Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Jsfl,
Ass Att
Vol 62, No. 58

A SIGN
OF THE
TIMES
War protestors have
taken their cause for peace
into the streets in more
ways than one. Giant peace
signs (below) have taken the
place of little blue peace
decab for automobiles, and
road signs have become the
object of idealistic
vandalism. After all, what
needs stopping more than
war? The photos are by
Pete Knocke.

111
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200 MORE CAN STILL ENROLL
Sex Invades UF Engineering Curriculum

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Sexual engineering will be one
of the subject areas covered in a
new two-hour course offered
this quarter in the College of
Engineering. Professor of
Chemical Engineering Dt.
Seymour S. Block is course
instructor.
Entitled EGC
3 00-Technology, Civilization,
and Man,** the course will be
taught starting today in the
Engineering Auditorium, Rm.
270, sixth period, and on
Thursday at the same time and
jdace.
Block is also president of Zero
Population Growth Inc. (ZPG)
of Florida, an organization
which has as its goal freezing the

The
. _, : ; ;
Florida Alligator

THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

-? .'IB
' r-4 .< -|j}lj^^3
' V-' ''' vlif"
-

world population explosion by
the year 2000.
Not a bread and butter
course," according to Block, it
will cover the dunces of a
person surviving a nuclear war
because each of os are too
highly specialized oar chances of
surviving are dun.
The man with the best
chance of survival will be the
man lowest on the economic
scale."
Also, Block said universities
havent been thinking enough
about the serial costs derived
from the development of
engineering projects.
We have to rethink our way
of Bring. Ethical problems are
involved. From an economic
standpoint the family has

University of Florida, Gainesville

changed. Women can earn as
much as a man today. Does she
or anyone else really need a
marriage license? Maybe its
more relevant to acquire a
license for having more
children," he said.
In addition to the above
subject areas, Block said
questions like the following will
be raised.
How can technology work
for us and not control us?
Can the computer be made
to think for itself and possibly
outwit us?
What are our natural
resources and how long will they
last?
Can babies be made to
conform to specifications
through the study and

ANONYMOUS GIFT
Drug House
Gets SI,OOO
By JANIE GOULD /
Alligator Aasignmants Editor
An anonymous donor has placed SI,OOO in the coffers of the
Comer Drug Store, a house in which former drug users will help
persons with drug problems.
His contribution follows one by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, who last month turned over a SSOO speech honorarium to
the drug facility.
The Drug Store will be housed in a small cottage at 1823 N.W. 2nd
Ave. It is scheduled to begin operation this quarter, and the first six
weeks will be run on an experimental basis in order to develop policies
for the long-range operation of the center.
We expect it to be open within two weeks, said Dave Doucette,
chairman of the board of governors. The SI,OOO donation will really
help us get on our feet.
The house will be operated under the new university policy on
drugs which was approved by OConnell last fall. The new guidelines
stress aiding students who abuse drugs without imposing disciplinary
or legal action on them. But they state that the use of psychedelic,
hallucinogenic or narcotic drugs is illegal and unacceptable at UF.
The policys stated purpose is to enforce the applicable Florida
statutes and United States government code, and University
regulations, while providing aid to students who request help.
Only individuals suspected of the sale, manufacture or involvement
of others with drugs will be subjected to disciplinary or legal action.
No drugs of any kind will be permitted in the Comer Drug Store.
Local law enforcement officers have asked persons involved in the
Drug Store what information about drug offenders would be turned
over to their agencies.
We should have no obligation to notify the police department
about the drug user seeking help, said Dr. Edwin A. Larson, a UF
psychiatrist, at a meeting in December. If we do we will lose the
trust of the people wanting help and the whole idea will flop.
We are not going to shield anybody who is actively avoiding the
law or who is actively pushing drugs, he added.
Det. Delroy Witt of the Gainesville Police Department wanted to
know what the Drug Store's policy would be when approached by
juvenile runaways as a crash pad.
The house is not meant to be an overnight holding facility,
Larson said. Im not sure yet what we will do about transients but I
feel it is morally wrong to let the house become a stopover place on
the road to further drug problems.
Witt cautioned the persons setting up the Drug Store about a
problem he said has occurred in a similar facility in Lexington, Ky.
Drug sellers there have used the house to get names of users as sources
for future sales, he said.
Barbara Eisenstadt, a UF student who will be in charge of the
day-to-day operation of the Drug Store, said such problems may be
countered if the facility is based on self-help and trust.

application of genetics?
Can we find suitable
engineering solutions for
pollution and waste disposal?
What role has technology
had in determining history?
Not listed in the catalog, EGC
300 may be added with the
permission of the student's
academic advisor through
Wednesday.
According to Block, there is
available classroom space for
about 200 students at the
Engineering Auditorium.
Non-engineering students are
being allowed to take the course
on a pass-fail basis, with
engineering majors given the
opportunity to take the course
on a regular bank as an elective.
Block said hell take students

Tuesday January 6,1970

who want to enroll in the course
any time during the quarter, but
added, The longer you wait,
the more red tape you will have
to go through to get in the
course.
RAY GRAVES asks
for support in an
open letter to the
student body .. .page 12
Academics 3
Classifieds 13
Editorials .* .9
Letters..- ...9
Movies .11
Orange and Blue 10
Small Society 6
Sports 12



Page 2

The

Greeks Welcome Three New Fraternities

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Three new fraternities will receive
their charters from UF President
Stephen C. OConnell in a special
ceremony tonight at 7:30 at the
Rathskeller.
Phi Kappa Theta, Sigma Alpha Mu,
and Sigma Pi will become official UF
chapters in the ceremony which kicks
off formal winter rush for UFs
fraternities. The initiation is open to
anyone, especially those who are

1 "^HnNHs|
; i :
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11 I
j| |
WHAT? NO MONEY? PETE KNOCKE
A disgusted crowd of students waited in line for about 15 minutes
Monday when the Hub, Division of Student Accounts, ran out of
money. The shortage was attributed to the large amounts of cash
needed to handle new accounts and early quarterly withdrawals.

UNTIL JAN 23
Art Exhibit Opens

The sth annual UF Art
F acuity and the 3rd
International Miniature Print
Exhibitions open the 1970
season in the University and
Teaching Galleries at the UF.
The Art Faculty Exhibition,
from Jan. 9 Feb. 15 in the
University Gallery, will be the
largest faculty display to date,
with the works of 22 faculty
artists.
P ainting drawing
photography, printmaking,
sculpture and ceramics are
among the featured works.
The Merchandise Mart
2409 SW 13th Villas* Square
Everyday bargains
Towels 49c to $1.89
Sheets, bedspreads, etc.
Open Mon Sat 9-6
Sunday*l-6

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
-lone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

TO RECEIVE CHARTERS AT RAT TONIGHT

interested in rushing a fraternity,
Interfratemity Council (IFC) President
Charles Brackins said Monday. 4
The event was planned as a welcome
for the new fraternities, and to expose
them to potential members, Brackins
said.
Phi Kappa Theta and Sigma Pi will
become the first of their chapters in
Florida.
The fraternities were chosen from
several national chapters interviewed by
an ad hoc expansion committee of the
IFC.

The Miniature Print
Exhibition, sponsored by the
Pratt Graphics Center in New
York City, opened Monday in
the Teaching Gallery.
This exhibit consists of 176
prints, each no larger than four
square inches, selected by an
artists jury from 1,518 entries
from throughout the world.
Os special interest locally is
print No. 86, an untitled
intaglio-stencil work by Ronald
T. Kraver, instructor of art at
theUF.
The exhibition lasts through
Jan. 23.
Guns Guns Guns
Inventory over 450. Buy
Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom
reloading. Harry Beckwith,
gun dealer, Micanopy.
466-3340.

Culture
Highlights
The7os
> ' V .'' S
Public attractions to suit
anyones fancy mark the
beginning of the 70s at the UF,
with productions by the Asolo
State Theatre of Sarasota and
UFs Department of Music.
Willard Brask, associate
professor of music, and Marie
Zumbro, assistant professor of
music, will highlight the
Department of Musics Stage
Concert at 8:15 pjn. today in
Constans Theatre.
Their piano duo is part of the
evening of music to be presented
by the Florida String Quartet,
the Neophonic Quartet, the
Florida Baroque Ensemble and
the Florida Woodwind Quintet
Tennessee Williams Pulitzer
Prize-winning play, Glass
Menagerie, will be presented by
the Asolo State Theatre at 8
pm Jan. 8-9 in Constans
Theatre.
The Jan. 8 performance is
open to UF students only.
Student tickets for this
performance, sponsored by the
Reitz Union in cooperation with
the Junior Welfare League, are
$1.50. Tickets for the Jan. 9
performance, sponsored by the
Junior Welfare League and open
to the public, are $3.50. Tickets
may be purchased at the
Constans Theatre box office.

Democratic Speakers Forum
Scheduled For February
The political new year is getting off to an early start with UFs
Young Democrats announcement of a Democratic Speakers Forum.
All Democratic candidates for Governor and U. S. Senator from
Florida have been individually invited to speak at the UF. All major
candidates have expressed an interest in attending and Atty. Gen. Earl
Faircloth has specified his appearance on campus in February.
Young Democrats President Bruce Smathers expressed his hope
that students, faculty and Gainesville citizens will use this opportunity
to become acquainted with the issues and get to know the candidates
personally.
The Y. D.s are hoping to have a question and answer period for the
audience after each presentation.

TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL
| K*Mu fried thicken 1
372-3649 34th S M
| Efl DINNER QQA J
I Him BOX vtlV I
M 3 Pc. Chicken M
Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 m
COUPQisi I

Strong alumni support in this area
and in Jacksonville figured in their
selection by the committee, Brackins
said.
Phi Kappa Theta, with 11 members,
has already moved into a temporary
home at 1728 N. W. 1 Ave. and claims
three alumni members on campus.
The house was so old, it took us a
week just to move out the trash; we ve
been renovating and sanding ever since,
Secretary Tom Ratican said. Phi Kappa
Thetas faculty adviser, Dr. Patrick
OLeary, is a resident surgeon at UFs

i **** ...... KLrr(a .v.y.ViV
UF Sophomore Killed
| 'ln Jamaica Cliff Fall
sf !;
>! *
Darryl Robert Mattox, 22, a sophomore honors student at UF, died
early Thursday morning when he fell from a steep cliff near the Ochos
Rios-Oracabessa main road, on the north coast of the island of
Jamaica.
Mattox was bom in Cincinnati and moved to Venice with his
parents in 1955. He graduated from Venice High School in 1965 and
enlisted in the U. S. Army. He spent 14 months of his three-year tour
in Vietnam. Upon his return, he became an active member of the
Tamiami Memorial Post of the VFW at Venice.
At the time of the accident, Mattox was visiting his father in St.
Marys, Jamaica, where the elder Mattox manages a hotel.
The body was shipped home and services will be held in Venice.
New Florida Law
Checks 35 Pesticides

A new Florida law restricts
the sale, purchase, use and
posession of 35 specific
pesticides.
The primary purpose of the
law is to limit the use of highly
toxic pesticides to commercial
agriculture. It also limits the use
of certain materials, including
DDT, Aldrin, Endrin, Dieldrin,
and Heptachlor, said James E.
Brogdon, entomologist, Florida
Agricultural Extension Service.
% Dealers now must have a
license to sell the pesticides,
and purchasers must have a
- permit to buy them, Brogdon
points out.
Permits are available to bona
fide agricultural users who must
be certified as such by county

Medical Center. The Phi Kappa Thetas
claim John F. Kennedy and Bob Hope
among their honorary alumni.
Sigma Pi, with about ten members,
has seven alumni on campus. The UF
chapter will be the 105th national
chapter of this fraternity. Its objectives
are to help the needy people in the
community, and work for the
communitys betterment.
Sigma Alpha Mu has not been fully
organized on the UF campus yet.

agricultural Extension directors.
Applications for permit and
certification forms are available
at any county agricultural
Extension directors office.
Upon receipt of a completed
form with accompanying
certification, the Commissioner
of Agriculture, will issue a
permit.
Permit to purchase and use
restricted pesticides may be
issued for uses recommended for
the pesticide in the labeling of
that pesticide, which is
registered with the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services or the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, with
the following limitations:'
MINI-POSTER

This atmosphere
Will SELF-DESTRUCT
v IN TEN YEARS
*
, %
%
*. . % % 4



Quaker Prof
Will Discuss
Wars Morality

ACADEMICS

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
- ' 5- ~'* 7 ~
The King of Sweden has honored Dr. Linton E. Grinter, former UF
executive vice president, by awarding him the Royal Order of die
North Star.
The award, presented to persons bringing honor to Sweden directly
or indirectly, was given to Grinter in recognition of fine and
generous help to Swedish scholars working in the United States and
especially your support of the joint Swedish-American research
project at the University of Florida.
Grinter served as dean of UFs Graduate School for 17 years where
he was instrumental in establishing the unique quantum theory
project, a joint program conducted by UF and the University of
Uppsala in Sweden.
The project is headed by Dr. Per-Olov, a distinguished Swedish
scientist who is professor of quantum chemistry at Uppsala and
graduate research professor of chemistry and physics at UF.
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers awarded the 1969
Richards Memorial Award to Dr. Robert E. Uhrig, dean of the College
of Engineering, at a recent meeting in Los Angeles.
The Richards Memorial Award was established in 1944 in honor of
Charles Russ Richards, founder of Pi Tau Sigma, the national
mechanical engineering honorary society. It is given annually by the
society for outstanding achievement by a mechanical engineering
graduate within 20 to 25 years after graduation from the regular
mechanical engineering curriculum of a recognized college or
university.
UF professor of engineering Thomas deSaussure Furman, was
named Civil Engineer of the Year by the Florida Section of the
American Society of Civil Engineers at its 1969 annual meeting.
The award was presented by Byron D. Spangler, associate professor
of engineering, who received the award last year. The presentation
marked the close of the two-day meeting in Gainesville. Furman
served as toastmaster of the formal banquet during which the award
was made and he did not know of his selection until the presentation.
Unrestricted grants totaling $7,000 for the academic year 1969-70
have been awarded the College of Engineering by the Humble Oil and
Refining Co., Charlotte, N. C.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell accepted the grants on behalf
of the College of Engineering from P. M. Mauney, Jacksonville retail
sales supervisor, and 0. L. Clevenger, engineering supervisor at the
companys Baytown, Tex., refinery.
Grants of SI,OOO each from the Humble Oil Education Foundation
went to the Departments of Chemical
Engineering and Electrical Engineering to support graduate research
and studies. A fourth SI,OOO check was presented for use by College
of Engineering Dean Robert Uhrig at his own discretion. A $3,000
grant from the Esso Education Foundation was given to the
Department of Chemical Engineering.
The Humble Oil Education Foundation has made grants totaling
$396,000 to 94 colleges and universities this year. The Esso Education
Foundations current grants total more than $3 million to some 300
colleges, universities and educational organizations.
?
U of F Student Insurance
Enrollment Period
OPEN
SPONSORED BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
COVERAGE
Until Sept. 1970
Pays infirmary expense
Hosp., Doctor and Surgical Bills
PREMIUM
Student premium $14.80
Student and Spouse premium $31.25
Student, Spouse and Children $47.50
Student and Children $31.25
Optional Major Medical $5 per personal additional
You may pick up Brochures and Enrollment Forms from
the Infirmary, McGriff Scarborough and Student
Government.
McGriffScurborotgli l Associates
M). Box 1407
115 N.E. 6th Avo. Ph. 376-8393

NEWS AND VIEWS

Dr. Paul Adams, professor of psychiatry and clerk
in the Society of Friends (Quakers) will lead a
discussion on The Morality of War, on Wednesday
at 4 pm in room 122 and 123 of the Reitz Union.
The discussion is the first in a series of four
presentations entitled Dialogue with a Theologue.
The series is sponsored jointly by the Union and the
UF Religious Association.
The series began in the fall quarter with speakers
on such topics as the underground church and the
Islamic religion.

Enrollment Up In 6os,
Women Gaining On Men

Student enrollment on the UF Campus has
increased by more than 8,000 during the past 10
years. Comparable figures for the fall terms of
1959-60 and 1969-70 show increases of 5,694
undergraduates and 1,771 graduate students with
populations in the professional schools of law and
medicine increasing by 566.
Comparison gives women a larger increase than
men over the 10-year period although men
outnumber the women in total count. Women
students soared by 4,107 with 3,297 here in 1959
and 7,404 in 1969. Totals for men were 9,413 in
1959 and 13,337 this past fall an increase of
3*924.
The upswing in graduate students shows a larger
male growth with an increase of 1,233 for men and
472 for women.
Numerically, the largest college in both years was
the University College comprising all freshmen and
sophomores, but proportionally it has the smallest
growth rate only 291 persons or four per cent in
the 10-year period. This college is the only unit with
a decrease in the number of men during the decade
as males dropped by 869 while women increased by
1,160.
The number in the University College is restricted
by the Board of Regents enrollment limitation
allowing only 2,800 new freshmen to enter each
fall.
The College of Arts and Sciences takes second
place in both years increasing by 2,196 persons a

THIS THURSDA Y AND FRIDA Y AT THE I
BatfeMler
EAST WING MAIN CAFETERIA
BYPOPULAR demand I
JCONTINUOUS MUSIC AND DANCING
> Hf f WITH THE
* A i PURCHASE OR
.> J PRESENTATION I
MEMBERSHIP I
CARD... I
ALL ERS I

r Mmmjg p, IfW.

Dick Thompson, graduate assistant in the
programs office who is working on the series,
stressed that the presentations are strictly informal
discussions.
The topics are usually very broad. These topics
are beginning points. Sometimes we stay on the
beginning topic and sometimes we wander,
Thompson said.
There are plans for a program in the near future
on the role of the church in relation to social
change.

164 per cent growth over the decade.
Undergraduate enrollment swelled by 1,550 while
graduate students rose by 646.
Engineering, the third largest college in 1959 with
1,021 enrolled, slipped to fourth in 1969, changing
places with the College of Education. Engineering
went up in numbers by 321 undergraduates and 274
in graduate work but ranks second lowest in
percentage increase with 58 per cent growth.
The on-campus figures do not reflect the addition
of GENESYS -a special off-campus network
Graduate Engineering Education System enrolling
in 1969 a total of 341 professional engineers over
the state in degree-granting programs.
The College of Education increased by 1,281
with undergraduates growing by 962 and graduate
students by 319 or 131 per cent. Education enrolled
980 students in 1959 when it was the fourth largest
college and totaled 2,261 in 1969 to gain third
place. Women out-numbered the men in this college
in both undergraduate and graduate programs nearly
two to-one both in 1959 and 1969.
Business Administration held fifth place both
years with the 159 per cent growth more than
doubling the size in die 10-year period. Graduate
enrollment almost quadrupled during the decade.
Journalism and Communications the newest
unit to achieve college status shows a 645 per
cent increase over the period. Enrolling 111
students in 1959, the unit had jumped to 827 by
last fall.

