Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vcl 62, No. 54

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MODULAR MOBILITY
Theatre and architecture students join forces in preparing for
environmental happenings scheduled for the Reitz Union Friday.
Modules constructed by students of architecture will enhance
theatrical events by drama students and vice versa.

'NOT THE END*
Bailey Charges Dropped

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writar
Charges against Jimmey
Bailey for the alleged misuse of a
special parking sticker during the
beginning of the fall quarter
have been dropped by Student
Traffic Court but further action
may be pending.
The decision, contained in a
report released by Traffic Court
Chief Justice Bob Wattles late
Wednesday, was the result of an
investigation of an apparent
violation of rules and regulations
of the University of Florida.
Bailey allegedly
misrepresented himself for
purposes of obtaining a special
perking sticker which would
allow him to park in Restricted
Area One."
The report said Bailey went to
Lee Borrows, UF traffic and
parking coordinator, and told
him, he (Bafley) worked out of
the President's office."
Burrows had just received a
call from the office telling him
that a. man was being sent over
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Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

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JIMMfcY BAILEY
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was given," the report said.
Without a letter of
authorization, Burrows issued
Bailey a special parking sticker,
only to find out a few minutes
later that Bailey wasn't the
person from the president's
office who was supposed to
receive the sticker. The report
goes on to say that Burrows then
ordered police to take the
sticker from Bailey, which they
m: m Bailey has b*en seen

University of Florida, Gainesville

OVER LOYALTY HASSLE

Protestors Picket
UF Law Center

See Editorial Page 8
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writs*
About 30 members of the
American Federation of
Teachers, AFL-CIO local 1880
formed picket lines Wednesday
afternoon at the Spessard
Holland Law Center to protest
the firing of three UF professors
and a staff member.
AFT President J. Jay Zeman
was among union members and
students picketing in front of
the classroom of law professor
Leroy Lambom, who was fired
for not signing the loyalty oath.
The blame for this situation
rests squarely on the university
administration," Zeman said.
Tigert Hall cannot hide
behind the claim that the law
forced it to do this.
Zeman contended the UF
administration shoifld use its
power and opportunities to
delay enforcement of this
unconstitutional oath until
litigation in court is complete.
The administration once
again chose to turn upon the
university community instead of
standing with it. Tigert Hall has
stirred up a great movement of
resentment on this campus.
Zeman said he expects no
comment from Tigert Hall on

using a special permit or
something resembling one for
the purpose of parking and
driving on and in restricted
areas.
Under the topic headed
Reasoning," the report said
Bailey had no authority to use,
or present himself as having
authority to use a special
permit."
And for this reason, the court
recommended that Dean of Men
Frank Adams look into the case
to determine whether or not
there was any wrong doing" by
Bailey.
The report stated that there
wasn't enough evidence to bring
Bailey before the Student Honor
Court or Traffic Court, but
added, a violation has occurred
and we will not turn our head to
the fact."
Part* (d), Section (3),
Sub-Section (c) of the Student
Code of Conduct, states that a
student could face possible
suspension from school for
forgery, alteration, or misuse of
University documents, records,
(SEC'BAILEY'PAGE 3)

The required signing of
the loyalty oath is an
insulting, unconstitutional,
calculated attempt to
interfere with freedom of
speech on the university
campus.
Leroy Lambom

the demonstration.
If they want to ask us any
questions they may, he said.
Among the sign-carrying
union members and students
Wednesday was Lambom.
I think its very gratifying to
see this support from faculty
and students, he said.
Lambom, who plans to begin
seeking new employment said he
offered to teach his classes for
free in order to finish out the
term.
This offer was rejected by
Tigert Hall, he said.
Commenting on the
administrations move in firing
him Lambom said, I still cant
figure out the time element
involved. Why did they require
signatures in the last few weeks
of the term? Why not in the
beginning or at the very end?
Lambome called the required
signing an insulting,
unconstitutional, calculated
attempt to interfere with
freedom of speech on the
university campus.
, This is one place where this
freedom should not be abused,
hesrd.
When questioned about
reinstatement Lambom said he
was very optimistic about the
union's chance of success in the
U.S. Supreme Court.
One of Lamboms students,
Kay Ellis, carried a picket sign
saying, I want my professor
back.
This is something students
should be very concerned
about, she said.
"Our lectures have been
canceled and students have been
a p in the course (passing).
The oath is just a political
gimmick.
Zeman said the picketing is
only the beginning of action
> planned by fiteulty in .the

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university community.
We plan to form a
university-wide support
committee shortly, he said.
Zeman said the committee
would not be solely a function
of AFT.
Others are welcomed and
urged to become involved.
The committee will have two
basic functions, to appeal to the
university community for
financial aid for those who were
fired, and to act as a clearing
house for official policy
statements, Zeman said.
There were no incidents
during the demonstration
Wednesday. Picketers left the
law center promptly at 2 pjn.
Among those picketing were
Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman of
the philosophy department, Dr.
Kenneth A. Megill, assistant
professor of philosophy; Dr.
David R. Kurtzman, assistant
professor of philosophy; Dr.
Robert L. Curran, professor of
education foundations; and Dr.
Paul L. Adams, professor of
psychiatry.
UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell had no comment
Wednesday on the
demonstration.
LAKE ALICE'S fate rests j
with the state and
efforts to save the lake may
be rewarded ... .... .page 5
Editorials. ..8
Entertainment .23
Letten .a
Movies .*.... 16
Small Society.... .6
Sports .ts 25
. omms i



Page 2

!, Tlw Florida Alligator, Thursday. Decamber 4,1908

NOT 'SCARE TACTIC
State Probes Dorm Arson

By MARGO COX
Alligator Correspondent
Denying any implications of
scare tactics, investigators
from the State Fire Marshal's
office in Tallahassee are on
campus this week to gather
information about recent cases
of arson in UF dormitories.
Our main objective is to go
into the dorms and interview
students on the particular floors
seeking information on recent
fires in those areas, Donald L.
Steverson, director of
investigations, said.
And we encourage any
persons having knowledge of
these Ares to call the Gainesville
Fire Department or the
University Police Department.
Steverson said if person'
Drug Help
Plans Begin
A basic program for a
self-help drug facility will be
discussed today from 12:30-2
Pjtl at 1823 NW 2nd Ave.
People interested in helping or
just brainstorming are invited.

SG To Provide
Cram Room

Student Government is
providing study rooms and hot
coffee to UF students during
finals week.
From Dec. 8-15, three rooms
in Little Hall and two rooms in
the Mechanical Engineering
building will be left open 24
MINI-POSTER
UTS LOSE (T
FORTHffiIPPER!
t i

TtfZ Don't Miss Saturday's Game
Teddy Bear Nursery
AH^ B t *7am-6pm $2.00
( _.WI Also all night Fri. ft Sat.
" trained AND EXPERIENCED BABYSITTERS
jjJ Children can be left and
rvn * y#
1214 N.W. 4th Stmt
Ph. 376-0917 for further information
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is puMbhed semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The AQgator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subacription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wil net consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be retponsMe for more than one
incorrect insertio*. A an advertisement scheduled to rpq several times. Notices
for correction must be given before the next Insertion.* * 1

involved are found, they will be
prosecuted if there is enough
evidence against them.
He and Deputy State Fire
Marshal T.W. Burkhart, of
Jacksonville, will talk to
students in the dorms.
Our purpose for being here is
educational. This is not a 'scare
tactic but to let people know
what they are doing. I don't
think they realize the potential
of such a Are, he said.
Gainesville Fire Department
Chief John Dampier asked the
state fire marshal's office to look
into the recent number of fire
calls on campus because he said
these calls have reached a point
when some action should be
taken. j
1 dont feel the students are
aware of what is created from
fires or the number of lives and
amount of property they
endanger, Dampier said.
The local department received
nine calls in seven days to one
dorm area recently.
Steverson said the TQwers,
South Hall and Hume Hall have
had the mQSt frequent number
of fire calls.

hours a day to give students a
quiet place to study. Police will
patrol to make sure the rooms
are kept quiet.
In Little Hall, rooms 125 and
127 will be used for any group
discussions and room 109 will be
strictly used for individual
study, Student Senator Ralph
Nobo said Wednesday.
Rooms 229 and 233 of the
Mechanical Engineering building
will also be used for quiet study.
Student volunteers will keep
watch to make sure coffee is
always available. SG is charging
five cents a cup.

Airplane Refunds Today
All tickets purchased for the Jefferson Airplane Concert will be
refunded in full starting today.
Ticket holders may receive refunds at Gate 13 on the east side of
the stadium today from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Refunds will again be issued on Friday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
and again on Monday from 12 noon until 5 p.m.
No refunds will be made after Monday.
All tickets must have the name and address of the ticket holder
written on the back.

He noted most dorm fires are
small usually in trash chutes
or in the dumpsters but they
occur in dorm areas where
people are living.
Large fires start from small
ones. It is easy to asphyxiate a
person from a fire like this,
Steverson said indicating two
common types of pranks.
The act of setting
newspapers on fire under a room
door to smoke out your
roommate is one way, and
another is the use of fire
extinguishers for water fights.
A great number of these fires
occur after midnight and are
detrimental to lives and property
on the UF, he said.
Fires occurring in the night
time hours which are incendiary
in nature carry a penalty of 20
years imprisonment in the state
prison. The punishment is more
severe if lives are lost in an arson
fire.
During recent campus
inspections, the inspection team
detected results of a number of
unreported fires in campus
buildings, Burkhart said.
This investigation, however,
was not prompted by the
inspection.
Both are conducted by the
same office but they are two
separate functions, Burkhart
said.

High Court Upholds
Marijuana Prohibition

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
The Florida Supreme Court
unanimously upheld the
constitutionality Wednesday ofi
state laws prohibiting the use or
possession of marijuana, even in
private.
Since marijuana, in addition
to harming the individual, is a
threat to society as a whole, we
have no difficulty in upholding

Get Involved With The Kibbutz
£35 in cooperative livinfl which strives for
are ** f " Win9 Pr 9ra ,S
KIBBUTZ ULPAN temporary worker
% f % *** a d Livin and workin9 " kibbutz one
AGE: 18-36 month or mor.
COST: Transportation coltt 35
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ZVIZEXER coniact.
KIBBUTZ ALIYA DESK Q
Suite 1301 MENASHE LINIVKER
200 Park Avenue South H 232-D Flavet 3
New York, New York 10003 I Gainesville, Florida

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WHEN DID IT LAND?
Visitors from outer space or is it a tree house out of Swiss Family
Robinson gone mod? Whatever our UFO is it stands mysteriously in
the Plaza of the Americas awaiting the return of its inhabitants.

its prohibition by the state,
said the decision, written by
Justice Joe Boyd.
An individual might restrict
his possession of marijuana to
the privacy of his home, but the
effects of the drug are not so
restricted.
The decision came in an
appeal by Anthony B. Borras,
former Florida State University
student sentenced to eight
months in jail for possession of
marijuana. His attorneys argued
the state law against marijuana
possession restricts a citizen in
the privacy of his own home.
Marijuana is a harmful,
mind-altering drug, the court
ruled. The interest of the state in
preventing harm to the
individual and to the public at
large amply justified the
outlawing of marijuana, in
private and elsewhere.

| Lottery Error j
I Corrected 1
ij |
:|: There was an error in the £
: draft lottery list carried onj
|J the UPI wire Tuesday, Dec. 2. j}
J: UPI inadvertantly carried;:
|:| Nov. 4 as number 226. The 8
V v
: correct number is 266. 8
V V
J There were also two errors^:
j in the Florida Alligators j||
|:| Line-Up which ran on the |jj
|:| front page Tuesday. No. 2221
|:| was listed as Jan. 28. It ::
|J should have read June 28. §
| No. 245 was listed as Oct. 26.|j
Â¥ It should have been Aug. 26. ft
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Productive Food
VIENNA Hens fed maize
pollen as a biostimulant gave
30 per cent more eggs in the
Petru Grozy Agronomic
Institute in Cluj, the Romanian
news agency Agerpress reports.
And calves gained 21.67 per
cent in weight after maize pollen
was added to their fodder.



IN CHARGES
Bailey: r A Misunderstandina

f FMM M6t OH Jj
or identification cards. This
rule was cited by the report as
possibly applying to Baileys
conduct,
Bailey, Wednesday, said there
is a misunderstanding between
himself and those investigating
the case.
.I didnt say the president
had sent me to pick up a sticker

ACADEMICS

By CRAIG HEYL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF professor of art JERRY N. UELSMANN is the photographer of a
four-page spread in the Nov. 21 issue of life magazine.
Uelsmann, who teaches photography in the Department of Art, said
the spread treats the photographs as art, not subject matter. He added
there is a minimal amount of wordage with the photographs.
A member of the art department for 10 years, Uelsmann expressed
his pleasure with the treatment Life gave to his selections.
Uelsmanns unusual, aesthetic combinations of nature, things and
people have been published in such nationally and internationally
known publications as Time, Newsweek, Fortune, Popular
Photography and Modem Photography.
His photographs occupy pages 8 through 11.
WAYNE C. HUBER, UF environmental engineer has received the
1969 Lorenz G. Straub Award for his research on reservoir water.
The award, given by the University of Minnesota, was made at a
colloquium at the St. Anthony Falls (Minn.) Hydraulic Laboratory
where Huber presented his technical paper on thermal stratification in
reservoirs.
The paper was the primary determinant in selecting Huber for the
award which has been given annually since 1966.
Temperature distribution in natural reservoirs and the importance
of stratification in reservoir water management are described in the
paper.
Huber receives a cash award in addition to a gold medal as the
award recipient. He has been a member of the UF faculty since 1968.
Assistant professor of Guidance and Counseling JOSEPH P.
WITTMER has been named visiting professor ad honorum by the
School of Education at the Universidad del Valle in Cali, Columbia.
He is the second American to receive this honor.
Wittmer was cited for outstanding professional services, and
excellent contributions rendered to the School of Education in
Columbia.
Three dental educators have been appointed to the staff of the UFs
new College of Dentistry.
They are DR. JOHN F. BUCHER, a specialist in endodontics; DR.
WERNER FISCHLSCHWEIGER, a researcher in the field of tooth
structure and dental materials; and DR. 0. WALTER
DONNENFIELD, a leading periodontist.
Bucher was a captain in the U.S. Navys Dental Corps and was head
of the Department of Operative Dentistry. He is 48.
Fischlschweiger, 37, is a native of Bremen, Germany. He is
presently a professor of histology at the University of Marylands
School of Dentistry.
Donnenfield, 46, is presently professor and chairman of
periodontics at Northwestern University.
THE NOW SOUNDS OF
S. ' :
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM Til
ALIBI
Lounge
MM 14th ST S UNIV. AVE.
v>:XW.V.v.y.>VAAV.VAytvo:w.v.vw
news and views

when I went to the station,
Bailey said. They had me
mixed up with Harvey Alper
who was supposed to pick up
the sticker.
During the fall quarter of
this year, I had only one sticker,
and it expired Oct. 20. I dont
have a sticker anymore.
1 havent done anything
wrong, Bailey said. Im sure
IH be cleared. Burrows will
show that I didnt misrepresent

myself. S
Bailey claimed that even
though he talked to Wattles
twice before the investigation
report came out Wednesday,
Wattles didn't ask me any
questions about the case.
The report said, Bailey was
not directly consulted with
respect to This investigation.
Efforts to reach him were not
successful at the time this report
was filed.
Adams wasnt available for
comment Wednesday.
Fish Control
AUSTIN, Tex. The Texas
Parks and Wildlife Department
reports state fish hatcheries have
produced a hybrid sunfish
larger than any other species
that will reduce pond
overcrowding.
The San Marcos Fish
Hatchery experimented and
found the hybrid to reproduce
at a much slower rate, thus
lowering the crowded conditions
which tend to produce less
healthy fish, and to grow up to
two pounds heavier than the
regular sunfish.

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JpHH by famous Magnavox
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C Afl TEPTA 1 ftj|
OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M.
122 N.W. 16th Ave 372-0433
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WEIMER RECOGNIZED
1
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Rae Weimer (right). Special Assistant to UF Presiden Stephen C.
O'Connell was presented with a special award by the Osceola Chapter
of the Florida Public Relations Association in recognition of his
service as charter president in 1968-69. Robert Lynch, UF director of
information services presented the award.

