Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I
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Br ?_># "
MARCHING YOUTH
The symbols of youth in the '6os wort demonstrators, marching,
titting-in, occupying buildings. These students participated in the
"Mnrch Against Death" in Washington, a prelude to the largest
demonstration of the decade last Nov. 15.

Christian Wants
School Tax Hike

By United Prat International
State Education
Commissioner Floyd Christian,
defying precedent that tax
increases in an election year spell
political suicide, went on record
Tuesday for additional taxes for
schools and predicted the people
would accept a fair tax hike.
Christian fired off a letter to
House Speaker Fred Schulta,
D-Jacksonville, telling Schultz
his public stand against new
taxes was unreasonable.
Christian said additional taxes

Housing Proposals Made

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Wrttar
Two Interhall Council
proposals for policy changes to
he written into the housing
contract for the coning year
were sent to rsubcommittee for
study by the university Housing
Committee' Tuesday. The
proposals include 24-hour open
house in the Towers area.
Interhall President Sue
Johnson said she has been told
that the referral to the
subcommittee will not
necessarily keep the changes
from being enacted in next
years housing contracts.
The proposals suggest that
stipulations be included in the
contract pertaining to the hours
of visitation in a said dorm and
that three choices be included
specifically in the contract.
The choices would leave one
THE CRISIS of environment
is discussed by Hugh
Emmons, the Alligators new
environment editor... .page 2
nHtoiU ................... i>
' Eatart5JaaiMt............... IS
Movias w.. v ................ IS
Sin ell Society .... 4
IfFm neeiiusin *|
* Jj
:

SPECIAL EDITION
A New Decade: UF In The '7os

are necessary because of a
financial squeeze on the schools
brought on by inflation, federal
cutbacks and the new property
tax limitations imposed by the
Florida legislature.
Schultz, a candidate for the
UJS. Senate, said during a special
session in December and
repeated at a news conference
over the weekend that tax
increases this year are out. He
said he has notified leaders of all
state departments to cut back
their budget requests to the

dorm with no visitation or open
house hours, one dorm, the
Towers, with no limitation on
visitation hours other than those
set by the individual suites and
seven remaining dorms operating
under the present system of
hours.
It was further recommended
for the Towers to be limited to
upperclassmen and students 21
year? old on a first-come
fast-served basis.
Also recommended is that
once the choice is made, there

VnM
YOUR FATHERS MOUSTACHE

An old decade has ended. A new decade begins. The past
10 years were tumultous years, marked with violence, war
and division. *
What will the new decade bring?
To review and comment on the last 10 years and to
project possibilities for the future, the Alligator is bringing
to OF this special edition on the 70s. The second section of
today's {paper contains reviews of the past 10 years, the
growth of UF and our perspective for the future. \

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 64

1970 legislature which meets in
April.
Christian, who is expected to
run for reelection this year,
asked Schultz where is the
money going to come from to
take eve of a five per cent
enrollment increase in the
schools in September.
kindergarten through graduate
school amounts to $944.2
million, a 17.57 per cent
increase over this year.

will be no dorm changes because
of the visitation hours.
With its proposals, Interhall
outlined arguments for
unrestricted open house in the
-Towers. The design of the
dorms, the more mature age of
the residents, encouragement of
individual responsibility and the
current trends on other
campuses in housing rules were
all cited.
We think we are staying
(SEE'HOUSING'PAGE 2)

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville wtLskJ /

Socialist
Goes Free
Socialist Edward James Fine had his sentence of probation
continued Jan. 9, thereby defeating an attempt by the State
Attorneys office to have his probation revoked.
The charges against Fine were leaving the county of
residence, a violation of probation: procuring marijuana, and a
charge of associating with bad characters, later dropped by
the prosecution.
The case stems from an event last April when Fine and other
antiwar activists leafleted Cecil Field Naval Air Station, near
Jacksonville, inviting servicemen to attend a peace march on
April 6.
This constituted the first violation, the state contended.
Several servicemen did attend the march and the state alleged
Fine had procured marijuana for them and participated in a
pot party.
Circuit Court Judge John J. Crews ruled that leaving the
county was not a material reason for revoking Fines
probation.
He also ruled the allegations concerning marijuana had not
been proved.
The judge noted the political implications of the case when
he said that, although it was well known that Fine had political
and social beliefs different from his own, this would not be a
consideration in his decision.
This decision came on the third day of a hearing which began
Nov. 29. During the course of the hearing, many supporters of
Fine attended, one day amounting to almost 300 people.
The defense admitted Fine had left Alachua County to
distribute leaflets. However, Defense Attorney Richard Wilson
contended that Fine misunderstood instructions. Both Fine and
his wife, Linda, testified to this. r
The state supported its allegations concerning drugs with a
statement by a sailor saying Fine had supplied him with drugs.
The statement was supplied by the Office of Naval Intelligence
(ONI).
The statement, however, was unsigned and the sailor denied,
under oath, ever making it. He also testified he had been
threatened by Navy authorities if he didnt cooperate.
The state also hrnnjhf a Jeanette Cursio from Jacksonville.
She testified she had accompanied the sailors on the date in
question and had participated in a pot party at Fines house
on April S.
At this party, she testified, Fine allegedly asked the sailors if
they would sabotage (guided) missies, procure for Fine hand
grenades so (he) would have something to throw at peace
marches, and offered to put the sailors on an underground
railroad to Canada.
The defense brought as witnesses John Sugg and Linda Fine.
They testified that Fine had been at a wedding all day long and,
that night, had been working on the construction of a peace
monument for use in the parade the next day.
r At no time, defense witnesses testified, had Fine participated
in the alleged events or even had time to do so.
The defense also contended that Mias Cursio was being cued
by an ONI agent present in court. It was also brought out by
Wlson that Miss Cursio was dear about the alleged events,
which had happened month earlier and while she was I
stoned, because die had been supplied with a statement by
ONL
In addition, the sailors allegedly involved all denied the
ocevMflce of the events described by Mias Currio.
(SEE 'SOCIALIST' PAGE 2)



Page 2

> TAm FLnrVt*- antii.

By HUGH EMMONS
Alligator Environment Editor
So just what's going on anyhow? Air pollution
is nothing new, and we've known about water
contamination for years. So why all the new
groups concerned with environmental
problems.
During the past few months there has been a
steady increase in the number of groups which
have organized specifically out of growing
concern for the environment in which we live.
Unlike organizations which have demanded an
end to water and air pollution, these new groups
focus their attention on environmental quality.
In Gainesville and on the UF campus there are
several organizations which are concerned with
the question of environment either as a basic
platform or as a modification of their original
purpose
Just as the quality control department of a
large auto manufacturer is concerned with the
reliability of a completed car, environmental
groups look at the total capacity and quality of
the world around us.
These groups are working towards a common
goal, even though they may be taking two
different routes in attempting to solve the
problem. On one hand there are those who are
concerned with population, and on the other are
those v concerned with resources, including
wildlife. Their common goal is to find a balance
between man and nature.
To ignore either of these factors is impossible
since it has become quite clear that the number
of people who can live productively in any one
area, country, or. world is limited by the
resources available to support them.
What has not been understood thus far is that

Health Center Robbed

V " *
*"* J **. .
Thieves pried open a glass door early Monday and
made off with 5952.14 in cash from the gift shop in
the lobby of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
Veda Webb, gift shop manager tokl University
Police the burglars walked off with the shop's
weekend receipts and a small amount of cash stored
in a box under the counter.
UPD investigator Gene E. Watson said the cash
register had been moved into a back storage room
where the thieves attempted to pry open the
drawer.
It was purely an unprofessional job," Watson

Interhall Asks For Open Housing

Ejfbom PACE 0
abreast of the present trend of
getting away from in loco
parentis* and of changing a
university from a shielded
indealistic institution to one
faced with the problems of the
real world and one equipped
with students who have
gradually accepted this change
and are willing to try to find
solutions to these problems,
Miss Johnson stated in the
proposals.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
?! ,r uthor - Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
* on Bu,,d,n University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of ail advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable-
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertidWr . ~

Environmental Planning A Must
Q

Support was also shown for
the minority who may not wish
the privileges of open house
hours and prefer not to have

Socialist Goes Free

PARE OWE^jl
- V irH -Vf'v i v
Fine has been a civil rights
and antiwar activist in
Gainesville since 1962. At one
time a prominent figure in SDS,

Environmental groups are looking for
neither doomsday prophets or wild-eyed
radicals to assist them in making their point
with the public. Plans are now underway to
present the question of environmental
5 quality to every discipline. . on campus.
>x*x*x*x xx*x*x x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x x*x*x*x*x*x*xx*x*x
the planet Earth is fast approaching this level of
population and pollution, and will shortly be
faced with many major, if not catastrophic,
problems.
According to at least one Florida politician the
whole question of environmental quality has
become the apple pie and motherhood issue
for the 7os, and unless elected officials begin to
take action they are liable to be passed over for
those candidates who are willing to face the
problem.
Americans are begining to wake up to the
problem of environmental quality. News
coverage can't help but follow this lead and it's

said. "They couldn't even pry open4he drawer, All
they had to do was push a button to open the
register.
Mrs. Webb said sll7 was left in the unopened
drawer.
Watson said some fingerprints were taken at the
scene but it's too early to determine if they'll be of
any use in the investigation.
We have no suspects at this time, however, we're
in contact with some possible witnesses to the
crime, Watson said.

guests of the opposite sex in the
living areas. These students will
be offered the choice of a dorm
designated as such an area.

he is now active in the Young
Socialist Alliance.
He holds a masters degree in
education from UF and was
originally convicted of
possession of marijuana and
placed on probation last
January.

214 N.W. 13th st.
376-6472
ranucii noacMCKBi dr\ Vl I
| 3 Pc. Chicken
Mashed Potatoes
| and Gravy
r Cole Slaw and
Rolls ... i_,

WEDNESDAY COUPON SPECIAL

Kntukn fried /Men

becoming tairiy common to find at least one
story a day in every major paper in the country,
dealing with pollution, or environment.
The new environmental groups are developing
programs which will give concerned individuals
the opportunity to do something about the
problems they face locally and in their state.
Pouring out information doesnt seem to be
the key because it is too quickly forgotten. The
answer lies in teaching people how to use the
information and draw conclusions from which
they can work.
Idealism plays an important role in this
movement, as does youth, of which there is an
adequate supply of both on a university campus.
Still more important than either of these,
however, is the relevancy of the issue which is
begining to make itself felt in cities and reral
areas across the country.
The point these groups are trying to get across
has been summarized by Stanford ecologist, Dr.
Paul Ehrlich.
It is the top of the ninth inning. Man, always
a threat at the plate, has been hitting Nature
hard. It is important to remember, however, that
Nature Bats Last.
Environmental groups are looking for neither
doomsday prophets or wild-eyed radicals to assist
them in making their point with the public.
Plans are now underway to present the
question of environmental quality to every
discipline and department on campus. Whether it
be politics, law, or research, there is a need for
concerned individual involvement in all of these
groups.
A lot will be said and written about the
problems that have made their organizations
necessary.

Vets To Get
' > ...
More Benefits

A bill has been prefiled in the
1970 Florida Legislature which
would give educational bonuses
to Florida veterans who iedeve
educational benefits from the
Federal G. I. Bill.
The bill, filed by Sen. Cliff
Reuther, of the 30th District,
would use $S million of state
funds to exempt veterans from
paying a substantial part of
their tuition for the 1970-71
fiscal year. It would take effect
July 1,1970. Schools recognized
under the federal bill would also
be accepted by the Florida
G. I. Bill
Any person who was a
permanent Florida resident for
one year immediately preceding
his entry into the service, and
who qualifies for educational
assistance under the federal
program is eligible.
There are about 18,000
ex-Gfs attending Florida schools
and a 10 per cent increase is
expected each year.

DINNER
BOX
BRING COUPON

The annual cost of the
system, $25,000, is financed by
federal funds under the Library
Services and Construction Act.
The amount of the bonus set
by the Board of Education is
based on the registration fees
established for institutions in the
state.
Mtm-rosra
(the 7OS
ARE UNSAFE
AT ANY SPEED
*
(HS m CARS; THE &\RS)
a

114 S.W. 34th St.
372-3649 i
99C:
Reg. 1.25 I



SHAME ON YOU
Believe it or not, this picture wasn't taken during the tenth week off
class last quarter; it was the first week of class this quarter. We could
say shame on this girl for yawning so dispiritedly during class, but
then we would have to say the same for our photographer, Pete
Knocke, who could think of nothing better to do but take pictures.
New Lending Service
Comes To UF Libraries

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Monday became one
of eight universities, along with
four mqmcipal libraries, to
participate in a new statewide
booklending system via teletype
machine.
The system will cut out days,
even weeks, of book-searching
for persons around the state,
UF*s Director of Libraries G. A.
Harrer said.
If a person cannot find a book
he wants in a participatmg
library the librarian wiD step
over to the teletype for
instantaneous transmission with
the Florida State Library. If it is
not in then 190,000 book
collection the request will be
forwarded by teletype to the
other 11 participating libraries.
The book will then be mailed
promptly to the library which
requested it, if it is in stock.
The teletype system is not
new to UF, which has made
routine exchanges with FSU as
well as with major research
libraries across the nation for
several yean.
But this state-wide system
could have one of two effects on
UFs system, Harrer said.
By making UF material more
avaiiable to the outside, it might
increase the use and
consequently decrease their
availability to the UF
community, hie said.
On the other hand, and this I
suspect is more likely, Harrer
said, it could cut down the use

Teddy Bear Nursery
I fc* Divided into seven age groups. OPEN 7
- a.m. to 6 p.m., Sat., also Night
Babysitting 6 to 12 p.m. FREE pick up
T \ and delivery to all schools.

of UF materials from outside
since libraries will search their
own stocks more thoroughly
before asking the UF.
In the past there was no
regular syrtem -of exhausting
resources at public libraries, and
more often than not a request
was automatically forwarded to
the UF as the major research
center before writing to other
sources first, he explained.
Secretary of State Tom-
Adams, who oversees the state
library system under the recent
governmental reorganization act,
called the system a giant step
forward toward better
utilization of our all-too-limited
book resources in Florida.
The network includes four
large city public libraries: Miami,
Tampa, Jacksonville and
Orlando. University libraries on
the hookup are the UF, FSU,
Miami, Florida Atlantic, Florida
A&M, South Florida, West
Florida and Florida
Technological University in
Orlando.

