39.80
SYNTHETIC Tapered -Curly Straight $22.00
WIGS Straight Taper with part $35.00
THE WIG BOX
378-8366 Nex ..TBSjjj&L-. 3764)165

Friday, January 16,1970, Tha Florida AMlator,

abortion laws.
In conclusion, she said that
we can fight the population
problem by spending more
money, and by being more
aware.
Are you interested in
fashion merchandising and
modeling? Then come to
Maas Brothers Personnel
Office and fill out an application
for our 1970 College Board.
DEADLINE FEB. 6, 1970

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16,1970

\
|toThe University of Florida
Order Os
Eighteen million-/^!Lg£^
t
£
' 9
WE DONT HAVE THIS CHECK.
s'
WE WISH WE DID
If we did, we wouldn't need to gather the many diverse groups we have to raise the money to
build University Activity Center.
The fact is that the University of Florida has just plain not been as successful as other schools
with singularly wealthy donors.
It must be admitted, in all candor, this plan does not please everyone but it is the only way
we can get a University Activity Center in the forseeable future.
THIS IS THE ONLY WAY WE CAN PRESENTLY \ /THIS IS WHAT WILL BE BUILT:
FINANCE THIS PROPOSED UAC: \ / 16,000 seat coliseum*
Students $6 million sl7 7 >/ 2,800 seat natatorium
State Education Funds $2 million \ / 1,800 seat Performing Arts Center
State Dept, of Transportation $.6 million ) \ 6,000 seat Outdoor Amphitheatre
City of Gainesville and Alachua County $2.5 million / million \ includes 220.000 sq. feet of
Private sources and Alumni $6.6 million / v \ IrT
Total $17.7 million built with state funds.
v ti ..
It cannot be overemphasized that this is the only way a University Activities Center can be built here.
A NO VOTE ON FEBRUARY 4 MEANS NO ACTIVITIES CENTER
o'
Without student help this just can't be built.
UF students must take this leadership role now -for without its commitment, the State of Florida
will withold its 6.6 million dollars.
t f
The students' 6 million dollars must come first, to be matched by 11.7 million dollars.
- -* \
If there is no
6 million dollars from students
(this means)
There is no
2.6 million dollars from the State of Florida,
(which means)
There is no
2.5 million dollars from the City of Gainesville and Alachua County
(which means)
There is no
6.6 million dollars from private and alumni sources
(which means)
There is no
University Activities Center.
Now, with the facts before you, won't you help build the Impossible Dream?
THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM 9
VOTE YES ON FEBRUARY 4
'N*/ ' *.* .. 1,...
nTrrr*Trrrr*TTTrrrr 7 .



Rush Successful
So Far, IFC Says
Though the Inter-Fratemity Council (IFC) will not have an official
report of how many people went out for winter rush until Jan. 27, an
IFC officer said Wednesday he thought the turnout was fairly good.
Miles Wilkin, IFC executive vice president, said a couple of houses,
Lambda Chi Alpha and Sigma Nu, have already pledged as many as 13
to 15 people.
He said a public relations campaign, with radio and newspaper
advertising, was launched in an effort to generate interest in
fraternities this quarter. Some houses used this to their advantage
and sought rushees, while others did little to seek new members, he
said.
Wilkins said he. had no figures to compare this winter quarters
turnout with that of winter quarter last year, especially since rush this
quarter was informal and men did not sign up for it.
Meanwhile, Lauren Genkinger, Panhellenic rush chairman, said
about 300 girls have signed up for winter rush, an increase over this
time last year.
She said rush this quarter was formal and the girls were required to
go to all the sorority houses and give them all a chance.

Seminole Uses
Nickel Votes
Students will have the chance
to cast a fund-raising vote for
their 1970 Miss Seminole
selection, yearbook Editor Ken
Driggs said Thursday.
The contest is to be staged on
campus in the spring, Driggs
explained, and judginjptoill be
based on several photographs of
each finalist.
You will cast your vote by
dropping a nickel in the girls
marked ballot box, the box that
raises the most money wins, he
explained.
The Seminole plans to turn
the proceeds over to the Gator
Loan Fund.
Driggs explained that
contestants may enter the same
as in the past. Entry will be
made by submitting a $5 entry
fee and an 8 x 10 photograph at
the Seminole office before Feb.
6.
Finalists are to be announced
Feb. 13. They will then be
rephotographed and a display set
up in the student union where
students may vote._
Entry forms will be mailed to
most campus organizations next
week; students desiring them
may pick them up in the student
publications office at that time.
I hope this more localized
aspect of the yearbook beauty
queen will help spur interest,
Driggs said.
More Volunteers
Needed For Pulse
Pulse, Student Governments
poll-taking organization, is
asking for student volunteers.
Interested students should
contact Student Senator Ralph
Nobo at the senate office or call
392-1665.

ENCOUNTER GROUPS
The University of Florida Counseling Center is
conducting its second encounter group series at the
times listed below. Interested students should call
392-1578.
Group 1 Mini-Marathon Mon., Jan. 19, 1970 6:00 PM 12:00 AM
Follow-up Mon., Jan. 26,1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
Group 2 Mini-Marathon Wed., Jan. 21,1970 6:00 PM 12:00 AM
Follow-up Thur., Jan. 29, 1970 7:30 PM 9:30 PM
Group 3 For Graduate Thur., Jan. 22,1970 7:00 PM 11:00 PM
Students Only Friday, Jan. 23,1970 1:00 PM 3:00 PM
Group 4 Weekly, starting Tues., Jan. 20, 1970 1:00 PM 3:00 PM
Group 5 Weekly, starting Tues., Jan. 20, 1970 3:00 PM 5:00 PM
Group 6 Weekly, starting Thur., Jan. 22, 1970 3:00 PM 5:00 PM

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Friday, January 16,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16,1970

Colleges Form FSA
For NSA Benefits

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Student
Association (FSA) will be
formed next quarter.
Thats the word from UF
student George Seide who is one
of those responsible for
conceiving the idea of the FSA
and bringing it about.
FSA will be a state-wide
organization of every college,
junior college and university in
Florida. It will make available to
these institutions the benefits
now being received by those few
Florida schools which are
members of the National
Student Association (NSA). This
would include special buying
plans, insurance and so on.
FSA is being formed,
however, because of
dissatisfaction with NSA.
UF is not a member of NSA,
although it did join last summer
and subsequently withdrew
because of student opposition.
The purpose of FSA, Seide
said, is to i mprove
communication and relations
between all schools in Florida
above the high school level. He
said communications are now
hurting.
Were setting it up to be a
sounding board for schools.
Schools will be able to
contact FSA and find out how
other schools have solved
specific types of problems, and
what the other schools in the
state are doing. It will try to
eliminate many of the problems,
both social and administrative,
that junior college transfer
students meet when transfering
to a college or university.
It will be inexpensive to
join, Seide said, and will
operate on a low budget. The
expected cost of joining for each
school is $25. In addition, FSA
will be non-profit, which NSA is
not, enabling some savings for
member schools on services now

Truth is, it would be comparatively easy.
But we want somebody with more than a pat answer for everything.
We need electrical engineers, physicists, mathematicians and systems
analysts who can think creatively and speak their minds.
People who can think logically about solving communications, radar
or information systems problems for the defense of the free world.Or
technical men who can think creatively about solving problems in air traffic
control or urban mass transportation systems.
You wpn't find any yes men coming up with
the answers to these complex problems. \/l I I R K
Get in touch with us.
A robot couldn tdo the job we have in mind. An equal opportunity employer
Interviews will be conducted on campus January 20,1970
Sign Up nOW Ot the placement Office Or write for more information:
Mr. F.O. Brown, The MITRE Corporation, 4000 Middlesex Tpke., Bedford, Mass. 01730
If we want a robot who answers
"yesall the build one.
* .f
4ae__ _ __

being provided by NSA.
The other schools in the state
seem to be in favor of the idea
Seide said. A questionnaire was
sent to every college, junior
college and university in the
state and the response was
overwhelmingly in favor of the
idea.

WHAT'S HAPPENING
_____ By BRENDA GEVERTZ
FOR A JOLLY GOOD TlMfi: All students are welcome to join
UFs Cricket Club which will be meeting Saturday afternoon at 2 on
the ROTC Drill field. For additional information call 376-7746.
EVERYBODY MUST GET ...: All single students, faculty or staff
over 21 are invited to join the Friday Afternoon Club. Meetings are
from 5:30 7:30 this afternoon at the Lamplighter Lounge
COME TOGETHER: Campus Crusade for Christ will sponsor a
College Life meeting Sunday evening at 9:15 at the Sigma Phi Epsilon
house
FROM EACH ACCORDING TO HIS ABILITY, TO EACH
ACCORDING TO HIS NEED: Marxist Economic theory will be
discussed at the Young Socialist Alliance meeting on Sunday evening
at 6. The program is hosted by the Student Peace Union and will be in
rooms 355-356 of the Reitz Union.
PRAYERS AND PICKETS: Reverends Harold Burris and George
Telford will speak on The Churchs Role in Social Change as part of
the Dialogue With A Theologue program. Todays presentation is in
room 122 of the Union at 4.
MOBILIZING SOME MORE: SMC meets Sunday, 8 p.m., Reitz
Union, room 349 and will discuss nationwide antiwar conference and
their recognition battle.