Page 3



Page 4

The

Highlights Os The Sixties On UF Campus

By Alligator Services
The UF closed out the soaring
sixties with a bang, enrollment
pushing over 20,000,
construction continuing, new
appointments announced and
efforts made to recruit more
worthy minority students.
Efforts were made throughout
campus to provide students with
more voice in University affairs
while at the same time taking a
strong stand against potential
disruptions.
A new program went into
effect with its goal to alleviate
the problem of traffic and
parking congestion.
And UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell continued to urge
support the UF needs to climb
to a position of prominence in
the academic world.
Coach Ray Graves Gators
made some inroads of their own
in the game of fame with an
unexpected 8-1-1 record and a
Gator Bowl victory.
Construction amounting to
more than $7 million was started
on the UF campus during 1969.
Outstanding faculty is one of
the keys to distinction in a
university. And UF took a step
in that direction with the type
of appointees made during the
year to several prominent
positions on campus.
Dr. Harry H. Sisler, dean of
the UFs College of Arts and
Sciences and a
nationally-recognized chemist,
was named UF executive vice
president Dec. 8.
Appointed provost of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center in
May was Dr. Edmund F. Ackell.
Dr. Harold Palmer Hanson,
chairman of physics at the
University of Texas, was
appointed dean of the Graduate
School; Dr. Jose E. Medina,
associate dean and professor of
clinical dentistry, was named
dean of the College of Dentistry,
and Dr. Robert F. Lanzillotti,
chairman of economics at
Michigan State University,
assumed the College of Business
Administration deanship July 1.
The UF took steps to recruit
more minority students on Aug.
IS when it announced the
appointment of Roy Ishaman
"
jnssisisrs:
V- : V <
If congratulations arc in order
for your recent engagement, and
now is the time for your
announcement, call
Johnston Photography
for your engagement portrait.
1915 N.W. 13th St.
PHONE 372-2512

ENROLLMENT PISFS AND GATORS GO 9-1-J

THE
SOARING
60'S
Mitchell of Jacksonville as the
Universitys first full-time
coordinator for disadvantaged
students.
Mitchell already has initiated
several recruiting trips around
the state in an effort to
encourage disadvantaged
students to apply at the UF.
Student action will determine
if the University of Floridas
proposed $17.5 million activities
center is to be or is another
impossible dream.
Student Government has
scheduled a campus-wide
referendum Feb. 4 on increasing
registration fees to help fund the
multi-purpose facility. t
The studies authorized by
President Stephen C. OConnell
showed a tremendous need for
the center which would include
a 16,000-seat coliseum, an
1,800-seat theatre for the
performing arts and a
natatorium to house an Olympic
pool and diving facilities.
Rights and responsibilities of
UF students engaged in campus
demonstrations were defined in
February by a University Senate
policy statement.
The statement supported
freedom of expression, but
warned that disruptive actions
would not be tolerated.
In May, a Grade Appeals
Board was established in two
departments of the UFs College
of Education. A three-man
faculty committee comprises the
board, which will hear
complaints of students feeling
professors have judged them
unfairly in classroom
performance. The idea: to
correct honest mistakes
i THERE ARE
y:A NO STRINGS
ATTACHED!
freshmen
JH vX join
ARMY ROTC
WPflr this quarter
take it until
* otter Y draw
(( if next fall
IF your number
\\ comes up 365 or so
g .....there is
t NO obligation to continue,
not too late r
ARMY ROTC
this quarter.
See us at the ROTC department.

maybe made in haste.
During 1969 internationally
known Italian architect Leonard
Ricci brought to the UFs
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts a new voice and direction in
architecture and urban design.
The Bureau of Economic and
Business Research at the UF this
year expanded its analysis of the
states economy to include
economic indicators, a good
measure of the business activity.
The Economic Indicators
are published monthly as a
separate leaflet and also as part
of Dimensions monthly
magazine featuring in-depth
articles on many economic
subjects.
The UFs College of Law
celebrated its 60th birthday
during 1969 by naming its new
Law Center for U. S. Sen.
Spessard L. Holland during
campus dedication ceremonies
Feb. 1 in the new $2,536,263
law academic building.
U. S. Chief Justice Earl
Warren, who since has retired,
made the dedicatory address.
Seven men of distinction,
from near and far, joined the
ranks of honorary degree holders
of the UF during 1969.
Honored were: George M.
Low of Houston, Tex., manager,
Apollo Spacecraft Program,
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration; Dr. Lester R.
Dragstedt, much-honored
research professor of surgery at
the UF; Dr. George W. Gore Jr.,

Headquarters for
Art and
Journalism
Student I
Supplies I

it* # jlii
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* .UPT Jj
piMf|g§~ y fnb : rm
r iQp -aagfr
UF'S CONGESTED STREETS
... were given relief by the new bus and parking system in 1969

retired president of Florida
A&M University.
Florida alumnus and 1968
Nobel Prize winner Dr. Marshall
W. Nirenberg, chief of the
Laboratory of Biochemical
Genetics, National Heart
Institute, Bethesda, Md., was
among the honorary recipients.
Others honored were: Robert
C. Beaty, former dean of

students at the UF;C. Archibald
Robertson, University
professor-emeritus of English,
and Dr. Harry M. Philpott,
president of Auburn University.
GENESYS, the UFs Graduate
Engineering Education System,
added its eighth center a
facility in West Palm Beach on
Oct. 13.



Dizzy DeanCooperative

DETROIT (UPI) Federal
officials indicated Monday Hall
of Fame pitcher Jerome Dizzy
Dean has been very helpful in
cracking a nationwide sports
betting ring that may have
grossed in the millions of
dollars,
The announcement of four
more arrests three in Biloxi,
Miss., based partly on
information supplied by Dean,
and one in New York City
brought to 14 the number of
men arrested since New Years
Day in the government
crackdown on big-time betting.
James H. Brickley, U. S.
Attorney at Detroit, indicated at
a news conference more arrests

Claude Kirks Governors Club
Given Supreme Court Priority

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Claude Kirks admission to
using Governors Club funds
for official state purposes will
weigh heavily in their decision
on whether the clubs
membership and bank records
can be kept secret, several
Supreme Court justices indicated
Monday.
Justice James Adkins
indicated by questions that he
was under the impression that
some of the m6ney was being
used in connection with Kirks
campaign for re-election. Kirks
attorney, Gerald Mager, denied
there has been any showing that
the funds were used for
campaigning.
At the end of hour-long
arguments on the pros and cons
of whether the ultra-secret club
is a public or private
organization, Presiding Justice E.
Harris Drew said the case will be
given priority and a decision
rendered as quickly as humanly
possible.
That means anywhere from
two weeks to six weeks, Drew
added.
The justices peppered
attorneys with questions at the
hearing which climaxed a
four-month tug-of-war between
a legislative committees efforts
to learn names of the clubs
SSOO-a-year contributors and the
Well
pay
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AGAINST BETTING RING

were to come. He declined to
say whether prominent sports
personalities would be among
those arrested, as was hinted
earlier.
The evidence is that there
were contacts (by the alleged
gambling ring) with members of
the sports world, Brickley said.
Now, this could be serious or
something relatively innocent
maybe stupid, but relatively
innocent.
Dean, the only sports figure
authorities have mentioned by
name, was searched but not
arrested at his Las Vegas,
Nev., hotel room. A Las Vegas
friend and a Michigan
acquaintance of Deans were

governors determination to
keep them under cover.
Justices Adkins and Joe Boyd
asked most of the questions,
bearing down heavily on Kirks

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among those arrested.
He (Dean) is furnishing
information that the government
is very pleased to get, Brickley
said. He appears to be very
cooperative, very helpful.
Brickley identified the
Mississippi men arrested as Peter
J. Martino, 47, described as a
Biloxi gambling boss; his
brother, Warren L. Martino, 44;
and Salvatore J. Sicuro, 64.
In New York, agents arrested
David Miller, 62, at his
Manhattan apartment.
In the New Years Day raids
in Michigan, agents confiscated
$620,000 in cash and checks and
a vast reservoir of records.

statement to the House
Elections Committee last month
that the club helped pay
expenses the state should but
does not pay for the governor.

See if its not more efficient to because communications is what
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Sandoval Announce!
Underworld Probe
WASHINGTON (UPI) Small Business Administrator Hilary
Sandoval Jr. said Monday the government was trying to recover
$530,000 in two loans made to Chicago and New Orleans firms with
alleged underworld connections.
He also said he had ordered audit teams to make unannounced
visits to 11 other unnamed cities to determine if other
Mafia-connected firms had secured loans from Small Business
Administration.
It is not possible at this point in our investigation for me to say
just how many thousands of taxpayer dollars have been channelled to
underworld operations through SBA loans made in the past,
Sandoval told a news conference.
He said the New Orleans loan involved the LaStrada Inn Inc., a
motel, which received $385,000 from the SBA last Jan. 22.
Sandoval said Frank Occhipinti, who managed the motel and is an
18 per cent stockholder, has been identified as a business associate of
Carlos Marcello, alleged to be the Mafia boss in New Orleans.
The second loan, for $145,000, involves Suburban Transit System
Inc. of Chicago, which received the money as a result of a tornado
disaster in 1968.
He also said that J. B. Alexander, the SBAs chief of financial
assistance in New Orleans, had been denied authority to approve loans
pending the outcome of an investigation.
Earlier, the SBA recovered $139,456 from a loan to the ANR
leasing Corp. of New York City, described by Sandoval as an alleged
Mafiarelated firm.
Sandoval, who has held his post 10 months, said a considerable
amount of my effort has been directed toward putting out fires and
cleaning up dirt left by my predecessors.