FREE FOR COEDS
Measles Test Available

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator outt writer
UF coeds interested in
learning whether they are
susceptible to German measles
can be tested for free on
Thursday and Friday.
Dr. Richard J. Hildebrandt,
assistant professor of obstetrics
and gynecology in the College of
Medicine urged women students
to take advantage of this
opportunity.
Coeds found susceptible will
be offered a chance to take a
new vaccine recently developed
to combat German measles.
Women who want to be tested
should report to room 118 Reitz
Union between 11 a.m. and 1
pm Thursday, or between 11
am and 6 pm Friday.
Hildebrandt said immediate
concern about the illness has
been aroused for two reasons:
First, German measles, also
known or three-day
measles, ir contracted early in
pregnancy, can cause deafness,
mental retardation and other
serious birth defects in infants.
Second, there have been
forecasts recently of a serious
Mr. Ray's
STYLE & BARBER SHOP
Haircuts from $2.00 UP.
We Specialize in Long hair.
Appointments Available.
Four Barbers to serve you.
112fTW. UNIV. AVE. 372-3678

-M ; .
'; ; ,
SUMMER
CHARTER FLIGHT
TAMPA TO AMSTERDAM
APPROXIMATELY JUNE 21
AMSTERDAM TO TAMPA
APPROXIMATELY SEPT. 5
* 218.25
PLUS $lO. ADMINISTRATIVE FEE
OPEN TO UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
\
' \
STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF & IMMEDIATE FAMILIES
il # M 1 :v>.' :
I "If you" aTe Interested in this*fught, j
I FILL THIS OUT A RETURN IT TO:
I AIESEC-FLORIDA
| 2 COLLEGE OF BUS. ADM. I
| NAME
I
ADDRESS |
I
| PHONE T mml

epidemic of the disease in this
country within the next year or
two.
Over and above our scientific
interest in the information

Walk-Up Postage Service ~
OKd By Planning Board
Student Governments request to install walk-up postal units on
campus has been approved by the Campus Planning and Land Use
Committee.
The facilities will be completely automated, Student Body
President Charles Shepherd said, providing stamps and other
materials at their actual price, not the higher price one pays when
using most postage machines.
Due to the Post Office Departments shortage of units, only one
can be installed at this time. The exact location is still under
consideration.
The Campus Planning and Land Use Committee has approved
several other SG-fmanced requests.
The proposal to continue development of Ravine Park, located
between Graham area and the Reitz Union, was approved.
Fences sue under consideration to be installed over the top of the
backwalls and extending across part of the sidewalls on campus
handball courts. A trial installation of the retaining walls is to be built
at the Norman Hall handball court site.
Temporary parking facilities for the residents of Towers have been
arranged white the current parking lot is being landscaped.
A proposal to build two tennis courts in the Hume Hall area was
postponed until the rest of a total recreational development in this
area is completed.

McGuire Trophy & Engraving
Univenity headquarter s for
MUG SPECIALTIES
COMPLETE SERVICE SHOPPE
ENGRAVING TROPHIES
NAME TAGS RING SIZING
DESK PLAQUES SIGNS
RUBBER STAMPS
- 24 Hr. SERVICE
CLOCK AND WATCH REPAIR
1706 W. UNIVERSITY 37S4S1S

wwmj v

derived from the rubella studies,
university coeds have an
excellent opportunity to
determine their susceptibility to
the disease at no cost to them.

(f MAtpNES 1
H| Book and Supply H
HI 1712 w\niversity ffl
H TEXTBOOKS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES I
H ART SUPPLIES
HI ENGINEERING
11. SUPPLIES
|J£USTOMER PARKING
~ 1 I

Page 3



Page 4

The

Student Jailed
A UF business administration major became disturbed at a
Gainesville utility crew early Monday and spent the day in jail on
aggravated assault charges.
Michael Hogan, 4BA, awoke and saw the crew trimming trees in
front of his residence on N. W. 4 Ave.
Hogan allegedly began throwing water balloons and firing a blank
pistol at the city workers who summoned police.
The student was in Gainesville city jail late Monday awaiting
arraignment in municipal court.

FOR UNION BALLROOM 1
' Sensitivity Conference Set

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writar
The Tenth Annual Personality Theory and
Counseling Practice Conference entitled
Sensitivity: I and Thou expects about 1,000
educators, counselors, psychiatrists, social workers,
and psychologists from the nation and Canada in
attendance at the Reitz Union ballroom, Thursday
through Saturday.
Highlighting the conference will be an original
play, The Heaven Mother, by the Academy
Theatre of Atlanta, noted for its ability to actively
involve audiences.
Abo planned are a poetry and color slide
presentation by Didier Graeffe, of the department
of humanities, and a lecture on Sensitivity I by
Dr. Everett L. Shostrom, director of the Institute of

Books Sold
Listed Below
The Student Government
Book Exchange has completed
its sale for this quarter.
If your book number appears
in the list below, a check will be
mailed to you in about two
weeks. Unsold books may be
claimed today. Bring yout
receipt. The exchange will be
open from 1-5 p.m. on the
colonade of the ground floor of
the Union for students to
reclaim their books.
371-1 399-9 442-2 493-1 725-1
371-2 400-1 442-3 493-3 725-2
371- 400-2 4429 494-9 727-1
372- 400-3 446-5 495-2 729-2
372- 400-4 446-7 495-4 7->9-3
373- 400-5 447-11 498-1 7294
3724 4006 448-1 498-3 732-1
372-5 400-7 448-2 499-1 732-5
372-9 406 448-5 499-2 732-6
372- 407-2 448-7 499-3 732-8
373- 407-3 448-8 500-1 732-9
373-2 407-5 449-2 502-5 733-1
373-3 408-7 449-3 502-8 734-5
373-7 409-1 451-3 502-9 735-5
373- 409-2 451-7 502-10 375-7
374- 411-3 451-9 503-2 735-8
373-3 413-2 452-1 506-5 736-1
373-4 413-7 452-2 506-7 738-1
376-5 413-9 454-4 506-10 738-2
376-10 414-3 454-1 507-1 738-4
376-12 414-5 455-3 507-4 738-5
376-14 414-4 457-1 510-1 739-8
376-15 414-11 457-2 5108 742-1
376- 415-2 457-3 5109 744-1
377- 415-3 457-6 512-1 7448
377-4 416-1 459-2 512-3 744.9
377- 416-2 461 513-2 745.1
378- 4164 462 515-1 745.9
378-2 41610 463-3 5161 745-11
378- 417 4634 5163 745.13
379- 417-1 463-5 5166 745.14
3794 4174 463-6 517-1 7462
3798 4201 464-5 519-2 747-7
3801 4202 465-5 522-1 7478
3803 4203 468-1 522-2 747-16
3802 4204 468-2 522-3 748-1
380 4 4214 469-5 523 748.2
382 421-5 4698 5244 748.3
383- 422-1 4706 5248 748-7
384- 423 47010 704-5 748-9
384-12 424-2 47012 705-1 748-13
384- 424-3 47013 707-1 748-14
385- 427-2 471-1 707-3 749-2
385- 427-2 471-2 709-1 7501
386- 427-3 472-1 7101 7504
3865 4261 472-2 712-1 7505
3867 4262 473-5 7144 7507
38610 4263 473-6 715-3 7509
38612 4264 473-7 7161 751-1
3862 4265 476 7164 751-2
2863 4266 477-1 717-1 751-3
3894 4261 477-2 712-2 752-9
3866 4301 4762 717-3 753-1
391-1 4302 4801 7174 753-2
391- 4303 4803 7161 7561
392- 4307 481-2 7162 7563
392-2 4308 482-1 7161 757-1
392- 431-1 4834 7194 759-1
393- 4363 483-6 7167
393-2 4365 483-7 7168
3961 4369 4863 7169
3963 43611 4869 71610
3964 43614 48611 719-11
397-1 4361 48612 71612
397-2 437 48615 722-1
3961 439-2 485-1 723-2
3962 441-1 487-1 723-3
3984 441-6 4861 7234
3967 4418 488-2 723-5
39610 441-10 4861 7238
39611 441-13 4901 723-7
3967 442-1 492-1 7261
IP W' V

Theraputic Psychology at Santa Ana, Calif.
Conference chairman b Dr. Ted Landsman, of the
College of Educations department of personnel
services. It is sponsored by Personnel Services,
Counselor Education, in the College of Education,
the University' Committee on Public Functions, the
department of religion, psychology, and sociology
and the Division of Continuing Education and
Special Programs.
Saturday morning will follow a theme of
Sensitivity in Sexual Relationships with Dr.
Sydney Jourard, of the UF department of
psychology, Dr. Thomas Hanna and Dr. Marilyn
Zweig, of the department of philosophy, and Dr.
Sharon Price of the University of Tulsa Department
of sociology, participating.

Do you think
a bright young engineer
should spend
his most imaginative years on
the same assignment?
Neither do we.

Thats why we have a two twoyear
year twoyear Rotation Program for
graduating engineers who
would prefer to explore several
technical areas. And that's why
many of our areas are organ organized
ized organized by functionrather than
by project.
At Hughes, you might
work on spacecraft, communi communications
cations communications satellites and/or tacti tactical
cal tactical missiles during your first
two years.
All you need is an EE, ME
or Physics degree and talent.

Some oi the current openings at Hughes:

Microwave & Antenna Engineers
Electro-Optical Engineers
Microcircuit Engineers
Space Systems Engineers
Missile Systems Engineers
Guidance & Controls Engineers
Spacecraft Design Engineers
Weapon Systems Engineers
Components & Materials Engineers
Circuit Design Engineers
Design Engineers

Hie small society by Bridgman
I'LL -SAY OHB TWIN<& THeY
THB VoHTT Lib
lVb oh TV- ANY

§
-
If you qualify, well arrange for
you to work on several different
assignments... and you can
help pick them.

For additional information,
please contact your College
Placement Director or write:
Mr. Robert A. Martin
Head of Employment
Hughes Aerospace Divisions
11940 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Culver City, California 90230
U.S. Citizenship is required
An equal opportunity employer

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Mine 17-Auj. 25 (70 full days)
$450. covers everything! This is
a student orgenized Bicycle Tour
sponsored by Americen Bicycle Ass.
LIMITED ENROLMENT 372-8841

i 1
CAMPUS
| INTERVIEWS
! January 28 j
Contact College Placement
Office to arrange interview
! appointment
i

You may select special specialized
ized specialized jobs, or broad systems systemstype
type systemstype jobs. Or you can choose
not to change assignments if
youd rather develop in-depth
skills in one area.
Either way, we think
youll like the Hughes ap approach.
proach. approach.
It means youll become
more versatile in a shorter
time. n
(And your j HUGHES i
salary will
show it HUGHES aircraft company
oiivvv 11./ akrobpack divisions



By ROBIN ADAMS
In late Oct. 1969 four UF students came back
from a HEW conference in Washington D. C. and
formed the Enviommental Action Group (EAG).
t oday EAG has more than 200 members and is
broadening its future plans.
Hugh Emmons, one of the four foundling
members of EAG, said, I equate EAG with the
black movement. When the young of the United
States becomes tired of the way the establishment
handles a situation they take it into their own
hands. I dont mean EAG is a violent group. But it
does want to try to improve conditions in the
enviomment faster than has been done.
As one written source of EAG says, EAG fe
concerned with the grave crisis facing the
enviomment and quality of life in the United
States.
This grave crisis may pertain to anything from
the over-use of pesticides, to air and water pollution,
to sounds produced by supersonic transport planes.

MORE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
SAMSON Meeting Set To Recruit

By DOUG OLANDER
Alligator Corrwpondent
SAMSON is organizing for a new quarter of volunteer community
service with a meeting for all present and prospective volunteers to he
held Thursday at 7:30 p. m. in Walker auditorium.
Now in its second year, SAMSON is hoping to attract more
volunteers than the 250 placed by the organization last fall. As many
volunteers as we get we can place. There are never enough, said
chairman Marsha Kaufman.
In fact, SAMSOhTs basic problem has always been a lack of
volunteers. Were certainly one of the largest campus organizations,
commented Miss Kaufman, but when you look at 250 people, that's
not very many out of 20,000.
In the past, the organization has been primarily a tutoring service
for poor youngsters and this is still its largest function. Increasingly
however, with the growth of SAMSON has come initiation of
programs in other areas such as adult education; day care centers;
girlsdetention school; community construction, (a new community
center is the current project); community association, which sends
volunteers to neighborhood organization meetings to see where
SAMSON can help; patterning, (helping children with physical
rehabilitation); and a community center program.
Volunteers may spend as much time as they want in whichever
program they are involved. Miss Kaufman estimates that most

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Plant Broaden
As EAG Grows
Students in the United States, says one EAG
pamphlet, Are concerned and uniquely well-suited
to take initiatives in exploring with all citizens the
problems created by mans growing impact upon his
enviroment.
There are three general goals of EAG:
to disseminate general environmental
information
to assist in organizing activities that will
contribute t 6 environmental education
to provide a clearinghouse that will direct
individuals
to specific environmental groups in which
efforts and abilities can be utilized.
EAG has several methods of implementing its
goals. Fact sheets, films and a regular newspaper are

volunteers spend much more, adds Bert Simon, program director.
Rather than plan programs to present to the community, SAMSON
responds completely to community requests, of which there have
always been more than could be filled. Often the organization works
closely with VISTA volunteers. It is not, however, an anti-poverty
program, as it tries to answer requests made by all people.
The volunteers pay is the satisfaction he gets. Miss Kaufman feels
that the greatest satisfaction is the relationship set up with the
child. She recounts instances of past volunteers becoming very close
to families with whom they worked. But for Simon, the
understanding the volunteer receives is the greatest asset. He says
SAMSON is a learning process.
But satisfaction does not come without its frustrations. Simon
notes that volunteers are often quickly discouraged. The greatest and
most severe problem, he said, is that most of the programs involve
work entailing a very, very slow process in terms of seeing results.
The same problem has been noted by Miss Kaufman in the past.
Some volunteers who have never gone into a ghetto before think that
because they tutor their kid today, many of them, (the kids), are
going to wake up tomorrow and get straight As.
SAMSON has unlimited potential, but the number of volunteers is
the factor determining its success, she said. There are always enough
problems but never enough volunteers.
Further information on SAMSON can be obtained at the SAMSON
office on the third floor of the Reitz Union or by calling 392-1673.

