Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
. T ' \
Biafra Surrenders; Vicious Civil War Ends

By United Pri lirtwmtial
The Nigerian High Commission in
London announced the Biafran chief of
staff surrendered today, ending 31
months of civil war that was bom of
tribal animosities and religious hatreds.
The conflict took two million lives.
The surrender was announced by Maj.
Gen. Philip Effiong, the Biafran chief of
staff, who broadcast an appeal to lay
down their arms. The appeal was
broadcast over Radio Biafra.
With the end of the war the nations
of the free worfd mobilized their
resources to prevent mass starvation in

-Po&f. "'
As? .AmWUL

Vol 62, No. 63

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PHIL BANNISTER
SLEEP TIGHT, ALBERT

UF 1 mascot Albert can sleep without worrying
about thoughtful students feeding him
marshmallows and other treats that cause
indigestion. Billy Mitchells Drill Team's quarterly

Glicks Snowball In Hell
Knocked By Shepherd

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd lashed into a
former student leader's charge
Monday that the proposed
1970-71 Student Government
budget has as much a chance of
as a mow ball has in
hell.
Refering to Marc H. Glides
statement Sunday which gave a
pessimistic view of the proposed
$378,000 budget ever being
accepted, Shepherd said, Glick
didnt have anything to do with
formulation of the new budget.
Despite what Prime
Minister Click says about the
chances for getting the increase,
we will get some increase. I
dont know anything about a
snow balls chance in hell,
Shepherd said.
Glick played a major role in
the formulation of this years SG
budget while serving as Student
Senate majority floor leader last
summer. He also authored
* Senate Bill No. 69-1238 which
lays down the procedure for
preparing the SG budget.

secessionist Biafra where relief
authorities said one million persons
might starve?during the next 48 hours.
sai JJ nnmnn^ml
Oflfl IRRW mso ippevm Ramil
s daughter of Ac Barfrans
The end appeared near this weekend
when Gen. Odumegwu Ojukwu, leader
of die Biafran forces, fled to a neutral
country and prepared to sue for peace
within the next 48 hours. The actual
sunender came first.
Bsafra seceded from dm Federal
Republic of Nigeria on May 30, 1967,
after Moslem Huasa tribesmen
massacred 20,000 Christian Ibo

The
Florida Alligator

Shepherd emphasized that
this is not next years Final
budget for SG. There has been
no action taken by the senate in
approving it. This is an executive
budget. I dont know how much
we will get. We are in
competition with after parts of
the university.
The reasoning behind
Shepherd's statement of
optimism toward the budgets
future SG's possibly receiving
$85,000 more next year over
this years budget is explained
by him as lying in the premise
that the UF has more obligations
to meet than other universities
in the state.-
Presently, the student at UF
and all other universities in the
state, pays a $32.50 activities fee
out of his tuition, which is
broken down and distributed to
athletics, health services, the
union, and SG.
Shepherd would like to see
this amount increased without
increasing the tuition.
Other universities in the
state are getting the same
amount even though a school

TWO MILLION LIVES LOST

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

initiation is providing guards 'round the dock this
week. Os course, the rifles are only wood, but the
visitors attracted by his new friends make those
long, cold winter days pass a little faster.

University of Florida, Gainesville

like South Florida doesnt have
the expense of our union and a
major student health services
program.
We want a different
aflocataoa. There are no plans to
mcreose the tuitientodothte.lt
would be abated to incieaae
tuition to get a different
ago cation. This idea v not being
Shepherd said he didnt know
how much of an increase SG will
get, but he added, We will get
some increase.

'Corner Drug Store
Opens January 26
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Comer Drug Store will open its doors to UF students involved
in the drug scene on Jan. 26.
The facility designed to provide professional help for drug users will
be located at 1823 N.W. Second Ave.
Dave Doucette, chairman of the Drug Stores board of governors,
announced a series of screening sessions for volunteer workers set
from Jan. 18-21, from 7 to 9 p.m.
(SEE'DRUG'PAGE 2)

tribesmen m tribal dashes that followed
a series of political coups.
The war that followed was one of the
cruellest known and more that one
million Ibo tribesmen starved to death
when Nigeria sealed off the rebel state
from the outside world. The fear among
the nations of die world was that a
puitive blood bath would follow.
The latest repasts from BMra said
same ffehtirg n absurd this morning
with the rebel fasces holding UK
Aapost, their only mpply Mnk with the
But the radio broadcast said General

POUCY STRICTER
Regents Revise
Tenure Rules
By USF ORACLE
TAMPA The Florida Board of Regents tightened its policy on
tenure in the state university system in a meeting here Monday.
The Regents voted on seven amendments to the proposed revisions
on tenure and then accepted the amended revisions as part of the state
policy.
Board member Chester H. Ferguson of Tampa proposed the
amendments as the tenure revisions came up on the agenda.
Most of the amendments resulted in a stricter interpretation of the
revisions with emphasis on retaining final authority for the Regents.
A revision on tenure eligibility conditions was amended to delete
the words at the discretion of the president, substituting he may
recommend as suggested by USF President John S. Allen.
Ferguson was particularly vocal about the long periods of
notification required to inform a faculty member of termination. He
said that a department head should not be burdened with a faculty
member who is not doing his job for the notice period required by
the policy revision. (In some cases this period could be two years.)
Regent Henry Kramer of Jacksonville said the universities were at
fault for not being more discriminating in their hiring practices, which
he said caused an undue number of terminations.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell explained that the state
universities did not have adequate funding to bring people to the
campus for personal interviewing and had to use mail for hiring
faculty.
Kramer then said that the Legislature should provide the funds
necessary to enable the universities to be more discriminating in their
hiring of faculty.
The new revision on notice of non-reapportionment states that
notice shall be given by March 1 of the first academic year of
service, or if a one-year appointment terminates during an academic
year at least three months in advance of this termination.
Notice must be given not later than Dec. IS of the second year of
academic service or at least 12 months before the expiration of an
appointment after two or more years in the institution.
Another significant change inriudrd the miring of the time
Mtemy lor i nnmtaratian for tenure from three to five yean, which
(SEE 'FINAL' PAGE 2)

Effiong told his troops the struggle
must be put to an end and they must
stop the bloodshed that is going on.
Effiong said he had been in contact
with both military and civilian leaders
of the Biafran community, but did not
say he had consulted with Ojukwu, who
led his Ibo tribesmen into independence
and through the civil war that followed.
Effiong said a Biafran negotiating
team was prepared to meet Federal
Nigerian negotiators to work out terms
for peace. He said any question of a
government in exile was repudiated by
our people.

Tuesday, January 13, 1970

ixroiiie .§§
The Gat&p j§
ri.Vi i i .Vr- 'i i i '. I |*l VsVt
DR. EDWARD TELLER,
famed nuclear physicist,
will speak Jan. 28 at
Accent 70 page 3
v
Classifieds 8,9
Editorials 6
FSU News..-. 2
Movies .. ...8,9
Orange and Blue 10
Small Society 4
Sports..-. II

/



Page 2

I The FtoridsAMpSor, January 13,1970

Venezuelan Folk Ballet
Tonight At Florida Gym

By DAN VINING
Mingnor ciiim uunfiMWi canor
Danzas Venezuelas, a Venezuelan folklore ballet,
will begin at 8:1S tonight in the Florida Gym.
The program, part of the Student Government
Productions (SOP) Concert Series, will feature
dancers, singers, and musicians form the south
American country.
Costumes are a big part of the glamour of the
Danzas Venezuelas and each of the dancers and
singers will be wearing some form of native dress.
Were hoping that the program will add a little
color to our bill of concerts and productions for this
quarter, Leonard Tanner, SGP chairman said
Monday.
The Florida Gym has been outfitted with all of

BILL PRE-FILEP
Water May Cost UF

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
AlUgribr Staff Writer
State Sen. Robert Saunders
has pre-filed a bill in the Florida
Senate which will authorize the
Board of Regents to add the cost
of water to UFs annual budget.
According to Saunders
administrative assistant George

'Drug Store Policy
To Be Discrete
||nMMiPA6Eoii^|
Were interested in anyone who is willing to work, Doucette said.
The Florida Alligators managing editor said persons once
hooked on drugs are not exempt from volunteer work.
Anyone once on drugs and now off the habit is welcomed and
encouraged to contribute their time to the project.
Barbara Eisenstadt, 7ED, in charge of day-today operations for the
house, reports a need for office equipment, kitchen utensils, couches
and chairs.
A grant for continued operation of the center is pending with the
Governor's Task Force on Narcotics, Dangerous Drugs and Alcoholic
Abuse, said Dr. Edwin A. Larson, UF psychiatrist at the Student
Health Center.
The Comer Drug Store will run under the new university policy on
drugs, approved by UF President Stephen C. OConnell last fall.
The Drug Store will not inform authorities of users seeking help.
However no drugs of any kind will be permitted in the Drug Store.

news th*-.
frem...JtMWEsu
By FSU Flambeau
COURT ACTION: Richard Wilson, Gainesville ACLU attorney, will
arrive in Tallahassee today to begin preparing the defense of the
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and 15 FSU students in an
attempt to block the issuance of a permanent court injunction against
the use of university facilities. The university presented its arguments
to the court Dec. 29 despite defense for continuance until after the
Christmas holiday.
The case stems from a request by university lawyers to change an
injunction made last March from temporary to permanent status.
GRACE: Amazing Grace is Tallahassees latest underground paper.
The paper made its first appearance yesterday, and will be published
every two weeks.