Student Special 1
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MSC 312
PALISCA: BAROQUE MUSIC
CSS 115
FROMM: ESCAPE FROM
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I- 'iii .. J

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January 19, 1970 7:30 PM
J. Wayne Reitz Union
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Friday, Jry W. H7O. Tfca Florida AWwlw. I

Page 7



Page 8

', Th*Plorid* Alligator, Friday, January 16. WO

The Florida Alligator
price o/ freedom
& t^le exeras of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
'RaU
AP[ Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
U Executive Editor News Editor
J\ tutttaui
Strawberry Fields^
Peasant Power
By Carol Sanger
The time doth draw near for the fate of the grand and glorious
Coliseum of Gladiators to be decided upon in this, the Land of Poo.
Verily, deep and deeper furrows creased the brows of all who
shared power in the land as they awaited the will of the peasants
laboring in affliction in the strawberry fields of Poo.
And chants of Peasant Power did become frequent throughout
the land, and the peasants did toss and turn violently in their sleep as
they pondered this new tax most bravely and with much concern..,
In the long and brilliant halls of Poodian state King Charles the
Shepherd, weary with great and growing tribulation as he did
approach the end of this, his second reign, called together all of his
greater and lesser nobles of varying stature and importance.
Harken! the king of Poo did chant, It is for the good of Poo
that we seek this grand and glorious Coliseum of Gladiators.
Yes, oh mighty and good and benign and wise and powerful regent
who doth reign over the kingdom most large and important, chanted
all of the greater and lesser nobles gathered in the bright and brilliant
chambers of Charles the Shepherd, This is indeed true. For the good
of Poo.
And with speed most astounding the chant was soon heard
throughout all of the land.
But woe! There did lurk in dark and hidden comers of the kingdom
a group of errant knights and nobles who dared to challenge the
wisdom of the king and all his ministers.
Verily, good and wise this is not, they did mutter and murmur
beneath their breaths. And they did begin to wage a campaign of great
and growing extent to halt the evil Coliseum of Gladiators which
would tax the peasants of Poo for great lengths in time.
And with great and growing speed did this chant of Good and wise
it is not begin to drift in growing volume across the kingdom most
large.
Great anger and concern did fill the long and brilliant halls of
Poodian state as word of this evil and sinister plot did fall upon the
ears of the king.
Woe and grim tidings be upon these arrant beings, he did cry.
And the chant was picked up and repeated thrice by all in attendance
to the king.,
They shall be sought out and trod upon until their sinister
presence is no longer known in this, the Land of Poo, Charles the
Shepherd did rant and chant with great volume.
Yes, oh mighty and kind ruler most wise, they shall be sought out
and trod upon, and we shall take much glee from this royal task thrust
on us, your humble servants, the greater and lesser nobles cried out
into the Poodian night most dark and silent.
But lo! This task was not one of easy nature, for the errant knights
and ministers who did mutter and murmur did keep far from the eyes
of the angry king.
Verily, 1 have searched both far and wide, yet nary a one can I
find who will speak such so as that I might hear it, Ralph of the
Glatfelters, he who did head the Coliseum of the Gladiators royal
office, did sob with great fear to Charles the Shepherd.
But woe unto him, for he was cast out from the kings sight and
told most strongly to return only with the heads of the errant beings
on a platter of sterling silver.
And even unto this day does Ralph of the Glatfelters pace to and
fro throughout the Land of Poo, seeking right and justice and an end
to any and all evil, as pronounced by the king.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Karen Eng
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
l auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
\ Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union. Editorial: phone 392-1686,
87,88, or 89. Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83, or
84. r irculation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in t|e Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

EDITORIAL
A Phys Ed Test?

Mandatory physical education is an
anachronism.
It smacks of the days when UF required
its students to attend chapel every day, to
observe rigid dress codes and to refrain from
drinking on-campus and off.
For the current crop of UF students,
mandatory phys ed is unpleasantly
reminiscent of junior high school days, with
its memories of grimy sweat socks, jumping
jacks in the gym and steamy showers after
class.
Mandatory phys ed has no place in the
curriculum of a multi-versity like the UF,
which trains its students for a variety of
professions few requiring phys ed training
for their practitioners.
The University Senate saw the
shortcomings of mandatory phys ed and last
fall recommended that students be allowed
to take courses of a cultural or participatory
nature in its place.
We couldnt agree more.
But apparently UF President Stephen C.
OConnell had misgivings about voluntary
phys ed. After letting the senates proposal
lie dormant on his desk for several months,
Wednesday he sent it back to the senate.
He wants the senate to reconsider its
decision.
Though he realizes there are some
problems with phys ed, he says it can be
improved, can be made to educate rather
than merely exercise and capable staff are
available to instruct such courses.
Os course, it is always risky to
second-guess anyone, but we think it is a

jn';
' ...
The vanquished -*
Bailbonds Punish The Poor

MR. EDITOR:
Bailbonds should be
abolished. They are nothing but
a legalized and blatant form of
discrimination against the poor.
It is the wealthy who are
innocent until proven guilty.
The poor serve months and
even years in prisons, which
belong in the dark ages, while
waiting for a trial or the results
of an appeal. Their family
suffers, not only from the loss of
income, but also, from the
brutal separation imposed on
them.
The ostensible reason for the
existence of the bailbond is
ludicrous. What person would
risk five years of his life to
reclaim $5000?

He who posts a bond is
trustworthy and may walk the
streets. He who does not have
that amount of money is
untrustworthy and should be
thrown in prison.

Not More Tuition!

MR. EDITOR:
What is our Student
Oovernment trying to do to us?
Already in the last four years we
have been the victims of two
tuition increases. The Florida
Legislature is considering a third
one for next year and Charles
shepherd wants us to give
ourselves another one!
Can you afford SIBO
v*~*kv7viv%

safe assumption that OConnell would veto
voluntary phys ed.
This is unfortunate.
Not only is phys ed unnecessary, but it is
also inconvenient. Students taking phys ed
usually end up scheduling all their courses
around phys ed, a two-hour bloc meeting
twice a week.
A rather poor sense of priorities and
values, we think.
Add to this inconvenience the fact that no
credit is given and you have a totally
inequitable situation.
OConnells desire to make phys ed
educate rather than merely exercise, while
pleasant-sounding rhetoric, is little else.
For making phys ed educate is something
akin to making drivers ed a liberal arts
course.
Phys ed teachers have been trying since
phys ed was invented to make their courses
academic. Any student who ever suffered
through phys eds written tests know what
were talking about:
When, where and by whom was
basketball invented?
What is the size of a regulation tennis
court, for doubles matches, as ruled by the
Lawn Tennis Association?
How many players comprise a
volleyball team?
If education means learning to think and
exercise ones reasoning powers, phys ed
does not quite fit the definition.
We hope OConnell redefines his
definition of education in reference to phys
ed.

When will this double
standard come to an end? When
will justice in this country
cease to be a farce?
HAROLD HUSCH, 7AG

quarter? Grad students more
than $250?
And what will this increase
get you? In TEN years we may
have a giant activities center, but
will you be here?
Vote NO February 4 we
need the activities center, but
not another tuition increase!
* *** *4



You won a lottery whats the prize?

14 Years To Go?

When I was a junior in high school I
read George Orwells masterpiece, 1984.
Ill never forget that while reading it, I
kept thinking that this might happen in
Hitlers Germany or Stalins Russia, but
that itd be inconceivable in America.
I was like most high school students
then: I imbibed all my social sciences
teachers threw out to me, about
freedom and openness in American
society, and how we had equal rights
and opportunities for all.
Then I made my fatal mistake. I
decided to go to college. I suppose I had
an urge to learn more about the world I
lived in, and how things really operated.
Now that I have some consciousness
of the way politics work and what the
establishment is doing, I have become
radicalized.
Often I feel frustrated because of my
powerless position to right some of the
wrongs perpetrated by the leaders of
our establishment.
This has set up a conflict in my mind:
to passively accept the unjust actions of
people in power, or tb fight the
unbeatable foe and tilt with Tigert, the
Board of Regents, or our jerky
governor. I have decided to fight.
Two stories reported recently in the
Alligator are immediate examples of this
dilemma. One is the firing of three
professors and one staff member for not
signing loyalty oaths; the other is a state
representatives attempts to punish
demonstrators who carry Viet Cong
flags in antiwar marches by giving them
jail terms of five to 20 years.
I think the entire loyalty oath
business is idiotically absurd. It is
frightening to think that anyone in
authority is so naive or stupid to think
that a dedicated Communist who
wanted to overthrow our government
by violent means would admit that he
was doing so (thereby getting himself
relieved of his position).
I dont know if the State Legislature,
Board of Regents and President
OConnell fit in the above category, or
whether they are just pandering to the
repressive feelings of the taxpayers of
the State of Florida so that waves of
ignorant, angry silent middle American
majority voters will not cut the
universities freedoms and budgets any
more than they have already done.