Wedneeday

already in me to ** Aoae interested abreast enviromental developments in Gainesville and
elsewhere.
The forthcoming project of EAG is to produce a
day on Floridas Environment during Accent 1970.
George Gardner, a charter member of EAG said,
knowing that Accent needed some big name
speakers EAG agreed to get them eight speakers for
one-fourth of the Accent budget. We have actually
gotten them about IS or 16 speakers.
Arthur Godfrey, Gene Marine, author
of*America the Raped, Kenneth Watt author of
Ecology and Resource Management and General
Clark chief of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers,
will be speaking.
In accordance with similiar groups on campuses
throughout the nation,EAG is planning a teach-in
on April 22. It is hoped according to EAG materials
to have a dramatic impact on the environmental
conscience of the nation. It is also hoped to
establish quality on a par with quantity as a goal of
American life.

I Gator Gets |!
I i;
i: New Editor 1
I I
$ Hugh Emmons of the
Environmental Action Group |:j
has been named environment
§ editor of the Florida
v Alligator, Editor Raul:*:
: Ramirez said Sunday.
His job will be toij:
> coordinate all news about £
% #.
problems of environment for
:j: the Alligator. This is the first
time the Alligator has had an :
environment editor. jj:
:* This is an area of growing :
:j interest among students, £
faculty and administrators,
:j Ramirez said. In an effort to $
: keep up with the times, we j
have appointed an editor for j:
j: what seems to be one of the
i; most crucial problems of the ?
J times. £

Page 5



Page 6

ttjhm Florido

EXPANSION IS KEY TO NEXT TEN
Health CenterTo Double In Decade

By DAVE OSIER
Amgno? oiiTT vvrtttr
With the next four months UF's J.
HOlis Miller Health Center should be on
its way to becoming the states largest
medical complex, rivaling the best in the
Southeast.
In the first half of this decade, the
facility will more than double its size,
both in worth and floor space. And with
completion of long range plans, the
center will ultimately link up to the
Psychology-Life Sciences complex along
a landscaped recreation and parking
mall stretching down what is now a
hilly, wooded area between Center
Drive and Newell Drive.
Valued now at about $23 million, by
1973 with file completion of a $33
million fedenl and state funded
expansion program, the center wfll
house the states first dental college,
coupled with an enlarged medical school
enrollment of 100 new students
annually.
That expansion project, called Phase
I, indudes $19.7 million in federal
funds, the largest chunk ever awarded
Florida higher education. The state
monies amount to sl3 million, provided
with no new taxes from the sale of
bonds authorized by the Higher
Education Building Amendment,
approved by the voters in November,
6-1.
However, it is well understood by
medical educators, among them former
Health Center Provost Samuel P. Martin,
that the program covers only immediate
pressing needs.
Health care requirements, in fact,
make the program obsolescent before
construction even begins. And if one
wen to produce a forecast for the
1970 s it would probably indude an
intensified campaign from the centers
medical educators pleading for more
money not only to beef up existing
programs, but also to fund new ones.
Such a prediction is not hard to make
when Floridas health needs are
analyzed.
Due to growing population, the state
must have 300 new medical students per
year, based on current conservative
estimates. It rates 37th in the nation in
the number of entering medical students
per 100,000 population, while in
growth it rates near the top, and in
overall size it rates 11th.
Added to this medical manpower
deficit, of course, is the lack of trained
ancillary personnel such as dentists,
nurses, technicians and pharmacists.
About 1,200 students attend classes in
the center yearly.
Massachusetts, a state of comparable
population, personal income and tax
revenues, has for example, twice as
many dentists per 100,000 people, and
almost twice as many physicians and
nurses.
These statistics, used in an article by
Martin in the UF alumni magazine,
Florida Alumnus, a year ago, are

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projected figures for needs by the end
of 1971.
But by then expansion program
construction should be only mid-way to
completion, due to delays in the
funding of the states share. The
entering freshman class of 60 dental
students already has been pushed back
one year to September, 1972. It is likely
the increased medical school enrollment
won't begin until then, also. Currently
the number of freshmen medical
students is kept at 64.
Martins optimism in that article has
fallen far short of whaf has already
transpired.
He projected that with the proposed
medical school at Tampa, and increased
enrollments at UF and University of >
Miami, the 300 entering students
needed annually for the state could be
accomplished by 1971."
But it appears by that year only one
of these conditions might exist the
increased enrollment at Miami, since the
state is continuing to subsidize the plant
there at $6,000 per year for each
student.
The school at Tampa's University of
South Florida lost its federal dollars last
year due to inadequate fund requests,
and UFs Health Centers expansion is
slow in getting started.
But aside from the snaggles in the
expansion, the anticipated results,
beyond just increased enrollments for
all file center's academic programs, look
impressive.
Included in the expansion will be a
90 bed addition to the Shands Teaching
Hospital for a total of 495, and Phase II
will bring the capacity up to 650. The
program also calls for a five-level basic
sciences building as an extension on the
north side of the present facility. This
will include teaching laboratories,
classrooms, a resources center, an
expanded library and animal research
quarters.

A southwest extension will house the
College of Dentistry.
While much of the center's focus
lately has been on the expansion,
another aspect the budget
continues to present > problems, and
while many of these will be alleviated
by the expansion, still others will
remain sore points because of poor
financing.
Hinging particularly on the expansion
are acute space shortages in the center.
As Martin notes in his article, even
broom closets and rest rooms have been
converted to support clinical programs.
Some functions have been pushed out
of the plant into trailers and World War
n barracks.
Within the permanent structure a
high density of occupancy exists, badly
hindering morale and limiting existing
and planned programs," he explains.
But even with these conditions,
Health Center accomplishments have
brought international recognition
private as well as federal dollars, now
supporting two-thirds of the facffity's
operations.
Herein, however, lies another
problem. While private and federal
grants fund research and do help to pay
salaries of those working in research,
many of the 2,018 employes are paid
out of the state budget, which, although
it has been raised, is still inadequate.
The state currently furnishes about
24 per cent of teaching hospitals
budget, a figure far below comparable
state-supported facilities across the
nation.
The University of Georgia, for
example, gets 80 per cent of its funds
from the state.
Martin quit his job as provost in 1968
after weathering budget crises for most
of his seven year stay as provost.
His successor, Dr. Edmund Ackell,
has said he expects no operating budget
problems, but when Martin relinquished
: < v:.....

command to him, he noted the center
still may have difficulties with personnel
hiring and firing until some local
autonomy is achieved.
Ackell is still faced with the same
problems Martin had. Salaries are not
competitive. Nurses, technicians,
secretaries and other staff members are
grossly underpaid compared to similar
jobs elsewhere, as reported by a
legislative committee a little more than
a year ago.
The Veterans Administration across
the street pays these people more than
does the center. A research assistant, for
example, can draw approximately
$2,000 a year more at the VA, but
many stay out of loyalty to their
departments and bosses. Others have
not, as noted by the committee report.
Ackell clearly understands the
problem, but approaches it
optimistically, unlike Martin, who
became fed-up after facing apathy and
inaction within the state budget
commission and other state agencies,
including a legislature which has not
funded the center adequately since its
inception, according to the same report.
We have been in contact with the
State Personnel Board (which now
handles staff positions and salaries via
Tallahassee) to try to rectify some of
these problems," Ackell notes, but it
will be difficult to initiate new programs
in the area of health because of the
limited budget."
To this Martin adds in his article:
And while Florida's investment in
the Health Center has been a bargain for
taxpayers, it has also carried awesome
burdens for the faculty and
administration because its productivity
and educational programs have been
limited by inadequate state support."
Still, the center's programs have
produced research and degree-holders
well-known throughout the medical
world.
The view for the 1970 s is likely to get
better up to the point where poor
financing stymies productivity arid
initiative.
Despite these conditions, the center
has produced research ranging from
life-saving drug combinations for victims
of ruptured aortas, to a new plastic lens
which restores vision to the blind.
The impact of the teaching hospital
and its 57 clinics is evidenced by the
112,215 days of inpatient care and the
90,198 out-patient visits last year.
Also the center is known for open
heart surgery and kidney dialysis and
transplantation.
But the challenge of tomorrow" as
Martin saw it just before he stepped
down as provost, is the expansion
program and the Binding of subsequent
ones deriving from it.
The time has come for substantial
support from the state legislature for
the continued development of the
states first health center, so this great
institution can reach fruition as a
leading force in medical education," he
concludes.
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SOMETHING IN THE AIR
... a naw sound, a now generation
SiW:w??ss:w^x >lke |
>les |
I
1
i decade of exciting jij
left out of the entire jij
$j
m similar to many :
on the UF campus money. ;
jj There has been more advancement in the field of police**:
and detection devices in the last 10 yean than in all the jij
j* years policemen have been around/* Shuler said. ::
:: In addition to an acute financial shortage, the 55 man UF police :J
g; force can. look forward to continued morale problems with members 3jj
jjjof the nnhfftity community. ~ |
:: The people at this university must begin to understand the role of :
:*: the police officer,** Shuler said. We*ve got to start getting along.** 5j
:: Expansion is another problem facing Shuler and his men as they :
ijisurge forth into the next decade. i
& Although they plan to stay headquartered in their present location ij
S on Radio Road, physical growth is not entirely ruled out
| Well expand on the basis of the student and financial growth of
i| the university,** the UPD chief said.
! j In referring to physical growth, the area of police equipment stands ;
scout as most important.
:S The present fleet of five police can will remain at the figure for the
I time being, but officers will continue to drive new squad can every i
li two years.
| Shuler recently ordered two new police motorcycles priced at $750
iijeach.
X A new radio system costing as much as $40,000 is desperately:
it needed by the campus cops.** Shuler lodes forward to the purchase
i! of new car radios, recording devices and improved antenna facilities, j
S now barely adequate.**
i? Going into the 70*s the police department can look forward to:
; and exciting advances in the field of electronics.
iji A new security-fire notification system** is being eyed by the;:
i campus police chief.
;Si If we eventually get the funds, we hope to install this device in iji
jjmany of the buddings on campus.** jij
11 Shuler explained the system lets men in police headquarters know i j
ijiby lights and buzzers if someone has entered a building or if fire is; ]
in the vicinity of the individual detection device located ini j
S leach area.
| The cost per building for this system is estimated at near $1,500 injg
: i addition to higher telephone charges. The system will utilize i
: telephone lines in transmitting impulses from the budding into police i
: headquarters.
The UPD is bracing itself for a continuation of thefts, the bfegestig
crime on campus, in the next decade.
As the population of the university continues to increase, the if
: crime rate will probably increase too,** Shuler said.
; Manpower has always been an area of concern for all polke|
i : departments including the UPD.
I qbnW explained that kgfelative appropriations are necessary for|
j i salary increases and salary increases are necessary for maintaining an
I effective police force, imnus frequent personnel tumovei. |
; The UPD contianes to seek a police captain, a vacant position on S;
: lithe force for many yean. §
I Shuler hopes the 70*s will produce such a man to fill the position, a ;
| I man with seven yean or more experience with police work in a laige j
: Florida municipality.
i He should be able and willing to replace me at any time under any
; circumstance,** Shuler said.
I The low salary has been keeping the properly qualified personnel ;
| from wakingthis y L ujul juuiiyui L y..L JUU:c f ,jtiuuul-JvvbL JlSyUTuf

Sexes Get Together ;
Freedom Abounds

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Feature Editor
An 1890 medical textbook
reads:
Any woman showing interest
in sexual activities is perverted.**
That scientific attitude is
miles of cinema and television
film, and billions of column
inches away from Flower
Children-inspired free love**
portrayed by the mass media as
the sexual state of the nation**
in the Sexy 1960*5.
Whats ahead for sex and
loving relationships in the 70s,
when scientists and political
experts aUke are predicting the
demise of mans natural and
self-created environments?
Will love as man and woman
\ know it, disappear too?
UF psychologists, sociologists
| and a religious leader see
significant changes in the way
men and women are loving and
relating to each other.
Men and women are getting
: to know each other better as
i people,* says Dr. Gerald Leslie,
: chairman of the department of
: sociology. He has taught
: Marriage and Family Life for 20
: years and has done extensive
: research in the field.
Your generation is working
: out relationships on a much
: more honest, less manipulative
: basis, adds Dr. Mary McCauley,
: a clinical psychologist at the J.
: Hillis Miller Health Center. She
j is now teaching the Psychology
| of Women, a course offered this
\ quarter for the first time at UF,
\ to graduate students in
j; counseling. She works "primarily
i; with married and unmarried
\ pregnant women.
Dating, which started barely
50 yean ago in coeducational
universities says Leslie, is one of
the major reasons for this trend
towards openness and honesty
: in relationships.
In social history, there never
; was an association of young
: people which did not lead to
; marriage, he said.
The ways men and women
began to learn from and about
I each other expanded as dating
I became more casual and spread
I down into high schools in the
; 1930 s and junior highs in the
; 4os. Leslie does not see dating
I going on below the age of
: puberty.
University students dont get
so uptight about a date now.
Ten yean ago a Florida man
wouldnt think of going to pick
up his date without being
dressed up or of asking her out
for something big like Frolics
less than one month in
advance, recalls Rev. Thaxton
Springfield, coordinator of I
religious activities.
Dating is much more natural, I
less artificial. The way dates
look at each other is changing.
They want more knowledge
about each other where before a I
dating couple may never have
gotten to know each other.
Sex is fun and sex can be love.
Today getting to know each
other may mean sexual
involvement before marriage. \
And young people today have I
discovered that sex can be fun I
and that it can be an expression I
of love that does not necessarily 5
lead to marriage.
Sign in head shop:

Flower Children of the past
decade popularized this sexual
attitude. With the development
of the easy-to-use birth control
pill, complemented by
nationwide lairing of university
regulations on women, observers
called the era of the 1960 s as
one of Sexual Revolution.
We are moving where we are
accepting our own bodies, and
our sexual organs as prats of our
body, said McCauley.
Science has put to bed* the
long-held idea that men have
sexual feelings and nice women
dont.
Women are becoming more
aggressive sexually, but most
must still feel and are still
conditioned to hold back. A
woman must be in a safe
situation before she can let
herself go, psychologically and
physically.
Thats why many couples
living together have difficult
sexual adjustment, she said.
A trial marriage is just that
a trial, it is not secure.
The danger she observes in the
developing trends of sexual
relationships is that sex is
becoming a conforming thing.
She fears sex is being
achievement-oriented in both
male and female domains.
When a freshman girl walks on
campus for the first time, she
gets the message right away that
any sophisticated woman has
sexual experiences as part of
growing up and not being a
square.
* At the UF, like at many other
large universities, many students
have come from small towns,
with firmly-entrenched value
systems. In addition to the
academically-inspired challenges
to a females basic beliefs, the

. : .$

Wattofrfc r THirftta rnM-dii Jl

desire for social acceptance,
McCauley believes, is pushing
many women into sexual
relationships without emotional
fulfillment or sexual satisfaction.
None of the UF experts
queried had seen any statistical
support for the popularly held
idea that premarital sex is on the
rise.
All have concluded, however,
that premarital sex is increasing.
' They bade this view by citing
personal encounters with UF
students, common sense,**
more prevalent frank and open
discussion, and public
acceptance of sex on the screen.
Up to now, sex before
marriage was a yea-no set of
rules that differed for men and
women. We expected boys to
push and girls to say no,**
McCauley said.
And even in marriage, many
women, because of their anti-sex
rearing, participated in
intercourse just to please their
husbands,** or to have children.
Birth control is opening up
the possibility of the enjoyment
of sex by women without fear of
pregnancy,** says Dr. Carl
Clarke, a clinical psychologist at
Mental Health Services who has
been doing research in College
and Married Life.
What we were doing before
was sneaking enjoyment. Now
people have the right to be
concerned whether T am
enjoying it* or whether T am
enjoying it enough.
Questions of sexual
compatibility, of frigidity and
impotence, of the individuals
capacity for involvement will be
discussed more openly by more
couples than ever before, in the
coming years, he said.

Page 7



Page 8

% * * 1
I, The Florida ANifator, Wednesday, January 14.1970

Testimony Continues At Chicago Trial

CHICAGO (UPI) Antiwar
protest leader David Dellinger
demanded on die first day of the
Democratic National Convention
that the violence-marked
clearance of Lincoln Park on the
eve of the convention must not
happen again,* a defense witness
testified Tuesday.
He insisted it not happen
again, Mark Simons told a
federal court jury in the trial of

Border Talks Resumed
Between China, Russia

MOSCOW (UPI) A Soviet spokesman said
Tuesday the Sino-Soviet border talks have
resinned in Peking with Moscow still hopeful for
positive results despite Chinese propaganda
attacks and snubs.
Leonid Zamyatin, spokesman for the Foreign
Ministry, also told a news conference that
Moscow rejected a sharp Chinese protest over
Soviet references to Formosa as a country.
A Peking correspondent touched off an angry
exchange of words with Zamyatin by repeating
the charges. Peking considers Formosa Taiwan a
part of mainland China.

President Nixon Commits Himself
To Balanced Budget, No Surplus

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon called an
afternoon meeting with his
cabinet Tuesday for a final
review of the surplus-seeking
budget he will submit after
Congress reconvenes Monday.
The President has committed
himself to a balanced budget,
said Press Secretary Ronald L.

Yacht Club Os President And Governor
Suffers Serious Expansion Plan Setback

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) An
exclusive yacht dub, of which
President Nixon and Gov.
Claude Kirk are members,
suffered a setback in plans for
expansion today when the
Cabinet refused to immediately
sell it three-quarters of an acre
of canal bottoms.
State officials questioned the
offered price of SI,OOO for the
submerged land in Canal
Hadendo on Key Biscayne.

THE SWING'S
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Dellinger and other members of
the Chicago Seven.
The seven men are on trial
before U. S. District Court lodge
Julius J. Hoffman on charges
that they conspired to incite
rioting during the August, 1968,
convention.
Simons, who said he acted as
a legal aide for Dellinger and
other leaders of the National
Mobilization Committee

Ziegler, and in this context,
there will be a surplus. Ziegler
mentioned no figures.
As for the 3 pm EST White
House session with cabinet
members, Ziegler explained:
The major budget decisions
have been made and it is in the
process of being finalized. The
President wanted to take

The club is located about
half-mile from President Nixons
vacation White House.
Commodore John
Handwerker, a Key Biscayne
physician, said Kirk and the
President were honorary
members.
Kirk, who suggested
postponement after learning
several homeowners on the key
contend they were not given
suffldent time to protest, said

WINTER BOWLING
LEAGUES ARE
ORGANIZING NOW!!
t ; Vs i it; f
; : ii. -
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES AREA and
fill out an application. Deadline for signup is Jan.
19,1970.
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA

PgHfWGERQUOTED

The news conference was called to discuss the
question of European security but ranged over a
variety of topics.
Zamyatin said the Soviets officially informed
Washington last November they had no objection
to U.S. participation in an all-European security
conference, hut he said the United States is still
trymg to block such a meeting.
Informed East European sources said
representatives of 22 European Communist
parties will meet here Wednesday to map joint
strategy on mtemational issues, including the
all-European security conference.

(MOBES), testified he and
Dellinger conferred with Deputy
Mayor David Stahl on Monday,
Aug. 26, in Stahls office.
That was the day after the
first major confrontation
between police and the
thousands of hippies, yippies
and other antiwar demonstrators
who came to Chicago to protest
the Democratic administrations
handling of the Vietnam War.

another look at the budget with
his chief cabinet officers before
it is locked up.
Under present plans, tire new
budget for the fiscal year
starting July 1 will be submitted
to Congress during the last week
of this month, following Nixons
Jan. 22 State of the Union
message.

he would abstain from voting on
the ultimate decision.
Handwerker, only half in jest,
said he would be willing to
suspend Kirk from the club
roster if it would help our
cause.

\
Scores of persons hud been
arrested or injured on Sunday
night when police, enforcing an
H p. m. curfew, ousted
demonstrators from the park on
the citys near North Side.
Simons said that Dellinger at
the Monday meeting demanded
to see Mayor Richard J. Daley
and that Stahl said it would be
impossible to talk to the mayor
because of convention business.
McCarthy
Negotiates
PARIS (UPI) A spokesman
for Sen. Eugene C. McCarthy
said Tuesday the Minnesota
Democrat was discussing with
Communist peace negotiators all
Vietnam issues including that of
American prisoners of war, but
that he was not negotiating any
deal for the release of some of
them.
The spokesman denied rumors
McCarthy was bargaining over
the release of 35 U. S. PoW*s
held by Hanoi. The denial came
shortly before the senator met
Xuan Thuy, North Vietnamese
minister of state and chief Hanoi
negotiator at the Vietnam peace
conference.

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Stahl later called Simons and
told him there was "no change
with regard to the curfew,"
Simons mid.
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DEADLINE FEB. 6. 1970



'We Want Lester Shout Georgia Students

ATLANTA (UP I) Several
hundred high school students
protesting school integration
marched into the Georgia
Capitol Tuesday shouting, We 0
want Lester, but were ushered
outside by state troopers when
some of them began throwing
firecrackers.
The incident occured about
two. hours before Gov. Lester
Maddox, who paraded with the
students Monday, was to address
the legislation on the second day
of its session.
Maddox gave the school crisis
top billing in his address..
Im begging, I am pleading,
with the members of this august
body, and with other State
House officials to join in the

FBI Called In To Investigate
Os Prisoner En Route To Hospital

LEESBURG (UPI) The FBI
has been asked to investigate the
death of a 15-year-old Negro
who died while en route from
the county jail at Tavares to the
state mental hospital at
Macdenny last month, it was
revealed Tuesday.
The investigation into the
death of James Farmer Dec. 23

WHATS
HAPPENING
I~SyKgWbA GEVERTZ

CAVIN IN: The Florida
Speleological Society meets
tonight at 7 in the Reitz Union.
New members are welcomed.
PULSATING EXPERIENCE:
Siudent Governments
poll-taking organization, Pulse, is
seeking volunteers. Interested
students are asked to call
Student Senator Ralph Nobo at
392-1665, or come to the Senate
office in the Union.
A REAL POWER-PACKER:
Students interested in working
with Project Samson this quarter
should attend a meeting
Thursday night at 7:30 in
Walker Auditorium.
THEY SAID IT COULDNT
BE DONE: Surprise, Surprise!
There the Rat sits; a legend in its
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effort by these children, by
these teachers, and by these
parents, both black and white,
to defend and protect their
schools, Maddox said.
The group that marched on
the Capitol today came from
more than a half-dozen Atlanta
area high schools and trooped
onto the Capitol grounds
chanting, This is Maddox
country.** the governors
campaign slogan.
Once inside the building,
some of them meed through the
halls, others exploded
firecrackers and one group took
seats on a stairway, clogging the
steps.
While some of the students
were seated, a man about 45,
who refused to give his name,

was requested by Tom Heran,
editor and publisher of the
Leesburg Daily Commercial.
The newspaper said Farmer, a
junior high school football
player, was jailed Dec. 17 and
held five days and five nights in
a restraining device while
incompetency proceeding were
under way.

time, a hallmark of student
ingenuity, a refuge to the
downtrodden, a castle for
merriment... sigh... and a year
older this week. Come celebrate
its anniversary at the Film
Festival tonight. W. C. Fields,
the Three Stooges the Little
Rascals and the Dead End Kids
are making special appearances.
On Thursday night, as well as
Friday and Saturday, Your
Fathers Mustache will be
appearing.

SAMSON
Helping Ton
Help Others
,a
SAMSON is an organization of University
students interested in helping the
underprivileged in Alachua county. SAMSON
is based on the desire and abilities to assist the
local anti-poverty agencies.
If you are interested in helping others, come
to
!
WALKER AUDITORIUM
7:30 PM TOURS. JAN 15

PROTESTING INTEGRATION

climbed atop a Womens
Christian Temperance Union
monument in the lobby and
attempted to speak with them.
Several of the students said he
was not connected with their
group.
You havent been able to
communicate with your elders
because they wont listen, the
man told the students. This
legislature is making you a slave
with your own money.
It was at this point that a
state trooper pushed his way
through the throng of students,
made his way to the top of the
steps where they were seated,
and announced:
Listen to me. You get these
people outside. This is an
unlawful assembly.

On Dec. 23 the youth was
reported to have been taken
from the jail at Tavares, but he
was dead on arrival at the
Macclenny hospital.
Results of an autopsy will not
be released until a pathologist
receives a report from Sheriff
Willis McCall, according to
officials in Alachua County, site
of the mental hospital.
The newspaper said a doctor
who saw the youth just prior to
his being jailed said there were
indications he suffered from
diabetes.
| ?
The youth had voiced fears
someone was trying to kill him
and was extremely nervous, the
doctor was quoted, and deputies
were called because of a
suspicion he might become
violent.
The doctor said his actions
could result from diabetes.
Her* I am. Just
out of col mm. > M
My skills untried
but full of vloor teJEfcA \
and imagination. fT 1 \
How can I sell v*
myself In the Mr J a
marketplace of
ideas? (An ad in /If}]
the Florida Alligator.

The students are protesting
court orders for reassignment of
pupils and teachers in the near
future, to bring about more
school desegregation.
We dont want teachers just
because of their color, said
over 450. Buy
~Se!l Trade Repair. 7
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* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
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JANUARY ONLY!
Closing Out Our
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Most Prices Reduced
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Wednesday, January 14,1970, The Florida AWtor, I

student Dorsey Crews. We want
the ones who will educate us.
Federal Judge Frank Hooper
scheduled more testimony today
on the (dan to move hundreds of
teachers and pupils from one
school to another.

Page 9



I, TtM Florida AWtor, Wadnnd. January 14,1070

Page 10

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TWIG
Thj long and short of it!
The outfit features a white,
nylon blouse with a ruffle
front topped by a long vest
over a short flared start in
burgundy of rayon.
Modeled by Carolyn.

'I I I
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MAAS BROTHERS
With the 70s come
close-to-the-body clothes.
This one is a subtle
exposure of cotton crochet
by Jonathan Logan. Its
belted low oi> the hips in H
suede for a Scandinavian I,
look. From the Junior
Terrace Department.
Modeled by Cindy. I
* tz |n
r ____.

f /j
Four Corners presents a
new idea in eye-catching
outfits tie dye. The
outfit is blue and white
trimmed on the belt, tie,
and jacket lining with a red
& white check. The blue
blouse features a tapered
collar made of dacron and
cotton. Modeled by Beth.
... 'V 34
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SEARS
Strike up the band! Brass is
back, a white pantsuit to
suit Florida weather. This
outfit keeps Sharon fashion
right and bright with a blue
ruffled blouse by Junior
Bazar.