YOUR FATHERS
WHAT?

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tlw official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion..

Patton, the bill, will
not take money from other
university allocations.
The Board of Regents will
just be authorized to add
another item to the legitimate
budget of the university, lie
said.
Since 1905, when UF moved
to Gainesville from Lake City,

SAMSON
HELPING YOU
HELP OTHERS

the lighting equipment available, Tanner said.
Starring in the program is Yolanda Moreno, an
authority on the tradition of dance in her country,
who also serves as artistic director of the dancers.
The show has received good response from
newspapers across the country. The Chicago
Sun-Times has called the show exuberant.
Were trying, by booking the Danzas
Venezuelas, to offer something in the way of variety
for the university community, Tanner said. Weve
had several distinguished ballets in the past seasons,
but never anything as unique as this program. It
should be quite an interesting evening.
Tickets are $1.50, s2* and $3, and are on sale
today in the Reitz Union box office.

the university has gotten its
water free.
The agreement, often referred
to as the free water contract
was part of Gainesvilles bid for
the location of the state
institution within this city.
However, this contract was
made at a time when there were
approximately 300 students.
For the last fiscal year, with a
student body of over 20,000,
UF ? .s water bill was more than
$137,500. ;
However, in 1955, the Florida
Supreme Court held the city was
obligated to provide free water,
regardless of the increased size
of the university and the
increased cost of water, Patton
said.
It is not Saunders intent to
take money from the university..
The money will come out of the
general revenue from the state,
he said.
If the bill passes, the water
charge would probably first
appear on the 1971-72 budget,
Patton said.
During the last legislative
session, May 1969, Saunders
introduced a similar bill, which
did not pass.

Status Quo Charges Prompt
Blue Key Reorganization

In reaction to charges that
Florida Blue Key is part of the
establishment and prefers the
status quo, an executive
council has been created to
Keep the organization up with
the times, said spokesman
Steve Uhlfelder.
The council will consist of
seven members appointed by the
FBK president and approved by
the chapter. Officers and
committee chairmen are not
eligible. Meetings will be held
twice a month, although an

WEDNESDAY COUPON SPECIAL
| fctftudoi Tried £hidten I
f JKKSBHD f~2 372-3649 3
dinner 99t
1 3 Pc. Ctwcfcan S
Mashed Potatoes Bt). 1.25
s?-* BRING COUPON \

I
DANZAS VENEZUELAS
... will be brought to the Florida Gym tonight
Final Tenure Say (
| Left With Regents j
FROM PAGE OH J
the Regents felt would allow more time for evaluation before granting
tenure.
The new policy also will provide a mandatory cutoff of tenure at
age 65 except for those professors now having tenure. In these cases
tenure will continue until age 70.
The Regents staff drew up the new policy in consultation with
representatives of the American Association of University Professors
(AAUP).
Tenure restrictions in Florida have varied greatly from campus to
campus. The new policy will present a more uniform system but the
individual schools will be allowed to set higher standards such as is the
case at Florida State University where tenure is given to associate
professors only if they have been promoted.
The new policy also allows the president to recommend to the
Regents that credit be given to certain educators for time spent at
other universities.
""In the case of an assistant or associate professor, he could be given
credit for up to two years outside the system and in the case of a
professor, four years credit could be recommended.
Turlington To Speak
Gainesvilles state representative, Ralph Turlington, will speak
on Floridas problems and the upcoming primaries tonight at 8
p.m. at the Reitz Union.
Turlington, former speaker of the House of Representatives,
is expected to attack Gov. Claude Kirk's handling of state
finances and the Governors Club.

emergency meeting could be
called by the chairman, who is
elected by the council members.
The council will attempt to
make FBK a more vocal body,
taking stands on such issues as
the University Activities Center,
the Vietnam War Moratorium
and the loyalty oath.
Uhlfelder said all issues would
be carefully researched but no
statement could be made by the
council without the approval of
the chapter, except in an
emergency.

MIM-POSTO
-A T It
BUM BACK THE
S6E-IHROUGH LocK
IN OUR AIR
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PETE KNOCKE
STERILE UNION?
Who said the Reitz Union was sterile? Saturday night's showing of
"The Graduate" lured so many students to that mausoleum that this
' line of students waited at 8:30 to see the 10:00 show; the early show
had sold out hours before.

Indianola Segregation Pleas
Refused By Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court
refused today to hear arguments that de facto
school segregation should be permitted in the South
if it results solely from housing patterns.
The court, as customary, gave no reason for its
brief order refusing to review legal issues involved in
the neighborhood school attendance zones set up at
Indianola, Miss.
The order left standing a decision of the sth UJS.
Circuit Court of Appeals rejecting the zoning
because it left the schools about as segregated as
they were before.
A three-judge circuit court panel held that even
though the zones were drawn without regard to
race, the city must redraw them or switch to some
other plan that would get results.
In other action today, the court:-
9 Agreed to decide whether anti-Communist laws
passed by Congress may be used to bar Communist
party candidates from election ballots.
i Refused to review the court martial conviction
of a former Air Force captain who admitted
meeting with Communist agents in East Berlin
during a 1960 vacation.
Let stand a state court ruling in a Cleveland
case upholding nondiscrimination provisions in a
construction contract a case likely to bear on the
Nixon administratioris Philadelphia Plan of goals

At FMC
the only thing
we promise you
is a great
chance
-l* > .
Whatever your interest-research, design, engineering, production,
marketing youll find wide open opportunity at FMC Chemicals. Our
growth, both in technological advancement and sales volume, has been
outstanding. Were one of the four diversified groups that comprise
FMC Corporations world-wide operations-sales exceed $1 billion.
We need people for sales with B.S. degrees in chemistry and chemical
engineering; for process, maintenance, design, industrial, and mining
engineering with B.S. degrees in chemical, electrical, industrial,
mechanical and mining engineering; and for research and develop development
ment development with 8.5., M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in chemistry and chemical engi engineering.
neering. engineering. Our locations span the nation.
rjj INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
WC Chemicals Ja,M ,,n, 20 1,70
QSBO An Equal Opportunitw
Employer 11
Take a
Chance
Talk with EMC
for detailed infonnatioii, write td A# : >.
FMC Cheinicajs, 63$ Thigd Avenue, New York, N-. Y-10017
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for hiring of more Negroes for construction work.
In the Indianola case, the federal circuit judges
cited recent Supreme Court decisions that in the
South, where schools were formerly segregated by
law, officials must take positive action to wipe out
lingering effects of the past.
This meant Indianola must either redraw its zones
so as to cut across the racial housing patterns, swap
grades among paired schools or adopt other
methods that will integrate schools in all zones, the
judges said.
In the Supreme Court appeal, city attorneys
argued that the judges relied on previous cases
involving so-called freedom of choice desegregation
plans not zoning by schriol neighborhoods.
The attorneys argued that the earlier decisions
held freedom of choice plans must get results if they
are to be accepted because they unfairly place the
burden of integration on parents.
In fact, the city of Indianola made no defense of
a free choice provision of its desegregation plan for
pupils who attend schools in the city from an
outlying county area.
But the attorneys claimed the Supreme Court had
never said the Constitution zones to be
gerrymandered to bring about racial integration for
its own sake* either in the South or elsewhere.