Another View

By Mike Hittleman

I applaud the courage of the four
people who had the guts to refuse to
sign the oath. It is an American
tradition to fight immoral government
actions, and these people are acting in
the best precedents of the founding
fathers and all those Americans that
have died and fought for our freedoms.
As for Rep. Jerome Pratt, who seeks
to deprive us of our right of free speech
and dissent, I say that you should study
the Constitution and please try to learn
some of the history of your beloved
country.
In most of our past wars except for
perhaps WWII, it has not been
considered treasonable to sympathize
with the enemy. During the
Revolutionary War only one-third of the
colonists were actively fighting the
British.
During the War of 1812 several
Northeast states contemplated secession
because of their opposition to the war.
There was vehement dissent within the
U.S. prior to and following our entry
into WWI, while the government
through a massive propaganda campaign
and intimidation tried to achieve
solidarity at home.
No, it is not the Cong flag-wavers
who prolong the war. It is the blindly
patriotic Americans who support the
Vietnam policy of President Nixon and
feel that the United States must be
supported, right or wrong. I always
wonder if these patriots blamed the
little people in Nazi Germany for
allowing the rise of Hitler? Are they any
better?
If we are to demand total obedience
to all government policies, lets quit
pretending that we are a free country
lets admit that we have become a
totalitarian state. This is what Rep.
Pratt seems to desire, and I hope that he
has the intelligence to realize that.
These are just two cases. But there
are hundreds of examples, both locally
and on a national level, of whats
happening. If people dont become
involved and activated enough to
demand the full promise of the
American Revolution, 1984 will be just
around the comer for all of us, not
just radicals or liberal Communists.

1

FORUM:
C Ainu ml Didwt J
hnp* rrrrnpH rgyl
Vietnams Unreal
MR. EDITOR:
In regard to the column Speaking Out in the January 12th
Alligator, hurray, Mr. Smith! Youre so right. Someone does need to
come to Lt. Calleys defense.
I was in Vietnam and I know whats happening. Ive talked to G J.s
and officers and I know how they feel. You cant make people
understand or believe the situation over there. Believe me, Ive tried.
The whole things just too unreal. You have to experience it to
understand how it is!
MEDA NEIMAN, 4AS
The War Itself
Is The Atrocity

MR. EDITOR:
Murder? During wartime? Mr.
Thomas Smith, in the January
12 Alligator, has attempted to
draw some neat moral
distinctions, the ultimate logic
of which I shudder to pursue.
Mr. Smith, at least, enjoys,
according to the Jan. 12 issue of
Time, the support of 65% of the
American people, who
apparently believe incidents such
as Mylai ... are bound to
happen in a war.
Could it be that that same
majority believes that wars such
as Vietnam are bound to
happen to a superpower such as
the U.S., and that those who
oppose such involvements are
misguided idealists at best,
traitors at worst?
But then, perhaps I am one of
the naive who needs to be told
what its really like, barely
three months out of the war
zone myself.
Grenades tossed out of
nowhere? Innocent women with
machine guns? . . the
American troops encountered
little if any hostile fire, found
virtually no enemy soldiers in
the village, and suffered only

*Tm not the replacement he is
r t
'* v* v.v *V

Friday, Jmuery ld. 1970. TM Florida Alliftor,

one casualty, apparently a
self-inflicted wound. The people
of Mylai were simply gunned
down. (Life magazine, 5
December 1969, page 36.) Kill
or be killed, huh?
If we are to make any sense
out of the Mylai massacre, it
must be seen as part and pared
of the infinitely greater atrocity
which is our very presence in
Vietnam. Certainly Lt. Calley is
being made a scapegoat, but not
for Mylai. The murder of
unarmed, unresisting elder men,
women and children is
incomprehensible regardless of
the situation.
Lt. Calley is taking the rap for
all those who have wasted the
lives of 40,000 of my peers in
defense of the right to
existence of that paragon of
liberty and justice, the Saigon
government. Most of our troops
in Vietnam have no illusions
about what theyre fighting and
dying for.
And when a country such as
ours is willing to expend the
lives of 40,000 of its young in
vain, Mylais are, I believe, the
inevitable result.
HENRY E. BRASS, 2UC

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16, 1970

Page 10

have something to say?
I*
1 -- * V . I
... then say It!
the UF Board of Student Publications is now accepting applications for
1971 Seminole Editor
Wt *. v. H
I (NOTE: Applications for Seminolo Editor must bo returned prior to 4 p.m., Friday, January 30.) I
I I
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms 111 & IV, 1970
1971 Seminole Managing Editor
|§ r ||
I
I
(NOTE: Applications for Editor and Managing Editor of the Florida
Alligator and 1971 Seminole Managing Editor must be returned prior
to 4 p.m., Friday, February 13.)
- General Instructions
I I
I t All applications are to be picked up and returned to Rm. #330, J. Wayne Reitz Union. I
I Each applicant must return an original plus two copies of his application. I
Applicants should be prepared to appear before the Board of Student Publications
I <;> I
for a personal interview.
I Watch the Florida Alligator for the announcement of B.S.P. interview meetings. I
I | For Further Information Call Mr. Norm Going, 392-1680. I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
German Shepherd: 6 weeks old AKC
from best of champion German
stock, show or pet quality. 372-4653.
(A-7t-62-p)
Used 5 pc. Dinette sets formica top
$15.00 Cash & Carry. Florida
Furniture Co. 713 S.W. sth Ave.
Located one block south of Alachua
Gen. Hospital. (A-65-3t-p).t-p).
OON't merely brlten your
carpets . .Blue Lustre
them. eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer. SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-66-lt-p).
New Model 12 Winchester Pump
Shotgun. NRA Excellent Rating. 12
guage 3. Inch chamber
POLYCHOKE Price $197. Call
373-2663. (A-66-10t-p).
65 MG Midget radio new battery, top
and paint 6 mo. $875. Call Roger
378-0782. (A-66-it-p).
Wedding gown of lace over satin with
chapel train. Size 7. Also have blonde
wig for sale. Like new. Ca 11.372-5166
after 3 PM for Info. (A-66-st-p).
Rolleiflex & case, Tessar f 3.5 lens,
None Better, Must Sacrifice SIOO.OO
392-3368 days, 378-9363 after 8 PM.
(A-66-lt-p).
DON'T merely briten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them .. eliminate reapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-66-lt-p).
SUPER FANTASTIC STEREO!
Component set, 125 W. Garrard SL
95 tt. Altec sp. systems. Come &
look. Call Bob 378-7479.
(A-65-st-p).
64 Dodge Dart GT, loaded, 4 speed,
red, chrome rims, bucket seats, new
brakes and ball joints, really sharp.
$825, 373-1634 evenings, student.
(A-65-st-p).
1967 Honda 90Excellent condition.
Helmet included $110. Call
392-9891. Also 1 yr. old
stereo-General Electric. Beautiful
walnut speakers3s watt amp ampflawless
flawless ampflawless turntable. Must sell! $95.
(A-65-4t-p).
Shopping for components? Pay cash
for new equipment and save 15% or
more of list price. Examples: Dual
1209 or Garrard SL 95b with Shure
M9IE-S115; Sony 355 tape
deck-$lB9. Most major-brand stereo
components. Call Jay at 376-9583
after 5:00 pm or on weekends.
(A-65-st-p).
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER 1969,
2200 miles, $625. Call 378-5192
after 5 or weekends. (A-st-62-p)
Portable typewriter 3 yrs. old made
in Sweden. Excellent condition. $65.
372-7973. (A-st-62-U)
Uncrated: Pioneer 100 TD amp,
S3OO, & 2 CSBB spkrs., S2OO,
Garrard SL9S w/ Sure cart, $l5O,
Dokorder auto RV deck, S3OO, no.
39 Village Park, Kurt. (A-st-62-p)
CAMERA Konica 35mm fully
automatic w/ 52mm & 135 mm
lenses. Original cost $425, now $325.
Call 378-5192 after 5 or weekends.
(A-3t-59-p).
1968 DTl 250 Yamaha Scrambler
2700 miles. PERFECT condition.
Two helmets. Buddy seat. $575. Call
Brad or Gary 376-8524. (A-64-st-p).
JPfSSKI?"
If congratulations arc in order
for your recent engagement, and
now is the time for your
announcement, call
JohnstonPhotography
for your engagement portrait.
1915 N.W. 13th St.
PHONE 372-2512