Tulvy, January 6,' 1870, TtwFtorfda AHfeatrio

Page 5



Page 6

* rlorida Alligator, T uesday, JanuaryO&Vo

AT NQUEST

Kennedy Testifies

EDGARTOWN, Mass. (UPI)
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy was
the star witness Monday when a
secret inquest opened into the
death of Mary Jo Kopechne. His
testimony virtually duplicated
his nationally televised account
of the accident last summer, UPI
learned.
I testified for about an
hour, the Senator said when
the inquest broke at 1 p.m.
EST for a one-hour lunch. Ill
be back this afternoon.
The inquest into the death of
the 28-year-old secretary began

SOME SCHOOLS ALL BLACK
-
Mississippi Totally Desegregated

JACKSON (UPI) Total
school desegregation hit
Mississippi Monday and the
Magnolia State met the moment
it had resisted for 15 years by
turning many public schools
completely over to Negroes.
One district became virtually
all-black and few whites showed
up in others as registration and
orientation began for the new
semester.
Nearly half of 30 Mississippi
districts ordered by the Supreme
Court 10 weeks ago to
desegregate totally and
immediately began their
registration procedures Monday.
At the same time a number of
new private schools opened
some of them in churches and at
least one in an abandoned
factory.
There apparently were no
incidents. Gov. John Bell
Williams had pleaded for calm in
a statewide television address
Saturday night, telling
Mississippians, the moment we
have resisted for 15 years that
we have fought hopefully to
avoid; at least to delay is
finally at hand.
It seems that were going to
function as an all-Negro school
system, said Bernard Waites
superintendent of schools in

Save rescue, deliver,
preserve, salvage, safeguard,
economize, conserve.
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amid tight security in a
century-old courthouse.
Kennedy seemed cheerful as
he emerged from the court
house along with five women
and five men acquaintances who
had attended a cookout pary
together the night Miss Kopechne
died in Kennedys car after it
plunged into a tidal pond.
Court Clerk Thomas A. Teller
told newsmen he would
distribute a statement at 2fpjn.,
presumably concerning ground
rules imposed by District Judge

Wilkinson County in
Mississippis southwest comer.
It will just cease to function as
it has in the past.
He said only two of the
districts 800 white pupils
showed up this morning.
Virtually all Negro students
attended.
Waites said nearly 100 blacks
had been attending two
otherwise white Wilkinson

Strenuous Demands Prompt
FSU Veeps Resignation

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
- Florida State Universitys vice
president for student affairs,
citing the day-and-night
strenuous demands of his job,
said Monday he will resign
March 1.
John K. Arnold Jr. said he
hopes to remain at FSU in a
different and less taxing
capacity. Arnold 56, has been
with the university since 1958,
serving as an air science
professor, dean of students and
vice president.
Its been kind of a fulltime
job for me, and I mean
weekends, days and nights,

smdlf^ocJety

#
FATH&P & rri
loT TO.A-^ r (fa
>"***
Wcir*ir.gic'r* St gpi

James A. Boyle, who presided at
the inquest.
Kennedy who flew in from his
Hyannis Port home on the
mainland, said as he entered the
court house, Im hopeful we
can reach an end to what has
become an extraordinary length
of time.

county schools under a
freedom of choice plan before
the Christmas holidays started.
It had taken some time for
the white people to fcet
accustomed to that, Waites
said, but they adjusted and
things were coming along fine.
You couldnt have made me
believe five years ago though,
that we would ever come to
this.

Arnold said. I just dont care to
work that hard anymore.
He said his resignation is not
entirely due to student unrest
following the universitys refusal
to recognize Students for a
Democratic Society and other
radical political groups.
He conceded that SDS-led
demonstrations took too much
of my time that could have been
put to better use.

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HUNDREDS OTHERS PROVIDE WELCOME
Nepal Students Demonstrate Against Agnew

KATMANDU, Nepal (UPI) Leftist students
demonstrated Monday against the official visit by
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew to this tiny
Himalayan kingdom bordering on Communist
China. But hundreds of other Nepalese, from
school-children to the king, made him welcome.
The anti-American demonstrations in the suburbs
of Katmandu and outside a U.S. library here were
believed provoked by Chinese Communists. Police
said. 20 students were arrested in suburban Patna,
about three miles from the center of the city and
site of the main demonstration, and 10 more in
Katmandu.
A UPI cameraman was beaten unconscious and
another cameraman was beaten and robbed of his
watch and ring during the disorders.

Viet Cong Proclaim Cease- Fire
For February Lunar New Year

SAIGON (UPI) The Viet
Cong Monday announced a
four-day cease-fire for the Tet
lunar new year next month. U.S.
military sources reacted
cautiously, recalling that North
Vienamese and Viet Cong troops
launched the war's biggest
offensive during Tet two years
ago.
The Viet Cong proclamation
of a Tet cease-fire coincided
with continuing reports of
increased activity by Communist
forces in South Vietnams
northern rim, particularly in the
supposedly neutral Demilitarized
Zone.
Field reports said North
Vietnamese gunners shot up a
U.S. helicopter over the DMZ
Sunday and wounded a crewman
in the 21st major incident in the
border region since U.S. planes
stopped bombing North
Vietnam 14 months ago. It was
the fourth DMZ incident
reported in the past three days.
The helicopter was reportedly
hit while making a
reconnaissance flight over the

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southern half of the
six-mile-wide DMZ in an area
four miles northeast of Gio
Linh. Spokesmen said it was able
to return safely to base despite
the damage.
The Viet Cong broadcast
proclaiming the Tet cease-fire
said it would go into effect at 7
am Feb. 5 and last until 7 am.
on Feb. 9. It said allied
violations of the cease-fire would
be punished accordingly.
There was no immediate
official reaction from either
American or South Vietnamese
headquarters, but it was
expected they would order a
shorter cease-fire for Tet,
Vietnams biggest holiday.
In 1968, during a Tet
cease-fire the Communists had
announced, North Vietnamese
and and Viet Cong troops struck
every major population center in
South Vietnam in the biggest
drive of the war.
They invaded parts of Saigon
and held wide areas of Hue, the
old imperial capital, for almost a
month. The Viet Cong called a

Agnew, accompanied by his wife and two Apollo
astronauts, flew here from Bangkok for an overnight
stay on his tour of the Far East. They made the
flight in a U.S. Air Force version of the
propeller-driven DC6 transport because the landing
strip is not long enough for his Air Force 2
jetliner.
The highest-ranking U.S. official ever to visit
Nepal, Agnew was greeted at the Tribhuvan Airport
by Prime Minister Kirtinidhi Bista and other
Nepalese officials as well as by U.S. Ambassador
Carol Laise. He was given a 19-gun salute and both
he and his wife were bedecked with flowers by five
Nepalese girls.
Observers said the welcome was particularly
warm because Agnews visit was an official one, and

seven-day cease-fire at Tet last
year, but the allies charged that
it was widely violated.

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not just a side trip from India as made by most
other distinguished visitors.
The anti-American demonstrations erupted while
Agnew was meeting with Bista. Police had arrested a
number of potential troublemakers during the
weekend but leftist students distributed anti-Agnew
leaflets Sunday night and massed in Patan to shout
such slogans as go back Agnew, down with
American imperialism, Americans withdraw from
Vietnam, and down with King Mahendra.
is
Nepalese officials said they suspected Chinese
Communist involvement because large numbers of
Chinese cars were seen in Pataq. before the rioting
started.

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Tuesday, January 6,1970, Tha Florida AMM

Page 7



Page 8


l. The Florida AMpftor, Ttmday, January 8,1970

Senate Boycott
By Non-Attenders?
MR. EDITOR:
As a non-elected senator from Engineering who voted against
continuation of the status quo in Senate membership, I take
exception to Dr. Kammerers report (December 4) that engineering
senators had received word from their administration on how to vote.
Fortunately, all my experience is that we simply dont operate that
way. I once received (gladly) a reminder to attend a Senate meeting,
but not the meeting in question.
Furthermore, Dr. Kammerers logic escapes me. The present Senate
criticized, somewhat justifiably, for .poor attendance. It is also
criticized on its vote on reapportionment which, because of the
"refusal by those from AS, ED, MC, and UC to attend the Senate
any more, was attributed to Senators from EG and AG, whose
attendance was relatively good.
Then, although the groups reputed to be non-attending appreciably
outnumber EG and AG combined, the recommended solution is a
100% boycott by the non-attending groups!
I hope that the non-attending colleges, if there are any, attend
100%, even if they do outnumber those presently attending, because
then the best interests of the University will be served.
H. A. SAWYER
PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING

Did you check under the bed, John?

Vietnam Prisoner Issue Cuts Both Ways

WASHINGTON High on the list of those for
whom Americans may pray are our prisoners of war in
North Vietnam, whose names we do not know, and of
whose number we are unsure. Two weeks ago the
House passed a resolution urging Hanoi to tell us who
they are. There is something empty and deceitful about
this gesture. Congress could do something for these
men. The oratory, the protest, the outrage, the
patriotism, the sympathy is a substitute offered to
wives and familes in the place of action.
What Congress could do is to resolve that this
government our government move to a defensible
posture on prisoners of war. The assumption that the
conduct of the enemy about prisoners is criminal,
while ours is both legal and moral, is sham.
United States troops do not keep prisoners of war.
We turn them over to the South Vietnamese. Once
they go to the South Vietnamese, we assume no
responsibility. The result is that when Hanoi responds
to our prisoner inquiries with charges that those men
are not prisoners but criminals, they are giving us the
cold logic of an eye for an eye.
For criminals is what the South Vietnamese army
is calling large numbers of the prisoners it receives from
us and as criminals they are treated. It takes not one
whit of justification away from the wives of Americans
who rightly call out to their government in anguish to
find out whether their husbands are dead or alive to
say that Saigon is almost as guilty as Hanoi.
Almost may or may not be accurate. It is
impossible to determine what may happen to any
individual prisoners whom we turn over to our allies.
We know that the South Vietnamese say they hold
31,495 men in six POW camps, an additional 10,000 in
interrogation centers and 35,000 in jails. When our
Army takes a prisoner, it does not know where he will
be sent.
Until about a year ago, the International Red Cross