ON FRUIT SALE OR SHIPMENT
Commission Sets Embargo

LAKELAND, Fla. (UPI)
The Florida Citrus Commission
clamped a seven-day total
embargo on the shipment or sale
of fresh fruit today, beginning
Wednesday, because of heavy
frost damage last week.
Joe Mullin, chief of the
Florida Crop and Livestock
Reporting Service, reported the
presence of some ice and slush in
round oranges in almost all
regions of the state.
The commission, at an
emergency meeting, said the
fruit could continue to be used
in the manufacture of processed
citrus products.
The decision to establish the
first such embargo since a 1962
cold snap was made after
testimony by Mullin, Warren O.

f WE APPRECIATE YOU ALll
! AND THE RESPONSE TO OUR
SPECIAL WAS TERRIFIC
SO MONDAY AND TUESDAY
I WIU BE THE SAME
LONPON BROIL I
| | With F.F. And Salad Bowl I
[ BLACK AKOPS STEAK H 42 I
I With F.F. And Salad Bowl \ *1
f OPEN FROM 6:30 AAA |
I /'AjVWh/' til 300 am 1
T 1225 W. UNIV. AVE.
X swei2ioS B 1 ''
§ \ i d/zoooo i

Johnson of the U. S. Frost
Warning Service, Dale Carlton,
director of the Florida Citrus
Mutual Grower Division and
H. M. Riley, director of the
Federal-State Fruit and
Vegetable Inspection Service.
Mullin said the reporting
service would need at least two
weeks to ascertain the full

Physicist to Speak

Nuclear physicist Dr. Edward
Teller will speak Jan. 28 at 8
p.m. in the Reitz Union
Ballroom as part of Accent 7O.
The topic of his speech will be
Secrecy in Government.
A native of Hungary, Dr.
Teller became a citizen of the
United States in 1941. He has
been working on atomic
explosives since 1939, and has
made significant contributions
to the development of atomic
weapons and to the design of the
worlds first hydrogen bomb.
Dr. Teller is now Professor of
Physics-at-Large at the
University of California, and
serves as Associate Director of
the Universitys Lawrence
Radiation Laboratory.
Earlier that day, Dr. Teller
will speak at the Physics
Colloquium which will be held

YOUR FATHER S
WHAT?
SEE AD PA(iF IV>

WIGLETS )0% Human Hair 10-12 in. $9,801
FALLS 00% Human Hair 22 in. $39,801
SYNTHETIC apered Curly Straight $22.001
WIGS Straight Taper with part i
7the wig box
376-Ol6s|^^

January 13, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

extent of damage to citrus fruit
by temperatures that dropped as
low as 20 degrees in some
groves.
A number of industry leaders
expressed a desire for an
embargo and recommended that
the inspection service keep an
eye on the situation and report
developments.

at 4 p.m. in Bless Auditorium.
The topic of that speech will be
Super-Nova Explosions.
Wks M
WM m 1
m
p
VjV
DR. EDWARD TELLER
... signed by Accent *7O

SAMSON
HELPING YOU
HELP OTHERS

Page 3



Page 4

\.The Florida Alligator, January 13,1970

the small society by Brickman
| i- r rpM't
w@ \wM
/INHERIT
HM'I (Mr

DURING THIS WEEK
Local Industry Recognized

The International Fraternity
of Sigma Delta Pi is sponsoring
Industry Recognition Week and
an industry show featuring
representatives of local industry
this week in the Gainesville Mall.
The show consists of exhibits
by each participating company
depicting its products and
services.
The purpose of the show is to
acquaint the citizens of the area
with their local industry and to
provide industry with an

Graduate Program
Focus On Lake Alice
The Department of Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar
for the Winter Quarter is focusing on the problems of Lake Alice. The
program is divided into three components: problem characterization,
problem analysis by several study groups in a workshop format; and
report of results and findings.
Dr. M. Mifflin (geology) will describe the hydro-geologic
relationships of Lake Alice today. Dr. F. Nordlie (zoology) and Dr. A.
Lugo (botany) will discuss the ecological aspects of the problem on
Jan. 20 and 27, respectively. Dr. P. Brezonik (environmental
engineering) will identify lake restoration alternatives cm February 3.
Interested faculty and students are invited to attend and participate
in this seminar series, which meets at 2:30 pm. on Tuesday in room
239 EES.
Corner Drug Store
Seeking Volunteers

Individuals interested in
working as volunteers in a
self-help drug facility are invited
to attend open house sessions at
the Comer Drug Store next
Sunday through Wednesday
evenings at 7.
Volunteers will be needed to
staff the facility and handle
work ranging from answering
telephones to handling crisis
situations, Dave Doucette,
Error Regretted
The Alligator Monday
incorrectly reported that
Thomas James Fieder, third year
business student, was killed in an
automobile accident. The
student who died was Thomas
James Seider from Sarasota.
Seider, a member of Alpha Tan
Omega, died Dec. 24. The
Alligator regrets the error.
ORANGES
$2 bushel
UPicm
Model Homes i
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone:s9l-1143

opportunity to display their
products and services.
The mayor of Gainesville, Dr.
Walter Murphree, has cooperated
by declaring the week of Jan.
12-18, Industry Recognition
Week in Gainesville. The UF
Business College has also
cooperated by providing an
exhibit for the show.
The following industries and
organizations are participating in
the show: General Electric,
Gainesville Gas, Gainesville

chairman of the board of
governors of the Drug Store, said
Monday.
The Comer Drug Store is
located at 1823 NW 2nd Ave.
F$U Probation
Extended
FSU basketball team was
placed on an additional two
yean probation by the NCAA
Sunday for a recruiting violation
by head basketball coach Hugh
Durham.
The Seminole basketball team
was already on one year
probation for previous recruiting
violations. The two year
probation wiH ban the team
from my participation in post
season play until after Oct. 29,
1971.

CONCERNED?
ABOUT FLORIDA! REP TURLINGTON
SPEAKS ON STATE PROBLEMS AT
the Young Democrats meeting
TODAY REITZ STUDENT UNION
BPM RM 346

Chamber of Commerce, Sperry
Rand, Pepsi Cola Co., Tung Oil
Products, Southern Bell, Coca
Cola Co., Archer Industries,
University College of Business,
IMA Electronics, Clay Electric,
and Delta Sigma Pi.
Play Tryouts
Set For Today
At Constans
A 25-year-old man, planning
his first trip to that great land of
opportunity, America, spends
his last day in Ireland surveying
the important events of his past.
Philadelphia, Here I Come! is
a comedy of modem life
depicting the hopes and dreams
of a young bachelor about to
embark for a new world. Brian
Friels play contains a little of
the old, a little of the new
packaged into a humorous and
sometimes sentimental
illustration of the human
condition.
Containing eleven male roles
and three female roles,
Philadelphia, Here I Come!
offers new opportunities for
acting skills. Tryouts will be held
at the Constans Theatre, Jan. 13
and 14, from 7-10 pm. All
UF students interested are
cordially invited to try out.
Scripts are available now in
room 363 ASB.
Engineering
Exam Tonight
An English screening
examination for engineering
students will be given at 7:15
pm., on Tuesday, in Walker
Auditorium, according to Dean
JA. Nattress.
All students who have just
been admitted to the College of
Engineering including transfer
students, those working for a
second bachelors degree and
foreign students, are required to
take this exam the first time it is
given after their admission to the
college.
Thoie who miM taking die
exam or fail it twice will be
required to enroll in EH 302,
Basic Technical Writing.

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BY PRESIDENT NIXON
$lO Million Sent In Biafran Aid

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon Monday
ordered SlO million in food and
medical supplies sent to starving
residents of Biafra, the rebellious
enclave overrun by federal
Nigerian troops after 31 months
of civil war.
White House Press Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said the President
cabled Maj. Gen. Yakubu
Gowon, head of Nigerias
military government, that the
supplies were being sent to help
prevent starvation among
millions of refugees in areas now
being occupied by the federal
forces.

Last Ambassador
Named By Nixon
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon today selected Dr. Jerome
H. Holland, president of Hampton Va. Institute, to fill the long vacant
post of U. S. ambassador to Sweden.
State Department officials said the Stockholm post is the last major
ambassadorial position to be filled by the Nixon administration.
Holland, 54, an all-American football player at Cornell University
in the late 1930s will be nominated to succeed William W. Heath who
left the post in Sweden effective Feb. 28, 1969.
The job had not been filled, partly because of tensions between
Sweden and the United States over Stockholms relations with North
Vietnam and the fact that Sweden has become an asylum for a
number of American military deserters.
The President has named three other Negroes to ambassadorial
posts since taking office but Holland is by far the highest ranking of
the four because of the importance of the post in Sweden.
Holland received bachelors and masters degrees form Cornell.
Court To Deliberate
Anti- Communist Laws

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court agreed Monday
to decide whether
anti-Communist laws passed by
Congress may be used to bar
Communist Party candidates
from election ballots.
The case, to be argued later
this term, could become a
constitutional test of two
statutes declaring that the
American Communist Party
should be outlawed and
denying the rights granted legal
bodies in the United States.
Minnesota Secretary of State
Joseph L. Donovan, acting on
the advice of the states attorney
general, Douglas M. Head, cited
the two laws in refusing to put
Communist Party candidates ft.
president and vice president on
Minnesotas ballot in the
November, 1968, election.