FOR SALE
* >:
Rugs, coffee table, washing machine,
air-conditioner, queen size headboard
and night stands, baby stroller,
playpen, scales, Infant seat, books,
odds and ends. 1302 N.E. 14th Terr.
(Off N.E. 16th Ave.) After 5:30 PM.
(A-64-st-p).
jfljoeeeew-r-v.sssv.-.ssvi'ivivK'WvK-xvx-:.:.;.
FOR RENT
Sublet new 4 brm. Townhouse apt., 2
blcks from campus. Call 373-2202 or
378-7933 ANYTIME. (B-65-3t-p).
Super calif rag ilisticexpialidocious
deal! Renting or subleasing
Landmark apartment to 2-4 lucky
blokes. Call 373-2277 Hurry.
(B-65-2t-p).
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished,
ww carpet, a/c, $l2O mo., Cable TV.
Colonial Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd
Ave. (B-6t-ti-c).
FOR RENT: Room in private home
near law col. Pleasant surroundings
meals if desired. Call 378-4952 After
6 P.M. (B-66-2t-p).
Must sublease one bedrocta apt. at
1824 N.W. 3rd PI. no. 45, close to
campus. Rent $125, available
immediately. Call 372-5522 after
6:00 PM. (B-66-4t-p).
One bedroom apt., A/C, ALL
ELECTRIC, 1402 S.W. 10th Terr.,
372-9569, 378-3628, couple or single
person-, (b-66-it-p),
2 bedroom apt. Central air, heat, wall
to wall carpet, garbage disposal,
dishwasher, would like to sublease.
Hawaiian Village, call Evy, 373-2307.
(B-st-62-p)

MG-TD FOR SALE
MG TD 1953 fully restored, British racing green,
cream interior, dark green carpet, white top &
tonneau, 5 WSW Dunlop tires, push button radio, 3
speed heater, courtesy lights, driving lamps, luggage
rack, car cover. Many extras! over $4,000 invested,
2,000 miles since restoration. Will not depreciate if
properly maintained. $3,000 378-5192 after 5 or
^^ mmh
ft rr Presents
Q aniied \\ s
Liquors Newest
LOUNGE
/&3 ychfjEofzfu/c
WARM
Hot sounds
Featuring "RUDI W
The HOTTEST D.J. in Germany, jfl
Direct from Hamburg m
NOW OPEN! 1611 S.W. 13fh S* J|

Friday, January 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
SUBLET: 1 bedroom furnished apt.
6 blks to campus in student
quarter. Rent $75 mo. includes most
utilities. Lease thru June. Call
372-5041 between 5 & 7 and after 10
PM. (B-66-st-p)
Concrete block 2 bedroom florida
room kitchen furnished central heat,
air, family preferred. 1410 N.W. 55th
St. $135 monthly. 376-5826.
(B-65-3t-p).
2 bedroom 2 full bath, Mt. Vernon
Apt.; AC, Heating, dishwasher,
tantalizing decor, only $2lO per
month; Call 373-2759. (B-64-st-p).
WANTED I
WANTED: POWER ... for the voter.
Sen. George McGovern pins the
Chicago Debacle on manipulated
primaries" and rigged delegate
selection. Read his plans for saving
the Democratic Party by returning it
to the people, in The Lessons of
1968." In this months HARPERS
MAGAZINE, Americas First
Monthly. On sale now. (C-66-lt-p).
WANTED: one or two roomates only
$42. per month. Contact Fred Village
Park apt. 77. If not there leave a
note. (C-64-st-p).

Page 11

WANTED 1
Cook wanted. Tall, short, fat, ugly,
or thin. If we can eat it youre hired.
Meals provided for your efforts.
372-5091. Ask for David.
(C-64-3t-p).
Female roomate share one bedroom
apt. Village Park $65./mo. Avail.
Feb. Ist. Phone 378-9072, after 5
p.m. (C-66-3t-p).
Listeners Wanted Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and
have normal hearing. Please call
Mrs. Slater between 1 and 4
p.m. for appointment. 392-2049.
(C-15t-60-c).

REITZ UNION THEATRE
L OUILLER...
he's not just another spy-
I § 3rid if he shstt
[ pr your nerves, remember-
V lj B J]Jonwu $
53Pf IVleniOK^dm*
H GEORGE SEGAL ALK GUINNESS
M MAX VON SYDOW SENTA BERGER
jf "" t. Guest Stets
* GEORGE SANDERS ROBERT HELPMANN
PANAVISION* Color by Os LUXE coducee b, ivm fOMKU by Niauf l AMKBMI Sc-npu, b, haioid Min*
FRI. & SAT. JAN. 16 & 17*5:30, 800,10:30 PM
Mightier Than The Sword...
** Jamm<& m .
The backbone
of democracy
is an informed
public.
Contribute your
skills to The
Florida Alligator.
N|M. . -..-.- -
330 Reitz Union

T ii ,t 1 1 it.' iTiTn-'
I WANTED I
Female roommate for a two
bedroom, two bath, poolside La Bon
Vie apt. $47.50 per mo. Plus utilities.
Phone 373-2955 apt. 436.
(C-64-3t-p).
FEMALE: Full time cashier and
waitress openings. Must be neat.
Good hourly wage. Apply Kings
Food Host. 1430 SW 13th St. PM
only. (C66-ts-c).
1 or 2 roommates to share poolside
Tanglewood apt. AC, TV, lVa bath,
dishwasher. 47. mo., Jan. free. Call
378-9861 after 6. (c-64-3t-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

r I
<.va-;wx-:.}w.sww ;kwwmwo!
Volunteers wanted to staff Corner
Drug Store. Attend open house
Sunday thru Wednesday. 7 p.m. 1823
N.W. 2nd Ave. (C-65-2t-c).
Female roommate Jan & Feb. rent
paid. apt. 64. 372-6535 or 378-3851.
Call SANDY. (C-65-2t-p).
FEMALE ROOMATE FOR
COLONIAL MANOR APARTMENT
373-1412 or 372-2711. CAROL.
(C-65-2t-p).
WANTED: POWER... for the
middle-class. "Professional Radical
Saul Allnsky- explains how the
hung-up majority must be
empowered to relieve Its own
frustrations before It can proceed to
relieve the sufferings of the poor; and
describes methods of organizing for
action, via graduated sales tax, stock
proxies, chewing gum. In this
months HARPER'S MAGAZINE,
Americas First Monthly. On sale
now. (C-66-lt-p).
WANTED: POWER ... for the black
revolution. Veteran black leader
Bayard Rustln contends that
violence, separatism and ultimatums
do not a revolution make; that true
revolutionary reform will come only
through trade unions, coalition
politics and the Democratic Party. In
this months HARPERS
MAGAZINE, Americas First
Monthly. On sale now. (C-66-it-p).
Fantastic deal
needed for plush village park apt.
occupancy Call 373-2394, no.
114, 1001 S.W. 16 Ave. (C-66-3t-p
Female foommate wanted French
Quarter 2 bdrm, $45 per mo. Call
before 12 noon or after 6 p.m.
376-0613. (C-64-st-p).
Research Assistant Wanted. MA In
psychology, speech, linguistics or
related field. Fulltime. Working In
psychollngulstic research. Contact
Dr. Scholes or Col. Lauer,
Communication Sciences Laboratory.
392-2046. (C-64-st-C).
Three male students need one
roommate to live at La Bonne Vie
apts. Call 378-8286. (C-10t-59-p)
|j 00000 HaP WA NTED**ni
WANTED Talented, experienced
art and architecture students for
color drawing and rendering. Good
pay. Part time your own hours.
Call 372-5843. (E-st-62-p)

Steve McQueen plays Boon^^^^Pj^gJ
Camille 2ooo* I
I #. Capturu beautifully colored, If
JiH JHp''"' explicit sax, in Roman pads fitted I
JH J9B f| ~,,: ; J | .with active swingers.lK
: A RADLEY METZGER
:; : PRODUCTION
2000" H
W Marring
'. 11l
>< mmsmwfflmk Releuwl through II
; AUDUBON FILMS 11
. FANAVIBION TKCHNICOLOR II
/C\ PINSONS UNDfA 17 ||
lllliMMMl: \*/ WILL NOT Bi ADMITTID II
Mll i:i# ll
HBHBBBMIIIIWBI:. FEATURE AT. H
mmm .. 7& o i

Page 12

|*"'hEIP~WANTP |
HELP NEEDED In alleviating
Americas hunger problem: Amply
available; however, not forthcoming.
Pulitzer Prize winner Nick Kotz
examines food Industry and
government reluctance In supplying
low-cost fortified foods for the poor,
while supplying same to foreign
underdeveloped countries. In this
months HARPERS MAGAZINE,
Americas First Monthly. On sale
now. (E-66-lt-p).
Male telephone solicitor. High pay
for about 10 hours per week.
Experience desired but not
mandatory. Call 376-2043 for
interview. (E-st-62-p)
Collection Supervisor, male or
female, salary open. Campus Credit
Union. Call Mrs. Decker. 392-0393
for Interview, apt. (E-61-10t-c).
"Trader Toms needs T-shlrted
waitressesfor more Info, contact TT
at 2212 S.W. 13th St., Call 376-7070
or 372-9350. Open for business at 6
P.M. (E-65-st-p).
MALE & FEMALE: Part time noon
and evening openings. Must be neat.
Good hourly wage. Apply Kings
Food Host 1430 SW 13th St. PM
only. (E-66-ts-c).
PARTTIME; Reliable Male; Honest;
Dependable, auto required; periods 4,
5, 6 open; Permanent Job. Call
FRASER; 376-4912. (E-66-st-p).
i| FOR SALE j
1968 E. Ford Cortina GT. Bought
new In *69. Excellent condition,
radial tires, warranty $1,650. Call
378-4889. (G-66-3t-p).