Thursday, December 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4SlM9i|

Pop Festival 'Rocks
West Palm Beach
Where else could you find The Rolling
Stones, The Jefferson Airplane, Janis
Joplin, and Governor Claude Kirk
all in one place?

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second of three
i articles on the Palm Beach Pop Festival.)
S ByCRAIG GOLDWYN
\ Alligator Staff Writer
i
They waited patiently, huddled together for more
\ than two hours Friday for the first act, the Iron
l Butterfly, to strike the first note.
: Then they swayed and gyrated to their favorite
l music, spirits dampened only slightly by the
l downpour and creeping mud.
i Only about 10,000 were in the immediate area of
! the stage at the time, but their numbers swelled
; with the music.
They came in all sizes and shapes, mostly hairy,
; white, and in couples. With them they brought to
I Florida its first taste of the countrys newest form
; of social gathering.
It was the first time since the Washington P<*"
i march two weeks ago for the young set to get it
i
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SWINGING GRANNY JUMPED ONSTAGE

Exams Bring Increase In Dexedrine Usage

By MARLENE SCHNEIDER
Alligator Correspondent
As exam week approaches, the use
and sale of dexedrine becomes
widespread.
Dexedrine, commonly shortened to
dex, is a stimulant drug popularly
used by college students to stay awake
and cram for final exams.
The U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare defines dex as a
stimulant to the central nervous system.
It is well known for its ability to
combat fatigue and sleepiness.
When prescribed by a doctor,
moderate doses of stimulant drugs can
check tiredness and produce feelings of
alertness, self-confidence and well-being.
But this is often followed by a period of

together and do their thing, this time away from
the politics and pressures of the outside world.
And they were beautiful.
At one point, during one of the many long pauses
between bands, a beach ball appeared and bounced
its way through the rollicking crowd for almost an
hour.
Then they started passing a string from the back
all the way to the stage. As it came by people tied
on toothbrushes, birth control pill boxes, fruit, soft
drinks, contraceptives and joints.
When the food supplies began to dwindle Sunday,
those that had, shared. Oranges, assorted cookies
and drugs were tossed into the throng.
Drug sales were amazingly low, although their use
was, to say the least, widespread. Most of it was
simply given away. Most there were using some
form of drug or another.
After one head lit his jay (a marijuana
cigarette) he passed it on to his neighbor, who
passed it on to his neighbor. It went across, through
the lungs of about 20 people until it was little more
than an ash. Then the end man lit another and
passed that one on.
On the streets the hue was Wanna turn on,
brother?
When the rains drenched everyones clothes, a call
went out from the stage for dry clothes and
blankets for the ODs (overdose victims).
One OD named Charlie, who had planted himself
firmly in the mire at the bottom of the stage
screamed when his friends tried to take him to the
aid station not the hospital, theyll bust me!
Warnings came over the speakers to watch out
for your grass, the narcs are everywhere.
But instead of the expected mass busts, only
about 100 were arrested on drug charges.
One St. Petersburg youth named Ricky had the
privilege of being arrested by Gov. Kirk himself.
Kirk had just completed a press conference in
which he guessed that an explosion Friday night at
festival promoter David Rupps office was a suicide
attempt. Kirk said he too would kill himself if I
were doing this kind of thing to American
children.
As the governor was leaving he spotted Ricky and
asked him if hed been taking a little something.
When the lad answered yea he was grabbed by
two deputies and charged with being under the
influence of hallucinogenic drugs. Some witnesses
claim the youth tried to hit Kirk. It is expected that
he will be charged with assault.
But despite harassment by health officials,
narcotics agents, unfriendly townspeople, bad acid,
rain, mud, cold, lack of food and crusading
governors, the show went on.
PHOTOS BY
CRAIG GOLDWYN

HELPS STUDENTS STAY AWAKE

depression, jitteriness, irritability,
unclear speech and tension.
Physically, stimulant drugs increase the
heart beat and raise blood pressure.
They cause dry mouth, sweating and
headaches.
Dex does not produce a physical
dependence. However, the body will
develop a tolerance to the drug,
requiring larger and larger doses to feel
the effects.
Public Health Service Publication No.
1830 on stimulant drugs stated that Dex
does develop a psychological
dependence that can become a habit for
mental or emotional reasons with the
person getting used to and turning to
the drug for its effects.
The danger lies in the fact that
stimulant drugs can driVea person to do.

things beyond his physical endurance
that leave him exhausted. Heavy doses
may cause a temporary mental
derangement which requires
hospitalization.
Not only is there a medical danger,
but there is also a legal danger in the use
of Dexedrine.
Section 3 of the UF Code of Conduct
states Explusion or suspension from
the University or any lesser penalty may
result from any of the following
violations: (paragraph 1) Ulegal
manufacture, sale, possession of use of
narcotKs, marijuana, hypnotics,
sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants,
hallucinogens and other similar known
harmful or habit-forming drugs
This fine-toothed definition is
-SMitadyset down in the proposed drug

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policy for the UF. The policy advocates
the enforcement of the applicable
Florida statutes and United States
government code along with University
Regulations.
Assistant to the Vice President of
Student Affairs James T. Hennessey saw
that it is the Administrations policy to
do all it can to help apprehend users an
pushers of Dex. He said, We will catc
them whenever and wherever we can.
We wifl leave no stone unturned.
UF Campus Police Investigator Gene
Watson said that there is a defiru e
increase in the sale and use of cx
during finals. But he said that te
campus police are handicapped because
they dont have the needed personne 0
combat this increased activity in t e
Dex market.



The Fate Os Lake Alice Rests With State

By JIM DAVIS
Alligator Corwpondont
Revised plans for a through-campus highway
satisfactory to Save Lake Alice campaigners are in
the hands of the State Department of
Transportation (SDT).
The new plan splits the four-lane highway into
two double-land, one-way roads skirting the oblong
lake on both sides at a distance of 400 feet. The
halves join at the lakes northwest and southeast
ends. ... >. .... :
In the first plan, a four-lane highway ran along
the northeast shore of the lake.
When the first highway plan was revealed in
mid-October, it met almost instant opposition from
professors in zoology, botany and agriculture.
The trouble with the first highway plan,
according to John H. Kaufmann, associate professor
of biology, is that the northeast shore (of the lake)
is the last wooded buffer area, or breeding ground.
Ail animals that use the lake are also in these,
Kaufmann said. He mentioned alligators, heron,
gallinules and osprey as animals that breed in die
wooded region.
Daniel B. Ward, associate professor of biology,
agreed. Thats the only part of the shore thats not
cleaned out already, he said. Theyve cut down
the other breeding areas.

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V
H I f- I I I I H H H H
- :
RANDY BASSETT
MORE MONEY FOR FUND
Dave Davis, left, of the Hurricane Car Wash, is donating one cent
from every gallon of gas he sells to the Gator Loan Fund. With him is
fund chairman Eddie Floyd. The car wash is located at 616 N.W. 13th
St
' i . - . .
OUR STEAKS
ARE ALL
WELL DONE
And done exactly to your liking.
We ind oat how yoa want your steak
before we do anything else. At Bonanza,
if yon want mediant rare yon get
medium rare.
And all of onr steaks are charcoal
broiled over an open fire. And what
steaks they are.
A delicious Ribeye steak for a
little over a bock. A sirloin strip for less
than two bocks. The best T-Bone in
town for less than three bocks.
Try a little tenderness tonight.
BOUNZI
mom pm

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT HAS PLANS

To combat the highway plan Kaufmann formed
an ad hoc faculty committee with Ward, Archie
Can of the zoology department and Thomas J.
Walker of Biological Sciences.
Hie group quickly grew to hundreds as the
professors collected signatures on petitions to Save
Lake Alice. In the Department of Biological
Sciences alone Kaufmann claimed to have 500
signatures.
That number did not include the names of
students who signed petitions placed by concerned
students in Tigert Hall, Broward Hall and other
campus locations.
Randy Huttoe, a technician for the botany
department, said she knew of at least 10 students
who worked in the campaign. A lot of agriculture
and botany students were involved, she said, and
)me students had tlieir own petitions.
The campaigners also directed a barrage of letters
at UF President Stephen C. OConnelTs office.
Kaufmann said the Lake Alice effort drew letters
of support from the Florida Audubon Society and
the Gainesville Womens Garden Club.
When the University Campus Land Use and
Hanning Committee met Oct. 22, members of the
Save Lake Alice Committee were in the audience.
In the following debate the conservationists won

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their point, and Nov. 3 the committee voted
unanimously to send the second plan to the State
Department of Transportation.
Ward rapped the UF Department of Physical
Planning for not consulting the biology department
while making its plans for the highway.
Theyre not thinking about the welfare of the
campu, just the feasibility of their plan, Ward
charged.
Worth Crow, assistant director of physical
planning, denied the charge, saying that both
highway plans had been considered at the same
time..
According to Crow, documents that date back
to early July show how old the split-road plan is.
The single-road plan got first exposure, Crow
said, because it was essentially taken out of
context when it accompanied designs for the
University Activities Center.
The total circulation plan was never fully
recognized Crow said.
The SDTs two main concerns with the new plan,
Kaufmann said, are cost and feasibility.
Its a question of whether they want to make
the curves tight enough to pull the highway back
400 feet, just outside the zoological compound
fence, he said.

TO
TAMPA
I 2 1/4 Hours I
I Lv. Gainesville : 4:05 AM, I
I 9:15 AM, 12:30 AM I
I via Interstate 75 I
I plus 4 add! trips daily I
I New! Daily Tfcni SenrkeV I
I From Gainesville (via Tallahassee) to
I Montgomery, Jackson, Dallas,
Atlanta, Chattanooga, Nashville, St.
Louis.
I TRAIIWAYS j I
I V 527 W. Univ. Ave. 372-632£/ I
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Trailways
easiest travel on earth
I 527 W. Univ. Ave. 372-6327 I

Thuraday, December 4,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 5



The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4, 1969

Page 6

Guidefines issued
,- '/*.*.? f
For UF Employes
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs personnel division has issued a statement detailing guidelines
for standards of disciplinary actions.
These guidelines list 24 on-the-job offenses and two
off-or-on-the-job offenses with penalties ranging from a verbal
reprimand to dismissal.
Robert A. Button, director of personnel relations said student
employes do not come under these rules, only the full-tune
non-academic staff. Students conduct is governed by the Code of
Student Conduct.
The university, in order to strengthen its employer-employe
relationship, has adopted standards for disciplinary action which will
help insure that supervisors are reasonably consistent in taking
disciplinary action against employes involved in similar
circumstances, Button said.
This will provide that employes will receive reasonably consistent
penalties for similar offenses and deficiencies, regardless of the unit in
which they work, he said.
Offenses include such things as gambling, horseplay, loafing, leaving
work stations without authorization, profanity, destruction or misuse
of property, excessive absenteeism, tardiness and substandard work,
all of which carry penalties of verbal reprimand for the first offense to
HkmiMl for the fourth offenses.
Sleeping, unauthorized distribution of literature of any
description, unauthorized solicitations or sales, unauthorized use of
state equipment, failure to request permission to leave job, reporting
to work drunk or under influence of drugs, drinking on job,
insubordination, absence without leave, willful violation of rules and
negligence entail a written reprimand for the first offense, suspension
for the second offense and dismissal for the third offense.
Fighting, indecency or immorality and stealing will cost an employe
suspension for the first offense and dismissal for the second.
Willful falsification of records brings dismissal on the first offense.
The two offenses on or off the job. are habitual drunkeness or
drug addiction and conviction of any crime other than minor traffic
violations. Both provide for second offenses.

Phi Beta Kappa Initiates
45 New Members Friday

The fall initiation banquet for
Phi Beta Kappa scholastic honor
society is Friday at 7 p jn. in the
Reitz Union ballroom, preceded
by an informal social hour at
6:30.
Prof. Alex G. Smith, of the
Department of Physics and
Astronomy, will speak on The
Relevant Universe. The charge
to the initiates will be made by
Prof. David Chalmers, of the
Department of History, and Mrs.
Joanne Mandell, a psychology
major, will respond to the
charge. Prof. Manning Dauer,
chairman of the Department of
Political Science, will act as

' c
Reg. $5.98
SPECIAL THIS WEEK $4.79
at
Recordsville
"SHOPGATORADS^_

historian of the society, and
Prof. Joel Siegel, of the
Department of English, will act
as guide.
The 45 students to be
initiated are Harvey Paulk Jr.,
Dorothy Mason, Mary Lee
Smith, Mrs. Joanne Schall,
Eugenia Jienzle, Peter Branning,
Ruth Hoodwin, Thomas Harris,
Robert Schwartz.
Melvin Meisner, Mrs. Andrea
Almand, Mrs. Catherine
Chisholm, Thomas Coakley,
Bruce Doyle, Mrs. M. Jo
Edwards, Mrs. Esther Eisler, Mrs.
Sandra Kessler, Robert Marcus
Jr., Mrs. Nancy McCown,

M njl 1 lM3ft WBl[ J Tlk y
TWO POOLS
. TENNIS COWITS 55£**
FABULOUSLY CARPETED & FURNISHED
AIR COND. RECREATION ROOM s M
I, 2 A 3 BEDROOM APTS. I i J{*£s

in i irntii" iII I'iSlil ~ ickman
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Frederick Pollack, James
Radiker, Hubertus Robeerst,
Daniel Squillance, Robert
Thornhill Jr.
Helen Byrd, Roslyn Goold,
Claude Pinkston Jr., Francisco
Proenza, John Trentelman,
Stewart Hershey, Bonnie Ward,
Glenn Fournier, Franklin
Baumann, Sandra Reid.
Mrs. Margaret Howard, Steven
Dowling, Jeffrey Seibert,
Barbara Jo Hailey, John
Chapman, Mickey Dansby,
Michael Mahoney, Charles
Kovaleski, Lenay Barron, Warren
Ross and Robert Walker.

Last Day
For Sorority
Winter Rush
Sign-up is
Dec. sth
Sign-up at the Panhellenic
office on the 3rd floor of
the Reitz Union between
1:00 & 5:00 pm

TODAY'S
GATOR GUI
Thursday's Gator beauty is
Katie Markman, a 21-year-old
marketing major. Katie is a
member of AEPhi and is
sweetheart of Phi Delta Theta.
Her hobbies are horseback riding
and water skiing. She is sales
manager for the Seminole and
her hometown is Peoria, 111.
v ; v'
PETE KNOCKE



PiionSun
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ROSSINI HANDEL
BRAHMS BIZET
CALLAS; KLEMPERER; STEINBERG

This one is
too good to miss

Thursday, December 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator

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Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4,1969

e aps 4 ToteoiflA sbho wriT ,636 r.> isdmsosO vefa^nuriT
The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
VwfSMj^ aul am rez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
FftM
/)/) Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
-Z' Executive Editor News Editor
y\ wCiim
&:*:Strawb6rry Fields
1 No Rice In Poo I
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COTOI SongCf
Woe! Compounded tribulations did descend upon the Land of Poo
as the days of this first quarter of the year of advanced numbers drew
to an end with great speed.
Few were the ox-carts that journeyed to and fro on the deserted
Poodian roads and by-ways.
Few were the peasants laboring with great sweat and physical pain
in the strawberry fields of the kingdom most large.
Few were the Tigert warlords burrowed deep within the fortress of
brick and bent over their files of great and growing nature.
Few were the errant knights and nobles of greater and lesser nature
who did bring plague and pestilence upon the land in this, the second
reign of King Charles the Shepherd.
Few were the proclamations of great and weighty import issued
from the long and brilliant marble halls of Poodian state by the wise
and benevolent king.
Lo! A great silence had descended upon all of the far and stretching
corners of the land.
But harken! One voice did echo from out all the peasant hovels of
Poo. But lo! It was not a voice known before in the land.
From a province situated great distances from Poo, the voice did
chant on into the Poodian night.
Forsooth. His voice did bring great lamenting throughout all of
Poo, and the peasants did begin to regret the day they were bom.
Had, friend of peasant nature,*' the peasants did chant to each
other throughout die long and lengthening night. What be your
number?*'
Woe! Methinks I shall soon leave these strawberry fields most dear
to mine heart. In their place shall I find fields of rice stretching as far
as the eye can see,* came the answer in voice weighed heavily with
sorrow and disgust.
Lo! Slich is the plight I share as well, my friend."
There is naught to say but happy birthday. And I pray you do
enjoy the taste and texture of granules they call rice.
And they did pass off into the night, their place to be taken by still
two others. And the parade did continue many hours.
And within the marble halls of state there was much sorrow as well,
for many of the greater and lesser ministers mid nobles of varying
degrees of importance.
With heads hung low they did begin the tasks of putting affairs of
state in order, for many did possess numbers of low and questionable
extent.
Pray, what is the pestilence most grave which has caused this
consternation in your midst," Charles the Shepherd did query from
his royal chambers. For, being of an age more advanced, he had little
cause to worry and crease his brow over the infamous joust of
numbers.
Lo! Oh mighty and benign king, they did cry out. It has
happened. Our time has come to bid adieu to Poo."
Ah-h, nodded the king most solemnly. It is the time when the
land is plagued by the curse known as finals.
And his words did cause further anguish among the group of glum
guardians of state.
Oh woe. Tis true, we fear. This thought most grim had not. yet
made its presence known in our minds," they cried out in distress
most severe. Is there no hope for us?"
And silence most loud did descend upon the marble halls.
Then it is not this curse which does cause your present condition
of depression? thundered Charles rite Shepherd.
And with motions most violent he did begin to pace the brilliant
marble corridors, demanding in thunderous tones to know who caused
this pestilence upon his knights and nobles of greater and lesser
stature.
Finally, a voice most small did venture forth upon the kings royal
ears.
It is he who is ruler of all of the provinces who has brought this
upon the Land of Poo, the noble voice did say.
And the king's brow did crease most deeply and a dark shadow hid
his eyes from all present.
Oh," he did thunder.
Arid verily, all fell quiet throughout the land, as king and nobles
and peasants alike did soberly open scrolls of wisdom to ward off only
the Poodian curse of equally threatening nature.
And Charles the Shepherd did summon all his powers to proclaim
rice outlawed in all the land.