JHL l STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

The President, Ziegler said,
also repeated his offer to Gowon
to provide eight Cl3o cargo
planes and four helicopters to
help distribute food and relief
supplies.
The $lO million in supplies,
Ziegler be distributed
to international relief agencies,
including the International Red
Cross, all operating in Biafra
under the auspices of the
Nigerian military government.
The supplies will be provided,
he added, under a public law
authorizing release of surplus
foods and by contingency relief
funds available within the

Charlene Mitchell, a
presidential candidate for the
Minnesota Communist Party,
and Michael Zagarell, her
running mate, challenged
Donovans decision in federal
court.
On Oct. 2,1968, a three-judge
federal court ordered their
names printed on the ballot.
Donovan complied, and Miss
Mitchell and Zagarell got 415
votes.
End Os A War
The Spanish American War
ended 18 days after the first
U.S. troops landed in Puerto
Rico.

Agency for International
Development.
Ziegler said the United States
had already contributed S7O
million in foodstuffs, channeled
through the Nigerian
government and international
relief agencies, and had provided
C 97 cargo planes for distributing
the supplies within Biafra.
The planes are operated by
international agencies using
volunteer crews.
Ziegler also said Nixon
telephoned British Prime
Minister Harold Wilson to
inform him of the additional aid
and to discuss U£.-Britiah
*
Sleeping
In Church?
WASHINGTON (UPI) Rev.
Norman Vincent Peale,
preaching at the first White
House worship service of the
new year, said this week this
nation has become so nervous
and tense no one sleeps in
church anymore.
He spoke to a congregation of
more than 300 top-ranking
cabinet and government
officials, diplomats and their
wives at an East Room service
mixed with humor and
philosophy.
The New York clergyman said
the American people are beset
by two problems meeting
inner tension and stress and
standing up to human crisis.
Americans, he said, are too
taut and tense.
Its been years since Ive seen
anyone sleep in church and
that is a sad situation, he said.
Dr. Peale said that the patron
saint of Great Britain is St.
George. Ireland has St. Patrick,
but he said, the patron saint of
the United States is good old St.
Vitus, because Americans are
nervous and high strung.
The President and Mrs. Nixon
and Dr. Peale and his wife stood
in a reception line after the
service and served coffee in the
State Dining Room.
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All ovar America people ere taking to the
sky...young and old...some just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
fust $5 Thats all it coats for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Gainesville Airport
gmn Waldo Road

cooperation to increase aid to
Biafra and to ensure there wil
be no human slaughter by
Nigerian federal forces.
World leaders have feared
possible reprisals and military
excesses* 1 in the conquest of the
secessionist state and Ziegler said
Monday Nixon was gratified 11
at Gowons earlier promise
reaffirming the Nigerian stated
policy of restraint toward the
Biafians. 11
I tear
mourn
... for a better job
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>
Try a little tenderness tonight
Try a delicious, delectable
Ribeye steak.
A crisp, cod, green salad with
your choice of dressings.
A steaming-hot battery
baked potato.
A big chunk of Texas toast
The tab?
*1.59
We think thats enough said.
SIRLOIN Pit
2445 S.W. 13 ST. TAKE OUT 378-0946
V : J

January 13,1f70, Tha FtartUa *il|lnr,l

RICHARD NIXON
aa a TO Il6ip pTWOIW SUsVailOii
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

Page 5



Page 6

t. The Florida AMi-tor, January 13,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
a Executive Editor
'7
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

WASHINGTON In Alaska, you can buy 30
minute* f television time for your candidate on
three stations, which combine to reach 80% of the
electorate, for 5275. In New York, you must pay
$8,500 for 30 minutes, for New Yoik City only.
Both states will elect a United States senator this
year, and each will have one vote.
It is this kind of fascinating statistic which
accounts for the relative optimism at the
Democratic National Committee, as professionals
examine the possibilities for 1970. They think they
have a maximum of six Senate seats at risk, and
they think they can hold them all. And they see a
possibility of gaining seven seats, at least three of
which they see as highly probable.
They think they will win seats in Illinois,
Vermont and Alaska. In Illinois, they count on the
name of young Adlai Stevenson to defeat recent
appointee Ralph Siriith. Smith is no Everett
Dirksen, and his change of position on Judge
Clement Haynsworth (he hit town announcing his
opposition, wavered and finally voted to confirm)
apparently did not help him with either Republican
liberals or conservatives back home.
Both Sens. Theodore F. Stevens of Alaska and
Winston Prouty of Vermont are regarded as
vulnerable. Stevens, appointed by then-Gov. Walter
Hickd to fill the term of the late Sen E. L. Bartlett,
has twice been defeated few statewide office and will
probably be opposed by State Sen. Joe Josephson, a
strong vote-getter in Anchorage, where 40% of the
voters reside.
In California, assuming Sen. George Murphy stays
in the race, the Democrats have a good chance to
win, either with Rep. John Tunney or San Francisco
State College President S. I. Hayakawa, who sounds
more and more like a candidate every day. But
rumors of a Senate race by HEW Secretary Robert
Finch are strong in California and the polls show he
would win easily.
Sen. Thomas Dodd of Connecticut is regarded as
the least likely Democrat to be re-elected, but the
Democrats are counting on Republican fratricide to
produce a weak candidate to run against whichever
Democrat defeats Dodd in the primary.
Elsewhere, Democrats are worried about
Tennesseewhere incumbent Albert Gore faces an
Alligator Staff
Helen Huntley Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
orS4 nrwiUtinnr 092-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

Democrats Broke But Confident

Our Frozen Indifference

In accepting his second Presidential nomination in
1936, Franklin D. Roosevelt said:
Governments can err, Presidents do make mistakes,
but the immortal Dante tells us that Divine Justice
weighs the sins of the cold-blooded and the sins of the
warm-hearted on a different scale. Better the
occasional faults of a government living in a spirit of
charity, than the consistent omissions of a government
frozen in the ice of its own indifference.
When we apply this axiom to todays America, we
cant help but view it as an indictment of its
government and the great masses of its people.
For, despite the much-heralded surge of social
activism in America in the 19605, the vast majority of
Americans have chosen to remain idle until they no
longer have a choice.
Take, for instance, the civil rights movement.
Despite the passage of multiple laws by Congress
however watered-down versions of the original bills
they might have been Americans, and in particular
Southern Americans, elected to ignore the mandate of
reason and continued to adhere to de-facto segregation
policies, and downright discrimination.
This bigotry is stil very much with us today, as is

T#m Irodtn
* >
Agnew-led Republican charge; Florida, rapidly
becoming a one-party state; and Utah, where
President Nixon put his personal stamp of approval
on Rep. Laurence Burton to run against incumbent
Sen. Frank Moss.
The astonishing thing is that the Democrats

I 1 jjjjjip 1 :: 'Fluted Columns ~~i
Sweetly, Now...
i John Parker Mftftftfll I

NEW YEARS
RESOLUTION: I will write
nothing but nice things from
now on.
Gee, whillikers, thats asking a
lot. Especially considering that
my favorite Christmas present
was a tiny wooden statue of a
hand shooting a bird.
Dont you ever say anything
nice about anything? friends
ask .. er... acquaintances ask.
People just dont realize what
sweet guys we are. Actually, 1
spend most of my time dancing
around in a loin cloth, tossing
rose petals into glistening
puddles of spring water.
Sick. He must be sick. Could
a normal person come up with
such sick thoughts?
Naw. But why fight it? It's
much more fun to sit back with
my sick mind and take pot shots
at all the myriad creatures of
folly leap and play and kick sand
in oar eyes.
And then to listen to the
squeals of sage. More beautiful
music Bach never dreamed of!
(Voice on the phone, quavering
h 9am either fear or rage:
Are you the John Parker
that wrote the editorial about

evidenced by Mississippis reaction to integration in its
public school systems.
It was not until Americans were faced with
outbreaks of violence that threatened to turn this
countrys cities into domestic battlefields that a sizable
percentage of Americans acknowledged racial
discrimination as the pernicious calamity that it is.
It took similar outbursts of action primarily
among college students to jar the conscience of the
country to the United States* hardly justifiable
commitment in another countrys civil war.
And it has taken our nations streams and lakes
conversion into quagmires of filth, the air of many of
our cities being defiled with toxic fumes, and our
urban centers becoming the cramped confines of
millions for our people and our government to awaken
to the environmental catastrophies that loom on the
horizon.
Such are the consistent omissions of a government
and a people frozen in the ice of its own
indifference.
For America does have a silent majority -a
blind, deaf, egocentric majority that can only
occasionally be awakened from its reveries to face
reality, to be humane.
EDITORIAL