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Wj.. sis X 4 '

WmM'
HP M / , i r >~ *' :-

COLONY SHOPS
Funwear by Bobbie Brooks!
A short gored skirt is worn
under a long fitted vest.
This set has available
coordinates, slacks, jackets,
etc., in navy, white, red and
brown. Navy blouse by
Emily M, shoes of crushed
patent by Bushens and all
tied together with a zesty
scarf. Modeled by Patty.
FIGURE FAIR
Look lovely when you
lounge or sleep in a printed
nylon pajama. The tunic
top has a scoop neck with
an elastic band cuff on
sleeve. Self belt. Sizes
713, about $15.00. Also
has a matching gown with
matching bikini. Sizes
7 13, about SIO.OO.
Modeled by Kathy.

5

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mi i i sb&swpi
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JB

SUSAN SCOTT
A kickey white crepe
pleated dress and navy vest
go together to create a
go-everywhere dress. One of
the many sophisticated
styles at Susan Scott.
Modeled by Carol.

JmlumjUiptrtby. cwhikt
pfotograpky. by. .. COM u>cop*

WadnMday,

SILVERMANS
Jodette took a simple
white acetate shift, added a
high neck with buttons and
puff sleeves, then topped it
with a mauve floral printed
tunic for a sensational look.
The outfit can or can't be
worn with the two yard
fringed scarf. Modeled by
Joan.

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida AIKgvtQC Wednesday.. Jeouerv M, 197 ft

IN UPCOMING DECADE
Burger Courts Effect Unsure

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Spanning two decades, the
Supreme Court, under the
leadership of Chief Justice Earl
Warren, has made decisions
which have changed the face of
our nation.
As the 70s begin, new issues,
as well as old, confront the new
Burger court.
Whether this court will be as
effective, as hard-hitting and as
forward-looking as many feel the
Warren court was, remains to be
seen.
Several factors lead many
people to say they believe the
court will begin to slow down'*
in its decisions.
The first, and probably most
obvious, reason for the predicted
change in trend is the new chief
justice, Warren Burger, UFs law
dean, Frank E. Maloney said.
Former Chief Justice, Earl
Warren was accused by many on
the right of the political
spectrum, of trying to give the
country to the** criminal*
radicals and militant balck
minority, one law professor,
who preferred to remain
anonymous, said.
Several groups, such as the
John Birch Society, were even
calling for Warrens
impeachment because of his
liberal leanings.
When Warren resigned,
Republican President Richard
Nixon nominated and the
U. S. Senate approved Burger'
to replace him.
The U. S. Constitution
provides for justices to hold
their offices during good
behavior, which in effect,
makes the positions lifetime
ones.
This provision was adopted to
free the judges as much as
possible from political pressure
and to encourage fair decisions,
Maloney said.
Justices do generally vote
according to the dictates of
conscience and conscience does doesnot
not doesnot always follow political lines,
he said.
For example, the Burger
court, in its first major decision
dealing with school
desegregation, decided
unanimously to demand
immediate, full inteU integration
in Mississippi, Maloney said.
Now there Is another vacancy
on the court.
v Nixon has already had one
nominee turned down by the
Senate the first time this has
happened since Franklin D.
Roosevelt's time, Maloney said.
American Institutions
instructor Ralph Glatfelter said
many liberals think Clement

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Haynsworth was not approved
by the Senate because of a
feeling in the country against the
military-industrial complex.
He said this is a manifestation
of displeasure with officials who
benefit economically from their
governmental decisions.
Conservatives, on the other
hand, seem to feel the
Haynsworth case is just another
indication of the loss of respect
and patriotism in this country,
the law professor said.
Especially if Nixon is
re-elected in *72, he has a good
chance to be the first President
ever to nominate a majority of
the court.
He has already had two
vacancies to fill.
A majority of the remaining
justices are over 60 years old.
Who will Nixon nominate and
why?
The next nominee will
probably be another Southern
conservative, the law professor
said.
Nixon is politically motivated,
and must be aware of the
support George Wallace could
get in 72, he said.
To please the South, and gain
at least a portion of the Wallace
supporters, Nixon will have to
nominate someone of
approximately the same political
persuasion as Haynsworth, he
said.
Maloney said he thought the
next nominee would be
approved more easily.
Glatefelter said he thought
the difficulty over the
Haynsworth nomination shows
concern about the type of
officials this country has.
Therefore, he said he thinks
the next nominee will be
subjected to the same type of
thorough investigation.
But, he said, he does believe
the President will be more
careful in his next selection.
If Nixon does have an
opportunity to nominate still
another justice before the
election in 1972, he will
probably try to balance the
court once again with a more
liberal justice, the professor said.
Experts say the President has
shown in the past that he wishes
to be all things to all people.
He is too shrewd politically to
do as some liberals fear and
attempt to stack the court
with Southern conservatives,
they say.
Another action being
diacussed is the appointment of
a woman justice.
Presidential aides have said
several qualified women are
under consideration.
I think it would be fine,
Maloney said.

The only problem he said he
could foresee is that women
comprise only three per cent of
the bar. Therefore, it would be a
disproportionate representation.
What effect will the court of
the 70s have on the country?
What are the decisions on some
of the major issues of the day
likely to be?
Most probably there will be
attempts to enforce
desegregation decisions of the
past, althouth it is doubtful
there will be many sweeping new
inroads in this area, Glatfelter
said.
The revival of loyalty oaths in
the country, and UF, may well
be an indication of a
conservative trend, he said.
Maloney said the court is
usually a leader in forming the
attitudes of the people, and will
make their decisions on the
constitutionality of the oath as a
legal question.
While I personally never
objected to signing a loyalty
oath, 1 would guess there would
be less emphasis on this type of
procedure in the next decade,

U This WEDNESDAY (TONIGHT) at the H
H ftattefeetler H
FESTIVAL H
H*W.C. Fields* Liftle Rascals *H
H 3 Stooges Dead End Kids* H
$.2 5 for members for others
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ifour Fathers Mustache
shows on Jan. 15,16, &17
Member ship Cards still
available. Entitles you to
special discounts & benefits.

Maloney said.
In all probability, the court
will strike at least the protion of
Floridas loyalty oath which
requires persons to swear they
do not believe in the overthrow
of the government of the United
States of of the state of Florida
by force or violence, Glatfelter
said.
More liberalizing decisions
will probably be made in the
areas of equal opportunity,
income, housing, consumer
protection, military questions,
riots, abortion laws and drug
abuse, Glatfelter said.
Also, a small, but growing,
number of law professors say the
significant growth of the law in
the 70s will be in the area of
participation in the
governmental process by
interested citizens, consumers
and subordinates of the official
decision makers.
The U. S. Supreme Court has
probably played a more
important role in the preceeding
two decades than ever before,
Glatfelter said.
Whether it will continue to be

EARL WARREN
.. .speaksat UF
an active, important participant,
influencing and being influenced
by the people of the United
States, remains to be seen.
Indications are, Glatfelter
said, that the court will change
slightly from its recent activist
position to more of an attempt
to define current problems of
our society.
However, this shift will not
hurt its prominence, which
should remain on a par with that
of the legislative branch, though
seemingly slightly below that of
the executive, the law professor
said.



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(A-7t-62-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera.
Need money, $75 or best offer.
376-4905 after 6:00 p.m. (A-4t-62-p)
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER 1969,
2200 miles, $625. Call 378-5192
after 5 or weekends. (A-st-62-p)
Portable typewriter 3 yrs. old made
In Sweden. Excellent condition. $65.
372- (A-st-62-p)
Uncrated: Pioneer 100 TD amp,
S3OO, 8> 2 CSSS spkrs., S2OO,
Garrard SL9S w/ Sure cart, $l5O,
Dokorder auto RV deck, S3OO, no.
39 Village Park, Kurt. (A-st-62-p)
Rugs, coffee table, washing machine,
air-conditioner, queen size headboard
and nightstands, baby stroller,
playpen, scales, infant seat, books,
odds and ends. 1302 N.E. 14th Terr.
(Off N.E. 16th Ave.) After 5:30 PM.
(A-64-st-p).
CAMERA Konica 35mm fully
automatic w/ 52mm 6 135 mm
lenses. Original cost $425, now $325.
Call 378-5192 after 5 or weekends.
(A-3t-59-p).
Factory built Healthklt Stereo Amp
Good Sound for $30.00 35 watts call
376-2344. (A-64-lt-p).
Spots before your on your new
carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer.
SI.OO Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-64-c).
1968 DTl 250 Yamaha Scrambler
2700 miles. PERFECT condition.
Two helmets. Buddy seat. $575. Call
Brad or Gary 376-8524. (A-64-st-p).
AKAI M-9,tape recorder, excellent
cond. worth S4OO plus S2OO worth
of pre-recorded tapes, must sell for
$225 or more, 372-7638, student.
(A-64-st-p).
'aHWII B B B 8 SftiiiiftWiftiWOftWO&WOOOWWCj SftiiiiftWiftiWOftWO&WOOOWWCj|
| SftiiiiftWiftiWOftWO&WOOOWWCj| I
Married student wishes to sublease
Mount Vernon Apt. JAN. RENT
PAID. Call 378-4072. (B-63-2t-p).
DESPERATE! Need one female
roommate for Landmark apt. $46.25
mo. immediate occupancy. Call
378-1927 Anytime. (B-61-st-p).
2 brm. apt. under contract til June.
Heat, kitchen, AC, Pool and more.
Lots of room. Will take 1,2, or 3
males now. $43 or $57 per mo.
376-3683. (B-st-60-p).
For Rent! One Male needed for
2 Brm. Apt. Quiet Area.
47.50/mo. + ut. Call Reb or
8111/376-0066 after 5 until late
evenings. Central Heat.
(B-st-60-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
APT. in Tanglewood Manor. s4l per
month. Share utilities, etc. Call
373- (B-61-st-p)
2 bedroom apt. Central air, heat, wail
to wall carpet, garbage disposal,
dishwasher, would like to sublease.
Hawaiian Village, call Evy, 373-2307.
(B-st-62-p)
Sublet 2 BR modern apt. 2 blks. to
campus. Call 373-1265. (B-3t-62-p)
Must sublease single room, Bath,
cooking $40.00 per month Including
water. See at 1813 N.W. 2nd Avenue
anytime. (B-61-St-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
two bedroom apt. Landmark apt. 85
$46.25 + util. Call 373-2503.
(B-64-it-p).
2 bedroom 2 full bath, Mt. Vernon
Apt.; AC, Heating, dishwasher,
tantalizing decor, only $2lO per
month; Call 373-2759. (B-64-st-p).
§ |
Listeners Wanted Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and
£fve normal hearing. Please call
Mrs. Slater between 1 and 4
P-m. for appointment. 392-2049.
(C-15t-60-c).
Research -Assistant Wanted. MA In
Psychology, speech, linguistics or
related field. Fulltime. Working In
psycholingulstlc research. Contact
r. Scholes or Col. Lauer,
Communication Sciences Laboratory.
392-2046. (C-64-st-c).
__ -

. mnnoMoi
WANTED I
Three male students -
roommate to UveTt La BSfne Vto
apts. Call 378-8286. (C-lOt-S^S)
Wanted 2 girls as roommates. Apt.
La n ( s mark starting winter quarter.
$46 25 P r month.
(C-3t-62-p)
Wanted Female roommate to share
2 bedroom apartment. 1100 SW Bth
*?* ** 407 CaH 372-1148.
(C-4t-62-p)
WANTED: One male roommate for
swinging French Quarter apartment.
SSO per month. Call 378-6551 or
c? *>y French Quarter 90.
(C-3t-62-p)
FEMALE ROOMATE FOR
ONEBEDROOM LANDMARK
APT. CALL 376-3873.
(C-st-60-p).
Gatortown: One, two or three men
for two BR apt. Im no. 34, so I will
be studying. Call 373-2422.
(C-3t-62-p)
Male Roommate Wanted La Bonne
Vie Apartment. January rent free.
Call 372-0268. (C-63-2t-p).
Two female roommates. 2 bdrm.
Close to campus. Furnished.
Alr-cond. $108.75 a quarter. Calf
373-2925. (C-63-3t-p).
Coed to share Apt. 1 block from
Campus. Own room, share kitchen
and bath. S4O per month plus to
utilities. Call 376-3184. (C-63-3t-p). j
Female roommate wanted French
Quarter 2 Bdrm. $45. per mo. Call
before 12 noon or after 6 p.m.
376-0613. (C-64-st-p).
1 or 2 roommates to share poolside
Tanglewood apt. AC, TV, lto bath,
dishwasher. 47. mo., Jan. free. Call
378-9861 after 6. (c-64-3t-p).
Female roommate for a two
bedroom, two bath, poolside La Bon
Vie apt. $47.50 per mo. Plus utilities.
Phone 373-2955 apt. 436.
(C-64-3t-p).
Male roommate Gatortown apts. $45.
per month Apt. 231. Come by or call
392-7529 between 7 and 8 P.M. Ask
for Scott. (C-61-st-p).
4 Pre-med & l Chem. student
need roomate for 3 Bdr.
Gatortown Apt. $36.66 mo. 309
S. 16th Ave. Apt 159.
378-6423, (C-st-60-p),
WANTED: one or two roomates only
$42. per month. Contact Fred Village
Park apt. 77. If not there leave a
note. (C-64-st-p).
Cook wanted. Tall, short, fat, ugly,
or thin. If we can eat it youre hired.
Meals provided for your efforts.
372-5091. Ask for David.
(C-64-3t-p).
2 roommates to share canty new 12 x
65 Spanish mobile home private
bedrm, pool, central heat, air, stereo,
T. $70., Plus Utilities 373-2456.
Ask for Bob. (C-61-st-p).
| OO HELP WANTED
NITE WORK. OVER 18 YRS.
GOOD PAY. TACO BELL.-826 W.
Unlv. (E-61-st-p).
Now accepting applications for
summer camp counselors at
Pinewood for boys and girls In
Hendersonville, N.C. Write P.O.
Box 4585, Normandy Branch,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141.
(E-st-60-p).
Male telephone solicitor. High pay
for about 10 hours per week.
Experience desired but not
mandatory. Call 376-2043 for
interview. (E-st-62-p)
WANTED Talented, experienced
art and architecture students for
color drawing and rendering. Good
pay. Part time your own hours.
Call 372-5843. (E-st-62-p)
Bar waitress, smiles, agility,
composure; call before 7 PM
376-9102. The Bench and Bar.
(E-64-it-p).
Collection Supervisor, male or
female, salary open. Campus Credit
Union. Call Mrs. Decker. 392-0393
for Interview, apt. (E-61-10t-c).
I AUTOS I
MGTD 1953 fully restored, British
racing green, cream Interior, dark
green carpet, white top A tonneau, 5
WSWD unlop tires, push button
radio. 3 speed heater, courtesy lights,
driving lamps, luggage rack, urcow.
Many extrasl over $4,000 Invested,
2.000 miles since restoration. Will
not depreciate!! If properly
maintained. $3,000. 37*5192 after 5
or weekends. Student. (Q-St-57-p).
STTwSST-Ib. 16.000 ml*.
Will Mil for 3 .*??' 1 247 t affw 5
one year ago. 372-1247 aTxer
p.m. (G-5t60-p).