EDITORIAL IfM
Well, Mr. President?

You have been very quiet, President
Stephen C. OConnell.
You were faced with the loyalty oath.
You were told to enforce it.
You did. You even Fired four people.
Because you had to do it, or you would be
fired.
We can understand.
But what we cant understand is why you
remain so quiet, Mr. President.
Perhaps you feel it is best. That the issue
will blow over and all will be forgotten if not
forgiven.
Perhaps you feel there is no need to speak
out.
Perhaps you think the oath is just.
We hope not. We dont see how you
could.
But you are so quiet, Mr. President.
The Arts and Sciences faculty passed a
resolution asking you to reinstate those
fired.
Its a matter of principle, they said.
We agree.
And we wonder why you have never said
anything about this McCarthyite intrusion
into our university.
Why you complied so promptly with the
order to fire the apparent Communists
who refused to sign the oath.
Perhaps you felt you would be standing
alone on the front line, as you would have
been.
It would have been rough.

WN& gfiSESL JUST
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Police Were A Great Help
During Fire At Frazier Rogers

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a copy of a
letter sent to Audie I. Shuler, Security Director of
the University Police Department.)
Dear Mr. Shuler:
I would like to convey my personal thanks to you
and through you to your men for the excellent
maimer in which they carried out their duties and
assisted Firefighting personnel during the fire at
Frazier Rogers Hall.
Not only was every duty promptly carried out
concerning controlling traffic and spectators, but
also your men assisted in setting up firefighting
equipment and moving lines into position and
cooperated with us to the highest degree at all
times.
Please convey my thanks also to the people from
maintenance who worked so well with us in cutting
off electricity, steam and water and assisted
whenever asked in other ways.
Our men certainly appreciated the drinks and
especially the hot coffee you furnished, which was
another example of the spirit of helpfulness and
cooperation we received.
Also, please pass along our thanks for the
cooperation and help the students gave us. This was

But that time is past.
Now you have an out, Mr. President.
The faculty of the College of Arts and
Sciences is a force to be reckoned with,
because of its size, if nothing else,
If you were to act upon their resolution,
reinstate these people pending litigation, you
would not stand alone.
The university is united, Mr. President.
The oath is unjust, its effects only
detrimental.
It has accomplished nothing.
If there are those dreaded beings known
as Communist*: lurking in this institutions
ivory towers, they are still here, Mr.
President, oath or no oath.
We think you know that.
But still you are so quiet, Mr. President.
It is up to you, sir, to go to the legislature
of this state and demand these oaths be"
repealed.
It is only up to you.
And you will not stand alone.
But only if you stand, only if you make
an issue out of this insult to the integrity of
state employes, can anything be done about
it, Mr. President.
Nothing will be done if you remain quiet
as you have been.
Nothing is ever accomplished if people
involved remain quiet.
Please, Mr. President, say something.
For if you do not, you are leaving more
than 22,000 voices crying to the wind.

a very orderly group and many of them helped in
firefighting operations.
Thanks again for the cooperation and assistance.
This highly efficient group and the manner in which
they assisted was a great help in bringing a serious
fire under control quickly.
JOHNNY DAMPIER JR., CHIEF
GAINESVILLE FIRE DEPARTMENT
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer of the article and no
those of the University of Florida.



UCRA Statement Didnt Get Enough Support

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to answer Mr.
A.R. Todds column, Speaking
Out: CRA A Disappointment
(November 25, 1969) not as a
member of UCRA (which never
really got off the ground at UF),
but as an individual faculty
member who tried to organize
the group. I might say first that
my relative short tenure at UF
(3 years) and my organizational
inexperience should be taken
into account in considering what
follows.
Above all, I would like to
make it clear that 1 share Mr.
Todds concern about instances
of questionable academic
procedures and pblicies at UF.
The problem is really not one of
concern, however, but of a
viable plan. It was the plan of
UCRA (adopted from its
successful use on other
campuses) to use the statement
on academic freedom to initiate
campus discussion of the
problems concerning academic
freedom and gather in those who
do not usually express
themselves on university
problems. We hoped to create
academic pressure from the
center for the changes needed at

Physical Education.
The New Requirements

MR. EDITOR:
PHYSICAL EDUCATION Credit or no credit?
Graded or Pass and Fail? Supplemented by personal
development courses or not?
These are some of the questions surrounding
mandatory P.E. which arose in last years student
body election. The time is drawing close when the
Curriculum Committee will hand down their
decisions to the students. Therefore, the time to ask
questions if now.
In conferences with Dean Boyd, College of
Physical Education, and Dean Lassiter, Academic
Affairs, the following questions were answered. If
you do not understand them, or disagree, please let
your Student Senator know.
Six credit hours in personal development
courses of participatory nature will be required.
These credits may be taken at any time during
the four years at UF. They are no longer a
University College requirement.
The hours for graduation in the various
colleges will not be increased.
There has been a suggestion made to let each
student decide whether he wants to be graded with
a letter or by pass-fad. Presently, all these
participatory courses are graded with the exception

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Okay, boys /mms over"

UF.
The theory behind these aims
was quite pragmatic: The 50 or
less activist professors on this
campus (as judged by the
turnout at the jointly sponsored
AFT, AAUP, ACLU meeting on
the loyalty oath) have succeeded
in little but alienating the state
government, the university
administration, and the people
of Florida from the academic
pursuits which should be the
universitys raison detre.
Without denying the very real
fact of legislative and
administrative overreactions, we
also were desirous of preventing
any further breach between
those who understand the need
for academic freedom and those
who have never had that need
explained to them. So much for
the plan.
Now for going astray. The
statement failed to draw the
support we had hoped it would;
less than 200 members of the
academic community returned
an endorsement of it. To be
sure, a more dramatic statement
might have drawn more support
but then we would have had
to chose sides support from
those who turned down the
statement as too liberal; or
support from those who turned

UPs
"There is no hope IA Disappointment

of physical education. This college though is
supporting the individual option method.
Until 1972 courses may be taken in your
major. (Not definite but Dean Lassiter is supporting
it).
Senator Ralph Nobo will be taking a poll of
students to predict the type of courses students will
demand..
If you are over 26, you still must take these six
hours (PE had been exempt, if over that age).
The P.E. department and Dean Boyd are asking
for two rather than one credit hour for their
courses.
Required courses can not also be used
simultaneously as elective hours?
The President of UF will make all final
decisions.
t P.E. courses will be listed in the schedule
books by activities after this program begins.
t If there are any special requests for courses in
P.E.; contact Mr. Waglow in the Mens P.E.
Department.
Courses that may be included in this program
besides music* art, and P.E. are SCH 201, LY 201,
etc.
JOYCE MILLER

down the statement as too
conservative.
And even more important
were those who did not turn it
down or accept it; the faculty
and students and administrators
who could not be bothered.
Even Mr. Todd, with all his
concern, took seven weeks to
engage in a discussion about the
statement.

For different reasons, then, I
share in Mr. Todds
disappointment with UCRA. I
am disappointed in its failure to
get. established; I am
disappointed in its failure to
attract moderates who should be
concerned with academic
freedom, not only here at UF
but nationwide. Most of all, I am
disappointed in its

Boycott Senate
MR. EDITOR:
The utter futility of the University Senate as presently
constituted was demonstrated eloquently in actions last
Tuesday. Just like the rural-dominated legislators who refused
to reapportion themselves equitably to provide truly
representative government, the University Senate with a heavy
contingent of professors from Agriculture and Engineering who
had reportedly received the word from their leaders to vote
negatively, voted down the question of establishing an elective
Senate. The vote was 114 to 78.
Every tired cliche of reactionaries sludged up out of the
Middle Ages by every king on the European scene and later by
every snob on the American scene who ever thougjht his status
superior to that of his peers was restated by the opponents of an
elective Senate.
But the most arrogant of all the arguments was that you cant
trust associate and assistant professors to help make policy
decisions for the university. Why? Because only full professors
have that ineffable experience and insight that gives them the
wisdom to govern.
Totally foigotten was the argument that experience for older
people is usually just a repetitive process of the same old thing
over and over again. Whatever one could have learned from such
an event or circumstance he could have learned the first time,
but it is totally milked of instructional value by the twentieth
time.
The Senate now represents very few as it is a constituent
body, like the British House of Lords made up of 500 full
professors ex officio, plus a meager 50 senators elected from the
ranks of associate and assistant professors. A few administrators
without professional rank who are members of the
Administrative Council are thrown in for good measure, like the
Anglican Bishops in England.
The argument was given that there would be no assurance
that the election of all senators would yield better attendance.
The full professors from Agriculture and Engineering patted
themselves on the back with the myth that The present
non-representative Senate is well attended, although attendance
figures belie them. So a count of the numbers present from all
groups again belied the myth.
Elected senators present last Tuesday were 31 in number or
62%0f their total. Full professors present were 156 or 31% of
their total, exactly half that of the elected contingent. Out of
approximately 550 members, 192 were present less than half.
Even more significant is the overwhelming and noticeable
refusal of the Arts and Sciences College, Education College,
Medical College, and University College full professors to attend
the Senate any more. In effect, the Senate is the Agriculture and
Engineering contingents and has lost all valid claim to speak for
UF.
I say to my Arts and Sciences colleagues and to friends in
Education, Medicine, and University College, let's all boycott
the Senate 100% and let those two colleges keep on running,the
show because that will really show up what a hollow sham our
House of Lords is. Why participate with people who prefer the
15th century to the second half of the 20th?
GLADYS M. KAMMERER
PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

ThuiMtay, December 4,1908, The Floride Alligator,

demonstration that at least at
UF we continue willing to leave
our futures in the hands of the
professional activists, of
whatever side of the spectrum:
The best lack all conviction,
while the worst/ Are full of
passionate intensity.
MELVYN NEW
ASST. PROF. ENGLISH

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4.1969

Pantry
Pride
DISCOUNT FOODS
MM

EVERYDAY LOW PRICE !I
r-~ b
I ROSEDALE I
CORN
[ 6/ 8 1J

f TOMATO)
hgVJUICE
I fSmut] I
I AV lO< [atmm}

|fV£yp4y tow price r]
[NESCAFE
| s INSTANT I
V COFFEE I
[ 79 J

COMPARE! ttrjfrr
Kraft Mayonnaise 59c 4 * m
Salad Dressing 'sm? 39c s < *
Miracle Whip 59c 47* w
Strawberry Preserves ts.'S? 58c w* m
Sun Aid Grape Jelly ,u - 39 * i
Enden Crane Rinse 2/88c * m*
Suave Hair Spray sresT" 49c < so*

fromnM(n|
W carkamon
I COFFEE 1
5 MATE |
I 99 1

EVERYDAY LOW PfllCF.'l
CREST
TOOTHPASTE I
fAM' l Y <>! Z l PIG ov min; H
77J

For additional information or to
of" town firm* ploeso call coHact-araa coda 904). Or, writa Holiday
Gift Certificatas, P.O. Box 2605, Jacksonville, Ha., 32203.

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!*]
f FRISKIES^I
ASST MEAT FLAVORS I
I CAT FOODS I
[ ?B 1 j

pyERypTTIOW PRICE!
'i. I.T.'TI 'fOIDRVL I
|Lt. B o*lo** HYE CP 9
C PUMPEPHICKEL I
BREAD |
16oz I
I LOAF AT J

[{VERY DA Y LOW PRICE
D
tomato I
SOUP I
t v; 10 c I

EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! 1
INSTANT
SHAVK no can
oat iaa JB £

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!
FYNE TASTE
California
TOMATOES
"> 4/ $ l,

BAY LOW PRICE! 1
ERSPIRANT I
RRID I
RA DRV I
A OR UNSCtNTED
j 99* Jj

B' tow PRICE. 1 ]
srj
lpagnel
0 DUCK, I
BURGUNDY
,99 J

/" BARTLETT )
I "KB p EARS
I "m W I
lrSsiri29oz I
[W CAN >/ | J
V Aviiy< f y

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
| ICED ASS T
| SWEET I
I BUNS I
[ 11j

COMPARE! "sJft
Hair Spray "?:" 49c 99* so*
Get Set Hair Spray xr<"o? 49c 79* so*
Halo Hair Spray 49c 99* so*
Hunts Catsup * 3/sl*i.n m
Pantry Pride Catsup * 27c as* *
Nice ll Easy By Clairol $1.59 $2.00 41*
Loving Care By Clairoi $1.39 as*

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!
k)
POP UPS OR
KELLOGG S
POP TARTS
b x 39*

SAY LOW PRICE 1
JAVE
AMPOO
2/ s l

fMf NOT LARGE ...NOT MMO JUT^JIIOWSUMdItbIwnmIotWFIOM^^
M King Size J Jumbo Size
I CHEER m DASH
.,jjj|s|i*l.o 9
...EVERYDAYI ELSEWHERE

[ £VfJ?yDAy tow PRICE f
Bl
| CORNED
BEEF
[ 49

EVfffYDAY LOW PRICE f
WHITE rain
HAIR SPRAY
I c 99

[fyfyplTtOW PRICE I
J PURE ALL VEGETABLE I
ICRISCO I
| SHORTENING I
-75J

Z' SPRINGTIME ASST A
[ FROZEN
VEGETABLES
1 20 ox rSSfSri M | /< I
( BAGS >/ J

tow pri'CeT]
hjakel^^^l
NNER I
ROLLS I
!/29<]

COMPARE! aSr
Kelloggs Com Flakes u or. aox 39c 45* 6*
Kellogg Variety Pack * 2/89c *
Kotex Tampons 40s 85c si.s 74*
Kotex Sanitary Napkinssc m
Paper Towels owrrtous 4/$l $1.48 484
7 oz. Cold Drink Cups 79c 894 104
White Paper Plates 9in. mcT 69c 894 204

BIA Y LOW PRICE!
IAVORSW
LL-0
TIN DESSERTS
io<

f EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
I
I HORMEL J
I CHILI I
L_3?lJ

|fV£gyD4y i6W PRICE
I SWEET I
I POTATOES I
A/$! I
I can *#/ IJ

I EV£fiyD4 y 10W PRICE !j
r CAKE w
I DONUTS I
B PIA t N OH MOWCUI 0
[ o> : 29
BV PRICE 1
EN Vy/
ED
IS
9<

f EVERYDAY LOW PRICE f]
I
SALTINESI
[taW* J

R)AY LOW PRICE!
SEAT
liS
6/*1 J

/till 72"X0" WOVIN AND
THERMAL
BLANKETS
ASST COIOIIS. 40% ROIYUTIL
33% RAYON, 25% COWON



I jfti| |k J^|

I f V f EgyD4y tow PRICEf^
Li AN MEATY I
I FRESH PORK I
I BUfTS I
- 59 I

rsIRLOIN^)
STEAKS
( $ |09i.J

I BONUS BUY! 1
j
| A Z Alt A AU :
[ KNOCK- 1
WURSYI
i J! II 1
PK.O *# T* J

frROUND )
I jssa, l STEAKS/
I # Jl>y

r- r
I FISH
I portionsl
1 3 89]

[ [V[PY[h 1 'VC-'"
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m pa >w r p koi v*r
I KiNirss
| FRANKS
[ 39 <
fcl i i "ff

| (||Sj|| FMor soitiii tm }
4 BANANAS
10c j

EVERYDAY LOW PRICES OOOD SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. SONUS SUYS GOOD THRU WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10 QUANTITY RIQHTS RESERVED.