fraternities? Answer. A
column on fraternities, yes.
Voice: Well, youve got a
helluva nerve writing crap like
that. If I ever see you Im going
to dance on your head.
Answer: Please wear
sneakers.)
But Ill make you a deal. If
everyone will straighten out, Ill
quit writing naughty things.
NEWS ITEM: Clarence
Frenzied, president of Fli Fli Fli
(Tri-Fli) fraternity, today
declared that his house had
disbanded itself voluntarily in
last nights chapter meeting. We
just got together and decided we
couldn't keep up this farce any
longer and still look each other
in the face. Weve been trying to
live in a synthetic world based
on a false sense of superiority
and it has no relation to reality.
Most of the guys were tired of
drinldqg and taing hel ai the
thne and they want to try
studying and getti* involved m
something relevant to tor
tones.
NEWS ITEM: Jimminy Bale
o Hay, campus right winger,
today renounced his political
affiliation with SBWGW

canwith considerable justificationdiscuss a
normal off-year gain in the House of
Representatives and stiH contemplate a party debt
which approaches $7 million. That debt will come
down as time goes on-a major fund-raising dinner
in February will slice away a million or more-but
much of it will still be around when the 1970
elections are over.
The debt problemmuch of it is owed to
contributors who loaned money to the 1968
campaign and who are willing to waitdemonstrates
what happens to a party in power. When John F.
Kennedy was elected in 1960, 70% of the
Democrats funds came from contributions of less
than $25; by the time Richard Nixon was
inaugurated in 1969,70% of Democratic funds were
coming from contributions of more than SI,OOO.
Eight years of Presidents Club fund raising can
account for a lot of patronage but, as Chairman
Fred Harris puts it, it hardly produces the party of
the people.

(Students for Bombing the
Whole Godam Worid). I was
sloppin hogs in AG 342 the
other day when suddenly it hit
me. Gene McCarthy is a nicer
guy than George Wallace and the
only conspiracy in this country
is the conspiracy of ignorance
led by red-necks like me and a
few neo-fascists over at the law
school.
NEWS ITEM: UF President
Stephen C. OHokum today
sprang to the rescue of Lavon
Gently, a student radical
convicted for handing out
anti-genocide leaflets. Citing
various portions of the state and
nation constitutions, OTlokum
said: This is a fundamental
issue of our tunes. Whether we
shall allow dissent to be
suppressed by arbitrary law
enforcement. As a former lawyer
I wfl be woridsf with
Lavaus attorneys to see that
vwy possMe log* defease is
raised oa belutf of this
ceir agcou > out-spoken
. You get the idea. The point is
that it is unhkeiy for any of my
ttfc fantasies to come tine,
vWdi h oi. by am.



V ... a*
V A\ bv \ iHj
w ? HH
__ r.
Wei f, we dwT? /wve Nixon to kick around anymore*
/#W
4slt / 1
W '-4 W>
Mr A.T W -JI Si) \
K. .. <1 x / l / *V J V
\ vv >
Jf (A* cm. \\jfcKtl jl^
jft! 1 o
<* :
Mirtf some? We gos millions of 'em
* I
Filched five gunboats from France, swiped one of our
a\o Vrw'iari vteMiw ili S&fit .lagniw liigh ojqmftd , ml moo ot Wttlnd **>?, * nU o n3 i pbol whrt nHol irit -< wA ,if^lUo^'^T

Wright Sees U.S., World

JMMVy 14, TwJl3 9 TIH *lOllllO

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

roTsAiir*"^^
TAPE RECORDER. Webcor
Regent 4 track stereo/built In
speakers, guaranteed, new tape
head. S6O. Call DAN 372-7395.
(A-st-60-p).
Light Organ: 3 chan, best model on
market $1.20. 1 chan organs $25.
Will custom build organs to suit suitneeds
needs suitneeds & funds. 376-2389. E.E.
Senior. (A-61-st-p).
Two cycle helmets 10 each. Like
new. Call Bob 372-0229. (A-61-3t-p).
v
Surfboard 7* 5" Rides good,
excellent condition, S6O. Call
373-1473. (A-61-st-p).
FIREWOOD, DELIVERED BY THE
CORD. CALL 378-2784. Stereo Record Player. Webcor
Portable large speakers, three speeds,
Diamond needle. Plays well. Buy dual
channel music- for $25. Call
376-0143. (A-61-3t-p).
German Shepherd: 6 weeks old AKC
from best of champion German
stock, show or pet quality. 372-4653.
(A-7t-62-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera.
Need money, $75 or best offer.
376-4905 after 6:00 p.m. (A-4t-62-p)
350 CC HONDA SCRAMBLER 1969,
2200 miles, $625. Call 378-5192
after 5 or weekends. (A-st-62-p)
Portable typewriter 3 yrs. old made
In Sweden. Excellent condition. $65.
372- (A-st-62-p)
Uncrated: Pioneer 100 TD amp,
S3OO, & 2 CSBB spkrs., S2OO,
Garrard SL9S w/ Sure cart, $l5O,
Dokorder auto RV deck, S3OO, no.
39 Village Park, Kurt. (A-st-62-p)
LOST bright carpet colors .. restore
them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer +I.OO Lowry Furniture
co. (A-lt-60-c).
raftoootic or*
1 FOR RENT
Married student wishes to sublease
Mount Vernon Apt. JAN. RENT
PAID. Call 378-4072. (B-63-2t-p).
DESPERATE! Need one female
roommate for Landmark apt. $46.25
mo. Immediate occupancy. Call
378-1927 Anytime. (B-61-st-p).
2 brm. apt. under contract til June.
Heat, kitchen, AC, Pool and more.
Lots of room. Will take 1,2, or Z
males now. $43 or $57 per mo.
376-3683. (B-6t-60-p).
For Rent! One Male needed for
2 Brm. Apt. Quiet Area.
47.50/mo. + ut. Call Reb or
8111/376-0066 after 5 until late
evenings. Central Heat.
(B-st-60-p).
Roommate wanted Summit House
Apts. Two bedroom $43.50/mo. Ist
mo. rent free. Call 378-0043 or
392-0505. Ask for Daryl or Rich.
fB-St-59-p)
Must Rent one bdrm apt. AC. Close
to campus. Fun for couples. $95.00.
Private Patio. 1933 N.W. 4th Ave.
Epsilon 378-0938 after 5:00.
(B-4t-59-p)
Small Cottage, furnished, 4700 S.W.
13th, Available Jan 30, 70/month.
Call Yael Lubin 392-1194, Daytime.
(B-63-4t-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
APT. in Tanglewood Manor. s4l per
month. Share utilities, etc. Call
373- (B-61-st-p)
2 bedroom apt. Central air, heat, wall
to wall carpet, garbage disposal,
dishwasher, would like to sublease.
Hawaiian Village, call Evy, 373-2307.
(B-st-62-p)
For rent sublet 1 bdr. AC, furnished.
$l2O. Quiet, good location.
378-4311. (B-3t-59-p)
Sublet 2 BR modern apt. 2 blks. to
campus. Call 373-1265. Must sublease single room, Bath,
cooking $40.00 per month including
water. See at 1813 N.W. 2nd Avenue
anytime. (B-61-St-p)

tONIGWr TH£ATRES tripic THEATRE 1
I
vjgKV| nj|MfiTi| T | afl vl11 Jz/Ml|£/7^|^9i
.. 'HfIF ^if?Ti I ./ WBM||WI
: jPwr\
I ..J|