Wednesday, January 14,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

r'V>Nsa>:%VA\ws: MW>>Xrfissf^
AUTOS §
v
Race car. 55 Pontiac wagon, full race
running. All best equipment. Car is
strong, fast, could be street driven.
SI,OOO buys 13.90 E.T. Cbr. Call
376-0143. (G-61-3t-p).
PERSONAL I
& ¥
A BADGE, A PARTY, A TROPHY,
A HOUSE ... none of these things
make Phi Kappa Theta. The qualities
which are
unseen . BROTHERHOOD,
FAITH, FRIENDSHIP, LOYALTY,
RESPECT... These are found Inside
of men .... These make PHI KAPPA
THETA COLONY. 1728 NW Ist
Ave. (Back of Cl). (J-st-59-p)
TIRED OF HO HUM fashions?
Change your look with Ponchos from
Columbia. Velvet clothes from India
and leather goods from Mexico. Just
In at the SPANISH MAIN. 1642 W.
Univer. Ave. Open MonSat. til
10:00. (J-61-4t-p)
The Bench and Bar 1222 W. Unlv.
Ave. Opening noon Friday 16.
Showtime 10 *tll ... Nikki and Judy
finally did It! Come by to believe It!
(J-64-lt-p).
TO THE 4th FLOOR ARGUER: I
dremt I was a Broward County
wrestler ln my Broward County
Phys. Ed. shorts. I mbs the matches
and the lumping Jacks.
GREENFIELD Is a cold lonely town
without you. JUNGFRAU.
(J-64-lt-p).
More than 10% of Americans go to
bed without enough food to keep
healthyls youre not part of the
solution, you're part of the problem.
Come to the SAMSON meeting,
Thurs., Jan 15, 7:30 PM, Walker
Aud. (J64-2t-c).
Flash! Happy Birthday to the
greatest photog (N.A.), the best
Toyota driver, and the most
wonderful guy that Is mine. Shump
111 Chick. (J-64-lt-p).
Barbara, you have been choosen by
the Head Beagle. Be prepared.
ARFGARD, Chuck. (J-64-it-p).
27 year old engineering student
Interested In meeting mature Jewish
co-ed. Please call Bill after 11:00
P.M. 372-4921. (J-64-st-p).

BMl
immm hi feature at ... i .-ss
3:53 5:48 7:48 9:48 I
William Pulitzer Prize Winning
Novel "The is now a film!
11l I
I W STARTING )
nyj j;lj I sToday /
||| Steve McQueen plays Boonl |
|^___jnThejteivers___^
[n Nr l||f>W .21r4 801 v

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Page 13

I NRSONAL J
SCIENCE FICTION Book Exchange
and Fan Club will meet tomorrow,
Thursday, at 8:00 P.M. In Room 363
of the Reitz Union. Interested people
are Invited to attend. (J-64-lt-p).
Great party Idea! Rent hilarious W.C.
Fields Flicks, 16mm, sound.
372-9408. (J-tf64-c).
Foosball? Foosball! In the new plush
game room at the Thirsty Gator, the
weekly tournament Is worth a case If
your good enough. Always great fun
at the Thirsty Gator. 633 N.W. 13th
St. (J-64-ts-c).
The Bench and Bar Invites you to
listen to the sounds of Sid Bertisch,
handsome devil that he is, every Fri.
- Sat. 10 PM 1222 W. Unlv. Ave.
(J-64-lt-p).
Lost: ladies watch, gold with oval
face and mesh band, sentimental
value. If found call: 378-3615 or
392-7558. REWARD. (L-63-4t-pJ.
Found Plain gold wedding bond.
Found outside Little Hall lnitials
CWP to DCD lO-18-63. CaH
392-1518. (L-3t64-nc).
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACELET,
single initialed charm (reb, sah)
sentimental value I BIG REWARD
CaH 392-8513. (L-64-3t-p).
FOUND: One pair brown oval Bagged
glasses besMe the tennis court In
front of Jennings Dorm. Call Karen
392-9372. (L-63-3t-nc).
I SERVICES 1|
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University opticians at 519 S.W.
4th Ave. Across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-59-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists who
can type your manuscripts
professionally and In good form. We
also have a XEROX machine. Call
Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160.
(M-7t-25-p).

1 VICK I
RUBYS ALTERATIONS Hat
MOVED to now address: 1951 N.W.
4th Stroot but samo phono:
376-8506. (M-st-61-p).
BABY CARE: 311 N.W. 15th Torr.
(Infants undor ono yoar old) $5 por
week also by tho day or hour.
Exporlonced reliable Christian homo.
Phono 376-2072. (M-64-3t-p).
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED. 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. Color, Conformation.
Temporamont: Aquarius! Reg.
Appaloosa Stud. 875. Introductory
foe. Book Now. 376-9020 or see
at Horse Show Grounds.
(M-10t-60-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERS: Frank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance is now at McCraas
Sunoco, 320 N. Main St., Gainesville.
Frank has 12 years experience on
Imported cars and specializes In
repairs and tune ups on these cars.
Come in and see Frank. For one
week from date of this publication,
tickets win be given to imported car
owners good for free lubrication.
(M-st-62-p)
Volkswagen Parts end Services; 1
Guaranteed Repairs by SpedaNsL.
Gainesville Machine Shcg>. CaM'
376-0710. (M-ts-57-C)
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologlst. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
WAKE-UP TROUBLES? Wake-Up
service. Pleasant, reliable. 85/month,
812/quarter. Phone 378-4216 or
372-3823. (M-st-62-p)
1 m
V IMS M,
C*
TEoSScOtM'
SS§]x
1 Nil W. W. UR S. vfcyl^--
/FROM THE PRODUCER OF
'vixEir
I The SttiMMttFilm... bj>Mitti
b alMsiteTs^R
| mW. Ifcdwrsbr bs I
Vs DUSTIN HOFFMAN'iL'
MIA FARROW
4w m.



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, January 14,1970

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following article has been
authored by Father Michael
Gannon, associate professor of
religion and pastor of the
Catholic Student Center.
Canon Gannon has conducted
a folk Mass in the Plaza of the
Americas and in the Rathskeller,
among other activities.)
Religion has a bright future
on the UF campus in the 19705.
And so do the churches, if only
their leaders will stop making
them so relevant. That is my
candid and thoughtful opinion.
In stating it I know that I fly
in the face of a Great Cliche, as I
also violate the canon that
historians should not play the
role of prophet. But since the
Alligator editors have asked me
to exhibit my foolishness in the
interest of Higher Things, 1 am
resigned to commit both sins.
I must straightaway reject the
notion, entertained by too many
breast-beaters, both in and out
of the clergy, that religion is
dying on campus. A flakier
canard I have never heard.
Religion is surging on campus
this campus and most other
campuses across the land. It may
demonstrate its presence in new
concepts, new forms, and new
interests indeed, it may
express itself outside the context
of the organized churches or
synagogues but it is there,
nonetheless, vitally there, and it
must take a blind man not to see
it.
A spiritual*, resurgence is
shaking in the'"ground. Along
with their general counter
culture university students are
developing a new sensitivity to
the spiritual. They are showing a
heightened concern for the
mystical, the symbolic, the
transcendent. They are looking
for love, community,
celebration. They are searching
for the sacred, for the ultimate,
for meaning. They are becoming
aware that religion addresses
itself to the deepest questions
that man can ask, and to the
loveliest impulses that heart can
feel. They are searching and they
are sharing.
The whole world of
psychedelia is a sign of the
tremors that abound. It is not
the movement to which most
young people belong, but it is
the loudest, and it shouts irony
at those religionists who have
been secularizing themselves and
their institutions in a tragically
misguided effort to stay in the
same ball park with the young.
The young have moved on, to
the search for unity with the
transcendent, while the
secularists ait in empty stands.
From astrology to Zen, young
people are striving* to

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Campus Religious Resurgence In 7os

communicate with the divine.
Look and listen to the wilder
fringes of those strivings: the
mind-blowing art, the ecstatic
music, the meditation, the
chanting, the yoga, the
witchcraft, the Tarot card
reading.
Look, too, at the
man-centered movements, such
as communal living. The new
monastidsm brings people
together in shared living
experiences where many practice
the vows of monks: poverty,
chastity, and obedience to the
life style. Even in loosely
organized ad hoc situations such
as the Woodstock gathering the
communal ideals are practiced.
At the Palm Beach
International Rock Festival
thousands of collegians shared
vans, tents, open space and food
together. Skip Homanski, a
student at Tulane, said: Did
you see those kids out there last
njght? Someone would bring a
blanket and spread it on the
ground and pretty soon thered
be eight people sharing it and
listening to the music. Thats
what its all about, brother.
One can call that neighborly
love. Why not? And something
else: when young people seek to
discover the best in man they
seek, however indirectly, for
religious meaning that goes
beyond man. I remember the
comment of 21 -year-old Phil
Amon, an FSU student at the
Palm Beach festival: Ive been
all through this. I went to
Woodstock looking for the same
thing these kids are looking for formeaning
meaning formeaning in life. Amon is now
a devout Protestant Christian.
Even the current psychology
cult, man-centered as it, too, is,
may be a religious omen for the
seventies. Though 1 personally
question the long-range good of
T Groups, sensitivity training,
encounter sessions, etc., and
though great damage has been
done to some individuals by
eager but inept practitioners of
the sensitivity art, who knows
but that acute growth
experiences may lead many
young people of the seventies
into new worlds of openness,
honesty, intimacy and personal
concern, where, as Langdon
Gilkey points out in Naming
the Whirlwind, ones capacity
for intense feeling may lead to
deeper communion with God
through deeply perceived
religious symbols.
My doubts about sensitivity
are open to correction. Im
afraid that 1 cannot say the same
for drugs. The drug cult is
self-centered and self-serving.
Those unhappy people who are
locked into its narcotic trances
know only the inner images of
the mind. They think that they

mV Wfl m
|1 m WAg M
are rich because of the many
pictures which they behold, and
the many escape tunnels down
which they plunge-
But in truth they are
impoverished beings.
Their days are centripetal
events, all their processes
incoming, none outgoing. They
do not know LIFE. Hence they
cannot know religion. They have
insulated themselves from the
real joys, the true sharings, the
great exhuberances of living for
real. It is a great tragedy.
1 think that all the above
phenomena of the infant
seventies, with the exception of
drug-taking, are signs sufficient
to prophesy a recovery of the
sacred in human life. To me they
represent not only a mounting
dissatisfaction with the purely
secular, which was so
apotheosized in the sixties, but
also an elevation of the spirit to
transcendence, to supemature
to God.
Secularly has just not proved
enough to respond to the quest
of the mind and to the longings
of the heart. The optimistic
self-sufficiency of the sixties ran
counter to the tears of
loneliness, frustration, and
suffering. Mere rationalization
flew in the face of the brooding
unknown that haunts every
aspect of mans existence.
Seductive sensuality nauseated
the deepest hungers gnawing at
the heart of man. Stoic
skepticism could not stop mans
undoubting impulse to transcend
himself. Moral relativism could
not satisfy a mans undeniable
sense of the absolute. Pleasure
could not stuff his senses, nor
money fill his palm. Like the
young Jacques Maritain he
pounded his fist on the floor,
because there were no
answers.