0> THE fiWO ABTISWr
OSTEfC
Fftl-SftT- IS2.G UJTUNIVERSITY fIVE

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16,1970

V.:.:.:.%s*xc*>>x*x*x.%w.vx*x*x-:*>:*SSK*:J;.'
| AUTOS 1
196 3 Dodge Dart GT. Good
condition. Interior like new.
Standard WW tires. $550. Call Cathy.
373-2727. Will transfer Insurance.
(G-65-3t-p).
I PERSONAL i
v
Want to see a revolution of love at
UF? What does God have to do with
this? Come to COLLEGE LIFE at Slg
Ep house Sunday night, 9:13 p.m.
(J-66-lt-p).
Foosball? Foosball! in the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament Is worth a case If
your good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-ts-c).
HAPPY CRUNCH DAY MRS.
VANLARDINGHOCK! 1 cen. old 1
You old bag! p.s. Shes getting her
Ph.D. In Economics! M & R.
(J-66-lt-p).
STROBE LIGHT 535.00.
VARIABLE FLASH RATE.
Sensitivity control for amplifier
hookup. Call 378-8723. (J-66-lt-p).
27 year old engineering student
Interested In meeting mature Jewish
co-ed. Please call Bill after 11:00
P.M. 372-4921. (J-64-st-p).
PERSONAL: Confessions of a
White Racist." Texas-born Larry L.
King recounts his tortured attempts
to dispel half a lifetime of inbred
hatred; discovering that the black
birthright of petty humiliation has
caused more hatred and violence than
the lack of social or economic
opportunity. In this months
HARPERS MAGAZINE, Americas
First Monthly. On sale now.
(J-66-lt-p).

REITZ UNION THEATRE
EXTRA
GIRL
MACK SENNETT
PRESENTS
SZZZS MABEL NORMAND
SPOOF, NON-STOP LAUGHS!
SUNDAY, JAN. 18 7.00, 9:3opm
Ji-y.m-L#
-i^i L '"^
K
* V
p S ATURDAY ONLY |
>0:00 & ifflijniTini 75 c
12:00 lIHUIJIHiIiIIKHI To
SON OF ROBIN HOOD
77ie ULTIMATE Film...by Rust Msysr
IH
Ud3 A U^"4l9lt
an

linHMpnmnmviJiw.uuaji <
YOUR
FATHER'S
WHAT??



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ip'' J Ifctsonal i
Dial 378-5600 and hoar a taped
oatriotlc message. Anytime day or
night. LET FREEDOM RING. 16
N.W. 7th Ave. (J-66-st-p).
Have you tried reaching out? T. F.
you have you'll understand.
392-9372. 392-9373. (J-66-2t-p).
Dean Dingy Happy 25th you old
Goat. Love and Kisses, your friendly
phebotomlst. (J-66-lt-p).
Today Is the day. The Bench and Bar.
1222 W. Unlv. Ave. The Judy Miller
Trio tonlte and Saturday 10 *tll 2.
Miss Nikki your hostess??? Sidney?
(J-66-lt-p).
To the girl from Graham with the
wet turkey sandwich, Im sorry.
Youre adorable. (J-66-3t-p)
8 Hours Dual Flight Instruction Only
SIOO Cessna 150. $lO per hour.
Phillips flying service. 495-2124 after
6 PM. (J-65-10t-p).
Hey mature UF singles! The Friday
afternoon club meets again. Students,
faculty, & staff over 21 are welcome.
The Lamplighter. Drinks 50/
5:307:30. (J-65-2t-p).
You asked for it! Giant movie
posters! Best buy around! Get em
now at the Dragon Dr. In Snack Bar
all originals no copies!. (J-65-st-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-ts-64-C).
CAROL Even though our
friendship blew out of SUPER that
aint bad at all! Ft. Lauderdale one
time! Green Firebird keys?? Happy
21st. R. (J-66-lt-p).
[ v L qs74 pouND^
LOST A small tan dog with white
spot on chest. Wearing old flea collar.
Answers to Booger. Call 378-7953.
ASK for LARRY OR STEVE.
(L-66-3t-p).
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACELET,
single initialed charm (reb, seh)
sentimental value ! BIG REWARD
Call 392-8513. (L-64-3t-p).
Found Plain gold wedding band.
Found outside Little Hall lnitials
CWP to DCD lO-18-63. Call
392-1518. (L-3t-64-nc).
FOUND Girls prescription glasses
brown frames Found on S.W. 13th
St. Near ARBYs 1/10/70 CALL
378-7846. (L-66-3t-nc)
FOUND: Frustration, betrayal,
physical exhaustion on
BERNADETTE DEVLINS U.S.
fund-raising campaign. Read Sara
Davidsons revealing diary of the Irish
Revolutionarys 13-day American
education. In this month's
HARPERS MAGAZINE; Americas
First Monthly. On sale now.
(L-66-it-p).
HAPPINESS is getting your
eyeglasses at the smallest eyeglass
office in town. Drive your own
waiting room to University Opticians
at 519 S.W. 4th Ave. Across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.

I 7 THEATRE
1 1 L 1 1

Friday, January 16.1970, The Florida Alligator,

11 mi
1 SERVICES 1
BABY CARE: 311 N.W. 15th Terr,
(infants under one year old) $5 per
week also by the day or hour.
Experienced reliable Christian home.
Phone 376-2072. (M-64-3t-p).
? 1 r Conformation,
Temperament: Aquarius! Reg.
Appaloosa stud. $75. introductory
fee. Book Now. 376-9020 or see
at Horse Show Grounds.
(M-lot-60-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERS: Frank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance is now at McCreas
Sunoco, 320 N. Main St., Gainesville.
Frank has 12 years experience on
imported cars and specializes in
repairs and tune ups on these cars.
Come in and see Frank. For one
week from date of this publication,
tickets will be given to imported car
owners good for free lubrication.
(M-st-62-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato

Page 13

f SERVICES I
9fiaaiWW.BiinoQadDflafLiwwo'Beacoca^
WAKE-UP TROUBLES? Wako-up
service. Pleasant, reliable. $5/month,
$ 12/quarter. Phone 378-4216 or
372-3823. (M-st-62-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED. 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38t-59-p)
BABY CARE 311 N.W. 15th Terr.
(Infants under one year old). sls per
week also by the day or hour.
Experienced, reliable, Christian
home. Phone 376-2072. (M-64-3t-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERSFrank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance, is now at McCreas
Sunoco. 1320 N. Main St.
Gainesville. Frank has 12 years
experience on Imported cars and
specializes in repairs and tune-ups on
these cars. Come in and see Frank for
one week from the date of this
publication, tickets will be given to
imported car owners good for free
lubrication. (M-62-st-p).

I GAINESVILLE Tson 1
2400 HAWTHORNE ROAD-ROUTE 20 H
51.50 A CARLOAD at ALL TIMES!
An lmofianal ixoerirntt
MMMi 0r
RUSS MEYER presents
# CUMMnW-LAW
! [ .CAHIWte^-
r- '£ '*m r ->.r.uul'r Tr Ijll Ijllt
t Ijllt 4Pi I 11 1 1 Love that doesn't wait on
v ceremony^^sr^^^
Si MON!)
TOPLESS
, . #* * WlMfeii--.
_ t V