Listeners Wanted Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and
have normal hearing. Please call
M rs. Slater between 1 and 4
p.m for appointment. 392-2049.
(C-15t-60-c).
4 Pre-med & 1 Chem. student
need roomate for 3 Bdr.
Gatortown Apt. $36.66 mo. 309
S.W. 16th Ave. Apt 159.
378-6423. T hree male students need one
roommate to live at La Bonne Vie
apts. Call 378-8286. (C-10t-59-p)
Coed roommate: Own bedroom In
new modern apt. near sorority row
and towers. $75 mo. 378-3303.
(C-st-59-p)
Wanted 2 girls as roommates. Apt.
61 Landmark starting winter quarter.
376-6043. $46.25 per month.
(C-3t-62-p)
2 roommates to share new 12x70
Spanish mobile home. Private bdrm,
pool, central heat/air, stereo, T.V.
S7O plus utilities. 373-2456, ask for
Bob. (C-st-61-p)
Wanted Female roommate to share
2 bedroom apartment. 1100 SW Bth
Ave. Apt. 407* Call 372-1148.
(C-4t-62-p)
Needed: Experienced band to play
for the winter quarter. If interested
come by Georgia Seagle Hall or call,
372-9410 and ask for Paul or Neil.
(C-2t-62-p)
WANTED: One male roommate for
swinging French Quarter apartment.
SSO per month. Call 378-6551 or
come by French Quarter 90.
(C-3t-62-p)
FEMALE ROOMATE FOR
ONEBEDROOM LANDMARK
APT. CALL 376-3873.
(C-st-60-p).
Wanted: Female roommate for
Williamsburg Townhouse -Apt.
January and last month rent paid.
Call 376-5771. (C-st-59-p)
Gatortown: One, two or three men
for two BR apt. I'm no. 34, so I will
be studying. Call 373-2422.
(C-3t-62-p)
Female roommate wanted
$46.25/md. + elec. 2 br, 2 full baths,
dishwasher. Would prefer upper div.
or transfer. Call 372-1774 after 5. La
Bonne Vie. 428. (C-st-59-p)
Female roommate. $41.25 month.
Frederick Gardens Apt. 373-1206.
(C-3t-59-p)
Co-ed roommate needed to share 2
bed. cottage $27.50 mo. + utilities.
Call 378-5532 3 blocks from
campus. (-61-2 t-p).
Female roommate Immediate
occupancy. Landmark Apts. Color
t.v., poolside dishwasher. All
conveniences. No deposit.- $46.25
mo. 378-3518. (C-61-3t-p).
Male roommate Gatortown apts. $45.
per month Apt. 231. Come by or call
392-7529 between 7 and 8 P.M. Ask
for Scott. (C-61-st-p).
Wanted: Immediate occupancy 1
male roommate 2 bedroom Apt.
228 Gatortown Apts. 42.50 per mo.
(C-61-3t-p).
Female Roommate: Frederick
Gardens Apts. January rent free. Call
372- (C-st-59-p)
Male Roommate Wanted La Bonne
Vie Apartment. January rent free.
Call 372-0268. (C-63-2t-p).
Two female roommates. 2 bdrm.
Close to campus. Furnished.
Alr-cond. $108.75 a quarter. Call
373- (C-63-3t-p).
Coed to share Apt. 1 block from
Campus. Own room, share kitchen
and bath. S4O per month plus **
utilities. Call 376-3184. (C-63-3t-p).
' 1
C)wwy.v.v.www HELP WANTED
occ-x-x-x-x-v-v-nv. aoeoe mmmwl
NITE WORK. OVER 18 YRS.
GOOD PAY. TACO BELL. 826 W.
Unlv. (E-61-st-p).

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator. January 13,1970

!pooooojooooot:^^mooo^oooo|
Now accepting applications for
summer camp counselors at
Pinewood for boys and girls In
Hendersonville, N.C. Write P.O.
Box 4585, Normandy Branch,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141.
(E-st-60-p).
Collection Supervisor, male or
female, salary open. Campus Credit
Union. Call Mrs. Decker. 392-0393
for Interview, apt. (E-61-10t-c).
Male telephone solicitor. High pay
for about 10 hours per week.
Experience desired but not
mandatory. Call 376-2043 for
Interview. (E-st-62-p)
SECRETARY WANTED Statewide
organization headquartered in
Gainesville has opening for
steno-clerk. Must be accurate typist,
capable of record keeping, filing and
receptionist duties; preferably
familiar with machine transcription
rather than shorthand. Salary
commensurate with qualifications
and experience. Reply P. O. Box
142 87, Gainesville, Fla. 32601.
(E-3t-59-p)
WANTED Talented, experienced
art and architecture students for
color drawing and rendering. Good
pay. Part time your own hours.
Call 372-5843. (E-st-62-p)
>X.XWX*X X*X X*X*SS*X*X-X-X X-X*XW*X*i;.'
I AUTOS 1
v
X***X*XX*NNXX*X*X # X X*X # X # X*XX*XXX*X* ; V
1969 Mercury Marauder plush
interior, stereo, radio, console, all
power except seats, 16,000 miles.
Will sell for $3,800, cost $5,400
one year ago. 372-1247 after 5
p.m. (G-st-60-p).
MGTD 1953 fully restored. British
racing green, cream Interior, dark
green carpet, white top & tonneau, 5
WSWD unlop tires, push button
radio, 3 speed heater, courtesy lights,
driving lamps, luggage rack, car cover.
Many extras! over $4,000 Invested,
2,000 miles since restoration. Will
not depreciate!! If properly
maintained. $3,000. 378-5192 after 5
or weekends. Student. (G-st-57-p).
Race car. 55 Pontiac wagon, full race
running. All best equipment. Car Is
strong, fast, could be street driven.
SI,OOO buys 13.90 E.T. Car. Call
376-0143. (G-61-3t-p).
*s?#vX"X*X*X*X*X*X*X # X*X # X*X*X*X # XXXXXJ
PERSONAL |
TIRED OF HO HUM fashions?
Change your look with Ponchos from
Columbia. Velvet clothes from India
and leather goods from Mexico. Just
In at the SPANISH MAIN. 1642 W.
Unlver. Ave. Open MonSat. til
10:00. (J-61-4t-p)
A BADGE, A PARTY, A TROPHY,
A HOUSE ... none of these things
make Phi Kappa Theta. The qualities
which are
unseen . BROTHERHOOD,
FAITH, FRIENDSHIP, LOYALTY,
RESPECT ... These are found Inside
of men ... These make PHI KAPPA
THETA COLONY. 1728 NW Ist
Ave. (Back of Cl). (J-st-59-p)
HON. RALPH TURLINGTON speaks
on Floridas Problems. 8:00 p.m.
Room 357, Tonight in the Union.
(J-63-lt-p).
Concerned with Fla. Leadership
young democrats Ralph Turlington
meet room 357 Union 8:00 p.m.
TONITE. (J-63-lt-p).
|LOST A FOUND I
s6bqc MoiowiwMasw Lost: ladles watch, gold with oval
face and mesh band, sentimental
value. If found call: 378-3615 or
392-7558. REWARD. (L-63-4t-p).

YOUR FATHERS
WHAT?
SEE AD PAGE 12

WINTER BOWLING £
LEAGUES ARE
ORGANIZING NOW!!
Mixed and mixed doubles Leagues are forming for
Monday and Thursday nights at 6:30 or 9:00 PM.
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES AREA and
fill out an application. Deadline for signup is Jan.
19,1970.
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Doodm -3too pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* M o
| l| 1| 1| . 5

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tiff c
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gator classifieds


II
.oc**..VWCo''..* *.-**.*.**.*.
iTnwrar n (wMwyMH i A/ ,v -"
I Steve McQueen I
lilMriMiSriurTOl I|l
DAYS
I /AT POPULAR ww / g I
If PRI( : ES! ffl]( ACADEMY I
IV continuous l/mAWARDSI
I Jk

Remember
1969-70?
Theyre making
a book about it.

January 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

| LOST & FOUND J
:-x*x-xox-xx-x*xx*x*xx<*x-x.x.v.sxr-?
FOUND: One pair brown oval shaped
glasses beside the tennis court in
front of Jennings Dorm. Call Karen
392-9372. (L-63-3t-nc).
Lost: Girls brown PRESCRIPTION
sun glasses and keys. Please turn in at
Union or Womens Gym. SGR.
(L-63-it-p).
|, ink: SERV j
RUBYS ALTERATIONS Has
MOVED to new address: 4958 N.W.
4th Street but same phone:
376-8506. (M-st-61-p).
I McMm Odr A^l
IdalJll Jtl 11 aa
nSiff*
THE PRODUCER OF
VIXEN'
| The UltimmU Film... by Matt Mtgtr
PMjVjIWTM^h
Bbhohmr
DUSTIN HOFFMAN
> MIA FARROW

Page 9

I SERVICES I
k^v^<*v.vAw.'.w;'KKS
INCOME TAX RETURNS
PREPARED. 35 N. Main St.
378-9666 378-6127. (M-38t-59-p)
Color, Conformation,
Temperament: Aquarius! Reg.
Appatoosa Stud. $75. introductory
fee. Book Now. 376-9020 or see
at Horse Show Grounds.
(M-10t-60-p).
NOTICE TO IMPORT AND SPORTS
CAR OWNERS: Frank Pendleton,
formerly service manager for Pinna
Performance Is now at McCreas
Sunoco, 320 N. Main St., Gainesville.
Frank has 12 years experience on
Imported cars and specializes In
repairs and tune ups on theee cars.
Come In and see Frank. For one
week from date of this publication,
tickets will be given to Imported car
owners good for free lubrication.
(M-st-62-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE I
SUNDAY FEB. 15 7;OO&9:3QPm|

SERVICES §
X i 8 8 effllM 808888889 aWMW'W'WWW
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-tf-57<)
c I
COEDS: Excess Facial Hair removed
forever. Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. Over 20 years
experience. 372-8039. Medically
approved electrolysis. (M-12t-57-p)
WAKE-UP TROUBLES? Wake-up
service. Pleasant, reliable. $5/month,
sl2/quarter. Phone 378-4216 or
372-3823. (M-st-62-p)
I REDPM qA I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Remember the year you fell in
love, or blew your grades
because there was too much to
do, or finally graduated?
Remember the year you
started to look around you
because you began to realize
that nothing ever stays the
same?
Remember the year you began
doing funny little things
because you were afraid
you'd forget how?
We remember.
And we saved as much as we
could so you'd remember
where you were.
1969-70
seminole
It's about you.