Ji': r v 'j
f.lif a ? ar N 'AT 9
FltL FISH I
STICKS I
. 43 J

pyfmTTW Pftifff]
r PANTRY PRIDE tl/|
I TOMATO & CHEESE I
[ PIZZA I
[ .... 69< j

[ERYDAY LOW PRICE f]
MRS. FILBERTS j
GOLDEN QUARTERS I
OLEG I
JsJ

I BONUS BUY! ]
r ~ m\
I BEEF CUBE I
STEAKS j
[ ... 79* j

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE l']
W HEAT AND SlflVl fjf I
I FRIED FISH I
I STICKS I
OOIDEN BBOWN
! 2 79 Ji

fVf#TO4T 10W PWCf/
CHEESE
WEDGES
. tB 69<,

(M r FLORIDA GRADE 'A* A
EDYEDfi
Im I Elm 9 I
rSmSn I
lufmuj I
WHOLE SAGGED J
save lb 991 Mm y

/SLICED 1/4 PORK)
I LOIN CHOPS I
I -fir fmrm) my j
I *yesk IwjmJ I
l Mvimu

[ fyfpypAy low price T
I
I SAUSAGE
Ij>kg9*

|ms7o7rToirwf7ij
i
I CHEESE 1
I LOAF I
[ : 59 |

A HD U.S. NO. I WHITE 'N
I POTATOES
I lbSg I
V 20 POUMP BAG 877

EcypAy tow PR/cf /^
LEAN FRESH
GROUND I
BEEF I
4,;i $ 199 Jl 99 J

[BONUS sun
AY
CABBAGE SOU |H
*1.19 J

| fyfpypAy tow price
*i
f CREAM I
I CHEESE I
[29
FLORIDA
GRAPEFRUIT
& 5 <
EACH

Thuraday, Ommlw 4,1969, Tkt Florida AMfrtor, I

MKHRM GAINESVILLES
UPO LOWEST
MlaffMl PRICES!
927 North Main at Cornor 10th St.
1349 N. W. 23rd Avonuo in
i J. M. Fiolds Plaxo
- S

I EVcRTDAy LOW PRICE. 1
I
| SLICED 1
! BACON I
[ g -59> |

fCHUCK)
I SYEJHjSj

IFVERyOAy LOW PRICE /"I
SLICED I
BOLOGNAI
" 6 J

COMPARE! Wr*T
Daisy Cheese Wedges -- 69c ni io*
Pantry Pride Tea Bags 68c n n*
Nescafe Instant Coffee ft 79c si so*
Maxwell House Coffee 69 nt ><
Pantry Pride Coffee 1 *-<- 49c <
Yuban Coffee 89c n < **
Frozen Waffles vest 10|$1 si.*

[ everyday m price! 1
SLICED
I AMERICAN I
I CHEESE I
I z' I

COMPAH! ;?-§?
Frozen Coffee Rich 4sl si-i$ w
Sliced Strawberries rsr 4/$l $1.33 33*
Frozen French Fries 02. KOI 10/S1 $1.65 65*
Fish Sticks 02. PK. IOSTON BONNIt MOE. 3/$l $1.17 17*
Frozen Bagels 4/S1 $1.56 56*
Turkey Dinner II 02. BANOWT 5*02. 38c *9* 11*
Chicken Pot Pie > 6/$l *>> *

[fV£RrD4)' LOW PRICE f]
IT ---to
I POT 1
I ROAST I
I tsa "W&, 1
Inn /O* J

1
.£0 A Nil j
>KED I
IRIMP I
* 89
E BONUS BUY!
OSCAR
MAYER
FRANKS
79'

I BONUS Bt/y
FLORIDA
ORANGES
29

GAINESVILLES

Enijs buy<>
(MANS
LICED
HAM
69 c

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BEAUTY BAKING I
APPLES I
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Page 11



Page 12

t, The Florida Thursday, December 4,1969

' v,a fe&a£. ii^SSSfey*
' ,*<£!?&>'. ,. : S ; :, i ; V&|9iH|j^^^^K^f
*
IBk.
#IJH ,w

v jre
fctflfl
PHIL COPE
NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE UNION

Drawing classes were out on the Reitz Union
grounds this week, putting on paper their own ideas

Savant Taps New Members

Savant-UF tapped new members Nov. 25,
recognizing coeds who are leaders on campus and
who have at least a 2.0 overall average.
The following were tapped in a torch-light
ceremony: Lynn Barger, Joyce Bartlett, Loshe
Borton, Carol Brunson, Ellen Corenswet, Sherri
Cox, Joan Dowd, Jan Druckman, Janelle Heck,

Holland Donates
Papers To Library

By RICK BENNETT
Alligator Correspondent
Retiring U.S. Sen. Spessard
Holland has left his entire
collection of senatorial papers to
the UF Library.
According to Fleming
Bennett, Asst. Director of
Libraries, over 80 boxes of
Hollands material has already
arrived on campus. Several more
boxes are expected soon, with
the remainder coming next year
after the Senator officially closes
up shop.
The material includes
everything from personal
letters and old Congressional
Records to mere notes. said
Bennett.
There are a lot of trivial
papers which are of little real
value and may be discarded, said
Bennett. But, on the other
hand, some people may be very
interested in these for research
purposes and we will be glad to
oblige.
The collection will take
several years to compile in any
orderly fashion, said acting

lAatfjstidfcr
TONIGHT
The Original
FLASH
GORDON.

special collections librarian
Joseph B. Dob kin. Things are
so disorganized that we hardly
know where to begin.
Plans are for the collection to
be catalogued and bound for
general use by UF students.
They will, however, be kept
under lock and key for their
protection.
When completed, plans are for
the collection to be housed in
the Research Library. Its
material will be used mostly by
graduate students although
anyone will be welcome to use
it.
We plan to keep it in the
Research Library right now, but
some of the collection may
phase out to the Law Library.
said Dobkin.
Bennett said that Hollands
collection is not just a piece out
of history... it is a piece out of
history as seen through the eyes
of a man who helped to
formulate it.
The Holland papers are
expected to be a tremendous
addition to the UF Librarys
collection.

of what the campus landmark looks like. Here artist
Jay Chen, 2UC, contemplates his work.

Susan Jacobs, Marsha Kaufman, Vickie Karezdom,
Cindy Lovely, Dianna Leach, Micky McCarton,
Eileen McDargh;
Marsha Madorsky, Lynn Marks, Judy Matthews,
Linda Mogge, Mary Palmour, Marie Perrone, Cathie
Reed, Ellen Rupp, Cathy Spellman, Jamie Sinnett,
Faith Tiilino, Cathy White and Nancy Wolfson.

Willy and the Poor Boys
New
Creedence Clearwater Revival
Album and Tape
*t
RECORDS VILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL

Have You
Bought Your
1970
Seminole
Yet?
AI
IN GAINESVILLE MALL
PHONE 372-8511
pf

Our Two Best Sellers Made of Miracle Kanekalon Modacrylic
' n^r L needs^e r |>ng. W 3 W l,h ,aPered baCk ready t 0 wear J|>o W)G
MOOD GODDESS" the Handmade Stretch Designer wig, lightweight 45 00 no. ms wig

Advisory Council
Forms 5 Groups
By Alligator Sarvices
The UF Presidents Advisory Council has divided into five task force'
groups to study such problems as the role of members in the
University community and the need for a better communication
Sy Dr 1 Robert Gaither, chairman, explained the council will look at
the entire realm of student governance, not just Student Government,
with specific attention to such things as the image of the group, the
honor system and fairness of apportionment.
Treatment of minority groups is another area to be considered,
involving communication with Roy Mitchell, director of the Office for
Minority Affairs. Specific topics will include the Universitys role
active and passive concern with minority problems, role of the
individual and procedures for dealing with individual problems.
The council will make an assessment of the status of Action
Conference recommendations, especially ones on counseling, conduct
of academic programs, minority affairs and teacher evaluation.
The first council meeting to hear various task force reports is
scheduled Dec. 4.
Task forces and members are: Role of Members in the University
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, political science; Walter Matherly, physical
planning; Dr. Harold Clark, agriculture; Dr. Benjamin Barger, mental
health program; James Hollis and Steve Zack, students.
Student Governance John Greenman, agriculture; William
Elmore, vice president for business affairs; Dr. Edmund F. Ackell,
provost J. Hillis Miller Health Center; Michael Gordon, James Royal
and Linda Roberts, students.
Minority Groups Dr. Hal G. Lewis, foundations of education; Dr.
E:T. York, provost, agriculture; Dr. Frederick W- Conner, vice
president for academic affairs; Larry Jordan and Kathy Ruppel,
students.
Assessment of Action Conference Recommendations Dr. Ruth
McQuown, political science; Dr. William Jones, chemistry; Dr. Linton
E. Grinter, acting vice president; Dr. John OConnell, engineering;
Donald Tucker and Jeffrey Smith, students.
Communications Joseph Sabatella, architecture and fine arts;
Hugh Cunningham, journalism, Dr. Lester L. Hale, vice president for
student affairs; Dr. Joseph Perry, economics; Karen Balkany and
Michael Hill, students.
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l|2H I

I Snowy Bloach
| 6. 26-ox. pkg. 79c
8> wii, *. to. i***) 1
EXTRA
Stamps gj
IStouffer's Chic Icon- I
Dumpling Casserole |
11 28-ox. pkg. $2.29 |
HNM EXTRA
ilmJ^Green Stamps @
Gillotte, Sols Hooting
! Shaving Croam |
16. 6V4-OX. can99c |
(Ix*lm* Wri. Dm. ID. IDDD) £
EXTRA |r~^i
<&GreenStampsfPl
I Garcia Spanish |
Boon Soup I
21. threo # 2 cans 93c I
(CxplrD* WW. Dm. ID. IDDD)
EXTRA
-iWGreenStampsM
WITH THIS COOTON AN* TUtCNASS B* BBBSB
| Rath's Black Hawk
| Honoy-Curo Bonoless
| 26. Smoked Hams
| par lb. $1.69
(bspim WU. Dm. ID. IDDDI
*

r
EXTRA
WITH THIS COVrON AMD POBCMASB OV HkttMH
ISingloton's Frozen 1
Cooked Shrimp |
5. 10-ox. pkg. 99c 1
(IxpirM W*D Dm. ID. IDDD)
EXTRA
dWGreenStampslPJ
(Armour's Gold Star
Bonalass Canned Hams |
10. 3-lb. can $3.99 1
(IxDlrM Wml. Dm. ID. IDDD)
H
Micrin Mouthwash |
12-ox. hot. 93c or 1
15. 18-ok. hot. Si.l $
(Cxpir*. WuD., Dm. ID. IDDD)
P K J|
I Hunt'* |
| Tomato Catsup 1
| 20. three 20-ox. hots. $1
* (IxHlr*. W-*., Dm. ID. IDDD)
Wllll^WGreenStampsf^l
| Regular or
I Super Modess
25. 24-ct. pkg. 93c j j
I \ IlKHirul WWw Dm. ID, IDDD) J

CTil^WGreenStampspi
WITH THIS CODFOH 9DRCMASI OF BUM
I Sara Lee Froxen |
| Pecan Coffee Cake J
| 4. largo sixo 89c £
(iHpirM WnD Dm. ID. IDDD)
EXTRA IP^l^
LAny Swift's Premium |
9 Beef Roast |
3-lbs. ar over £
ll*lru* W*D Dm. ID, IDDD) J
eeeoj>seeftssseellmuM>Beeeeee EXTRA
JW Green Stamps |gj
Jergen's Extra-
Dry Lotion
12Vi-ox. hot. $1.69 or
14. 7-ox. hot. $1.19
J IlKDlr** W*D. DM. ID, IDDD)
xeeeeeeesseeeeeeeelheeeeeaftfteeiuuMMam: 1
EXTRA
n Sta mps Pll
McCormick's Pure 1
Black Popper |
19. 4-ox. can 45c £
Est ft"" ,0/ >9#9> li
[fi|i]^GreenStamps^^j
Lysol Spray £|
Disinfectant £1
24. 21-ox. can $1.89 ||
(IxplrM WW. Dm. id, IDDD) 11

EXTRA W£M |
Lambrecht's Pizza
| with CHmm -6 Tomato 1
I 3. 13-oz. pkg. 69c i
| Itarlm Wad. Dm. 10. IDM)
XOOOeOQOeeeoaeeiUH>l|OOOe*eoeaaaOOeQOX
M~ EXTRA
| Sue Bee |
| Honey 1
I 24-oz. bot. 6Sc |
EXTRA iF s *!
pgj
Right Guard Anti-Perspirant
~ 5-oz. can 99c or
19 8-ox. can $1.39
[ (Ixpirot Wei, Dm. It, 19*9) J j
EXTRA
McCormick's
| Vanilla Kxtract
I 18. 2-oz. bet. 49c
| (Ixpiraa Wad. Dac. 10, 10*0) J |
[pi
I Planter's Dry
Roasted Peanuts
23. I'/hos. jar 69c I
(laplra. Wad. lai, 10, 1*00) |
ooeoaeeeoaeonoaesteeoeeeeaaaooneaxax

Thursday, DMmtar 4,1989, Tha Florida AMpatar, I

t^ tra
WITH VMM COUPON ANB PIfBCNASt Os iKiiiijfl
| Fresh Florida 1
| Grapefruit 1
1 2* 8-lb. bag 69c 2
5 (Ixplra. Wad. Oat. 10. 1000) J
: xeeseeeessseeeeeeebeeseeeesseeseeeejpf
[pi
Mr. Bubble 2
Bubble Bath 1
7. 12-oz. pkg. 39c |
(Ixplrai Wad. Oat. 10. 1000) 1
j| [pi
IDry, Normal, Super
VO-5 Shampoo
12. 7-oz. size 89c
(Ixpira. Wad. Oac. 10. 1000)
xeeeeftsseeeeeeeeli(UMM>eeessaft(iignto)y
[flllldJwGreenStamps pi
! WITH THIS COUPON ANB POBCNASI OF
I Asst. Flavors, Betty |
I Cracker Cake Mixes |
17. three reg. pkgs. $1 2
|S (Ixpira. Wad. Da. 10. 1000) J
do extra iF^sj
WITH THIS COUPON ANB PUBCNASI OF ttittfidiH
I Borden's |
C remora |
22.,16-oz. far 79c I
(Ixpira. Wad. Sat. 10. 1000)
aseeeeeaseeneeeeebeee eeeeeeenssses nr

Page 13



Page 14

i, Ths Florids Alligator, Thursday. Bscs mbs; 4,1944

[cklibratino thi
KnH t TTi n grand opinino op
1 rWlrif OUR 153rd PUBLIX
\ Ittfefi^Friiit Coktail.. 5- $ 1
1\ \ 'xIBK' 'lywYOoidewCowi.. 5~ s 1
v \ Sweet Peas .... s-*l
tmmSmmk Creen Beans... 5-" 5 l
4ojUligi Coni... 4sr*l
PVrV nWiniWR I \ 'At /# / wy-. \\ l/
Fabric Softener ££* 77* nmri W !*c..Thn.
!r?l' -
irr^ o** 0 **- 1 *= iaWMaiS' *
SS22?J!I? ,, r ,# SCSSST ir
llayalOlati. S* & Muffins iT M*
Oxydol Detergent V* ** lfK!>iW Dinar Ball. ... 39 <
Taster's Choice £ 14* ... a
**..* Medium Cheddar ... s* 69*
- 49 U^£nCheese .... .89
D^atalCream....tt 49- Cottage Cheese. ~ St*