The
Florida
Alligator

FRIENDS FROM THE PRISON WRITE
I ~ IIIWI 11 M
WRUF-FM: The Rock Music Reaches Out

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
We young aften are
characterized by our music. We
are like it and it is like us.
It is a brutal sort of thing. It is
obnoxious in one way and
foolish in another. It is loud and
full of energy. It often flies in
the face of tradition and it talks,
in its own special hard tongue,
of freedom, or the dream of
freedom.
I feel almost pushed into a
comer by the thing. I really do
wish I could do something.
Those are the words of Danny
America, a young announcer at
WRUF-FM who with two
other announcers does the
stations weekend progressive
rock programming.
The announcers knew what
kind of people listen to the
music. There are heads listening,
and fraternity people, and
fraternity heads, and most other
kinds of young people. There are
high school kids and younger,
too.
The announcers knew about
all those people, but they didnt
know that there were young
people in the Florid* State
Prison at Raifoid listening, too. (
They found out in a letter from
one of them this week
Its really a good thing to
think that we have the chance to
entertain them, Danny said
Thursday. But it makes me feel
a lot differently about doing the
program.
The letter signed Richard
0. Simmons Jr. reads, May I
say that I enjoy the show not
only for the music but for the
conversation, too. It is the one
contact that myself and the
others here in the prison have
with the progressive rock scene.
He wrote Peace at the
bottom.
When the kid says were his
only link with the progressive
rock scene, what he means, too,
is that were about his only link
with kids on the outside, the
announcer said. I and the other
announcers would like to write
join the fun!
THe'SWINGS
TO WINGS
All America people arc taking to tha
sky...young and old.. soma just lor tha fun
of k,. others teaefuaa their business bona-
RtS from (aster flying trips to out-of-town
TRY A LESSON
iilMt if Thats alt it. costs for our Special
IWroSuctory Flight Usson in a Piper
CltsrohsS with modem low wing and total
IllyiAf ease. Come visit us today.
I CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road

m | ,1- IlfeAk HI, M mm jak gtk vdtik jju* fef. wL jgjt
9KP^ML %, V^HR l *- ~ msst BM88M8r wst -MBF
111 IMH HI M HII 11 m 111 BB lli 111,1 HIB jjlif M Ml, I, If
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to him and tell him were glad he
enjoys the programs, but he isnt
allowed to get letters from
anyone except his own family,
he said.
According to the announcer,
rules on the back of the letter
Simmons sent say that the
inmate is allowed to write only
two letters a week and to receive
letters from only four people in
his family. Theres a limit on
how many letters he can receive
from them, too.
So, I guess what were going
to do this weekend, the
announcer said, Is to say
something to him and his friends
over the air and hope hes
listening. I guess thats all legal
as far as the prison is
concerned.
The announcers at WRUF-FM
dont know anything about the
writer of the letter except his
name and that he is in cell
number 3-T-3 and has been
assigned the number A-016515.
They dont know what his
sentence is for or the length of
time hell be imprisoned.
Sebastian, another of the rock
announcers for the weekend
program, said Thursday that he
would /like to drive to Raiford
soon and meet the listeners
there.
But 1 dont think they are
allowed to have any visitors
except family folks, either, he
said. Id like to dedicate one of
our shows to them. We had
thought about saying, The
program tonight is dedicated to
all our shut-in friends, but 1
guess well use his name,
Sebastian said.
The announcers for both the

STARTS MONDAY
for weeks
" THE WESTERN PRIM REVUE"
Pounds
pHHMHHHHHI Pure
THE HAMMER 4 Tuesdays ~ I
Lc. Two Days
DUBS LOUNGE

Friday and the Saturday night
shows last weekend asked for
letters from listeners to get an
idea of the programs popularity
in the area. They asked that the
letters include pledges of
support to one of the shows
sponsors.
The writer from Raiford
wrote, Im not in the position
to pledge my support to your
sponsor at this time, but Ill bear
it in mind upon my return to a
food and record buying status.
Jack Paige, the shows other
announcer, said Thursday, At
first I thought it was kind of a
funny thing I think we all did
- and then we got to thinking
about how this guy is probably
about our age, likes a lot of the
same things we like and there he
is, sitting up there in a prison
cell.
Danny America said the letter
had a postscript: More Dylan,
please!
1 got to thinking about how
much Dylan means to me and to
a lot of people my age. Knowing
that Simmons cares about a lot
\ of the same things, makes me
feel close to him in away,
America said.
Bob Dylan has a song that will
be played this weekend. One line
goes, My friends from the
prison, they ask unto me, how
good, how good does it feel to
be free?
And a lot of us will think of
Richard O. Simmons Jr.
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
qFa 3 games SI.OO
vDy Sat. 9am 6pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

ft ft~
~ ft~ DANVINING
Entertainment Editor

Page 14

JANUARY ONLYI
Closing Out Our
Office Supplies Dept.
Most'Prices Reduced
50 to 75% or More
Riser's
OFFICE EQUIP. CO.
"^aJc^h^oaSnut^dr/veandl
SAVE! a
I STARKE, FLORIDA j
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
-HOURS- I
WEEKDAYS BAM-6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM I
GAINESVILLEPHON^7ZOIO^N>mM^^PPOIWTME^T|

I STUDENT FACULTY SENSITIVITY GROUPS
I These groups have been organized for members of the
I university community who are interested in improving
student-faculty relationships. The groups are designed to
I promote understanding and sensitivity to students and
faculty as individuals outside of the structured roles of
I teacher-pupil. Group meetings will focus on a free
I expression of attitudes and feelings to provide the
I opportunity to know each member as an individual. Three
j groups are being organized to meet at the times listed
| below. Each group will be composed of a maximum of 14
I members. Those interested should call 392-1578. The
I program is jointly sponsored by the Counseling Center and
I the Mental Health Service.

. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16,1970



Orange and

address campus calendar
notices to public functions
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

graduate record
EXAMINATION (GRE) will be
given on Saturday, Jan. 17 at
8:45 a.m. in Walker Auditorium.
PREMEDICAL AND
PREDENTAL STUDENTS must
register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education,
Room 105 Anderson Hall, Jan.
12-30. Bring full names of your
instructors and the course and
section numbers.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June and August grads
unless indicated otherwise. **
Indicates U.S. Citizenship
required. Degrees: B-Bachelor's,
M-Master's, D-Doctorate.
Jan. 19: Florida State
Personnel Board; M.A.
Montenegro and Co.; Defense

Campus Calendar

Friday, January 16
Muslim Student Association
Prayer Meeting, 123 Union,
12:30 p.m.
Student Government Book
Exchange, C-4B Union, 1:00
5:00 p.m.
Union Lecture, Dialogue with a
Theologue, Rev. Harold
Cutris., Rev. George Telford,
122 Union, 4 p.m.
Union Movie, "Quiller
Memorandum," Union Aud.,
5:30,8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Tournaments,
Registration, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Service, Hillel
Foundation, Israeli Dancing
Afterwards, 7:30 p.m.
Muslim Students Association
Seminar, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, "Your Father's
Mustache," 8:30, 10:30 &
12:30 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, "Major
Dundee," South Hall Rec.
Room, 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 17
Hillel Foundation Service, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
Lunch served afterwards.
Athletic Dept. Wrestling Match,
Florida vs. Tampa, 4:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Quiller
Memorandum," Union Aud.,
5:30,8:00 & 10:30 p.m.

V ~ 7 GAINESVILLE FLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
m __ -^ ILLS ? taxes? debts?
.. / 7 JJ lt r s Income Tax time again and this year is even worse!
Alx M Besides this* all of those nagging bills can amount to
MAH / p/ enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces*
t ||l \ yl HBB your taxes and end up with less of a monthly output,
ill V } x" \ Come in to talk it over...we're specialist at solving
- those kinds of problems!
a . - -

Administrative Notices

Intelligence Agency; Geigy
Chemical Corp.; Dept, of
Housing and Urban
Development; City of
Jacksonville, Council Auditor;
U.S. Public Health Service, V.D.
Program; Washington Corp. B,
M: Business, The Standard Oil
Co. of Ohio, B: ChE, ME, CE,
EE, Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts.
Jan. 19-20: The Trame Co.;
The Martin Co.
Jan. 20: Sangamo Electric
Co.; Florida Probation & Parole
Commission; FMC Corp.
Chemicals Division; The Mitre
Corp.; U.S. Gypsum Co., B:
Engr., Acctg. **
Jan. 20-21: ARO, Inc., RCA
Corp., Blount Brothers Corp.,
Allied Chemical Corp.
Jan. 20-21-22: Union Camp
Corp.
Jan. 21: Federal Reserve Bank
of Atlanta; J.A. Jones
Construction Co.; South wire

Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs. West
Virginia, Morgantown
Rathskeller, "Your Father's
Mustache," 8:30, 10:30 &
12:30 p.m.
Union Dance, 'The Go-Mads,"
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, 'Twenty
Million Miles to Earth,"
South Hall Rec. Room, 11:30
p.m.
Sunday, January 18
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Phi Chi Theta Rush, Meet at the
Steps of Matherly Hall, 2:30
p.m.
Union Classic Film Series, 'The
Extra Girl," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Univ. Religious Association:
Father Clarence River, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
College Life Meeting, Sigma
Phi Epsilon House, 9:13 p.m.
Monday, January 19
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Lecture, Dr. Arnold
Graeffe, Astrology, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Women's Commission Meeting
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.

BLUB BULLETIN

Co.; Montgomery Ward & Co.;
Continental Can Co., Inc.; Oscar
Mayer & Co., A&S, Bus. Ad.,
Journ., Communications **
Jan. 22: Xerox Co.; Savannah
Electric and Power Co.; U.S.
Army Waterways Experiment
Station; Olin Corp.; Control
Data Corp.; City of Philadelphia,
Pa.
Jan. 22-23: General Dynamics
Corp., Fort Worth Div.;
Florida Power & Light Co.;
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.
Jan. 23: Schlumberger Well
Service; Stone and Webster
Engineering Corp., Carnation
Co.; Armco Steel Corp.; Ortho
Pharmaceutical Corp.;
Ingersoll-Rand Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Jan. 19: Rich's; Naval Air
Rework Facility
Jan. 20: Procter and Gamble
- Market Research Div.