Page 10

I, The Florida ANigefeor, Jmiary 13,1970

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION (GRE) will be
given on Saturday, Jan. 17 at
8:45 a.m. in Walker Auditorium.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
March, June and August grads
unless indicated otherwise. **
Indicates U.S. Citizenship
required. Degrees: B-Bachelor's,
M-Master's, D-Doctorate.
Jan. 13: Lehigh County
Community College, Pa.
Jan. 14: Vanderbilt
University, Tenn.
Jan. 15: Fort Lauderdale
University.
Jan. 16: Catonsville
Community College, Md.
Jan. 19: Florida State
Personnel Board; M.A.
Montenegro and Co.; Defense

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, January 13
Student Government Textbook
Exchange, C-4B Union, 1:00
5:00 pm
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 and 4:00 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Rush Meeting,
347 Union 7:00 pm
Delta Sigma Pi Smoker, 122
Union, 7:30 pm
Air Force Dames Meeting on
Self Defense, Air Force
ROTC Library, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 pm
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 pm
Law Dames Meeting, Law
School Auditorium, 8:00
pm
Univ. of Fla. Young Democrats
Meeting, Speaker: Ralph
Turlington, 357 Union, 8:00
pm
SGP: "Danzas Venezuela,"
Florida Gym, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, January 14
Phi Delta Kappa Luncheon
Meeting, Speaker: Dean
Harold Hanson, "The Voice
of the Graduate Student in
the University" 150 Union,
12:15 pm

FOR YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN... jfr MjMlftel
computed each month on the unpaid
tjalance vou ever save when you

Intelligence Agency; Geigy
Chemical Corp.; Dept of
Housing and Urban
Development; City of
Jacksonville, Council Auditor;
U.S. Public Health Service, V.D.
Program; Washington Corp. B,
M: Business, The Standard Oil
Co. of Ohio, B: ChE, ME, CE,
EE, Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts.
Jan. 19-20: The Trame Co.;
The Martin Co.
Jan. 20: Sangamo Electric
Co.; Florida Probation 8t Parole
Commission; FMC Corp.
Chemicals Division; The Mitre
Corp.; U.S. Gypsum Co., B:
Engr., Acctg. **
Jan. 20-21: ARO, Inc., RCA
Corp., Blount Brothers Corp.,
Allied Chemical Corp.
Jan. 20-21-22: Union Camp
Corp.
Jan. 21: Federal Reserve Bank
of Atlanta; J.A. Jones
Construction Co.; South wire

Student Government Textbook
Exchange, C-4B Union, 1:00
5:00 pm
Sigma Nu Chapter Meeting, 362
Union, 6:30 pm.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting. 361 Union, 7:00
pm
Circle International Meeting,
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
All Campus Tournaments, C-4
Union, 7:30 pm.
Latin American Colloquium,
Speaker: Prof. Kamal Dow,
"Economic Intergration and
Foreign Trade; The Case of
Colombia," Colloquium \
Room, College Library, 8:00
pm
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 pm
MENSA Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 pm
Thursday, January 15
Student Government Textbook
Exchange, C-4B Union, 1:00
5:00 pm
Christian Science Organizational
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
pm
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 pm
Rathskeller, "Your Father's
Mustache," 8:30 and 10:30
pm

BLUE BULLETIN

.Co.; Montgomery Ward & Co.;
Continental Can Co., Inc.; Oscar
Mayer & Co., A&S, Bus. Ad.,
Journ., Communications **
Jan. 22: Xerox Co.; Savannah
Electric and Power Co.; U.S.
Army Waterways Experiment
Station; Olin Corp.; Control
Data Corp.; City of Philadelphia,
Pa.
Jan. 22-23: General Dynamics
Corp., Fort Worth Div.;
Florida Power & Light Co.;
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.
Jan. 23: Schlumberger Well
Service; Stone and Webster
Engineering Corp., Carnation
Co.; Armco Steel Corp.; Ortho
Pharmaceutical Corp.;
Ingersoll-Rand Co.
CANCELLATIONS
Jan. 19: Rich's; Naval Air
Rework Facility
Jan. 20: Procter and Gamble
- Market Research Div.

Friday, January 16
Student Government Textbook
Exchange, C-4B Union, 1:00
5:00 pm
Union Lecture, Dialogue with a
Theologue, Rev. Harold
Burris and Rev. George
Telford, 122 Union, 4:00
pm
Union Movie, "QuiJler
Memorandum," Union Aud.,
5:30,8:00 & 10:30 pm
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 pm
Rathskeller, "Your Father's
Mustache," 8:30, 10:30 &
12:30 pm
> 9
UNION BOX OFFICE
SGP: Florida Symphony
Orchestra, $3.00, $2.00 and
Audubon Wildlife
Films, Single Admissions, U.
of F. students, SI.OO, General
Public, $1.50, High School
Students, $.50; Series of 5
films, U. of F. students,
$4.00, General Public, $6.00,
High School Students, $2.00.
Rathskeller: $1.50.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

We're going to transport
you over new horizons
of literary experience...
Send your imagination
soaring.
Come with us.

were coming
to take you
away

We have something to
show you.
florida
quarterly



The Florida Alligator

OWENS HEID TO 17 POINTS

Gators Upset Vo Is In Overtime

By RICHARD BLAINE
Alligator Sports Writar

A hustling and determined
Gator basketball team overcame
a 31-27 halftime deficit to
defeat the nationally ranked
Tennessee Volunteers 57-56 in
overtime.
The Gators evened the score
52-52 at the end of regulation
play with senior forward Andy
Owens throwing in 12 second
half points.
Owens, averaging 29 points a
game coming into the encounter
with Tennessee, was held to just
17 points as the Tennessee zone
defense continually double
teamed him.
The Gators took the lead for
good on a 10-foot jump shot by
Earl Findley with 54 seconds
left in the five minute overtime
period and played brilliant
defense to hold on to the win.
The UF got the key rebounds
and shots when they needed
them with 6-foot-8 Earl Findley
snagging three last minute
rebounds to insure the overtime
victory.
The UF zone defense
continually forced the Vols to
take long outside jump shots,
despite the presence of

Gator Football Coaches Record
Finest Recruiting Season Ever

The signing of five
blue-chip football prospects
since Doug Dickey became Head
Football Coach at Florida caps
what appears to be the finest
recruiting year the Gators have
had.
Dickey started recruiting on
Jan. 3 and since that time the
Gators have landed 6-2 Fort
Lauderdale quarterback Mike
Moore, defensive back Jim
Revels of Merrit Island, running
back Vince Kendrick of Miami
Springs, split end-flanker Joel
Parker of Clearwater and tight
end Hank Foldberg.
Parker was the first signee of
the Dickey era, bringing with
him credentials as an
All-Southern choice and
unlimited potential as a split
receiver.

WEDNESDAY COUPON SPECIAL
( Kntukn fried Aicken |
I 214 N.W. 13th St. 14 s>w 34t h st.
m 376-6472 372-3649 M
1 dinner DUp I
I wmam) box wy I
I r * l 25 I
Cole Slaw and BRING COUPON I
Rolls M m

Tennessee center 6-10 Bobby
Croft.
The victory brought the
Gators season record to 5-7

PETE KNOCKE
SOPHOMORE FORWARD DAN BOE
... scored 13 points against the Vols

I want to congratulate the
Florida staff for the recruiting
job they did, said Dickey.
Rabbit Smith and all of the
assistant coaches did an
outstanding job.
Foldberg, Lineman of the
Year in Greater Atlanta and first
team All-State in Georgia, is a
6-5,220-pound tight end sought
by most major colleges in the
nation. His final five choices

W.C. Fields Best
"My Little Chickadee
with Mae West
BY POPULAR DEMAND IMffSf RIV
Continuous Showing J 1 |
1 p uZL AM

JMNMvy 13,1870, The Florida Alligator,

overall and 2-3 in SEC play.
Meanwhile in the early
evening contest the Baby Gators
easily defeated the Tennessee

were Florida, Texas, Arkansas*
Notre Dame and Tennessee.
Another, All-Southern pick
was fullback Ride Browne of
Longwood Lyman, a 6-2,
210-pounder. Quarterback Chan
Gailey of Americus was another
Georgia All-State first team
choice*.
In all, the Gators signed more
athletes with All-State honors
than any previous year.