i
The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
7 Raul Ramirez 37
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Frank Mankiawicz-
Tom Bradnn
complained strongly about the treatment of the men in
the POW camps, about 6,000 of whom are North
Vietnamese. Now, the Red Cross says, the men in the
camps are treated according to international law. But
the Red Cross knows nothing about what goes on in
the interrogation camps, and, as every soldier who has
taken a prisoner in South Vietnam knows, the rumors*
are nasty.
Nor is it any business of the Red Cross to find out
what goes on in South Vietnam's prisons and jails
where, the facts strongly suggest, a large number of
those who would normally be considered war prisoners
wind up after they get out of interrogation centers and
where they are held as criminals or Communists.
The South say these prisons and jails
house 35,000 men, of whom most are charged with
being Communists. But they do not know or say
they do not know how many of these were taken
during the kind of village raid (in which uniformed
soldiers tackle a civilian population) and who might

editorial
Look Forward
The University of Florida has a new vice-president -a
spot filled only by interim appointees since Dr. Harry
Philpott left in 1967 to take the Auburn University
presidency.
But the appointment of Dr. Harry Sisler to the post of
executive vice-president is not just another vacant slot being
filled.
It is, we hope, an attempt to lubricate some
decision-making machinery that has been rusty and sluggish,
except for some superficial showpiece gimmicks such as the
Action Conference and its successor, the presidents
Advisory Council.
We congratulate UF President Stephen C. OConnell for
selecting a fine man, a man who has focused his attention
on student concerns, Harry Sisler.
And, moreover, we hope OConnell uses similar good
judgment in filling the vast void Sislers appointment has
left in Arts and Sciences.
Sisler was instrumental in setting-up the Arts and Sciences
Student Council when he was dean of that college. We
anticipate more great things from Harry Sisler.
His first action should be to, in keeping with his own
excellent tradition, open up his office to students.
To use his leadership to inject new life and new ideas into
UFs decision-making by first opening-up the inner sanctum
of the Council of Academic Deans, and second, by moving
to convince reluctant faculty members to restructure the
University Senate to grant students their right to
respresentation in that body.
We realize Sisler is only one man. His leadership needs
support from within. And finding support in the
traditionally backward-looking UF administration may be a
difficult task.
But we look forward to seeing innovative,
student-oriented reforms emanating from Sislers office. He
could be the one droplet of oil needed to free the corroded
crank which generates power in UFs decision-making
machinery.
Perhaps then well see a full-blown plant, going
full-strength toward OConnells dream of a truly great,
unified university.

thus be classified as prisoners of war.
Thirty-five thousand is a large proportion of the
total South Vietnamese population to be in jail. On the
basis of proportion of population, it more than doubles
the number of persons held in jail in this country. The
suspicion is strong therefore that a great number of the
Viet Cong and some of the North Vietnamese who are
taken in battle are not held in POW camps at all, but in
jail.
Officials of the Red Cross, senators and congressmen
and officers at the Pentagon who have looked into it
share this opinion; yet the United States does nothing
about it. Officially these are not our prisoners. We
subscribe to the rules of the Geneva Convention. We
can issue ringing declarations about the treatment of
our men by Hanoi. But, like Pontius Pilate, we hand
over prisoners to the South Vietnamese and we wash
our hands.
Alligator Staff
Helen Huntley Janie Gould
Assistant News Editor Assignment Editor
Anne Freedman Mary Toomey
Feature Editor Editorial Assistant
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84, Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
* ii or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



View From The Crowd

The Seventies .. We ll Make It Or Break It

I was driving from Orlando to
Tampa late in the afternoon on
New Year's Eve. Before me was
the most unbelievably beautiful
sunset I have ever seen. The
golden rays lit the underside of a
huge cluster of clouds in such a
way that there appeared to be a
magical island in the sky.
Suddenly, it seemed very
appropriate that this particular

That settles it seven to six against civil disobedience

Right Way To Change

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The
following article is reprinted
from the 25 April 1969 issue of
SCIENCE magazine.)
For a long time we have
fondly preserved the fiction that
the drama of social change is a
conflict between dissenters and
the top layers of the
Establishment. But as the critics
fling themselves in
Kamikaze-like assaults on
sluggish institutions, they
eventually come into head-on
collision with the people who
are most deeply implicated in
the sluggishness, namely, the
great majority. The stone wall
against which many radical
reforms shatter is the
indifference (or downright
hostility) of that majority.
The collision between
dissenters and lower middle class
opponents is exceedingly
dangerous. As long as the
dissenters are confronting the
top layers of the power
structure, they are dealing with
people who are reasonably
secure; often willing to
compromise, able to yield
ground without anxiety. But
when the dissenters collide with
the lower middle class, they
confront an insecure opponent,
quick to anger and not prepared
to yield an inch.
It is at this point that young
rebels find great appeal in
Herbert Marcuse's ideas. When
they think they are attacking the
fat cats at the top of the social
structure, democratic doctrine
seems a serviceable banner to
wrap themselves in. But
democratic doctrine suddenly
becomes a considerable
embarrassment when they
discover that the people" they
seek to Mberate ate in fact
bitterly opposed to them.
Marcuse deals with that
difficulty by saying that

sunset had occured. This was the
eve of a new decade and maybe,
just maybe, this phenomenon of
extraordinary beauty was an
omen that all is not lost. That
there is still hope for us.
This is our decade; we of the
younger generation. The
seventies will determine whether
we make it or break it. During
the sixties we of the

democracy and tolerance are
themselves barriers to the
overthrow of an evil society. He
society. In doing so, he makes
the assumption made by all who
fall into authoritarian
doctrinesthat, in the
directed" society he envisages,
people who share his values will
be filing the tune. So thought
the businessmen who supported
Hitler.
The debasement of the critical
role makes responsible action for
social change increasingly
difficult. The irresponsible critic
never exposes himself to the
tough tests of reality. He doesnt
limit himself to feasible options.
He doesnt subject his view of
the world to the cleansing
discipline of historical
perspective or contemporary
relevance. He defines the
problem to suit himself. Its a
hard game to lose. If he takes
care to stay outside the arena of
action and decision, his
judgment and integrity will
never be tested, never risked,
never laid on the line. He can
feel a limitless moral superiority
to the mere mortals who put
their reputation at hazard every
day in accountable action.
The consequenes of such
reckless radicalism are
predictable. Out of such
self-indulgence come few
victories. The model of the
ineffectual radical is the man or
woman who spends a few brief
years exploding in indignation,
posturing, attitudinizing,
oversimplifying* shooting at the
wrong targets, unwilling to
address himself to the exacting
business of understanding the
machinery of society, unwilling
to undergo the arduous training
necessary to master the
processes he hopes to change.
Those who are engaged in the
gnieling work of accomplishing
institutional change are in

post-war baby boom were
growing up and reaching
maturity. It happened fast. We
saw a president and his brother
assasinated live on television.
We lost friends, brothers,
sweethearts in Vietnam. Our
cities ware ravaged by fires of
hatred. There is hunger in a land
of plenty. We grew up fast, there

desperate need of allies.
Responsible social critics can be
of enormous help in identifying
targets for action, in clarifying
and focusing issues, in
formulating significant goals and
mobilizing support for those
goals. The responsible critic
comes to understand the
complex machinery by which
change must be accomplished,
finds the key points of leverage,
identifies feasible alternatives,
and measures his work by real
results. We have many such
critics, and we owe them a great
debt.-John W. Gardner

ft
V- r.-S ' \
' S
Dark at the top of the stairs

was nowhere to hide.
We have blamed it on the
older generation. They are
responsible for a sick society.
Well, now its our turn; we have
ten years, maybe less. This is our
decade. We can become the
driving force in politics, the arts,
the sciences, the business world.
jAdoia
mi
VIA&Mt

'On Aggression 1
Explains Songmy?

MR. EDITOR:
It appears likely that many of
the American troops involved at
Songmy committed acts
considered barbaric by their own
Western standards. It is difficult
to understand the circumstances
that allow a presumably typical
group of American men to
behave toward other humans in
a manner discontinuously
different from that expected of
their social environment and
training.
I would like to call attention
to the possible relevance here of
the thesis presented by the
naturalist Konrad Lorenz in his
book, On Aggression."
Lorenz's conclusions
concerning human aggression are
based largely on extrapolation
from observations of other
animals and therefore subject to
criticism; they nevertheless
suggest important and
provocative considerations for

Tuesday, January 6,1970,7 ha Florida Alligator, I

By Rob Matte*

We can find each other o.
continue to think only of
number one. Life may be a
erode but weve one last chance
to make it a worthwhile erode.
Tearing down the walls is not
the answer. It is hard, surviving
amid nibble. Renouncing our
fellows is not the answer.
Individuals quickly perish in the
wilderness. We must change the
system from within, subvert evil
and corruption with love and
honest dedication. It can be
done. Ask Ralph Nader. Ask
James Brown. Let us take the
spirit of Woodstock and harness
it as an instrument of change.
This is our decade. Its up to us.
The sun went down. It grew
dark. I hope that someday there
will be another sunset like that
one, and away of life to match.

those of us not expert in the
behavioral sciences.
Os specific interest, I believe,
is Lorenzs chapter on rats. Rats,
it seems, demonstrate to others
of their social group or pack
many social and parental
attributes paralleling those
admired by Western society. On
the other hand, interpack
behavior within the same species
is cruel in the extreme.
Further, if a member of the
social group is stripped of his
identification with that group,
(in this case odor), he too is
treated in a grossly different way
than that prior to the
modification.
Lorenz cites this as an
example of aggression gone
astray in the sense that its
function is destructive to the
species in contrast, for example,
to interspecies aggression whose
function is that of preservation.
The implication, of course, is
that man also is capable of
aggression destructive to the
species. Thus one social group
adjusts its morality to behave
quite differently toward another
social group than is
characteristic of intra-group
behavior.
This adjustment may take the
form of rationalization in man,
such as rigid adherence to
religious or social doctrines
taken as absolutes, but leads to
the same destructive effect.
Perhaps our reasons for
waging war and rationalization
of behavior during war should be
tempered by more global
considerations, e.g., to what
extremes of aggression may one
go to preserve a useful ideology
before the destructive aspects
dominate?
JAMES W.DUFTY
POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW
PHYSICS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Bs typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
9 Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
9 Have addraes and
telephone numbers of writers.
amil win m wiuinvia oroy n
writer shows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit aM
letters for space.