Swifts Premium Tender-Grown Gov.rnm.nt- I r f\ r C i IYj-
Inspected not Frozen, / f H A hem. IW N>Jol W Wft.
bKlim-O &tSkj&iSkimKk( -S' 3 *'
rriiHix m vx ppim *.v.'.*i
I BDVI MB Wm (Chicken, leel, Turkey, Meureel A CkttM,
%w wn*....s3r
Mrs. Smith's OsUss Delexs
CUT-UP WHOLE Apple Pie .... VC 89*
b
Swiff's Premium With Ribs Qulck-Fresen New Zenleed lEOIICIFCI wFHOHS phf. 1 #
Fryer Breasts Leg O'Lamb 89 c grrg-SL. "^ee
For Tho Kids, fryer Swift's Premium Brow* Supuv*Cured POrCR FIIMT9 e ** Hw
Drumsticks .. 69* Sliced Bacon 19*
Swift's Premium Tosty Swifts Premium Skinless Seusepe, FISH CQKOS 000 0 Phs- lj)W
Fryer Thighs ... 69* Breakfast Links VC 59* mZiL'*m3&. M
Swift's Premium Monty Hormnn's Oronpe Bend Assorted Sliced FISH PVff 0 0 o*o pkp. Sf
Fryer b. 39* Luncheon Meats 3*^99*
f (Seiepnn, Wcklo A Pimento, Olivo Loot) pk #
Swift's Promiom Wofor-Thin Seofeod Trent, Qeick-F resen
Sliced Meats Trout Fillets
Swift's Promiom Boneless See food Trent, PlorMn White
Smoked Daisies 99* Large Shrhnu . s l 4
Sliced Bologna... 29* 49* 69*
Beef Roast £ r *l**
whjj..~-..-.,u.. Sweet Pineapplesi //-
Chuck Steaks 19* 3 *1
Short Ribs ,> ..
%FFClowCr B VI B We The
69 C Ri ht T Li-it < ,antities
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fH |^agCoohio g boions I^^2SC^^^|
Cooked Scdami I; 1 69* 7^^^
Potato Salad a. 39* y***^^R
Sandwiches ... . 59 or.m expires dec, ,
BLIX-0
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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER Where shopping
oi4N 2630N.W. 13thStrsst W.UnNnsityAvonu.st34thSent ls a pleasure
14 Store hours 99 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat. r

Thursday, OMMntar 4.1*69. Itiu Florid* Alligitbr,

Page 15



* GATO R CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
A-Croton Skymaster Wristwatch
Chronometer: B- Three insect dials:
C- Two Push Buttons: D- Water-proof
to 60 ft.: E- Shock-protected. Cost
$125 new, for resale at $95 firm.
Call 372-1981. (A-st-51-p)
Dachshund puppies, red minature,
AKC, 6 weeks old, SSO. Call
378-8819 after 6 p.m. or weekends
all day. (A-st-52-p)
Good condition Newmoon 28,000
BTU CENTRAL AIR, 2 bedrooms,
fully carpeted, front kitchen, will
consider renting. 378-2146.
(A-st-52-p)
Tired of walking. Must sell Harley
Davidson 175 cc. 1966. Good
Transportation. La Mancha Apt. 29.
Ask to see Rich. $175. (A-st-51-p)
Color Organs: music from stereo or
instrument is changed into light
patterns which follow music. Unit
drives anything from X-mas tree
lights to flood lights. $25. Strobe
lights $45. All are new. 376-2389.
(A-4t-51-p)
US diver scuba tank W/J valve, pack,
2 hose regulator $65, 20 cu. ft. tank
$25, Galesi cal 22 auto, pistol S4O.
German vis-ed cards $3. Call
378-5296. (A-2t-53-p)
For sale: Camera Kodak Retinette
1A 35mm with leather case and
exposure meter $34.00. Phone
376-0108 after 6 p.m. (A-3t-53-p)
Three piece Lafayette AM-FM radio
stereo combination Empire turntable.
Needs cartridge SIOO. 378-6495.
(A-4t-53-p)
The Underground Zoo has these
switched on pets for you. Agout is
$4Q.00. Tree Porcupine $30.00. Owl
Monkey $22.00. Sacred Dove $5.00
and other tame roommates from
Gainesville's bizarre pet bazaar. 7
N.E. Ist St. 373-2681. (A-2t-53-p)
Unbelievable deal. Brand new never
been used Roberts 770 X stereo tape
recorder valve S3BO + S7O worth of
unused tape all for $220 or make
offer call Sullivan 376-9226 or
392-9038. (A-4t-53-p)
Mobile Home 12x48. Air. One
bedroom. Nothing down, assume
payments. $72.00 a month.
378-9402 or 3101 SW 34th St. Lot
66. (A-4t-53-p)
Ford Falcon wagon '6l. Automatic
It runs. $75. 614 NE 6 Ave.
372-7195. (A-3t-53-p)
4 Track stereo tape player Muntz
515.00. Tapes also. 373-1462.
(A-2t-53-p)
Fantastic stereo with BSR turntable,
4 speakers in 2 walnut cabinets,
cueing device, anti-skate control and
more. $125 or best offer. 378-6115.
(A-3t-53-p)
Tape recorder Webcor Coronet 4
track stereo with built-in speakers,
new tape heads. S7O. Call 372-7395
after 5. (A-2t-53-p)
Circle of sound stereo, two weeks
old, must sell, SIBO takes. Gibson
Classical Guitar, almost new, S7O
takes. Call 376-6683. (A-st-53-p)
Honda XL9O 3 months old. 1,000
miles. Excellent condition. Must sell
$295. Phone 376-0358. (A-3t-53-p)
Lovable golden retriever male 9
months $l5O. Father Amcn. champ.
Mother show champ. Obedience
training started. Family
circumstances require sale to kind
owner. 376-6005. (A-3t-53-p)
1968 Honda 305 Superhawk
excellent condition. Extras included
$450. Call 372-2715. (A-4t-53-p)
196 7 Honda CLI6O Scrambler.
Excellent condition mechanically &
physically. $375 or best offer. Call
378-5996. (A-4t-53-p)
MOTORCYCLE 69 350 HONDA
less than 5,000 mi. Paul at 372-9760.
{ A-lt-54-p)
Darling black puppies for sale $5.
Mother half beagle half bassett
hound. Father St. Bernard type dog.
Long and shorthaired. Both sexes.
378-0166. (A-2t-54-p)
1965 Honda Sports 50. Knobby tires,
inspected, good transportation.
Helmet incl. Make offer. Charlie
3 76-2003, (
WATCH Men's Omega Seamaster
w/ 14K solid gold band. Original
$430. Like new and 1 year guarantee.
Need money! Asking S2OO. Andy
378-7291, 372-9415. (A-3t-54-p)
Custom made perfumes and after
shave. 20 odour types. Many one of a
kind. Reasonable cost. Made In time
for Christmas 392-9417. (A-3t-54-p)
For a "job well done feeling clean
carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furnltuie Co. (A*lt-54-pf -

rSWWSMWSWWSOWfIOWWWWSS'SYS'Si*
FOR SALE |
S*;-;*X'X<*x-x-X*x*:*X*:*X<*:*X-X*:*x-x-x-Nv
400 watt Stereson guitar or bass
amplifier. Features true stereo
channels with twin vinyl bottoms.
Microphone and echo unit also for
sale. Will accept best offer for each.
Call 372-2777. (A-2t-54-p)
16 cu. ft. refrigerator 85, Desk 10,
2-way window fan 15, 26" Schwinn
bike 22, Table model TV 10, Phone
8:00 5:00, 392-1521 Barbara,
3786140 after 5:00. (A-3t-54-p)
65 HONDA 90, runs. $75, Fender
electric guitar, 60 watt amp, Spanish
12-string, need cash, best offer,
GREGG 378-0039. (A-3t-54-p)
AUCTION: New Used Antique
Merchandise. Saturday, December 6,
1969, 7:30 p.m. C&J AUCTION
HOUSE, ARCHER, FLORIDA.
(A-2t-54-p)
FOR RENT |
X*XWX<*X-XXSTW%X-X-X-X*X*>
Several one bedroom apts. One bath,
kitchen, living room completely
furnished, A/C, sllO $l2O mo.
Cable TV. Colonial Manor
Apartments, 1216 S.W. 2nd Ave.
372-7111.
One bedroom apt. for sub-lease,
available Jan. Ist, 1970; $65.00 p/m;
married & grad students; 725 SE sth
Ave. Phone 373-1700. (B-3t-54-p)
Sub-Lease one-bedroom Village Park
apt. On pool. $l3O a month. Call
372-5772 after 6 p.m. (B-lt-54-p)
Sublease couple large 3 bdrm apt.
SBO mo. furnished water included.
Available Dec. 30. 720A SE 4 Ave.
378-3709. (B-3t-54-p)
Sub-lease French Quarter Apt. for
Winter and Spring Quarter. One
bedroom. Good location on pool.
Call Steve or Mike 373-2750.
(B-3t-54-p)
1 BR efficiency. Can move right in,
clean, warm, quiet. SBS per month.'
Can be seen at dinner time. 1222 NW
8 Ave. no. 15. See Mgr. or call
3766854. (B-3t-54-p)
One bedroom Gatortown apt.
sublease Jan. June, large,
furnished, carpeted, with pool. Call
3786188. (B-3t-44-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom townhouse in the
French Quarter. Sublet from Jan. to
Aug. for $l4O per month. Call
373-2225 after 5 p.m. (B-3t-54-p)
2 bedroom, 2 bath, overlooking pool.
Point West Apt. Must sublet by Jan.
Ist. $190.00 month. Call 378-3605.
(B-2t-54-p)
Do yourself a favor, walk to class in
10 minutes, swim and be
airconditioned in the heat, 1
bedroom furnished apt. available
now. 378-4607. (B-3t-54-p)
Must sublet 1 bedroom
airconditioned large garage apt.
SIOO/month lease Jan. thru Aug. 4
blocks from campus. Call 378-2177
after 5 p.m. (B-3t-54-p)
1 Bdr. apt. to sublet from Jan. to
June. Available after finals only $95
a month. Call 373-1571. (B-st-53-p)
Great 1 bedroom apt. furnished. Will
be available Jan. 1. AC, pool, laundry
facilities, close to school. Only slOl
a month. Call 378-4092. (B-3t-54-p)

ONE-ACT PLAYS TONIGHT!
| THE DOCK BRIEF 1
L ILL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS J
COMINGS AND GOINGS 1
I CONSTANS THEATRE 8:00 P.M. 1
m Admission : $.25.
ROBBIES
Fnr The Best In Steaks.
Meals & Q l^Sandwiches
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I 'On The Gold Coast |

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4,1969

Page 16

x<*x.x*rwx*x*x*>x*x*x*x.x-;
FOR RENT
: Sx*X*X*XX*XXiVX*X*XX*XX*XV. i VXWX>JL
Male 2BR, 2 bath, dishwasher,
laundry facilities, commuter zone.
Near Law Complex. Pool, fully
carpeted, central heat air. $55 mo.
Ralph 373-2493. (B-3t-53-p)
Efficiency apartment available Dec.
11 thru spring quarter. Excellent
location for campus at 1829 NW 2nd
Ave. Telephone 373-2684.
(B-st-53-p)
2 acres of quietness on Lake Geneva.
25 miles to UF. 2 BR, partly furn.,
use of fishing boat. SSO. Couple or
family only. Phone 3786 630.
(B-3t-54-p)
Apartment for rent now! 2 blocks
from campus, one bedroom, all
electric kitchen, roommates or
married. Call: 378-8061, 372-1338
ev. (B-3t-51-p)
SUBLET Landmark apt. starting Jan.
Call 378-4592 from 10:00 a.rii. to
12:00 noon and night 7:00 p.m. to
11:00 p.m. 1 bedroom, beautifuly.
(B-3t-54-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt. no.
23-1001 SW 16 Ave. Complex has
laundry facilities and pool. Call
378-3552 after 5 or anytime on
weekends. (B-st-50-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try
Georgia Seagle Co-Op. 1002 W.
Univ. Ave. Installment plan
rm-meals $220/quarter. Some
financial aid available. 378-4341.
(B-st-35-p)
Sublet modern efficiency 10 minutes
walk to campus, great for single or
couple; quiet fun, 85 mo., phone
3 78-6988, available after finals.
(B-st-51-p)
Sub-let Village 34. 1 bedroom apt.
Available mid-Dec. Pets allowed.
Easy drive to campus. Call 372-6020
before noon or after 6:00 p.m. Dec.
rent paid. (B-7t-48-p)
Double room for male students. AC,
refrigerator. S9O per quarter each. 3
blocks from campus. 327 NW 15th
Terrace. 372-8929 after 1 p.m.
(B-st-51-p)
Tired of Roomates? Modern
efficency Apt. 2 blks. from campus.
Carpeted, A.C., S7O/mth. utilts.
included except elec. Call John
378-8489. XB-st-52-p)
Sublease 2 bedroom townhouse Mt.
Vernon Apts. Call 373-2500 or
376-4271. Unfinished $l9O.
(B-st-52-p)
QUIET, 5 min. from campus. Sublet
a new & large 2 bedrm. mobile home
until June lease expires. Furnished.
sllO/md. Call 373-2679. (B-st-52-p)
2 to 3 male roomates to rent house
located near Mall. Will be leaving in
March. Can Move in end Dec.
$125/mO. Call 378-6780 from 6 to 8
p.m. (B-3t-52-p)
Coed Must Sublet private room w/
kitchen. 2 blks. from campus.
Washer/dryer. S4O. mth. 378-4307
after 10 p.m. (B-4t-53-p)
Sub-let 2 bedroom apt. in Hawaiian
Village. Call for information after 4'.
373-1810. (B-3t-53-p)
Sublease 1 bdr. furnished apt. AC
and heat; four blocks from campus.
Call 376-8591 or come by 1935 NW
4 Ave. Apt. Lambda. (B-4t-51-p)

C" J;
.;.;.;.;.X-v.tX*X X :X*X"X4X-WXvX v^&
Need 2 groovy male roommates
immed. or starting winter quarter for
French Quarter apartment 93. can
Rick at 373-1403 nights or this
weekend. (C-3t-54-p)
Choice of three I need a coed
roommate for the rest of the year or
winter qtr. only OR need to sublet
one bedroom apt. Frederick Gardens
376-2909. (C-3t-54-p)
Roommate wanted: S4B a month
AC pool Call 378-4442.
(C-3t-54-p)
1 female roommate for Fr. Qtr.
poolside apt. for winter and spring
qtrs. Call Sue, Irene or Muff anytime
at 372-5246. (C-3t-54-p)
Female roommate to share 3
bedroom house NW section. Own
room. Central heat and air. Car
necessary. SSO month. 373-1027.
(C-2t-54-p)
One female roommate starting Jan. in
single Landmark apt. -no. 152.
Contact 376-3873. (C-3t-53-p)
Male Roommate needed for winter
quarter Village " Park apt. 6. Call
373-1530. (C-3t-54-p)
Need a ride to S.F., Cal. and back for
Xmas. Leave after Dec. 13. Must be
back in time for classes. Call Mike at
378-8688. (C-2t-54-p)
Male Roommate to share 2 bedroom
French Quarter Apt. 20 with two
students $54/mo. Call 376-0516.
(C-3t-54-p)
Female roommate needed. Three
blocks behind Grad. Lib. Own
bedroom S6O a month. Central AC &
H. Groovy neighborhood. Call
evenings 3786727. (C-3t-54-p)
One Male Roommate needed for
winter quarter. Landmark Apts. 167.
378-7142. (C-st-51-p)
7:00 & 11:30 |
N.W. 13th St. Ph. 372-9523
PLUS -" W |LD, W | LD PLANET"
Starring Tony Russell 9:45 ONLY

esss THURSDAY-SUNDAY I
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TRY
GATOR
advertisers
ARCHITECT
GRADUATE
Require part-time services
of graduate student strong
on imaginative design, to
work with developers of
unique garden condomini condominium
um condominium concept. Phone Stanley
Schrag, 378-2755.
iwil
2nd GREAT WEEK
(AT... Wnm| \
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FEATURE AT...
2:06 3:59 5:52
7:50 9:53



* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS

yytyMM WWW W W W V V v JB
WANTED 1
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share new four bedroom, two
bath Spanish style apartment just
off sorority row. Private bedroom,
carpeting, central heat and air, all
electric kitchen, pool and barbecue
grills. Reasonably priced, all
utilities furnished. Call June at
378-7224. (C-tfr47-c)
One female roommate needed by
January. Beautiful Williamsburg
Apt. with dishwasher, etc. Move
in anytime after finals. Call
372- (C-st-50-p)
Female roommate for winter
quarter. Private room La Mancha
Apts. Phone 376-6871. Apt. 3£.
(C-st-50-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
Landmark Apt. 173. Available Dec.
15th. Dec* rent free. 46.25/month.
Pool, A/C, gym, dishwasher, carpet.
Call 373-1475. (C-st-51-p)
COED ROOMMATE for wtr. and spr.
qtrs. 2 bdr. apt. 3 blocks from
campus sllO per qtr. Call
373- or come by 8395 SW 5
Ave. (C-st-51-p)
Wanted one male roommate for La
Mancha Apt. Must Sublease. Rent
$70.00 mon. util, included. Call
Wayne at 392-3608 before 5 p.m.
(C-3t-53-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Luxury and privacy at a price
YOU can afford! Four bedroom,
two bath townhouse with
carpeting, central heat and air,
Spanish decor, pool and barbecue
grills. Walk to campus. Phone
378-7224. (C-ts-47-c)
One male roomate wanted to share
nice Gatortown Apt. Starting in Jan.
$45/mO. + utilities. Call 376-3960.
(C-3t-52-p)
COED ROOMMATE one block from
Tigert. $43.50 per month. Call
378-0963 or come by 1210 SW 3rd
Ave. Apt. 8. (C-3t-54-p)
2 female roommates wanted for
Landmark Apt. 145. Move in right
after exams! Call 376-0207.
(C-3t-54-p)
Male roommate to share one
bedroom French Quarter apartment
beginning in January. The junior
premedical student wants a
non-smoker only. Rent is S7O per
month. Call 376-0428. (C-3t-54-p)
Wanted: 1 student driver to drive to
Pittsburgh in exchange for
transportation. Meals & lodging
furnished. For local and holiday
weekend. Call 392-1905 before 5
p.m. & 373-1632 after 6 p.m. for
personal interview. (C-st-53-p)
1 male roommate for modern 2
bdrm. apt. 3 blocks from campus.
Have your own pvt. bdrm. A/C +
heat. Quiet guy. $55 mo. Call
378-7933. (C-4t-53-p)
Female roommate wanted for
modern spacious University Gardens
apt. 1 bedroom, all electric, pool
facility. Call 373-1814 after 5.
(C-st-53-p)

Wierdo wanted!! 2 natural people
want 3rd to share large 2-br. Univ.
Gardens apt. Inexpensive and very
friendly. Call 373-1689; Coed only.
(C-3t-53-p)
Female roommate needed sublet La
Bonne Vie townhouse. Jan. to June
only $47.50 a month. Call after 5
p.m. 373-1228. (C-3t-53-p)
Female Roommate needed beginning
winter quarter. Landmark.
$46.25/mo. Call 373-2240 anytime.
(C-st-51-Dl

Albert Claus says : I
i If W a
\\ w M W
S?^f^P ALLIGATOR

ji WANTED 1
tov^vx*x*x*x%x*x*x*v.*.*x*x*:*xw***s
PARK 97. One Male
f} dent Roommate Needed.
$42.50/mo. 2 br. Poolside. Call
378-8697. (C-2t-53-p)
Male roommate wanted. La Bonne
Vie apts. Poolside $42.50 PM. Call
376-4859. Four roommates one
getting married. Next to Gatortown.
(C-3t*53-p)
Roommate getting married. Need
coed roommate for Winter Qtr. $lO9
Qtr. 2 bedroom, central AC + heat.
Starlight Apts. 3 blocks behind NRN
378-0365. (C-4t-53-p)
HELP WANTED §
Part time and full time work during
Dec. Wanted immediately students
must qualify for college work-study
program, apply immediately. Student
Aid Office, Rm. 23, Tigert.
(E-lt-53-p)
Graduate student mother needs help!
Live in or out. 2 children, 7 & 9.
Student applying must have
transportation, be available late
evenings. Phone
372- after 6:00 p.m. (E-st-51-p)
If you are interested in a challenging
position with varied duties and
responsibilities and are proficient in
the secretarial skills, we may have a
spot for you. Apply now! We will
give you 10-days paid training
beginning December 10. Call Mrs.
Mendoza 462-2499 at Alachua.
(E-4t-54-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. You'll be using
IBM's new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminole and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
;;>x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*>j
AUTOS |
v >
;*:.*.*.*:-x*x*:-:*:*;*>x*:*x:vx*:*x*x*x*x*r*x>w*:*>:*
VW *67 red with cream Inter. Easy
fun inexpensive transportation for
Christmas. Apt. no. 31 1716 NW
3rd Ave. Call 378-4532. (G-3t-54-p)
1965 Olds 442. Mags, radio, 4-speed,
needs brakes and tune. $750. Call
373- (G-2t-54-p)
911 PORSCHE 1966, good as an
S", beautiful, fast, long list of
options, would like to sell it this
week, $3,800. Fantastic, Call
376-0301. (G-2t-53-p)
'67 AH Sprite. Good condition runs
good. Michelin X tires, tonneau and
boot covers, radio and heater. Call
Steve 392-7431. (G-4t-53-p)
'6l Pontiac in good condition,
2-door, hard-top, auto, trans., radio,
heater, new plugs, runs real good.
$450. Call 378-5174. (G-st-51-p)
Alfa Romeo 1964 Spyder
white/new top, rebuilt engine,
excellent body. Must sacrifice for
school. &750.00 Dave Finlay
372-3824. (G-3t-52-p)
1965 Mustang, 2+2, V 289,
excellent condition, WSW, radio,
heater, console, must sell soon.
Call Jim Carter, 372-5703 or
392-0834. (G-st-50-p)

Thursday, December 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL |
*x*x*v.*.v.sv.*x*x*x*:*x*x*x*x*xv.*.*x*.
SSO REWARD for Information
leading to return of 1965 CBI6O
HONDA, Black, stolen from, SE
7th St. V.l. No. 1031740.
373-2915 evenings. (J-st-50-p)
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE a
craft shop leather: belts, vests,
watchbands brass: buckles, pipes,
earrings, necklaces lOB NW 7th St.
1000 ft. from the Circus open from
about 12 to 7 daily PAX. (J-3t-53-p)
APPY* HOUR ALL WEEK All
large premium drafts 20 cents. Ail
day all week Dec. 1 Dec. 6. THE
CHATTERBOX 4551 NW 6 St.
(J-4t-52-p)
All singles over 21! Friday Afternoon
Club meets this Friday at The
Lamplighter, 5:30 to 7:30. Doubles
65 cents; all other drinks 50 cents.
Last meeting this qtr. Plenty of
action before exams! (J-3t-53-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Landmark 118. Available Dec. 15.
Dec. rent free. $46.25/mo. Call
373-1518. (J-3t-54-p)
3 mos. Europe $450. Transportation,
food, shelter. Student organized.
Informal. June 17 Aug. 28. Call
Wende Snow after 5:30.
Hurry limited room. (J-3t-54-p)
WIN A ZENITH COLOR TV FROM
WUWU RADIO .. THE NEW
LEADER! NO PHONE CALLS, NO
QUESTIONS, NOTHING TO BUY.
JUST STOP BY OUR STUDIOS IN
THE MALL AND REGISTER. ITS
OUR CHRISTMAS PRESENT TO
YOU! (J-3t-54-c)
To My Sweetie, B.E.M. Good luck on
your finals. Remember, I love you a
whole bunch. Candy. (J-lt-54-p)
ITS GREAT to be GREEK! Winter
rush sign up through Dec. 5.
Panhellenic Office, 3rd floor Union
between 1-5 p.m. Mon. Frl.
(J-st-51-p)
Two coeds need a third roommate to
share their new 2 bedroom La Bonne
Vie apartment starting winter
quarter. Call 373-2446. (J-4t-53-p)
Cat Sitter wanted for Christmas
Holidays. Beautiful pay for taking
good care of beautiful kitten. Call
372-5109. (J-4t-53-p)
SINGLE MEN! Computer Dating is
fun. All dates with Gainesville
women. Most dates UF students. Get
your date list now. For questionnaire
write: Natlowide Dating Service, 177
10th St. N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-10t-53-p)
:w*-*nxx*x*x*x*wwx*x*x*x*x*:.www^
1 LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Spiral notebook with
Important class notes Romantic
and 17th century poetry. Please call
376-8720, 302-207 N.W. 17th St.
(L-lt-54-p)
LOST: A cameo ring in the restroom
of Little. If found, please return to
Hume Hall 255E or call 392-8584.
Reward Offered. (L-lt-54-p)

| EFFECTIVE j
| IMMEDIATELY
| NEW STUDENT PUBLICATIONS |
j PHONE NUMBERS j
I EDITORIAL
j 392-1686,87,88,89 j
I ADVERTISING, BUSINESS, I
j OPERATIONS, SEMINOLE |
I FLORIDA QUARTERLY j
| 392-1681, 82,83, 84 j
I CIRCULATION j
j 392-1619 |

Page 17

:<:x*x*:*sx*>x*r*x.s*'.s*xyxsx*:*x*:*:<*x*x*:.v.s*;v
| LOST & FOUND |
* A ' V
:Nx*x*x*x*x*x*x*x*:*x.;.x.sv.v.vx*x*x*x*x*:*X
A black wallet Nov. 30 at College Inn
or Fletcher parking lot, keep money.
Reward offered. If found call
378-5984 ask for Dan Hall.
(L-3t-53-p)
LOST A brown McGregor overcoat
Sun. night (Nov. 30) In the men's
room second floor of the College
Library. If found please call Kirk
Hubbard at (39)2-9559. No questions
asked. (L-2t-53-p)
, C4eWVVia.99BB9OOBOO>OOSaBBtiT">KWOOO<^
SERVICES |
S taWQWWWWWWWW;iir *;*XXX*X*X*
Loving care fun and meals for your
child. Start January prof, wife would
like companions for daughter age 4.
Prefer girls $12.50 wk. Call
378-0166. (M-2t-53-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested, repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-46-c)

MORBISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
FRIED CHICKEN
All You Caro To Eat / / y
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce -y
Choice of Potato / GAINESVILLE MALL
rnzmm

{iiinwi^iii>iiiiiiiiiywQwwc<
SCR VICES I
RWftWepPlElWVi?i?gi{ltiiT|>l!lllH|lin
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thpsis and dissertation copies and
cohating. Call for prices.' Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Tennis racket restringing. Free
pickup and delivery M&R Tennis
Services. 378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1126%
N.W. Bth Street. Cost estimates
depend on garment structure. Prices
not given over phone. 376-8506.
(M-st-52-p)
MIKE FLYNNS M.S.S. WAX
SYSTEM. Simonize Paste Wax your
car in 30 min. NO WAITING.
Guaranteed 6 full months! Special
Student Rates $6.95 others slightly
higher. NOBLES Atlantic Station,
1410 S.W. 13th. Phone 378-0593.
(M-3t-54-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-45-ts-c)

SERVICES

y-



I, The Florid* Alligator, Thursday, December 4,1989

Page 18

T"CoWee of choice w/$5.00 or more purchote Bj
PRICES GOOD ALL WEEK-DEC. 4-10 can mv m^r
SKBeHIans ... ,5/i. TOMKRIB .4/M.
GREEN PEAS 7/M. UMA BEANS 4/M.
GREEN PEAS 5/M. GREENTBEANS ... .4/M.
JB SPINACH 5/M. treORN 7/M.
7 mwmm 4/m. mrnrnm .... 5/m.
Quantity Rights Rasarvad-Pricas Good Wad. Noon Thru Wad. Noon
WINN-DIXIE STOMES. INC t -COPYMONT-IMf
l-i. THRIFTYMAID V ~
CHEK LO CAL ASSORTED SOFT Tomato Sauce 10/ $ 1.
____ _
B Noodle, Mushroom or
Imllf C * 8/sl
tff 18l Tuna 3/ $ l. f 1
Pineapple .... 5/*l.
MS No R.turn g^^nl
I b f x^Bi^ajj^ii^/
GOOD Tly. Nty Bdy., & %B I Bl A- J %
Bars .... 3/ $ l. 1 U I I J
Prestige Bread 29 £ OK WlglirW
Din. Rolls ... 2/39 c JHI
I DIXIE DARLING
Danish Rings. .2/M.
Limit loF choice w/15.00 or more purchate excluding cigarettes
BLUE WHITE # COLD WATER W N
GIANT BOX W B
KINGSIZEBIZPBESOAK Mi 20c OFF
DETek6eNT T i 97 c Mi Kt r?!,... .w.s I lil\Whl n MM LOHNGES 69" PAPER TOWELS 4/*l. SC6TCH"'NNE ,'"."! 14 m
130 N.W. 6TH ST. 1401 N. MAIN ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS
OPEN ON SUNDAY

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WED. NOON THRU WED. NOON
l| USOA CHOICIWHOLK TRIMMIO
WSm" KiWa!^F 9P BBr 20-25-LB. AVG. PR*
I CUT INTO ROASTS
I ib.%# JP
TOP R(^N^
SHIbER SfEAK 98 SWISS STEAK ITr .M .M---tiFsTEAr;;:
--tiFsTEAr;;: .M---tiFsTEAr;;: ;:. *r porterhouse :.. *r
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WINN-OOOi STORES. INC.-COmMMMMt PP
A U.S. No. 1 REGULAR
potatoes IQi
I I p^y uss T B^j IG hh
ipi
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F IHP/ ORANGE JUKE.... 6£i 1 FANCY CORN 8 59' JUICY PEARS 11 ... 98'
POTATOES 5 A 69' BRAISES 5 £ 39' RED GRAPES 4 99*
COFFEE RICH .... 39' iSWKADOS 4 . l" (MANGE JUICE .... 4 ... *1"
BfISRWW.7.Tf *i N XpFles "srs** 6Kapefruit 5 &49*
MARGARINE 39 c veXlparmagian.. a99* bagappies *.&m wamm,,.....a s9*
TOPPING _39' tfStKEN IN-A-BASKET .. *1" thriftymaid -auplavors -auplavorsE--;::JI?E5r.:::E
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OPfN ON SUNDAY

"USDA
CHOICE'

TW VAujf STAMPS
jf two n*. OH "A'
WMOUOtCUTOE
FRESH FRYERS
OOOOTWUMC M
.r'A-

"MT V'.
Ifnijf
ONE Ml.
' 0 WHITE THICK
: KST sliced bacon
t MjttaH OOOOTHtU OEC. 10 |
No. 25 .. icn I
: BggSw t 11l vri mi

.^w^jgmuinmnmiM
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ONE ME. OOMOtE
K!mSmL usda choice BONELESS
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MWMniSji^Bri

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'351 <£2* BSSf RIBS
'lfey OOOOTHtU OfC. 10
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Thunday, Dacambar 4, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator, I

\M4 t WwExrirmiAk I
; PIM TOP VALUE STAMPS \
*
TWO NO. JH CAMS
TMMTTT MAIO
I RKT# BARTLETT REARS
20 * eC >o
4

lift
Ib
*"* i> >.'jcgLii i

Page 19



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, December 4,1969

Page 20

ON POLITICAL PROTESTS
Agnew Hits Press For I Ricochet Rhetoric

WASHINGTON (UPI) Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew said
Wednesday that hard-headed
political protests by an
outspoken minority has shut
off rational two-way discussion
of Americas problems.
That refusal to approach an
issue with an open mind, that
refusal to entertain a spirit of
compromise that is what is
building barriers between the
young and the not-so-young,
between an outspoked minority
and a soft-spoken majority,

Personal Income Tax Exemption Up SIOO

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate
voted Wednesday to cut everyones
taxes by increasing the S6OO income tax
personal exemption to S7OO next year
and to SBOO in 1971.
The plan sponsored by Sen. Albert
Gore, D-Tenn., and vigorously opposed
by the Nixon administration as
undermining its campaign against
inflation, was approved after senators

ONeil Confirmation Stall Talk
Is Tar-Fetched Says Sen. Pope

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Sen. Verie Pope
branded Wednesday as far-fetched talk that
confirmation of Transportation Secretary Michael
ONeil is being stalled as a lever to get Gov. Claude
Kirk to reveal membership records of the
Governors Club.
But Pope admitted that it will probably be
Monday or Tuesday before his Transportation
takes a final vote on its
recommendation.
He said, Several members have asked that action
be delayed because they want to settle some things
in their own minds first.
He refused to say who the senators are, but Sen.
Dick Fincher, D-Miami, a close, personal friend and
godchild of the Miami business executive, was the
only one who voted to take up the matter during a
committee meeting Tuesday.