A.I.E.S.E.C. Meeting, 356
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, E&l Bldg., 8:00
p.m.
Tuesday, January 20
Peace Corps Recruiting, Games
Area Lobby, Union, 9:00
a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Zeta Meeting, 346 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Lecture, Joseph Heard, Union
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Cox's Furniture Company,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept.: Faculty Concert,
Two Pianos and Four Voices,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
SGP: Florida Symphony.
Audubon Wildlife Films, Single
Ad., U. of F. Students, SI.OO,
General Public, $1.50, High
School Students. $.50; Series of
5 films, U. of F. Students,
$4.00, General Public, $6.00,
High School Students, $2.00.
Your Father's Mustache, $1.50.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

GENERAL NOTICES
WAUBURG COMMITTEE
MEETING is scheduled for Fri.,
Jan. 16, at 3 p.m. in the Board
Room, President's Office, 226
Tigert Hall.
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, co-educational
honorary service organization,
will be holding its winter
membership social Jan. 29, at
7:30 p.m. in room 123, Reitz
Union. Students interested in
doing service for the University
and community are invited to
attend. For more information,
call Richard Spool, 378-0529.
JAPANESE STUDENTS
interested in the John W. Hill
Fellowship for advanced studies

*r
t
were coming
to take you
away
We re going to transport y\/ e something to
you over new horizons show you
of literary experience...
Send your imagination flUiUlCl
soaring.
Come with us.

Friday, January 16,1970, The Florida Alligator,

in Public Relations at Colombia
University during academic year
1970-71 are asked to see Col.
G.A. Farris, International
Center.
PEACE CORPS
RECRUITERS will be on
campus Jan. 19-23 outside the
Games Rooms of Reitz Union.
NEW FOREIGN STUDENTS
and their wives are invited to a
winter quarter welcoming dinner
in the church hall of First
Baptist Church (425 W. Univ.
Ave.), Fri., Jan. 23, at 7:00 p.m.
If transportation is needed,
' contact International Center.
AMERICAN STUDENTS are
invited to consult the 1970
Directory of Overseas Summer
Jobs at International Center.

Page 15



Page 16

,Thu Florida AUtgstM;. Friday, January 16.1970

Pick A Flick: I
[Theyre 13 Here
On Her Majestys Secret Service A new James Bond (George
Lazenby) is killing people and just missing getting killed himself
several hundred times. At the Center One.
* *
Good Morning and Goodbye Russ Meyer who made Vixen
has a new one. It has a different leading chick who probably moans
throughout the thing. At the Center Two.
* *
The Reivers A good film about a boy coming closer to becoming
a man with the help of two friends. The three of them travel from
Jefferson, Miss., to Memphis and sleep in a whore house, trade their
borrowed car for an undependable race horse and do enough other
fun things to gently work you into the story and the story into you.
At the Plaza One.
* *
Camille 2000 Theres no advance information on this one except
the ads which say the film is about Camille and apparently about
every inch of her. At the Plaza Two.
* * w
The Quiller Memorandum This is a spy story and an exciting one.
It stars George SegaTlmd Alec Guinness. At the.Reitz Union.
* *
John and Mary lts a tender kind of movie that gains much of its
strength by keeping simple and by being technically sharp. Dustin
Hoffman and Mia Farrow are good. The supporting people are weak
(another dope smoking party sene), but they arent bad enough to
keep the movie from making you feel good. Its at the Florida.
* *
Birth of Triplets lf you like your women in surgical gowns and in
the delivery room, this ones for you. As if one child birth wouldnt
be enough, or even two not enough, there are THREE. Three, count
em three. Also on the program is Circle of Love and No Greater
Sin. At the Gainesville Drivein.
* *
Blow Up lts about a photographer and finally about a tennis
game. I once heard a lady in Orlando say it was about Communism.
At the Suburbia on the big screen with The Best House in London,
which aint about real estate.
* *
Alices Restaurant Arthur Penns neat little story about kids and
how they say theyd like to live. Its good with some moving parts. At
the. Penthouse One at Suburbia.
* *
The Graduate You know about The Graduate. Its about plastics.
Plastics. Its at the Penthouse Two at the Suburbia.
OUR STEAKS
ARE ALL
WELL DONE.
And done exactly to your liking.
We find out how you want your steak
before we do anything else. At Bonanza,
if you want medium rare you get
medium rare.
And all of our steaks are charcoal
broiled over an open fire. And what
steaks they are.
A delicious Ribeye steak for a
little over a buck. A sirloin strip for less
than two bucks. The best T-Bone in
town for less than three bucks.
Try a little tenderness tonight.
vnmwn
SIRLOIN PIT.

Free Pop Show Sunday

Lincoln High School
Auditorium will be the scene
Sunday afternoon for a free pop
music concert sponsored jointly
by the Aquarius and the Junior
Class at Lincoln.
The show is set to begin at 2
p.m. and last until about 6 p.m.
and will feature four bands.
A spokesman for Aquarius,
Larry Woldenberg, said early this
week that the show is being put
on, to promote a sense of
brotherhood in the community
and to have a good time.
There will be two soul bands
playing Millers Combo, a
Lincoln High School group; and
West of Prim, another local
soul band. Joe Whalens Jazz
The Go-Mads
fix
UNION DANCE
SATURDAY, JAN. 17,
UNION BALLROOM, 9:00
PM 1:00 AM. ADMISSION
25c. U of F STUDENT I.D.
NEEDED. SPONSORED BY
J.W.R.U.

Headquarters for
Art and
Journalism
Student
Supplies

Quintet will appear as well as
an unannounced hard rock
group.

EUROPE!
LUXEMBOURG-GERMANY
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June 17-Aug. 25 (70 full days)
$450. covers everything! This is
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sponsored by American Bicycle Ass.
LIMITED ENROLLMENT 372-8841
SMALL THINGS
COME IN
BIG PACKAGES
Hogg:.- .. :
Like Little Judy of the
Judy Miller Trio. Tonight
and Saturday. From 10-2.
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1222 W. University ^& 2i '-

PC*l"Pfv



The
Florida
Alligator

SAYS BARTLETT

Small Crowds Hurt Gators

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writer
Long lines curl around the
gym, students stand in line for
hours waiting to get the few
remaining tickets and a large
overflow crowd packs the gym
every game.
A description of student
support at the UF? Hardly.
With three home games
already gone the average
attendance is only 4,000, a drop
of over 2,000 students a game
from last year.
An added attraction for this
years games is the closed circuit
TV broadcasts to handle the
overflow of students when the
seating capacity of the gym was
cut to 5,100.
Even though the crowds at
the home games have cheered
and been enthusiastic the smaller
crowds have, according to head
basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett, hurt the team in small
ways.
The students caught on and
cheered during the last eight
minutes of the Kentucky game.
If they had cheered that way
during the first half it could have
been the miracle that we were
hoping for, Bartlett said.
We need students to come
out and see the team. This is a
young team and the school spirit
definitely has an effect.
When asked if the closed
circuit TV had any effect on
attendance, Bartlett said, Im
all for the closed circuit TV as
long as the gym is full. If the
gym is not full then they should
not have the closed circuit TV.
I certainly feel that if
someone wants to see us they
should be able to see the game in
some way.
The Gators, now on a road
trip, will return home for six
straight games beginning on Jan.
31, as they travel to West
Virginia University on Saturday.
West Virginia features a
running type of game
continually trying for the fast
break or a long pass.
The UWV Mountaineers are
sporting a 4-7 record while the
Gators will come into the game
with a 5-7 mark.
The Mountaineers are tall

WINTER BOWLING
LEAGUES ARE
ORGANIZING NOW
Call 392*1637 or come by the GAMES AREA and
fill out an application. Deadline for signup is Jan.
19,1970.

GATOR SPORTS

with Mike Hitz, a 7-foot-2-inch
senior starting at center, Mike
Truel, a 6-7 junior and Curt
Price, a 6-2 sophomore, will be
starting forwards. Starting
guards will be Dick Ramsey, a
Natter
3 4
CLIFF COX
... reserve strength
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
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60LF PAR 60
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HI e GOLF CLUBS RENTED
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iljfp* LESSONS AVAILABLE
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
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GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

6-3 junior and Will Robinson, a
6-1 sophomore.
Both Price and Hummel are
excellent on outside shots with
Truel leading the way in
rebounding.
The Gators have easily
defeated the Mountaineers the
past two years but this will be
the first time the Gators will
face the Mountaineers on their
home court in Morgantown.