Page 9



The

Page 10

Orange mi

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
- NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices Campus

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
on Jan. 31, 1970. The last day
for receipt by the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, N.J.
08540, is Jan. 7 for application
with the $lO fee for reading
knowledge examinations in
French, German, Russian and
Spanish. Registration fees
increase to sl3 after this day
and up to closing date of Jan.
14.

I K> I
*- H
EFFECTIVE
IMMEDIATELY
NEW STUDENT PUBLICATIONS I
PHONE NUMBERS I
EDITORIAL
392-1686, 87,88,89
ADVERTISING, BUSINESS,
OPERATIONS, SEMINOLE
FLORIDA QUARTERLY
392-1681, 82,83, 84
CIRCULATION
392-1619 I

~ GAINESVILLE FLORIOA FEDERAL CREDIT UNldfi
m -r-, -m-^ lULS? t axes? debts?
/''ui. dfe / f JpCbs It's Income Tax time again and this year is even worse'
Ml / 7-W/ ' -ntr // Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
W ;L / r T/ /l enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces-
PI \ Z y BP V [\ s,t,es of l,fe! CONSOLIDATE all of those bills pay B
HI l j \ \ vour taxes and end up with less of a monthly output.
I 111 l' V \ mM- Come in to talk it over...we're specialist at solving
y 7 those kinds of problems!

PLACEMENT NOTICE
DUKE LAW SCHOOL,
Durham, N.C., representative
will be interviewing Jan. 8 from
1:30 to 4:00 p.m. for seniors
interested in law study. Sign up
in the Placement Center, G-22
Reitz Union, for an
appointment

BLUE BULLETIN

.. -i
GENERAL NOTICES
UF STUDENT CHAPTER OF
THE AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION will hold a
board meeting Sunday, Jan. 11,
1970, at 5 p.m. All board
members and other interested
are asked to meet at the
Information Desk, 3rd floor,
Reitz Union.
ORANGE AND BLUE
BULLETIN will be published
Tuesday and Friday this quarter.
Deadline for Tuesday is 5 p.m.
Friday and deadline for Friday is
5 p.m. Wednesday.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday, January 6
Student Government Book
Exchange, C-4BUnion, Noon
6:00 p.m.
Union Humanities Film, 'The
Tempest," Union Aud., 7:00
& 9:30 p.m.
Assoc, for Computing Machinery
Meeting, 346 Union, 7:00
p.m. ..
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Players and Music Dept
Mixed Media, 'The Pierian
Spring," Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Council of International
Organizations Meeting, 316
Union, 8:00 p.m.
L
%
Wednesday, January 7
Uranium Plasma Symposium,
Union Aud., 8:00 a.m.
UR A & Mental Health Meeting,
Union Lounge 122, 10:00
a.m.
Dialogue with a Theologue,
Union Lounge 122,4:00 p.m.
General Motors Scholarship
Banquet, 243 Union, 6:30
p.m.
Sigma Nu Chapter Meeting, 362
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Union Humanities Film, "The
Tempest," Union Aud., 7:00
8t 9:30 p.m.
Circle K Smoker, 347 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs
Alabama, Fla. Gym, 7:45
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 p.m.
Student Government Book
Exchange, C-4B Union, Noon
6:00 p.m.

Calendar

ThurJlay, January 8
Uranium Plasma Symposium,
Union Aud., 8:00 a.m.
Student Government Book
Exchange, C-4B Union, Noon
6:00 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 118
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Union Performing Arts, Asolo
Theatre Production, 'The
Glass Menagerie," Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m., U. of F.
students only.
UNION BOX OFFICE
"The Glass Menagerie,"
Thursday, Jan. 8, U. of F.
students only, $1.50. Friday,
Jan. 9, General Public, $3.50
each.
Audubon Wildlife Films, Single
Admissions: U. of F.
Students $1.00; General
Public, $1.50; High School
Students, 50 cents. Series of
five films: U. of F. Students,
$4.00; General Admission,
$6.00; High School Students
$2.00.
"Danzas Venesuela," $3.00,
$2.00 and $1.50.



jpp M I
-' nHH iM
i sli" dwk&mmsmm 1
> '3i '* If ;^k^|
. <*3l3 T |
If M
STUDIES WIND TUNNELS
Alan M. Eskenas, right, a UF aerospace engineering student, learns
the workings of a high-performance wind tunnel used for aerospace
vehicle tests from R. H. Roberts, an engineer for ARO, Inc. Eskenas is
working at the U. S. Air Force Arnold Engineering Development
Center near Tullahoma, Tenn. and attending classes for alternate
quarters until he earns his degree.
UF RESEARCHERS SHOW
Animals Breath Liquid
Safely For 8 Hours
Florida medical researchers have shown that experimental animals
can breathe liquid for eight hours without apparent harmful effect,
according to a recent issue of Medical World News, a national
magazine for doctors.
Dr. Jerome H. Modell, professor and chairman of anesthesiology at
the UF College of Medicine said results of laboratory tests remove
liquid breathing from the realm of fiction and challenge ones
imagination about the future.
Dr. Modell began the studies with associates at the University of
Miami before joining the Gainesville faculty in August, 1969.
To make die liquid breathing possible, the researchers used a
fluorocarbon, a heavy oxygen-carrying liquid. The liquid was poured
into the lungs through a tube inserted in the trachea. The animals
absorbed the oxygen from the liquid as they would absorb oxygen
from the air they breathe.
The studies by Dr. Modell and associates establish that not only can
larger animals survive the fluorocarbon procedure, but they can be
ventilated by liquid for eight hours and can then be re-converted to
normal breathing. The eight hours is not an outside limit, but a
matter of convenience in the laboratory, Dr. Modell says.
The work is an extension of earlier studies reported in 1966 by Dr.
Leland Clarke of Cincinnati and Dr. Frank Gollan of Miami who
determined that smaller animals can survive liquid breathing.
Dr. Modell believes the technique conceivably opens new avenues
of investigation. The research was stimulated by a concern for
finding better methods of removing thick tenacious secretions from
the lungs.
But, Dr. Modell cautions, much more research is needed before
scientists can determine if the fluorocarbon procedure causes toxicity
or other problems which would prevent its use in people.
At present, it is only at animal research stages, he assarts.

11
i | o |j M vnTiThlsJ/v lyi
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GAINESVILLE MALL J vJM
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Take soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-58-lt-p).
tfliwaee: v.assv;sww'wwww
I FOR RENT i
Fantastic 2 Bdr. apt. 2 blocks from
campus. AC, Heat, 125.00 mo.
378-7479, 314 N.W. 14th St. Apt. I
Seasons Greetings. Kiss the family
for us. (B-58-2t-p).
'' ... ,y
Clean single & double room, private
home, CH & AC. Home privileges,
near Westgate Shopping. SSO mo.
Includes everything. 376-2137.
(B-st-57-p)
, Biiiiiooiwwawwooowwwcwwwi
AUTOS
J Nawwooawacesanro :
MG-TD 1953 fully restored, British
racing green, cream interior, dark
green carpet, white top & tonneau, 5
WSW Dunlop tires, push button
radio, 3 speed heater,-courtesy lights,
driving lamps, luggage rack, car cover.
Many extras! Over $4,000 invested,
2,000 miles since restoration. Will
not depreciate!! If properly
maintained. $3,000. 378-5192 after 5
or weekends. Student. (G-st-57-p)
PERSONAL |
v k
v.v:-;:-
MARY ALL my love and wishes
for a joyful New Year and the best
term yet. Miss you whole Bunches,
DANNY. (J-2t-57-p)
SINGLE MEN! Computer Dating Is
fun. All dates with Gainesville
women. Most dates UF students. Get
your date list now. For questionnaire
write: Natiowide Dating Service, 177
10th St. N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-10t-53-p)
Knight Papers
Appoint Veep
MIAMI (UPI) Byron B.
Harless, a psychologist who has
specialized in newspaper
personnel programs for 21 years,
Monday was appointed vice
president for personnel of
Knight Newspapers, Inc., based
in Miami.
His assignment with us is to
work with other executives in
building the strongest staffs,
said Chairman James L. Knight,
who announced the
appointment.