Song My Board Hears Medina

WASHINGTON (UPI) Capt.
Ernest A. Medina, commander
of the Army company involved
in the Song My slayings, was
summoned Wednesday to testify
today before a Pentagon board
formed to investigate the
incident.
Medina is now at Fort
Benning, Ga., and has not been
charged in the case. The
commander of one of his
companys platoons, Ist Lt.
William L. Calley Jr., has been
charged in the death of 109
South Vietnamese civilians at
Song My on March 16,1968.
Medina was directed to appear

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- V.-.
' >:
Agnew said.
That is the barrier we must
begin to dismantle from both
rides.
The vice president said those

first turned down two Republican
proposals.
Rejected 72 to 23 was an amendment
by Sen. Charles H. Percy, R-111., to raise
the exemption to $750 over a three-year
period. Also turned down, by a 70-25
vote, was a plan by Sen. Jack Miller,
R-lowa, that woidd have granted a tax
cut of $l5O over a three-year period for

before a board headed by Lt.
Gen. William R. Peers, which
was formed to look into the
adequacy of the original Army
investigation of what happened
at Song My. The Peers
investigation is being held
behind closed doors at the
Pentagon.
Medina has retained the
prominent Boston criminal
lawyer, F. Lee Bailey, as his
attorney. Bailey will accompany
Medina to the hearing today.
The Pentagon made public
names of witnesses heard by the
Peers group Wednesday but gave
no indication of what

Confirmations that are not acted upon in the
session following appointment amount to automatic
rejection, and the governor could not teappoint
ONeil.
The main opponent to confirmation of ONeil,
whose family controls the huge General Tire &
Rubber Co., is Sen. Lee Weissenborn, Miami
Democrat, who told UPI in an interview that I will
fight confirmation in committee, on the floor and
from the top of the Capitol if necessary.
He noted that ONeils company sold tires to the
Turnpike Authority while ONeil was a member of
the authority, and that he contradicated himself by
telling one committee he never solicited money for
Kirk funds although he had mentioned the
Governors Club and war on crime debt to
inquirers.

who oppose his recent criticisms
of antiwar demonstrators and
news coverage by the press and
television are engaged in a
ricochet rhetoric when
people do not respond to what is
said, but to what other people
say you meant.
With President Nixon sitting
in the front row, Agnew
renewed his attack against those
who protest against the
administrations policy of
gradual withdrawal from
Vietnam.

connection they might have had
with the case. The witnesses,
with only last names given, were
identified as Maj. McKnight, Lt.
Col. Blackledge, Maj. Calhoun,
Capt. Kotauc and CWO
Thompson o
The Peers investigation is
being conducted separately from
the Armys probe of the over-all
Song My affair. Under orders to
determine why no report of the
alleged massacre was made and
why no disciplinary action was
taken, the board will attempt to
determine whether there was
cover-up.

each taxpayer and his dependents.
President Nixon is against cutting
taxes by the device of increasing the
personal exemption, which has stood at
the S6OO level since 1948.
But Gore put together a coalition of
liberals and conservatives to get through
his proposal which is understood as
Gore put it by every mother in
America. The vote was 58 to 37.

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Lower prices eTrained technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
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Call 454-1488 Toll Free
MARY QUANT comes to GAINESVILLE I
You know who Mary Quant is, the girl from Chelsea, London.
The girl who changed the face of fashion. Now she makes
make-up. Terrific, toned-down now make-up. To give you a face
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____ A Mary Quant make up
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to show you how to get
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BONUS: a valuable
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I T with any cosmetic -- I
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It America were to cut and
run, he said, we would be
cutting the chances for peace
and running out on the children
in shcool today who would have
to fight a war tomorrow...
Agnew, who shook hands
with Nixon after his speech, said
the outspoken minority was
engaged in politics of protest,
and he listed these Ten
Commandments of Protest:
Thou shalt not allow thy
opponent to speak; thou shalt
not set forth a program of thine

own; thou shalt not trust
anybody over 30; thou shalt not
honor thy father or thy mother;
thou shalt not heed the lessons
of history; thou shalt not write
anything longer than a slogan;
thou shalt not present a
negotiable demand; thou shalt
not accept any establishment
idea; thou shalt not revere any
but totalitarian heroes; thou
shalt not ask for forgiveness for
thy transgressions, rather thy
shalt demand amnesty for
them.

The Gore plan would cost the
government about $3.3 billion in lost
tax collections next year and about
twice that amount in 1971.
It also would grant special tax relief
for 12 million poor and near-poor
taxpayers, eliminating the burden of
federal income taxes for 5 million of
them.



r we care j
GRADE 'A' FRESH FLA'. OR GA. LEG OR BREAST
FRYER LB Q 6 BIMMi
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Thursday, December 4,1960, The Florida Alifator, I

Page 21



!, The Florida ANiptor, Thuraday, December 4,1969

Page 22

W. Germany Tells NATO Os Draft Cut Plans

BRUSSELS (UPI) West
Germany told the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO) today it is considering
cutting its 18-month military
service period. But it pledged to
fulfill its 1970 commitments to
the Western alliance.
West German Defense
Minister Helmut Schmidt said
Bonn's contribution to NATO
will remain at 460,000 men.
He said a West German
armored regiment and an
airborne brigade will be Created
to compensate for the planned
withdrawal of 5,000 Canadian
troops from Germany while a
West German Starfighter
squadron will replace one of the
squadrons Canada will return
home.
The allied defense ministers
met in the shadow of a Moscow
Communist summit meeting in
Moscow to discuss, among other
issues, Western nuclear reply to
any Soviet bloc attack on
Europe.
Sitting first as NATOs
nuclear defense affairs
committee, the meeting agreftl
to increase from seven to eipit
the membership of the inner
nuclear planning group for 18
months. Permanent members
will be the United States,
Britain, West Germany and Italy.
Non-permanent members
include Canada, the Netherlands,
Norway, Greece and Turkey.
This group will share the eight
seats and attend alternate
meetings.
Schmidt told the council that
reduction of the current
18-month draft service had
become an urgent internal
political necessity in West
Germany.
Most NATO members already
have cut their draft periods to
less than 18 months. Some like
Britain had abolished it entirely.
The United States still had two
years but has just introduced a
draft lottery.
Schmidt assured the ministers
West Germnay will carry out its
1970 defense commitments and
thus make a major contribution
to the military balance between
East and West in Europe.
The defense ministers meeting
opened a three-day conference
of NATO defense, foreign and
finance ministers held annually
to review present NATO policies
and determine new ones.
This time the Soviet Union
and its Warsaw Pact allies were
holding a simultaneous summit
meeting in Moscow. Many
Western diplomats saw it as
deliberately timed to coincide
with the NATO meeting and
designed to rob the Brussels
conference of some of its
publicity.
The Western defense ministers
met to approve so-called nuclear
guidelines on circumstances in
which the West would use
nuclear weapons against an
attack on Europe by
conventional Communist forces.
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1970 UNCHANGED HOWEVER



The
Florida |
Alligator |
t

'Alices Restaurant 1
By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Reviewer
A generous blending of fact and fiction and the talents of Arlo
Guthrie make Alices Restaurant now playing at the Plaza Theatre,
a movie of unexpected meaning.
After seeing Easy Rider you may be tempted to go to see this
movie to get a few laughs. Forget it.
No story of life, human actions and feelings could be more serious
in content. When you laugh in Alices Restaurant its with a tear in
your eye.
The movie opens with young Arlo Guthrie, played by himself,
being declared elibible for the draft. Guthrie decides he is college
material and heads out to Rocky Mountain College. Everything would
be fine but he is a hippie, long haired perversion in the minds of the
more intelligent portion of the American population. So he gets
hassled in a local pizza parlor by the wests version of our own
red-necks.
Guthrie again decides that he just cant cut college so he hitches it
back to New York. Here Guthrie exhibits his beautifully sarcastic wit
which gives the movie its light allusion. But underneath the grim
humor runs a current of intolerance for what is different that makes
the story of Alices Restaurant personally applicable in the life of any
member of a minority.
Once back, Guthrie visits his hopelessly ill father Woody, played by
Joseph Boley. Woody Guthrie while he was alive was a noted folk
singer.
One thing to keep in mind while viewing Alices Restaurant is
that the story is mostly true and that many of the actors are replaying
the roles they had in a real life happening. This gives the movie life
and a believableness that many found hard to accept in Easy Rider
about existence as a hippie.
Now the story of Alices Restaurant really begins. The central
point of the movie is the recounting of Guthries famed misadventure
with a load of garbage in Stockbrikge, Mass. He recounted it in a song
about the incident, Alice's Restaurant Massacree.
From New York Guthrie goes to Stockbridge to visit two old
friends, Alice and Ray Brock, played by Pat Quinn and James
Broderick. When he arrives he finds that they have just taken over a
deconsecrated church.
A place to be at last, as Brock later puts it.
Kids come from all over to live peacefully in the church and help
Alice fix up her famed restaurant, Where you can get anything you
want, as Guthrie sings.
Alice and Ray are two beautiful heads who care about their kids as
they express it. Alice is a mother, a friend and a lover to those in her
house. She comes across as liberated but moral within her own social
framework.
As the story continues, big hearted Ray invites a few friends up
to the church for Thanksgiving dinner. Guthrie and his friend Roger,
Geoff Outlaw, being considerate people volunteer to take out the
garbage. That was their first mistake. They loaded up Guthries VW
microbus and headed for the city dump. Who would have thought
that it would have been closed for Thanksgiving?
So they go looking for some place to dump the load and find a
place where other garbage had previously been dumped.
Unfortunately a public minded couple witnessed the foul act and
reported the deed to officer Obie, played by Officer William
Obanheim, himself.
These ensuing scenes are full of grins and represent the lightest
side of Alices story
Comparing Alice's Restaurant with Easy Rider would be
unfair to both movies. While they each tell a hippie story Easy
Rider is a fictionalization of life. Alices Restaurant is a real life
account. The techniques employed in the filming of this movie are
nothing out of the ordinary and the dialogue is just everyday stuff.
But its just this commonplace style that makes the story of Alice and
Ray Brock a beautiful, appealing and vital one.

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THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
QUICK-WAY COPY CENTER (QUICK-SAVE)
1620 w. university (univ. plaza) 372-74^6^

ARLO GUTHRIE AND HIS GIRLFRIEND
... produce the music for Alice's wedding

Sigma Pi
Meeting
Scheduled
By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Corrapondant
The first organizational
meeting for the Sigma Pi social
fraternity, one of three recently
given the go-ahead from the
Interfraternity Council to
colonize, will be at 9 a.m.
Saturday at the Reitz Union.
Interested students are urged to
attend.
James Ver Plank, who has had
several years of organizational
work with the national
headquarters and now heads the
fraternity's Pinellas County
planning board, will be the
featured speaker.
The UF chapter of Sigma Pi is
the first to be created in Florida.
There are 104 chapters
nationally.
Foremost among the
fraternitys objectives are to help
needy people in the community
and contribute to community
betterment.
John Richards, 3AS, who is
working to recruit members, said
qualifications for membership
are an acceptable grade point
average, willingness to work for
the fraternity and an interest in
community affairs.
Campus adviser for the group
is Dr. George C. Osborn. While
on the University of Indiana
faculty in 1932, he was
instrumental in forming Sigma Pi
and substituting help week for
hell week.
Richards said Tuesday Sigma
Pi has nine or ten prospective
members. Osborn said there are
about seven Sigma Pi alumni on
campus and a few more in the
Gainesville community.

a T" "" ' "" "" i
**** #*T h- c
TEDREMLEY
Entertainment Editor

Thursday, Da camber 4,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

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Page 23



Page 24

I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Oaoambar 4.1969

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WHO SAYS?
Someone affiliated with the Florida Players. This sign is posted
above a door backstage in the Constans Theatre adjacent to the Reitz
Union. Sets are constructed for Players' performances in this area.
SLATED THIS WEEKEND
Millhopper Fair
Has Prominent Art
By MAGGIE COE
Assistant Entertainment Editor
The Millhopper School is sponsoring its Third Annual Professional
Arts and Crafts Bazaar, Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday
from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Art objects on sale have been contributed by UF professors,
students and other local professional artists.
Featured will be pottery, paintings, collages, silk screens, batiks,
wood cuts, stained glass, enamel and silver jewelry plus many more
types of art work.
All money received from the sales and from a 50 cent donation fee
will go toward scholarships for needy nursery school children so that
they can attend the school.
We didn't want this to be just another middle-class school," said
Mrs. Myra Schulkind, one of the coordinators of the Bazaar. We
wanted all economic levels to attend the school and we knew that we
would have to raise money so we started the bazaar."
She went on to explain that the school was started three years ago
as a co-operative effort of mothers in the community to have good,
available education for their pre-schoolers. Each parent is required to
work at the school one day a month along with the paid teachers,"
she said.
The scholarships are not just token, Mrs. Schulkind explained.
The school has about eight scholarship students now.
Millhopper School is an integrated school. Most of the needy
students are black," she said.
The school has been in existence for three years and each year it
has provided a place for artists to show their wares around Christmas
time. Approximately 30 artists are setting up booths this year, said
Mrs. Ann Nuerenberger, a co-ordinator of the bazaar and one of the
artists on display.
Among the prominent UF personnel that have given their work to
the bazaar are Dr. Robert Carson and Walter Marinetti of the
Humanities Department and William Osborne and Mary Smith from
the Reitz Union staff.

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Together
Lead your own life.
Enjoy it.
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r

If ****** W .jO* Viin"
rnmmfm l
No Color Equipment Production
Blocks National Transmission

Affiliate stations of the National Educational
Television network soon will be able to provide
viewers with more programming, both in quality
and quantity, predicts Dr. Kenneth A. Christiansen,
director of WUFT-TV (Channel 5) at the UF.
Christiansen is one of the four incorporators of
the newly formed Public Broadcasting System Inc.
He said the non-profit corporation represents a
major move in the expansion of programming for
national educational television stations, many of
which cannot operate seven days a week due to the
lack of enough quality programming."
Authorization of S2O million in operating funds
for 1970 and $45 million in educational facility
funds for 1970-72 for the PBS was approved by
President Nixon recently. Christiansen said Congress
is expected to act on appropriating the funds in
early January.
WUFT-TV has produced two programs dealing
with- religion and life which were distributed
nationally on the NET network, but further local
production for the network will be impossible due
to the lack of original color production equipment,
Christiansen said.
Both programs produced earlier were in black and
white, but all NET production is now in color. We
have the facilities to record color from elsewhere
and to transmit it to our nine-county area, but we
do not have the facilities here for live color
programming, he said.
Christiansen estimated that SIOO,OOO from the

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Florida Legislature and a SIOO,OOO federal matching
grant would be necessary for WTJFT-TV to produce
its own color programming.
Christiansen will act as liaison between the NET
Affiliates Council and the PBS,
In addition to programming responsibilities, the
broadcasting system will investigate the feasibility
of satellite transmission of NET programming,
future funding of educational television and the
development of an interconnecting NET network.
A major priority will be the funding of color
production facilities in areas where they do not now
exist, but it is impossible to tell when, and if, this
might include any of the'educational affiliates in
Florida, Christiansen said.
Currently, Jacksonvilles WJCT-TV is the only
educational station in the state with color
production facilities, but it is not producing any
network color programming.
At the UF, the opportunities for the development
of national programming are great, Christiansen
said.
We have both the human and informational
resources here. The laboratory of the University is
an exciting place and the functions the University
serve in generating new information and objects
have the potential for both human and economic
gain through television, he explained.
Expolitation of this opportunity must wait,
however, until we are capable of producing for the
national audience.