OF GAINESVILLE
Our Semi- Annual
Stocktaking
Clearance
I c% I
Starting Monday
JANUARY 19 AT 9..30 A.M.
Save 1/4-1/3-1/2 A More
. k
I
This is a store wide clearance sale, I
when Wilsons cleans house of odd I
lots, broken sizes & color ranges and I
manufacturer discontinued styles, I
so shop early while selections are I
good. I
SHOP I
Wilsons
of Gainesville I
, MONDAY -SATURDAY *3O AM. -9 ML I

T STCAK SHAKC "!
Student Special
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' 5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
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10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771

Friday, JJnuiryi*. T9?O, TWFl6rtdrf AlHgaur,

Page 17



Page 18

Hi* Florid*Alligator, Friday, January ifc'VSTO

TAKE ON FSU
Swimmers Looking For Win

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF Swimming Team
travels to the very hostile
Tallahassee area to meet arch
rival Florida State Saturday
afternoon.
The Gators are expected to
come back strong from their loss
to Tennessee last week. Florida
is now 3-1 on the year with
victories over Georgia, Alabama,
and South Florida.
Much is made of the home
court advantage in basketball
but few realize that there is a
Ur-
A t
IB rPf
#1
GREG HARDEE
.. impressive against Vols
Hometowner
Signs At UF
Its been a few years since
Hank Foldberg, Jr. was starting
elementary school in Gainesville
and fans of UF football will be
elated when he returns in 1970
after an 11-year absence.
When young Hank left he was
six years old and a first grader.
He returns in September as a
Baby Gator football player
standing 6-5, weighing 220. He
plays tight end.
Foldberg is the son of former
Gator assistant football coach
Hank Foldberg, Sr., who also
served as head coach at Texas A
& M and Wichita.
Hank is one of the countrys
top blue-chip football players,
in the opinion of most observers.
He was Lineman of the Year in
Greater Atlanta, first team
All-State in Georgia and sought
by most major schools in the
country.

ieu
9 I
kicky fashions! j
wooden shoot from Sweden |
available in suede or leather. |
colours: beach, white, navy, |
and rad. $ 9. pr. |
the design shop j
3448 w. university ave. j
near the westgateshoppinfl^center^^^^^l

home pool advantage in
swimming.
This was exemplified last year
when the Gators beat the
Seminoles at Gainesville
63 1 /£-49V£ and then lost in
Tallahassee 60&-47}4. Most
coaches realize and privately
admit the advantage, but few
will use it as an excuse for losing
an away meet.
The home pool advantage
comes in several forms. First, the
visiting team often undergoes
some stress and strain during the
trip to the meet. Secondly,
extremely close races are often
decided in favor of the home
team.
The Gators received some
impressive showings last week
against Tennessee. Greg Hardee,
a Jacksonville freshman, finished
second behind Mark McKee in
both the 500 and 1000-yard
freestyles. In both races Hardee
trailed the pack but managed to
come from behind for second
place showings.
Another freshman, Gary
Chelosky, not only won the
200-yard breaststroke and
individual medley, but in
winning the breaststroke event,
qualified for the NCAA
championships.
Sophomore Steve Hairston
finished third against Tennessee,
but touched right along with the
first place finisher, losing by
\ung9
Excellence in Food
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376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

only two tenths of a second.
The Gators next home meet
will be against Florida State Feb.
14, following meets with the
tough University of North
Carolina, and North Carolina
State.
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Where the time of
your life is right
under your nose. I
M Vo Tonight and Saturday
V J
Tickets on sale
q the Union Box office,
Record Bar & The Rat
I I NEXT WEEK I
iiff Thursday Saturday I
wm
I TGIF Every Friday Night I
I Beer 15< a glass & PLUS SI.OO a pitcher I

I Trader Toms
Free Keg Fri.
8:30 til out
Emergency Exit
No Cover j
same for Sat.
Band Armpit Experience |

Dialogue with Theologue
The [hMSsrou:
Methodist Output Northern lews
If d
Pastor of Church
FRIDAY, JAN.HH), 4*oo P.M.
Room Union
iMeeerid by J- Reitz Union and University Religious Aim.

over 450. Buy J
Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom
reloading. Harry Beckwith,
gun dealer, Micanopy.
466-3340. _*



Turnout For Televised Game Low

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Correspondent
Student response has been Cool to the WUFT
closed circuit television broadcasts of UF basketball
games, according to head counts from Kappa Alpha
pledge ushers on the scene.
Dave Curran, KA pledge president, reported 161
students have visited the 35 TV outlets situated in
McCarty Hall, Norman Hall, the GENESYS
Engineering Building and Little Hall to view three
home games-
There are 1,473 seats available in the areas,
according to the Office of the Registrar.
The idea for the free on-campus telecasts for UF
students came from UF Student Government action
when it was learned that the Florida Gym seating
capacity was being cut because of fire hazards.
At the urging of Student Government, the
Athletic Department contracted four home games
with the Universitys television station to
compensate for the reduced capacity. This was
destined to be necessary, if the Gators matched
their 1968-69 winning season.
Although the winning season has yet to
materialize, the team has won two out of the three
televised games.
The team appreciates the fine support of the
student body, Basketball Head Coach Tommy
Bartlett said. But Id rather not have the games

?' INTRAMURALS
§ i. *
Referee Famine Hits
V kj
BY STEVE ROHAN "*

OFFICIALS NEEDED
Between 40 and 60 officials are
needed for volleyball and several
are needed to officiate for
basketball.
Anyone interested should call
392-0581 or sign up in room
229 of the Florida <}ym.
LAW LEAGUE A new twist
may be seen this year in Law
league basketball one team
may be seen to be guarding
itself.
According to team organizer
Howard Wizard Coker,
everybody on the team likes to
shoot. Hot shooting guard
Jimmy Roberts says that if the
ball hits his hands, Im going to
wing it.
Coker said that everybody
Why Do
You Read
So Slowly?
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple technique
of rapid reading which should
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According to this publisher,
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To acquaint die readers of this
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HEAD COUNT TOTALS 161

was going to stay outside and
shoot and only Mingo Teper
would rebound. Teper reported
that if he gets the ball the other
guys on the team would never
see it.
Coker said there would be no
defense. The best defense is a
good offense. 1 wonder what
Tennessee coach Ray Mears
would say about that.
DORM BASKETBALL
South 111 dosed out last quarter
in a big way by copping the
Dorm League All Campus
Basketball Championship with a
stunning 6849 win over Glunt
section of Hume Area.
Qww a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

televised unless the game is a sellout.
The only reported near capacity crowd of 5,100
came to see second-ranked Kentucky last Saturday
night. One-hundred and nine attended the
broadcast.
A slim group of 18 viewed the initial broadcast of
the Alabama game while the most recent home
game with Tennessee claimed 34.
If students dont fill the gym you cant expect
them to attend the broadcasts, observed Dr.
Kenneth A. Christiansen, director of WUFT.
But the Athletic Department provided the
contract to serve the interest of the student, he
added.
Dr. Christiansen estimated each broadcast costs
the Athletic Department from S4OO-SSOO.
Curran noted that students understandably would
rather see the games in person, but even interested
students may face obstacles.
In two Little Hall rooms, supposedly to be used
for a game, I found one had a study hall and
another had a class, he said.
__ Curran said he expected better attendance at the
final telecast on Feb. 4 with LSU because of the
Tigers prolific scorer Pete Maravich.
Will broadcasts continue next year if student
support doesnt improve?
Theres been no talk of it, said Robert Estes,
producer and director of the games. The Athletic
Department contracted four games with us, thats
all we know.

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Friday, January 16,1970, Tha Florida AHifator,

Ths Merchandise Mart
240 f SW 13t VHton Square
Everyday bargains
Towels 49c to $1.89
Sheets, bedspreads, etc.
Open Mon Sat 9-6
Sunday 1-6

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 16,1970

c.t 5k.,4 8..k.u,. BONANZA
SIRLOIN PIT
a£ Check Our List | J "Congratulates the
V ForYourNeeds PLAYER of the WEEK p| ay er of the Week
Come get your FREE
Mascot Stationary
Film and Developing 1L j I
SATURDAY 9-12 2445 S.W. 13 ST..
BRANCH STORES Medical Center, |j < open 11 am 9 pm
Hero Worshipers:
iS k 1 Capt. Wishbone, that flamboyant
1 MEf# m 1 crusader for plump, juicy WISHBONE
S F! 1 fried chicken, way
I 3L s| she hearts of millions of Americans
I Sf every day. At the same time, that
I HHHIHBIBHMm plump, juicy WISHBONE fried
chicken is finding its way into their
yV d 00130 18 They are very happy
This week's player of the week goes to Gator V
scoring ace Andy Owens, who dropped a 10-foot //
r a jump shot with 54 seconds left in the overtime JBT^H
Of Q vnAINwC period, to upset Tennessee, 57-56. vajj^pr
Owens, a 6-foot-5 senior from Tampa, is
m I currently nation's 11th leading scorer with an
trOITI the average of 29.0 points per game.
Prior to the Tennessee game, Andy scored 36
- qw points against second ranked Kentucky, despite
U KUINAK Y fouling out with eight minutes left in the game.
a UNIVERSITY
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