Tuesday, January 6,1970, The Florida Alligator,

I SERVICES I
Volkswagen Parts and Services.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-ts-57-c)
CO-EDS Excess Hair Removed
forever E. Dwyer Electrologist
Over 20 years experience. 372-8039.
Medically Approved Electrolysis.
(M-12t-57-p)

SHAKESPEARE'S
'*TT
The Tempest 9
Union Auditorium 7:00 and 9:30
Jan 6 and 7 50<
First in the Classic Film Series
sponsored by the JWRU
Hi AT 1:58 3*53
PS3Sy|77CT ,, 409|
LAJI O l/m J*.. 6:48 9:27
BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!
U // AT p K)PULA R \\ /WINNERV
N^lSSst!^Ph?372S23
Sidney Poitier in I
Guess Whos Coming to Dinner I
at 7:00 and 11:00 I
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at 9:00 only I
Newl Suburbia Penthouse I
Mini Theatres:* I
Doctor
Penthouse #2
Zhivago
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at 7:00 only
Penthouse #3 Midnight I
Cowboy |
at 7:15 and 9:00 I
tQ \
"Tickets for Penthouse may bo I
purchasod at the Box Offico.
Tho Ponthouso Theatres are I
located above the refreshment stand
H
ofth* SUBURBIA DRIVEIN. |
Call 3729523 for information

Page 11

RED PM o X
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



The
Florida
Alligator

IN OPEN LETTER TO STUDENTS
Graves Asks For Continued Support

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is an open
letter to the student body of the UF from Athletic
Director Ray Graves concerning his recent
resignation and the appointment of Doug Dickey as
head football coach.)
Welcome back to school and to the 19705, a
decade of wonderful potential and probably holding
more than its share of surprises. .
From the standpoint of intercollegiate athletics at
the University of Florida the same holds true,
certainly the potential is exceptional for the coming
years and the surprises have already started.
My decision to resign as Head Football Coach is
one which has been contemplated for some time. It
has been a most difficult decision and, admittedly, I
have leaned heavily one way and the other before
making a final choice and moving to Director of
Athletics.
The dual role of Head Football Coach and
Director of Athletics in a program as large as ours

WUFT Jo Broadcast Basketball
On Closed Circuit Television

Four UF home basketball
games will be televised by WUFT
on a closed-circuit network
hook-up to a student-only
audience on the UF campus,
according to WUFT program
manager Mark Damen.
The four home games,
announced by Percie Beard of
the Athletic Department, will be

INTRAMURALS
Activities Begin
STEVE ROHAN J
Intramural activity is set to move into high gear this Monday after a
short holiday break. All students are urged to note the following sign
up dates in each campus division.
Fraternity bowling will be the first to begin as the kegglers start
striking away Monday, Jan. 12.
Dormitories should begin signing up for volleyball, which begins
Monday, Jan. 19. The sign-up deadline is Wednesday, Jan. 14 at 5
pjn.
The Independent League tennis tournament will open Wednesday,
Jan. 21, but all participants must sign up by Jan. IS.
All independent and dormitory students should sign up in room
229 Florida Gym or may call 392-0581. Any persons with questions
or suggestions are invited to visit or call the intramural office.
The Badminton Club is now organizing and will meet Wednesday,
Jan. 7, at 7:30 pm. in the women's gymnasium. Meetings will be held
each Wednesday evening throughout the quarter. Men and women,
beginners and pros, and students and faculty are all welcomed.
Qualified instructors and the necessary equipment will all be provided.
m TOURNAMENTS
BILLIARDS, BOWUNG, CHESS,
BRDOE TABLE TENNIS
INDIVIDUAL TROPHIES FOR EACH EVENT
TOP PLACED PERSONS IN EACH EVENT
WILL RECBVE AN ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP
TO ATLANTA. OA., IN ADDITION TO TROPHIES.
REGISTER: RHTZ UNION GAMES AREA
JAN 12 NOON

GATOR SPORTS

Alabama on Jan. 7, Kentucky on
Jan. 10, Tennessee on Jan. 12
and L.S.U. on Feb. 4. Beard said
the broadcast would hopefully
reach 1,400 students.
The broadcast will be
channeled into classrooms in
Little Hall, Norman Hall,
McCarty Hall and one other

has become is simply too much for one man to
properly master. In the end this fact was the
deciding one.
Standing out in my mind when thinking about
the 1960's at Florida is the tremendous and growing
support of the football team by the student body.
Students at Florida have established a reputation
for supporting the team which is envied around the
Southeastern Conference. It has become a tradition
and I want to personally thank the UF student body
for this.
You are fortunate in having as my replacement
one of the finest head coaches in the country, Doug
Dickey. He is a Florida graduate coming home and I
know he can look forward to your continued
support. As you might have read, Coach Dickey
stated that one of the major reasons he took this job
is the support given football by the Florida
students.
Good luck in the coming year.

location. Specific rooms have
not yet been designated.
We have to wait until the
final schedule is arrived at to
find out which rooms are
available, Beard said. The cost
of S3OO-400 to broadcast each
game would be paid by the
Athletic Department.
The decision to broadcast
some of the home games due to
the small size of the UF
gymnasium was made by the
Athletic Department in
November, but it was Damen's
actions that helped crystalize the
plans.
Damen was contacted by the
Athletic Department about the
possibility of close-circuit game
coverage, and then he was
promised a letter formalizing the
request.
The letter has never been
received by this office, Damen
said. A phone call by him to the
Athletic Department finalized
plans.
Students will not be charged
and will need only their I.D.S to
eiiter the viewing rooms.

m M

mi 1
fl S SB Bk
2
. .if
VB

the J. Wayne Reitz Union, in cooperation with the
Junior Welfare League of Gainesville, is bringing to our
campus 'THE GLASS MENAGERIE," presented by the
Asolo State Theatre. Tennessee Williams' prize-winning
play will be presented to University of Florida students
only on January Bth at 8:00 p.m. in the Constans
Theatre. Tickets are on sale at the Union Box Office at
the special student rate of $1.50. A General Admission
performance is scheduled for January 9th. Tickets for
this performance are $3.50.

Page 12

*'
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR RAY GRAVES
... entering a decade of surprises
Rivals Switch Position
In Senior Bowl Tilt
MOBILE, Ala. (UPI) The rival quarterbacks in the Orange Bowl
have swapped places for Saturdays Senior Bowl game.
Penn State quarterback Chuck Burkhart was named as a
replacement for Missouri quarterback Terry McMillan when it was
learned that McMillan was injured Thursday night during the Orange
Bowl game and would be unable to play.
Penn State beat Missouri 10-3 with the Lions defense intercepting
seven Tiger passes, five thrown by McMillan.
DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
AND
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT
LICHTER'S
IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

!. Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, January 6,1970

I W I
HHRK;
9*Ls



SECOND SSCEOSS

Gators Fall To Vanderbilt

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)
Tom Amholt hit 26 points and
Perry Wallace 22 to lead
Vanderbilt to a 90-79 victory
over the Florida Gators in a
Southeastern Conference game
Monday night.
Vandys Rudy Thacker, with
nine assists in the second half,
teamed up with Wallace to break
a 57-57 tie with 12:52 left in the
game.
Andy Owens, Florida's big
gun with a game average of 29.5
points, had an off night, scoring
only 18.
Vandy hit 493 per cent from
the floor and Florida 38.1 per
cent.
Karate Class
Begins At UF
The UF School of One Heart
Isshin-ryu Karate is now
conducting beginners classes for
all male students and faculty at
no charge.
The classes are under the
supervision of the Intramural
Department and the Miami
School of Isshin-ryu Karate.
All interested participants are
asked to meet in the basement
of Florida Gym at 4 pjn. on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Controversy
Hits NASCAR
DAYTONA BEACH (UPI)
Stock car racing baron Bill
France said Monday if the
nations top stock car drivers
and owners do not agree to new
entry stipulations for the
SIOO,OOO Riverside, Calif.
500 this month, They won
race.
But Chrysler racing officials
informed NASCAR from Detroit
late Monday that their factory
teams would have entry blanks
in the mail soon. There was
no immediate word from the
Ford camp at Dearborn, Mich.
Mickeys Homers
Mickey Mantle's home runs
are almost evenly divided
between Yankee Stadium and
the road.
Os Mantle's 536 lifetime
homers, Mick smashed 266 at
home and 270 on the road.
[thereTs
NO BETTER
jSMALL WAGONj
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$231 less than Volkswagen
i datsun:
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local freight, D. 8t H.
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mt %p,'- M
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pfsSr
SCORING ACE ANDY OWENS
... led Gators with 18 points

: HL.
Bb.
Ijv

Namath To Miss
AFL All-Star

NEW YORK (UPI) Weeb Ewbank, The New York Jets' Head
Coach, announced Monday that Quarterback Joe Namath will not
{day in the AFL All-Star Game in Houston on Jan. 17.
Ewbank said that by keeping Namath out of the game, his
Quarterback might avoid having his fourth knee operation. Ewbank
said the Jets' Orthopedic Consultant, Dr. James A. Nicholas, had
strongly recommended that Namath rest his ailing knees before an
examination.
We have to make a decision on whether to operate on Joe's left
knee, said Nicholas. In order to make an accurate decision, it is
imperative that he use the month of January to stay away from
football and to see if the knee responds to rest. If the knee responds
to rest, an operation could be deferred.
Were he to {day in the All-Star Game, a decision would have to be
deferred and if an operation were then deemed necessary, the
convalescence would last until next Fall.
Namath said he would go along with the club's and doctor's
suggestion and would pass up the All-Star Game in which he was
selected to quarterback the East Team coached by George Wilson of
the Miami Dolphins.
I'm sorry that I can't play in the game, said Namath. It is an
honor to be selected to the All-Star Team but even more important to
me it is a privilege to get together with the other players of the league.
I wish I could play. A
Namath has had three previous knee operations, all performed by
Dr. Nicholas.

Tlw. Jwry I. tiTO. Tl flartin AWr.