The
Florida
Alligator

IQ APED WITH DEPTH
Tankers Ready For Opener
By Alligator Services

Floridas swimming team opens its 1969-70
season with six 1969 prep All-Americans on its
roster in hopes of capturing the Southeastern
Conference title and gaining national honors.
Florida had one of its finest recruiting years last
season as the Gators signed six of the top swimmers
in the nation. The Gators also have six 1969 NCAA
All-Americans along with their prize
newcomers.
The Gators build their attack around four seniors,
seven juniors, three sophomores and 14 eager
freshmen.
Returning to the Florida lineup of All-Americans
will be Bruce Williams, Mark McKee, Steve Macri,
Jimmy Perkins, Bill Strate and Steve Hairston.
Heading the list of All-Americans are McKee and
Williams. McKee is known as the complete swimmer
and was All-American in two events last season. He
also holds many conference records. Florida has had
15 All-Americans honored 25 times in swimming
since 1951.
The prep All-Americans include Gary Chelosky, a
breaststroker from Claymont, Del.; Greg Hardee, a
freestyler from Jacksonville; Kevin Kierstead, a
freestyler from Oreland, Pa.; Steve McDonnell, a
butterflyer from Colombia, Mo.; Pete Orschiedt, a
freestyler from Baltimore, Md., and John Plemons, a
breaststroker from Winter Haven.
We have tremendous talent and with hard work
and top efforts, this team may go a long way, said
Gator coach Bill Harlan, who has guided Florida to
a 56-18 dual meet record and six conference crowns
in seven years. We are hoping to be in the top five
at the NCAA meet this season.
Harlan takes his young squad on the road early
this year meeting Georgia in Athens on Friday and
journeying to Alabama on Saturday. The SEC meet
is set for Mar. 5-7 in Athens and the NCAA will be
held in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Mar. 26-28.

Steve Tannen On Sporting News
Annual All-American Ist Team

ST. LOUIS (UPI) The
Gators Steve Tannen
Wednesday was named to the
Sporting News 36th Annual
All-American football team.
Tannen was one of three
defensive comerbacks chosen for
the all senior team.
Heisman Trophy winner Steve
Owens was named college
footballs Player Os The Year by
the Sporting News.
Owens headed the weekly
newspapers Annual All-America
team, picked from nominations
by the directors of player
personnel of teams in the
National Football League and
American Football League.
Bob Anderson of Colorado
was picked as the other running
back, and Mike Phipps of Purdue
is the quarterback.
Receivers on the team are
split end Ken Burroughs of
CHRISTMAS
VESPERS
DECEMBER 7
7:30 P.M.
Baptist
Student
Center
1604 W. University Ave.
Students, faculty, Friends,
everyone welcome

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STEVE TANNEN
... another honor
Texas Southern, tight end Steve
Zabel of Oklahoma and flanker
Walker Gillette of Richmond.
The offensive line is center
Ken Mendenhall of Oklahoma,
guards Ron Saul of Michigan

MIIMIIHMMIMIMHIWIMMMIMIHHNNC
| Fishi & Chicks j
| THURSDAY SPECIAL i
| HAMBURGER BOX j
| french fries & LARGE COKE ]
i 69t j

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BRUCE WILLIAMS
... top Gator tanker

State and Mike Carroll of
Missouri and tackles Sid Smith
of Southern California and Bill
McKay of Texas.
The defensive team has Bob
McCoy of Notre Dame and Mike
Reid of Penn State at the tackles
and A1 Cowlings of Southern
California and Phil Olsen of
Utah State at the ends.
John Small of the Citadel is
the middle linebacker, and
outside linebackers are Steve
Kiner of Tennessee and Don
Parish of Stanford,
A tie in the voting resulted in
the selection of three
comerbacks, Tannen of Florida,
Tim Foley of Purdue and Jack
Tatum of Ohio State. Safeties
are Glenn Cannon of Mississippi
and Ted Provost of Ohio State.
The punter is Zenon
Andrusyshyn of UCLA, and the
placekicker is Bob Jacobs of
Wyoming.

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Thursday, December 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Pre-Gator Plans
Set For Bowl

Final practice and pre-game
plans were announced
Wednesday for the Gators clash
with Tennessee in the Gator
Bowl game Dec. 27 in
Jacksonville by Head Coach Ray
Graves
The Gators will hold light
workouts Friday and Saturday
this week, knock off all but
informal sessions during the final
examination period of Dec.
8-16, and start heavy work in
Daytona Beach Dec. 18.
Floridas training
headquarters at Daytona Beach
will be the Desert Inn Motel.
Graves plans to keep the Gators
at this site until Christmas Day,
Dec. 25, then go to Jacksonville.
Florida will practice twice in
Jacksonville prior to their Dec.
27 meeting with Southeastern
Conference champion
Tennessee. The Florida-Vol clash
begins at noon.

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CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

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LET
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Page 25



Page 26

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TOM PURUIS
... gets tip-off

Surprising Gators
Bounce Back Big
By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
In a surprising about-face, the Gators shot down big East Tennessee
State 6849 after being completely out-played the night before in
falling to Morehead State 82-73 in Jacksonvilles Sunshine Classic:
One Jacksonville sports editor described the Gator squad as
Floridas weakest team in a decade, after seeing the Gators bounced
all over the court by the smaller Kentuckians.
To say the least it angered the Gator players to remark who is that
guy. Especially after the Gators completely out-defensed the East
Tennessee team and out-shot them in the second half.
In one span during the second half the Gator defense kept the East
Tennessee players from getting any short easy baskets and the Florida
offense racked up 17 points before East Tennessee could score again.
Coach Tommy Bartlett said he made only a few defensive and
offensive changes after the first game loss.
Bartlett said I think just getting a game under our belts and letting
our new boys get some experience made the big difference between
the two games. Experience really counts.
They came back real good, Bartlett said. The boys were real
upset after our first game. They really wanted to win this one.
Captain Andy Owens wanted it so bad he pumped in 26 points and
grabbed 18 rebounds and was elected to the Sunshine Classic
all-tournament team.
Owens was the only Gator to make the team, which included
7-foot-2 Art Gilmore and Rex Morgan of Jacksonville University, Jim
Day of Morehead State and East Tennessees Mike Kretzer.
The Gators next game is in the cold mid-west as the cagers meet a
strong Northwestern squad on Saturday at Evanston, 111. WRUF will
carry the game starting at 8:30 pan. with Otis Boggs doing the
play-by-play.

THE SWINGS
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Hr -flj
HOOVER THE MOVER Photos by Phil Cope
... gets Gators going

feEM HONOR SYSTEM HONOR SYSTEM HONOR SYSTEM HONO
fn
§ Certificate of pfegaritg
§ Know All Men By These Presents That E
I s
5 _____ o
ui 5
J- Having Met and Satisfied the Requirements of the THIRSTY
y GATOR as to her Fitness and Qualifications for the Title.
f/) is Hereby Acclaimed a Itftryy
CC and is Entitled to all the Rights. Honors and Privileges *<
O Thereto Appertaining, including the Right to Bullyrag CO
Z THOSE OF THE SAME SEX NOT AWARDED THIS CERTIFICATE. J
O m
Witness the Seal of the Establishment and the Signa- 2
X ture of its Duly Authorized Officer Hereunto Affixed. 7
! JUSL i
| This Coupon and a brick HlfVf lfe fl£|MP
| will get you a permanent lOiAvil |
h Virgin's Card and a g
£ f your eho,c# 633 NW 13th ST. \
2WATCH GATOR CLASSIFIED FOR VIRGINS
X HONOH toiSASaD^waiSAfradNOHW3-19AS aONOH^

>H HHrHr
x x. JH9 1
W Case: .
jHHnal
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IB f iTa i
kKV; HP2j£S&
R vW H
EARL FINDLEY
... fires away

BLOW YOUR MIND
to the Kinetic Sounds
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TONIGHT
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n | n VLsassaaji
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Colors and patterns to complement
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ANDY OWENS
... all-tourney player



Wrestiing-Rules Os The SEC Sport

By ALAN HAYNES
Alligator Correspondent
Take a man off the street.
Say hes in fair condition, knows
a little about wrestling. Id give
him about one and a half
minutes in the ring before hes
worn out.
Keith Tennant, coach of the
UF wrestling team, said he looks
for conditioning first in a
wrestler. Aggressiveness comes
next, with skill ranking only
third.
Skill can be taught,
Tennant said, but in the high
speeds you have in amateur
wrestling, conditioning is the
essential factor.
Agility and balance are more
important than brute strength.
Leverage is important, he said.
Weight is not a factor since
classes are divided into eight
weight classifications.
The object is not to maim
your opponent, as you would
UF Gets New
Bowl Pants
ALEXANDER CITY, Ala.
(UPI) The machines are
humming over at the mill,
whipping up brand new
uniforms on rush orders from 17
bowl-bound college football
teams.
But if there are any colorful
surprises in store for live
television audiences during the
upcoming bowl games, Sam
Bradshaw of Russell Mills is
keeping it top secret.
Well make the deadline, he
said. Thats all I can say.
Among teams his firm is
outfitting are Texas, Southern
California, Mississippi, Florida,
Tennessee, Auburn, Houston,
Alabama, Georgia, Nebraska,
South Carolina, and West
Virginia.
UF Sports Information
assistant director Richard
Giannini said the Gators were
having new pants made, but that
they will be the same as the old
ones. We just need new pants,
he said, because the old ones
wore out.

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suppose is the case in pro
wrestling, or to force him into
submission. It is to pin both of
his shoulders for one second, or
to outscore him in points.
A key word is alternatives.
Mental agility, the ability to
think of several possible moves
to use, is essential if you want to
win. This, said Tennant, is called
chain wrestling. It consists of

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UPS TENNANT TELLS HOW

making a series of manuevers to
score a pin or gain some sort of
advantage.
It is a matter of sensing
where your opponent is,
Tennant said. To learn this, the
wrestlers go through a rather
strange drill.
One wrestler is blindfolded,
the other is not. This aids the
blindfolded wrestler in knowing

where his opponent is without
looking. While groping and
grappling in the dark the
wrestler also gains a keener sense
of balance.
A match is divided into three
rounds, the first lasting two
minutes, the second lasting
three. A wrestler can score a
win by fall or a win by
decision, or the match can be a
draw.
Tennant, 27, smiled as he
spoke slowly and easily with a
heavy southern accent. He is
stocky, muscular, with black
hair and sideburns.
Wrestling is a more personal
competitive sport, Tennant
said. You either win or lose as
an individual. Mistakes are
costly. If a wrestler is
outmanuevered, it is harder for
him to come back than it is for a
guard who misses a block.
Wrestling is one of the few
places that a smaller person can
get involved in athletics. Where
else can a 118 pounder find a
contact sport to compete in?
This is the first year that UF
has competed on a varsity or
Southeastern Conference level.
This has changed the attitude of
the wrestlers, Tennant said.
They now seem to be able to
find more time to devote to the

Thursday, Doaambar 4,1950, Th Florida AlNtator, I

sport. More are coming out, too.

sport. More are coming out, too.
All UF wrestlers are
non-scholarship. They come
out because they love the
sport, Tennant said.
Wrestling is one of the fastest
growing sports in America. The
growth of the sport in Florida in
the past few years has been
phenomenal, Tennant said.
Tennant, who says he is not
an ardent professional wrestling
fan, reached to get a letter. It
was from Don Curtis, chairman
of the state chapter of the
Amateur Wrestling Association.
Curtis was at one time one of
the most highly ranked
professional wrestlers in the
country.
Curtis has done much to
promote amateur wrestling in
the state,said Tennant. Don is a
good friend of mine. He is
sincerely interested in helping
boys who want to wrestle.
Tennant received his BA. and
MA. from the UF in physical
education. He is currently doing
post-graduate work.
Tennant is at present the only
wrestling coach at UF. In
addition to coaching the 20-man
team, he teaches wrestling for
the physical education
department.

Page 27



Page 28

I, The Florida Adaptor, Thursday, Dacsmbar 4,1968

GATOR BOWL OPPONENT

UT Has Good Sophs Too

KNOXVILLE The selection
of three Tennessee players to the
Football News* sophomore
All-America team calls attention
to the fact that the Vols have
quite a corps of rookies.
Fullback Curt Watson,
linebacker Jackie Walker and
offensive tackles Joe Balthrop
were awarded spots on the
Football News team of the best
first-year performers in
collegiate football.
DOUG DICKEY
... has impressive sophs

Alabamas Bear Bryant Blames
Self For Tides Sorry Season

ATLANTA (UPI) Bear
Bryant, stung by a 64 season
and two straight bowl losses,
says Alabamas visit to the
Liberty Bowl is not going to be
a fun trip.
The Crimson Tide, which
posted its worst record in more
than a decade, returns to the
practice field Wednesday to start
preparations for its Dec. 13
meeting with Colorado at
Memphis.
We look to the Liberty Bowl
as a chance for our seniors to
redeem themselves, Bryant
said. We dont consider the
game a reward but an
opportunity.
This will be Bryants 16th
bowl game as a head coach
three with Kentucky, one with
Texas A & M and 12 straight
with Alabama. But he hasnt
been a winner since the 1967
Sugan Bowl and thats
beginning to gall him.
Last year, after a 35-10 loss to
Missouri in the Gator Bowl,
He buys it
...she
loves it.
S3OO Less than Volkswagen
DATSUN
Drive a Datsun... then decide at:
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Ur versus
Tennessee

We feel this has been an
unusually good group of
sophomores, Coach Doug
Dickey said. 'Three of them,
Watson, Walker and Balthrop,
have moved in as regulars and
done outstanding jobs.
We havent had sophomores
play bigger roles on a Tennessee
team since 1965 when Bob
Johnson, John Boynton, Charlie
Fulton and Dewey Warren had
such outstanding seasons.
Watson has been one of the
best running backs in the
Southeast Conference, Dickey
continued. Walker stepped in
and has done a fine job along
with our two great senior
linebackers (Steve Kiner and
Jack Reynolds). Balthrop has
been one of our most consistent
players in the offensive line and
a number of other sophomores
have made substantial

Bryant made it clear that if
Alabama got invited to another
bowl our preparations will be
different.
Bryant, a gentleman of the
old school who seldom berates
his players publicly, nearly
always blames himself when
Alabama plays poorly. He aid
after last years Gator Bowl, just
as he did after last Saturdays
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contributions to our football
team.
Watson, a 210-pounder from
CroKvflle, Tenn., has gained 692
yards in eight games and was
named the Back of the Week in
the South after the Georgia
game, in which he broke file
school single game rushing
record with 197 yards. He
missed most of the Mississippi
game and the Vols dash with
Kentucky because of a thigh
bruise.
Walker, a Knoxville Fulton
High School product, has made
quite an impression in his rookie
season despite a relatively small
stature (190). He broke into the
lineup so well, in fact, that
instead of people saying
Tennessee has the best pair of
linebackers in the country in
Kiner and Reynolds, they now
say the Vols have the best trio.

loss to Auburn:
I did a poor job of coaching;
I didnt prepare the team
properly.
He doesnt come right out and
say it, but one is given the
impression that if things go
wrong in the Liberty Bowl, it
wont be for the lack of
preparation.

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Owens Leads
Scoring Race

NEW YORK (UPI) Heisman
Trophy winner Steve Owens of
Oklahoma is on the verge of
achieving a rare double in major
college football winning the
individual scoring title and the
ball-carrying crown.
Owens, who completed his
season last Saturday against
Oklahoma State, has 138 points
in 10 games according to the
next-to-last weekly NCAA
statistical report made Tuesday.
He also has bulled his way for
1,523 yards rushing.
The only player with a chance
of catching Owens in the scoring
race is BiD Burnett of Arkansas
who has one game left against
Texas. Burnett has 114 points
and would need four
touchdowns to tie Owens.
Cornells Ed Marinaro, who has
also completed his season, is
second in rushing with 1,409
yards.
Dennis Shaw of bowl-bound
San Diego State nailed down the
total offense leadership with
3,186 yards. Floridas John
Reaves has 2,852 yards.
Reaves, the sensational
sophomore for the Gators,
completed 222 passes in 396
attempts for 2,896 yards and 24
touchdowns.
Jerry Hendren of Idaho led
the pass receivers with 95
receptions for 1,452 yards and
12 touchdowns. Other individual
leaders were Bob Jacobs of
Wyoming in kick soaring (76),
Chris Farasopolous of Brigham
Young in punt returns (527
yards), Stan Brown of Purdue in
kickoff returns (698 yards) and

JOHN REAVES
... offensive runner-up
Seth Miller of Arizona State in
interceptions (11).
In team statistics, San, Diego
State set the pace in scoring with
an average of 46.4 points a game
and top-ranked Texas led in
rushing offense with an average
of 376.2 per game.
Toledo led in total defense
with an average yield of 209.1
yards and Louisiana State was
the rushing defense leader with
an average yield of 38.4 yards.
In defense against scoring,
Arkansas set the pace with an
average of 6.8 points, followed
bv Penn State with 8.7.