How will the organized
churches and synagogues
respond to that quest and
longing? Certainly they will not
respond adequately if they insist
on being relevant. Here is
where I lift my lance against the
Great Cliche:
I cannot think of anything
that has been more damaging to
the cause of the major Western
religious traditions among the
young than their almost
desperate effort in the sixties to
make God relevant. They
ended by making Him
subservient. They thought to
make Him stoop to the purposes
of secularity, and one of the
curiosities of the decade was the
announcement -by a
theologian that He was
dead.
By an unhappy irony, just as
young people were thrusting
toward the transcendent, many
of the churches were cutting
God down to size. It was like the
two armies which missed each
other at Mantinea. No wonder so
many churches are empty.
There is no doubt that, during
the sixties, with their manifold
issues of race, justice, poverty,
war, pollution, and sexuality,
the moral forces of religion were
a needed presence in the secular
city. They still are needed. The
horizontal dimension of Western
religion love and justice
toward all men had too long
been moribund in the struggles
of society. It is well that they
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Tko Air Forco has a place for pooplo I
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Doctors, administrators, engineers,
journalists, educators, etc.,
can find a challenging p in
Today's Air Force. |
v If you are interested in applying for the I
two-year Air Force ROTC program here at UF
Your first step is to take the I
Air Force Officer Qualifying Test
at 8:15 a.m. on Jan. 17 in Rm 208 Mi. Bldg. 1
THIS IS THE ONLY TIME THE TEST WILL BE GIVEN! I
so contact the I
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FOR AN APPOINTMENT AT 392-1353 I
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were reasserted to claim their
proper role, and to exercise their
salutary influences.
But, for too many churches,
the vertical dimension man to
God was lost sight of.
Religious leaders were all caught
up in economics, sociology,
politics, housing, and
international relations. Prayer,
worship, reflection, ecstasy,
faith these tended to be
shunted aside. One no longer did
anything unless it was
relevant. The mystical
element in religion died away.
Now many people, and
especially the young, are
bringing it back to life.
Campus churches in the
seventies will be empty churches
unless the priests, the ministers,
and the rabbis dare to be
irrelevant: unless they become
once more the spokesmen for
the sacred; unless they once
again proclaim the Gospel and
the Torah for their own worth as
Gods word; unless they restore
awe and mystery to their liturgy;
unless they urge prayer,
meditation, and spiritual
experience; unless they get out
of the guidance and counseling
dodge and get back to the
business of putting men in
contact with God; unless they
challenge youth to approach
God in love even when the
approach seems to have nothing
directly to do with a mans
present needs.
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REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST,
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins



The
Florida
Alligator

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Discipline, some insecurity,
and an occasional sleeping
member of the audience are
some of the things an actor
learns to live with in his
profession.
Sharon Speiman, actress and
tour manager with the Asolo
State Theatre, and Patrick Egan,
an actor with the company, said
last week that their profession
has a lot of particular kinds of
pressure that have to be dealt
with.
The pair were interviewed last
week while here for two
performances of The Glass
Menagerie** at the Constans
Theatre.
They agreed that discipline is
the most important part of an
actors work.
It is a common fault of
young talented actors to lose
control, Egan said. He recalled
an instance when a young actor
was so overcome with emotion
that he sobbed on the floor and
then had to crawl off the stage.
The lack of control is
embarrassing to the audience
and the other actors and it can
destroy the performance, Mrs.
Speiman said.
Its permissible to lose
control during rehearsal and to

'Fathers Moustache
Opens At Rathskeller

The Rathskeller celebrates its
first anniversary Thursday with a
night of entertainment featuring
Your Fathers Moustache, a
Dixieland group that appeared at
the club on its opening night.
The band will give two shows
Thursday night, one at 8:30 and
the other at 10:30. There will be
a cover charge of $2 at the door.
Advance tickets are priced at
$1.50.
The popular group features
several banjos, a brass section
and a honky-tonk piano, and
two girl singer-dancers. The
group calls the result of the
combination of their talents, a
19208 light show.

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AUDIENCE MAKES IT WORTHWHILE
Actors Life Full Os Pressure

find out how far you can go in
your role, she said.
But even if an actor has good
discipline, he may often feel
insecure before a performance.
But Egan doesnt think that
insecurity lasts very long.
The minute you walk onto
that stage, all you can feel is the
audience and you begin to do
your best to affect them with
the role youre playing, he
Mrs. Speiman said it is quite
an experience to act before a
large audience. Its an
exhilarating feeling to be in
front of 1600 people and know
they are watching you, she
said. But your ego sure suffers
if the audience doesnt
appreciate what youre doing,
she added.
Sometimes some members of
the audience dont appreciate
what the actors are doing to the
extent that some of the theater
goers fall asleep.
Nothing shakes me up so
much as seeing a man sleeping in
his seat during a performance.
The only reason he is there is
because his wife dragged him
along so the ticket wouldnt be
wasted.
They have found college
audiences to be the most
appreciative. Theyre very
aware, very intelligent, and the
most critical. They catch all the

We had a real good response
for the group last year, Marc
Click, a spokesman for the
Rathskeller said early in the
week. We dont have any
doubts but what the university
community will come out this
time too, he said.
Your Fathers Moustache
also will appear Friday and
Saturday night at the Rat, giving
a show beginning at 12:30 each
night as well as the 8:30 and
10:30 p. m. shows.
u Once again we want to remind
people that you dont have to be
21 to come to the Rat, Click
said.

subtleties other audiences
dont, Mrs. Speiman said.
The audiences on Broadway
she found to be faded. The
audience has an attitude that the

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Wednesday, January 14,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

theatre is a social event to be
mentioned at cocktail parties the
following evening, she said.
But beyond the worries about
discipline and insecurity and the
sleeping man in the audience,

DAN VINING
Entertainment Editor

there is a reward that makes the
profession worthwhile.
When the audience says,
Thats something human, thats
real,* then you know youve
succeeded, Egan said.

Page 15



Page 16

VWa lA||||Aa|a 44 4 A^A

'Reivers; Old-Fashioned, Good

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entartainmant Writar
Several reviewers have called
The Reivers an old-fashioned
movie, the kind they used to
make in Hollywood back in the
days before sentimental became
a bad word.
Though most of the writers
dont explain themselves too
well, I think 1 see what they
mean about the film and I think
I agree.
The movie, now playing at the
Plaza Theater, is an adaptation
of a Faulkner story set in
Jefferson, Mississippi, shortly
after the turn of the century.
Its a good story about an 11
year-old kid, Lucius McCaslin
(Mitch Vogel) who gets a taste
of sin and the big city life in one
short weekend with the help of
two roguesBoon Hogganbechk
(Steve McQueen), and Ned

Variety Offered
In Area Theaters
(EDITORS NOTE: The following three short reviews mark the
beginning of a new policy of The Alligator to feature some notes
about all films appearing in the areas theaters. Other short reviews
will be featured in forthcoming issues in an attempt to give members
of die UF community an idea what will be available for the weekends
entertainment.)
John and Mary lt is a good story about two young people
(Dustin Hoffman and Mia Farrow) who find love in each other. Their
gentle feelings toward each other are contrasted throughout the film
with scenes of people who arent finding anybody to love. The pair
meet in a bar, spend the night together, and then spend the negtt day
together trying to find out who they are and what they can mean to
each other. The result is nice. It is a beautifully simple movie though
much is revealed about the characters and what their lives have been.
Its playing at the Florida Theater.
On Her Majestys Secret Service James Bond is back for those
who want James Bond to be back, and there apparently are many who
do. Its a new Bond (George Lazenby), but hes as good looking as the
other one and he kills enough people and there are enough people
trying to kill him to make it exciting. The skiing footage is among the
best in the film. There are lots of women, too. Its showing at the
Center.
Good Morning and Goodbye Producer and Director Russ Meyer
is somehow convincing someone that his skin flicks belong in regular
theaters as opposed to those little art houses. Just because he
doesnt call this Nude on the Moon, or Blonde on a Bum Trip,
doesnt mean that same old mild perversity isnt there that so many of
us apologetically enjoy. Also showing at the Center.
Seminole Meets Sunday
There will be a mandatory Seminole staff work day next
Sunday afternoon at 1 p. m.
All section editors are to meet with Editor-in-chief Ken
! Driggs during the week with a complete report on their section.
Winter quarter office hours are Monday through Wednesday 10
! a. m. to 4p. m. and Friday 11 a. m. to 3p. m.
The Sunday session will last at least until 5 p. m. with the
possibility of an evening session Driggs said.

DTACof
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McCaslin (Rupert Crosse), a
loose-boned Blade man whose
McCaslin ancestry apparently
dates back to somebodys
woodpile.
Its Lucius story and
watching him find out what
people older than himself are
doing in places like Miss Rebas
boarding house in Memphis
makes the movie what it is.
The parts all are played well.
The supporting cast is one of the
best Ive seen. The people
walking around Jefferson look
real and it is easy to be taken
into their lives.
The film has been called
old-fashioned, I think, because
of its bigness and its
sentimentalityboth of those
characteristics of the old
cinema. Lucius grandfather
(Will Greer) is the main figure in

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which the hugeness and sense of
sentimentality is carried. It is
easy to love him and what he is
able to tell the boy about life
and living.
A characteristic of Mr.
Faulkners fiction writing is
careful use of each scene to ring
it for all it can do and be. That
same characteristic is found in
the movie, screenwriters Irving
Ravetch and Harriett Frank Jr.
obviously have worked to put all
they can into each piece of
dialogue and scene.
At one point, Lucius is
charmed by Boons whore
friend, Corrie (Sharon Farrell),
who regardless of her
occupationcomes off motherly
and comforting, Lucius finds out
what Miss Rebas place is all
about. He is crying in front of
Corrie and gets into a fight to
defend her honor. Ive had a lot
of men fighting over me butnone
have fought for me , she says to
him. And I just dont know
what Im going to do about
that. The last line shows so
much more potential for moving
the audience and actually
capturing the feeling of the
moment than a lesser artist than
Faulkner or the two
screenwriters could have
achieved. And the lines such as
this one are what give the film
Theologians
To Speak
Dialogue with a Theologue, a
v program sponsored by the Reitz
Union and the University
Religious Association, will host
Rev. Harold Burris and Rev.
George Telford Friday at 4 p. m.
in rooms 122 and 123 of the
Union.
Entitled The Churchs Role
in Social Change, it will be the
sixth in the series of
student-theologue discussions.
Rev. Burris is Methodist
Campus Minister at the
University of Northern lowa and
Rev. Telford is Pastor of
Tallahassee First Presbyterian
Church, and formerly was pastor
of UFs University Presbyterian
Center.
- J c.
They will be the first
theologues outside of the UF
community to attend these
dialogues.
The discussions are part of
an effort by the Reitz Union and
the University Religious
Association to present programs
involving student participation,
said Dick Thompson, graduate
assistant to the Union Programs
Office.

its hugeness and wonderful
ambiguity.
Technically, the movie is
competent. There are only a few
technically clever parts-the
most outstanding of which is a
horse race in which young
Lucius makes a beautiful
discovery about the world.

New Group'Helps

By ROBIN ADAMS
Alligator Writer
An organization has been
formed to help those who want
to help someone else.
According to Valerie
Woodard, volunteer coordinator
of Operation Help. This group
reflects the many needs and
opportunities in the community.
It aids those who want to
volunteer to help, find an
organization to work for, and
helps the organization find
volunteers.
The ecumenical group that
formed Operation Help will
be sponsoring a panel Jan. 22 at
Bpm concerning opportunities
for volunteering.
The meeting will include
speakers from various
organizations who need
volunteers. The program is
scheduled to end at 9:30, after

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On paper, the film sounds
disjointed and ambigious and
wildly sentimental and perhaps a
bit foolish, but it isnt. In the
end, all its parts can come
together in your head and make
a thing greater than those parts.
Its a lot of fun and its got the
power to get inside your heart.

which there will be informal
refreshment period when any
additional questions may be
asked.
Some of the organizations
who are seeking volunteers
include day care centers,
neighborhood houses, nursing
homes, and those groups seeking
help in preventing suicide, aid to
the mentally retarded and
tutoring.
Aid comes in many forms.
Some organizations are looking
for donations ranging from
pianos and furniture to toys,
books and clothing.
Other groups are asking for
volunteers for health-associated
needs. These include The Suicide
and Crisis Intervention
Association, patterning for
brain-injured children, caring for
children in Shands Hospital and
writing letters for the sick.



The
Florida
Alligator

SAYS FSU PRESIDENT
i
Durhams Intentions Good

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Florida State President
Stanley Marshall said today basketball coach Hugh
Durham showed good intentions but poor judgment
in recruiting violations that cost the Seminoles two
more years on NCAA probation.
Marshall, who ordered Durham last week to cease
recruiting activities and confine his duties to the
sidelines, told newsmen he was confident the coach
did not intentionally try to dodge rules against
off-campus entertainment of prospective players.
Durham said the violations resulted from an error
in his interpretation.
The 18-member NCAA council in Washington
imposed an additional two years probation for the

UF Pro Golfers Among The Best

UF golfers now on the pro
tour pushed their winnings over
the $2)4 million-mark this past
year, paced by the leading
money-winner of 1969, Frank
Beard.
Beard is the first former Gator
golfing great to top the PGA
touring pros in winnings, as he
brought home $175,223.93 in
1969. In all, Gator golfers won
$479,025.52 this past year to
give the group an all-time

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to spread. f iWBi Mrep^^HMKfllf


GATOR SPORTS

income of $2,538,347.61 since
1957.
Stfll tops among all-time
money-earners from the Gator
golfing stable is Doug Sanders,
who has captured $648,938.06
in earnings during his career.
Beard has won $552,029.53,
Dan Sikes $482,085.96, Tommy
Aaron $419,632.54, Dave Ragan
$208,936.82, Bob Murphy
$162,474.96, Laurie Hammer
$31,510.85, Pat Schwab
$19,765.98, A1 Kelley

Seminoles last weekend for allowing a business
corporation to pay for air travel of three athletes to
Atlanta, where the firm offered them summer jobs.
Marshall said he saw no benefit in identifying the
business or the players, but added that two of the
three are now playing for the Seminoles.
Florida State was already on one years
probation, barring the team from post-season
tournaments, when the new violations occurred.
Durham and assistant coach Bill Clendinen visited
Atlanta during the boys* trip, which they had
arranged.
Durham said all three had signed letters of
intent to play for Florida State, but only two
signed grants-in-aid.