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Freshmen 82*72, behind the pin
point shooting of Ken Van Ness
with 22 points and Bill Nagel's
14.
£unT -Inventory over 450. Buy
*Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom 9
reloading. Harry Beckwith,
'gun dealer, Micanopy. 9
*466-3340. H
AUTO GLASS
MAULDINS
323 N.W. 6th St.
East Side ACL Depot
FREE ESTIMATES
376-2558
Fast attention to insurance
claims for cars, trucks and
buses.
GOU PAR tO I
DRIVING RANGE
GOLF CLUBS RENTED
CLUB HOUSE
electric CARTS
lUii LESSONS AVAILABLE
f1 *t NINE $1.25 $2.25 FOR 18
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2731 I

1232
lllrlllr w. Univ. I
j| | 376-7657 I
I Ro-Mo makes I
I Huge Posters I
I from your own I
I photographs!!! I
I Decorate your I
I pad now I
I with several!!! I
ONLY $ 4 SO each

Page 11

Swol
U RANCHO 0
Kfl Hw
f L I



Page 12

E. The HerWe AMemer, Ttey, January 13,1970

IN PHONE CALL TO STRAM
Nixon Lauds Another Number One

NEW ORLEANS (UPI)
President Nixon, who is getting
the reputation of being the
nations number one football
fan, called Coach Hank Stram
after the Super Bowl game
Si indy to congratulate the
Kansas City Chiefs on their 23-7
victory over Minnesota.
Stnm was besieged by sports
writes to such an extent that he
was hocked up against the

All-Pros Selected
CANTON, Ohio (UH) The Pro Footbafl Hal Os Fame today
armnupaed its first annual ad-pro team comprised of players foam
boMidbs American and National football leagues.
The team was choeen by the Hails Board of Selectors, a 26 member
committee made up of one member from each of 24 pro football
cities and two from New York, which has two teams. The board was
organized primarily to select new members to the pro grid shrine.
The first offensive and defensive units, including a punter and
placekicker, are dominated by NFL performers, with 17 of the 24
named coming from the alder league. The second, however, lists 15 of
its 24 form AFL squads, making the overall figure 26-22 NFL for the
48 players chosen.
The Los Angeles Rams of the NFL had the most selections for the
first team, taking five places, while the Kansas City Chiefs of the AFL
landed four.
Other teams with more than one player named to the first unit
were the Dallas Cowboys with three and the Minnesota Vikings,
Cleveland Browns and Chicago Bears, two each.
Chicago, despite its 1-13 record, had the top two vote-getters in the
balloting in running bade Gale Sayers and middle linebacker Dick
Butkus. Sayers was named on either the first or second team by each
selector and Butkus missed only one.
The Oakland Raiders dominated the second team with six
selections, including five on the offensive team. Green Bay and the
New York Jets each had three men on the second team and Denver,
Kansas City and Dallas two each.
Bud Grant, coach of the NFL champion Minnesota Vikings, was
picked as coach of the first team, and George Allen of the Los Angeles
Rams was named to head the second team.
The first offensive team, by position, is:
WIDE RECEIVERS: Lance Alworth, San Diego, and Paul Warfield,
Cleveland.
TIGHT END: Bob Trumpy, Cincinnati.
TACKLES: Bob Brown, Los Angeles, and Jim Tyrer, Kansas City.
GUARDS: Tom Mack, Los Angeles, and Gene Hickerson,
Cleveland.
CENTER: Mick Tinglehoff, Minnesota.
QUARTERBACK: Roman Gabriel, Los Angeles.
RUNNING BACKS: Gale Sayers, Chicago, and Calvin Hill, Dallas.
PLACEKICKER: Jan Stenerud, Kansas City.
PUNTER: David Lee, Baltimore.
On the first defensive team were:
ENDS: Dave Jones, Los Angeles, and Carl Eller, Minnesota.
TACKLES: Merlin Olsen, Los Angeles, and Bob Lilly, Dallas.
OUTSIDE LINEBACKERS: Bobby Bell, Kansas City, and Chuck
Owley, Dallas.
MIDDLE LINEBACKER: Dick Butkus, Chicago.
CORNERBACKS: Lem Barney, Detroti, and Willie Brown,
Oakland.
SAFETIES: Larry Wilson, St. Louis, and Johnny Robinson, Kansas
City.
U of F Student Insurance
Enrollment Period
OPEN
SPONSORED BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
COVERAGE
Until Sipt 1970
9 Piyi infirmary axponsa
i Hosp., Doctor and Surgical Bills
PREMIUM
Student premium $14.80
Student and Spouse premium $31.25
Student, Spouse and Children $47.50
Student and Children $31.25
Optional Major Medical $5 per personal additional
You may pick up Brochures and Enrollment Forms from
the Infirmary, McGriff Scarborough and Student
Government.
McGriffScarborough & Associates
px>.bo* 1407 ... r
115 N.E. 6th Aw. Ph. 376-8393

farthest wall of the dressing
room and standing on a chair
when an assistant tugged at his
sleeve and told him he had a
telephone call.
Stem, clutching the silver
Soper Rood trophy, hepped
down and picked up the phone
a mi mid Wendy, Hdfo, who is
this?

After a pause, Stram said,
Hdo, Mr. President. This is
Coach Stem.

The president talked to Stram
for a few seconds, then Stram
replied, I think we won this
game with 40 people. We are
very proud of our football team.
Thank you very much.
Then dm president talked for
91 EHHHv
Lenny (Dawson) is a great
young man, Mr. President, A
credit to our team and a credit
to professional football. Thank
you.
Newsmen asked what the
president said. Stram replied:
He congratulated our squad on
a great effort. He toid us that we
earned the right to be
ciMMpiMis** 9
THERE WERE so many guys
running around them in that
backfield, it was hard to figure
out what was going on,
Minnesota linebacker Roy
Winston said following the
Vikings 23-7 Super Bowl loss to
Kansas City.
Winstons assessment of the
Chiefs offensive attack, with its
innumerable formations and
sets, agreed with an analysis
given earlier in the week by
Kansas City coach Hank Stram.
Stem said Thursday the
Kansas City offense used 18
basic plays, but unveiled each
one of them from various
formations.
A pretty good tool kit, is
how Stram described his
offensive repertoire. He said it
forces opposing defensivemen
into a moment of indecision
which gives the Chiefs the edge
coming off the ball.
BART STARR, the Green
Bay Packers quarterback who
has played in two Super Bowl
games himself, showed up at this
one Sunday in a Swiss-style
tytolean hat and tipped it to
Kansas City quarterback Len
Dawson.

I In Honor of our FIRST ANNIVERSARY you are invited to the
ji I Va[B H B b^H
b .... ...
This Week Featuring: W.C. Fields, The Three Stooges
The Deed End Kids, end The
11 Little Rascals
25c for members for no^S"§eenftbers
FREE IF YOU BUY A MEMBERSHIP CARD
I 8:30 Tomorrow and every WEDNESDAY night
I following the Spaghetti Special A
I This Thursday Friday and Saturday
YOTJH FATHEHS
MUSTACHE Llgy
I Where the time of your life is right under your nose Am
I SHOWS: Thursday 8:30 and 10:30
Friday and Saturday 8:30, 10:30 and 12:30
Tickets on sale now at the Ret, Reitz Union
Box Office and the Record Bar
you DONT HAVE TO BE 21 TO COME TO THE RAT
| East wtn< Wain Cafeteria

Fantastic, he said of
Dawson's performance.
Absolutely fantastic.
Starr side-stepped neatly
however when asked to compare
Dawsons play with Joe
Namaths in the Super Bowl last
year.
I dont want to get involved
in that, he laughed.
Len Dawson spiked still
another rumor Sunday hes
not retiring.

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My wife has some thoughts on
that but I haven't he said when
asked whether he intended
quitting football. 1 have two
more years to go on my present
contract.
Dawson is 34 and has played
professional football 13 seasons,
making him the senior
member of both teamsthe
Kansas City Chiefs and
Minnesota Vikings in Sunday's
Super Bowl contest.