Page 13



Page 14

The

DUNN, HALL AND KNOTTS
Dickey Selects Three Viol Coaches

By RICHARD BLAINE
Altigrtor Sports Writar
With the announced hiring
over the weekend of former
Tennessee assistant coaches
Jimmy Dunn, Doug Knotts, and
Jack Hall the coaching picture at
the UF is becoming clearer.
New Head Coach Doug
Dickey announced last week
that he would bring some of his
coaching staff with him from
Tennessee.
Dunn was the regular Gator
quarterback from 1956-58 and
remained at the UF until 1963
as an assistant coach before
moving to Tennessee in 1964
when Dickey took over as head
coach there.
Dunn will become Offensive
Coordinator in charge of
coaching the quarterbacks and
wide receivers.
As Head Defensive Coach at
Tennessee Doug Knotts will take
over as defensive coordinator in
charge of coaching the defensive
linemen. Knotts played center at
Duke from 1952-55 and coached
at Duke until 1965 before

\ :7 FOR MRS. DALLAS DICKEY
Wildest Dream Comes True

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Mrs. Dallas C. Dickey's
wildest dreams" have come
true.
Mrs. Dickey is the mother of
newly-named UF head coach
Doug Dickey, who resigned the
same post at the University of
Tennessee to take the Florida
job.
Never in my wildest dreams
did I think my son would return
home to coach his alma mater
and to live where I have retired,
Mrs. Dickey said.
Dickey, 38, graduated from
Florida in 1954 after three
successful seasons as a Gator
quarterback. He graduated from
the universitys laboratory
school, P. K. Yonge, where he
lettered in four sports during his
senior year, Mrs. Dickey
recalled.
She said Dickey had told her
he will be here Friday to
officially accept the
appointment.
Doug has something really
professional to give to the UF,
she said. He has proven himself
a fine coach.
But, she added, you have
to realize this is his mother
speaking, though others,
including the committee which
selected him, regard him the
same way.
I am really thrilled that

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moving to Tennessee.
Jack Hall was named assistant
coach in charge of recruiting
with his other duties
unspecified. Hall comes to
Gainesville with 19 years
coaching experience having
coached at the Citadel and Duke
before coming to Tennessee.
. "va *
mi |L ~
w,
f>; djfwFQ&k
..
jM I
I 41
DOUG DICKEY
... brings staff

Doug is coming home, she said.
His wife Joanne has had sand in
her shoes for a long time to
return to Florida.
Dickey's wife is from Daytona
Beach.
The new UF mentors mother
recalled both his high school and
college days as ones of happiness
and glory for her son.
She said Dickey at hjgh school

Super Bowl Host Louisiana
Gets Civil Rights Ruling

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) A judge ruled Monday
that the Louisiana host city for Sundays Super
Bowl football game is within its rights to outlaw
racial discrimination in taverns and taxicabs while
allowing segregated barber shops and beauty parlors
to remain in business. Barroom owners claimed the
law would turn their taverns into battlegrounds
between blacks and whites.
If your Honor doesnt grant a stay,'* said
Russell Schonekas, attorney for the tavern owners,
Theres going to be a hiatus.
But Civil District Judge Richard Garvey ruled
New Orleans New Public Accomodations Ordinance
was legal. A group of 80 neighborhood bar owners
had challenged the law. They said they would
appeal Garveys ruling Tuesday before the 4th
Circuit Court of Appeals.
The ordinance was passed unanimously last month
by The City Council. It prohibits racial
discrimination in all business places except barber
shops and beauty parlors.
One of its aims was to assure the city would

In addition to naming his
three new assistants Dickey
interviewed the remaining UF
coaches and stated he hopes to
keep as many as possible.
Gene Ellenson assistant head
coach and head defensive coach
is still undecided as to what he
will do but has been offered a
JBI '111
IHPIIW
A hi
B M; fete
FRED PANCOAST
.. goes to Georgia

lettered in track, baseball,
basketball and, of course,
football.
Os Dickeys Florida days the
event that stands out in her
mind, she said, is the 1952 Gator
Bowl game against a
highly-touted Tulsa team.
The Gators won it, 14-13
when a Tulsa player missed a
go-ahead field goal.

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remain the host of Sundays Super Bowl football
game between The Minnesota Vikings and The
Kansas City Chiefs.
New Orleans lost the American Football League
All-Star Game several years ago because negro
players claimed they were discriminated against by
New Orleans businesses.
In the courts opinion this is a constitutional
ordinance, Garvey said Monday. This court is
constrained to hold that this municipal ordinance
designed to prevent discrimination by reason of
race, color, religion, national origin of ancestry
bears a substantial and reasonable relation to the
authority granted in the City Charter and is not an
arbitrary or unreasonable exercise of the police
power.
Schonekas asked that enforcement of the law be
stayed until appeal papers could be filed.
If I thought this ordinance was constitutional, it
would be hypocritical of me to grant a suspensive
appeal to stay enforcement, Garcey said.

position in the athletic
department as an Assistant
Athletic Director. Ellenson
indicated he was interested in
this position.
Fred Pancoast, Head
Offensive Coach has already
signed a contract to move to the
GENE ELLENSON
... eyeing new position

The Gators were jubilant,
she said.
Dickey came here with his
parents in 1946 from Baton
Rouge, La., when his father, a
speech professor, accepted a
teaching post at the university.
Dickeys father died in 1957.
The Dickeys have five
children, four boys and one girl.

University of Georgia at the
same position.
Coach Dickey hopes to
confirm the remainder of his
coaching staff before the end of
the week.
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not like old one

Kapp A New 'Super Joe

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) The nations Super
Joe isnt at all like the old one.
Joe Kapp is a fighter, not a lover.
Thats just for openers.
He doesnt have that quick release either, nor is
he the classic passer or classic leader. All he does is
move a ball dub and if you have to ask how you
must have missed seeing him move the Minnesota
Vikings into the Super Bowl Sunday with a
ridiculously easy 27-7 grin over the Cleveland
Browns in frigid Minneapolis.
Hardly anyone who has ever watched the Vikings
big, tough, hoarse-voiced refugee from Canadian
football hasnt been struck by his obvious rough
edges.
The guy doesnt do anything right, says one
NFLer. He rolls out when he should stay in the
pocket; he throws the ball with his right foot
forward instead of his left, and he makes far more
physical contact than any sensible quarterback
should, but it all seems to come out all right.
And then some.
The triumphant Vikings, already established
favorites over the AFL Champion Kansas City
Chiefs for Sunday's Super Bowl showdown, are due
here tomorrow but dont expect the same kind of
pre-game predictions from the new Super Joe as
you got from that other one.
There is an occasional similarity between them.
Like you can get Joe Kapp to talk about love if you
press him a bit. The way to do it is tell him how
everyone underrates the players who compose the
Vikings offensive line.
They may be underrated, but I love em all, he
says.
Joe Kapp does have one thing in common with
the other Joe: He tells it like it is. Watching the film
clips immediately after Sundays contest, he was
asked to comment on his early 33-varder to Gene

Frostbite Takes Its Toll
On Clevelands Johnson

CLEVELAND (UPI) Walter
Johnson, all-pro defensive tackle
of the Cleveland Browns, was
hospotalized today with severely
frostbitten fingers suffered in
the National Football League
title game.
Playing at Metropolitan
Stadium, Bloomington, Minn., in
eight degree weather, the

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Browns lost to the Minnesota
Vikings, 27-7.
The frostbite could cost
J ohnson the loss of some
portion of one or more fingers
on his right hand.
J ohnson had bruised the
joints of the middle fingers in

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Washington and he immediately said:
Actually it was a poorly thrown ball but Gene
made a great catch.
The next time they got the ball Kapp connected
with Washington again for a 75-yard scoring play on
which Cleveland defender Erich Barnes slipped and
fell down. Kapp didnt take any credit for the pass
he threw that time either.
The ball hung badly there, he said.
Football fans hereabouts know about Joe Kapp
mostly from what they saw of him on their TV
screens Sunday. The Vikings played here only once,
in 1968, and Super Joe was just plain ordinary
Joe then as New Orleans beat Minnesota, 20-17.
Those who saw him Sunday couldnt help but be
impressed though, particularly by Kapps typically
to-hell-with-it collision with Jim Houston looming
dead ahead, but instead he plowed straight into the
Cleveland linebacker, who went down as if he had
been hit by a telephone pole.
Somebody asked Minnesota Coach Bud Grant
about the play later and he said:
We knew they had hit into each other pretty
hard and we didnt know about Houston, but we
knew Joe would get up. He took a pretty good lick,
we could tell when he came back to the bench, but
thats the way he is. He always gets up.
In away, the same can be said for Daryle
Lamonica, Oaklands quarterback, who took one of
the severest beatings of his football career Sunday
but still wasnt able to prevent Kansas City from
licking the Raiders, 17-7, at Oakland.
Again and again Lamonica, trying to protect his
injured right wrist while being hit, was slammed to
the ground by Kansas Citys aroused front four.
Lamonica always got up and was still looking for
some way to get the Raiders out in front at the final
gun.
It was no use, For Daryle Lamonica, it was
simply a case of too much Aaron Brown.

recent games, and asked for an
injection so that it would not be
necessary to tape the fingers
together. The team physician
said the tackle may not have
realized how frostbitten the
fingers were until the injection
began to wear off.

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TVieAdey, Jeniitey 0,1970, The Florida AHlgetnr,

Page 15



Th PM* Jmwy , Jf7o

Page 16

B&V 'v 'r y S
E).. \ -.- c
j' ' *, '£-' RH
Help Steve
66w t # 95
say Hi,
I
H
.
I or hello, or whatever you usually say when greeting I
9 |l|
I a new friend. All male students are invited to join I
I President OConnell in welcoming the. Uof Fs three I
I newest fraternities PHI KAPPA THETA, SIGMA PI, I
I. and SIGMA ALPHA MU, tonight, 7:30, at an Open I

I House in the Rathskeller. This will be an excellent I
I opportunity for you to meet the members of the I
I fraternities in an informal atmosphere, get acquainted, I
I and have an enjoyable and worthwhile evening. I
I Come by the Rathskeller tonight at 7:30 for I
the Open House. It will be a great time to see how good
S
I : yourHireally is. I
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GREEKS fJVIOV E
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