$8,060.62 and Don Blisplinghoff
$4,912.29.
On the list of all-time pro golf
money winners, Sanders ranks
7th, Beard Bth and Sikes 9th.
Aaron is 25th.
Winnings in 1969 by this
group, in addition to Beards,
were as follows: Aaron
$116,462.41, Sikes $89,103.68,
Murphy $56,525.97, Sanders.
$30,311.86, Ragan $7,138.85,
Hammer $4,017.44 and Schwab
$241.38.

WadiMsday, January 14,1970, The Florida AMpWar,

jHMM tfSt&£SS£s x
PETE KNOCKE
GOT ITI
Andy Owens (45) dutches rebound during the Gators 57-66 upeet
over the Tenneseoe Volunteers in overtime. Owens, who finished the
game with 17 points, put in the winning basket
Volleyball Deadline Today
The deadline for dormitory students who want to sign up for
intramural volleyball is today at 5 pm. Students can register in room
229 of the Florida Gym or call 3924)581.

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Page 17



Page 18

i, Jbpmwv 14,1970

A TRULY GOLDEN ERA* PREDICTED
Sports In The VOs-Grand And Gaudy

By STEVE SNIDER
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK The seventies:
theyll be swinging, stabilizing,
super, sweet or golden
depending on whose crystal ball
you read.
Baseball Commissioner Bowie
Kuhn believes sports in general
are entering a truly golden era
because of the enormous
sports-mindedness of the people
and the quality of the skilled
American athlete.**
Stabilizing is favored by Pro
Football Commissioner Pete
Rozelle, whose group emerged
stronger than ever from violent
storms of the sixties.
To commissioner Walter
Kennedy of the National
Basketball Association they*H be
the swinging seventies and
NASCAR President Bill France
fancies super.**
Says Pro Golf Commissioner
Joe Dey:
I think the seventies w3l be
fat and booming. So why not
dub them the sweet seventies?**
By any name, the new decade
in sports apparently will be
grander and gaudier than
anything weve seen before.
In these earliest days, the new
era looks more like the sour
seventies** with baseball facing
a court fight and gambling
investigations popping on a wide
front but there are plenty of
goodies on the list for 1970-79
according to top executives who
made these forecasts for the
sports they lead:
Bowie Kuhn for baseball
A dramatic increase in
attendance. New super stars
already are emerging, a high
percentage of them non-pitchers.
With more artificial truf coming
in, scientific hitting will return. I
think I see another .400 hitter.**
Pete Rozelle for pro football
lt is likely the seventies will
see further expansion, possibly
to cities outside the United
States mainland such as Mexico
City and perhaps Honolulu.
Joe Dey for golf
significant changes in
tournament scheduling. Bigger
purses. Increasing financial
rewards for the players. Broader
popular appeal as television
techniques are improved and the
game is brought into more living
rooms.**
Walter Kennedy for the NBA
- We look forward to NBA
basketball in France, Italy and
Spain among other foreign
countries.
Bdl France for auto racing
I look for the super seventies to
be the years auto racing becomes
the no. 1 sport in the nation.**
Alastair B. Martin, president
of the U. S. Lawn Tennis
Association Top U. S. pros to
be making $200,000 a year,
before taxes. Davis Cup open to
all players. Grass courts to
become obsolete. Pancho
Gonzalez still threatening to
retire.
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Clarence CampbeD, president
of the National Hockey League
a move to Europe-sooner
than you think.**
Walter Byers, executive
director of the NCAA Better
performances will continue to
accelerate because of better
equipment, improved physiques,
training and coaching methods.
Coaching responsibility will be
greater with emphasis on the
psychological preparation of
athletes.
John D. Schapiro, president
of the Thoroughbred Racing
Associations "We had an
historic, record year in 1969 and
I am optimistic about the future
of racing which anually attracts
and entertains more fans than
any other sport.
The optimistic notes far
out-weighed the occasional
mention or comment on factors
that could have an adverse effect
on sports in the seventies.
Os unrest on the campus,
Byers said, I believe present
efforts of some to turn the
sports field into a political arena
will be one of our most serious
problems.
Professional golf will keep
right on growing, said Dey,
Barring a major economic
recession.
Kuhn declined to comment
directly on baseballs immediate
problems, which could change
from hour to hour, but said:
I think baseball wiD see an
era of increasing economic gain
for the player and possibly
greater harmony between the
player and the owner.
Kuhns crystal ball brought
forth images with the speed of a
35 slide projector on automatic:
Rules changes favoring the
batter but not until the 1969
changes (smaller strike zone,
lower mound) are fully assessed.
Tighter spitball rule. New
stadiums, emerging where
current parks are old or in
undesirable locations, some of
the new with all-weather domes
but I*m not certain its
desirable to have 24 domes.
Baseball clubs will become
move promotion-minded as a
result of centennial year
successes. Crystal ball doesnt
show clearly either new
franchises or transfers but
certainly in my lifetime I would
expect to see a move to Latin
America, the Orient and possibly
Europe.
A continuing assault on the
record book. Home run records
to go, including perhaps Babe
Ruths 714 for a career but I
see the potential for hitters like
Pete Rose to become more
important than the sluggers as
more artificial turf comes in. A
centralized administration for

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greater efficiency with offices of
the major and minor leagues
located in the commissioners
office.
As for Pete Rozelle, hes
about ready to sit down and
watch a little football come
autumn days of the seventies.
I hope the next decade can
become the stabilizing seventies
for professional football, said
Pete. With all that happened in
the sixties expansion, the
so-called war* between the two
leagues, the merger agreement,
restructuring, realignment into a
26-team league, we ate anxious
to stabilize what we have.
And paramount among that
stabilization would be getting
our main emphasis back to the
football field, to the playing of
the game, to the on-the-field
competition that has brought
enjoyment to so many millions
of people.
In addition to the possibility
of expansion outside the
continental limits, Rozelle sees
one of his other major hopes
moving closer to reality.
We also see the seventies as a
time when professional football
can move closer to being able to
play its games under mostly
uniform field conditions with
the more general use of
synthetic turf in existing stadia
and in new stadia at Cincinnati,
Pittsburg, jiiwar City and
Philaddphk.
A $300,000 golf tournament
is on the 1970 schedule so one
for a half million cannot be far
behind. Re-styling the
conventional tournament
schedule, however, is Deys
major project and the big money
will fall in naturally.
You might find three types
of events, said Joe. They
would be (A) some 20 premium

tournaments leading up to a
major event at Rainbows end,
(B) a series of satellite
tournaments concurrent with
the premium events and (C)
some 20 or more other first-class
tournaments unrelated to one
another.
Many top stars have been
protesting for years the regular
tour is to loqg and demanding.
Hie premium tour would take
care of that. Young pros have
protested the difficulty of
qualifying for tournaments as
now conducted. The satellite
tour would be their on-the-job
training grounds.
Such an U. S. program, Dey
feels, also would help produce
more international tournaments
of significance. Top American
stars who play the premium tour
presumably would have more
free time to play overseas.
Pro basketball has picked up
plenty of steam through national
television exposure and even a
war with the new American
Basketball Association hasnt
exactly spoiled things for the
NBA.
Our attendance has doubled
to a record high of 4.4 million
during the last five years, said
Kennedy. 1 visualize that
during the next decade we will
more than double that figure.
The swinging seventies wfll find

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the NBA proceeding with its
announced plans for orderly
expansion and this growth will
extend beyond the territorial
boundaries of the United
States.
For tennis,USLTAs president
Martin sees more vast changes in
a sport already quaking with
growing pains.
The term contract or
promoter professional will be
little used, he said, for it will
be accepted that almost every
top professional has his agent or
promoter.
United States tennis will be
under the control of the
USLTA, working closely with
one organization which manages
the majority of top stars.
Most of the tournaments, he
predicted, will be open to
everyone and will be played in
municipal stadia. The U. S. Open
then will gross close to $2
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Kansas City Chiefs Godlike
MR. EDITOR:
The Kansas City Chiefs have saved us! Following a decade of
conflict, turmoil and chaos, the achievement of this great team has set
the tone of the decade that is now upon us.
Last Sundays SUPER BOWL has to be the most profound social
phenomenon since Woodstock. The psychological factors that were
involved should have thrilled even the most intellectual of observers
To begin with, the Chiefs suffered in true Dostoevskian tradition!
Ignominiously defeated by Green Bay four years ago, and the object
of much Oakland brutality since that time, the Chiefs have finally
realized themselves. They are now the most professional of the
professionals.
Their sophisticated style of play was sheer beauty. The true
significance of the game, however, lies in the fact that a God named
AARON turned the Rock of the NFL into dust. Such a feat can
find historical parallel only in a biblical tale about some other God
that turned some guys wife into salt.
What this means, is that a miracle has occurred. The WAY has been
shown. The UNITY of mankind will now be realized when the two
super-structures of American society the AFL and NFL become
ONE. To be able to observe such an event is truly more than any
mortal can ask.
DAVID LIBERMAN, 4JM
In Praise Os Carlos Alvarez
MR. EDITOR:
I must take care what I write, neither over-reacting nor
under-reacting to a sensitive situation (to use UF President Stephen
C. OConnells felicitous phrase); Accordingly, if a portion of my
ensuing remarks seem somewhat vague, this is deliberately so.
I have admired Carlos Alvarezs abilities and accomplishments as a
flanker on the football team. More importantly, off the field he has
shown himself to be an individual of substance and character, willing
to speak out when his conscience tells him that persons in positions of
authority and trust have not acted in a proper fashion. These qualities
of courage and character call for commendation.
The statement by Carlos Alvarez (Gainesville Sun, January 2) and
statements by others will elicit a whole spectrum of reactions and
responses; Let me enumerate some of them. Note that the types of
reactions are not exclusive and an individual can belong to more than
one category.
At one extreme, one finds those who see nothing reprehensible
about tiie entire episode. (Perhaps, we dont have the slickest PR
department around and maybe the officials' statements were liable to
misinterpretation amen.)
Moving along the list of possibilities one encounters the
semi-sympathizers. (Sure, it's tough to start the new year without
a job, especially after going 9-1-1, but that's life in a putty knife
factory.)
The realists follow. (Christ, this is a competitive world and
youve got to be realistic to survive, much less come out on top of the
heap. How would it look if Graves made promises to prospective
recruits and then word leaked out that he would not be around to
fulfill them? What would that have done to our recruitment
program?)
Next conies the who-does-he-think-he-fa group. (Just because
hes an All-American doesn't give him the right to shoot off his mouth
that way. And criticizing President OConnell. Why, hes not even an
American.)
Now one comes upon the sincere-but-naive types, (f heard that
Alvarez is a' real clean-cut kid but awful naive. He seems to be sincere
in what hes doing but this is a mans world. Youve got to move with
the punches, be flexible when necessary.)
Next come the fact finders. (There is more to this than meets
the eye. You have to take what you read and hear with a grain of salt.
Pm withholding judgment until all the facts are in.)
And now die tough-for-the-ncw-coach group. (No doubt about
it a case of *tactlMs mishandling of a delicate situation* (Florida
Alligator, January 5). Its an added challenge for the new coach but he
is a stnughtshooter.)
Next the lets-let-this-whole-mess-die-in-peace advocates. (Weve
had enough of these rumors, charges, gossip and the like. The less said
the better. This whole thing will blow over.)
At the other extreme, the ardent-Gator-supporter. ( I
understand we out-recruited Georgia in Georgia. Man, with our
super-sophs and now Dickey, we'll just bowl em over. Yeah, I
understand Alvarez said something. I bet tickets are going to be holy
hell to get. That with Tennessee should be something else.)
1 have by no hated afl the possible reactions to the events of
the past few weeks. Im sure others could develop a more exhaustive
Where do I fit into the spectrum? In my mind, the key issue is a
moral one, a question of ethics, a matter of values. Terms such as
mishandling, blundering, irresponsible, tactless,
ambiguous, misinterpretation and so forth are bandied about. As
1 e it, these terms and their implications the crucial isaie.
The essential question is: Is my President, is UF President Stephen
C. OConnell a straightshooter?
GREGORY E. BOCZAR, 7BA
ts. The tbovt remarks and reflections ait entirely my owi. I just
want to make sure that any flak which may occur is aimed m the
proper directions

IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL
No Need For Rule Changes

WASHINGTON (UPI) An
advisory committee of coaches
has notified the National
Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) that there is no need to
tamper to any extent with
college football rules. They're
fine as they are.
That goes for the platoon
substitute rule, the two point
optional conversion and the
placing of the goal posts 10
yards back in the end zone.
The report of the rules
recommendations Committee of
the American Football Coaches
Association highlighted the
annual NCAA convention, which
went into its second day today.
The committee told the
NCAA that the game is
presently enjoying the most
stimulating and popular appeal
in its 100 years of existence
and... no radical rules changes
are necessary or will be
forthcoming.
Committee chairman Jack
Curtice of the University of
California at Santa Barbara, told
newsmen that for the first time
in yean there was no suggestion
made that the colleges change

I Dont befieve
I everything you hear.
J > t i i;Ji' *i* ~i *>. IF; > >. "*. s-t .'.
I 1 Vbkswogens are hod to drive I
A fully automatic transmission* comes in I
Volkswagen's Fastback and Squareback Sedans.
I "Vdkswagens don't hold enough* I
I Volkswagen's Squareback Sedan has more than I
twice as much carrying space as the average sedan. |
I "V6kswogens are ugly" I
I Volkswagen's Fastback Sedan doesnt even look |
like a Volkswagen.
I Miller-Brown Motors, Inc. I
4222 N.W. 13th St. I
OainasvilU §
I authorized I
DEALER S
\ ..: ; j i ntc'&.O Yjunawji*

their present platoon
substitution rule. He also said
that the optional two-point

14.17b; ngrfUMtMtrnm

conversion after touchdown
probably enjoys the support of
90 per cent of the coaches.

Page 19





Page 20

>, Ttw Florida AlMtor, ftmdnmdmf, January 14,1970

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