Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Ka&t
AH Ameiim

Vol. 62, No. SO

WONT REAPPORTION
Senate Votes Against
Constitutional Changes

See Editorial Page 8
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate voted 114-70 Tuesday
afternoon against a predominantly elective senate,
throwing out the constitution committees proposed
reapportionment amendments to the UF
Constitution.
The amendments, calling for an increase in the
number of elective faculty members from 50 to 200
and providing for 10 voting student members, were
the result of nearly a years study by the committee.
The senate will continue to consist of all full
professors, 50 elective members, ex officio members
(deans and UF administrative council members) and
five non-voting student members.
I understand this vote does not mean the senate
opposes all change, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said. It is very important to express to
the committee what is on your minds and exactly
what changes should be made.
The committee is entitled to some direction as
to where to go now, OConnell said, for the
lengthy reapportionment study and resulting
amendments are the result of a resolution which
came from the senate itself.
The senate voted to give the committee a poll of
what changes are wanted at the next scheduled
meeting on Dec. 3.

Supreme Court Denies
Restraining Order Request

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court
Tuesday denied the request of
the American Civil Liberties
Union (ACLU) for a restraining
order against UFs loyalty oath.
When Justice Hugo Black
denied the request for an
emergency infunction last
Wednesday, the ACLU decided
to take the case to Justice
William 0. Douglas.
Douglas referred the case to
the whole court Tuesday. There

Conduct Committee Finds Rossis Innocent

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Not guilty was the only choice the Student
Conduct Committee could make concerning the
charge that UF students Judy and David Rossi had
publicly used profanity on Oct. 10.
This was the position of a brilliant defense and
two defendents who kept fighting even when it
appeared that during the early hours of the hearing
their defense might be squashed but it wasnt, and
they won.
The conclusion to the 10-hour ordeal came at
2:05 ajn. Tuesday when Dr. Henry Fenn,
committee chairman, judiciously stated, The
committee has reached a decision. The vote in both
cases is not guilty.
About 150 spectators in a gallery which had held
more than 400 earlier in the hearing, applauded the
committees decision.
Mrs. Kay Ellis, a third year law student,
spearheaded a defense that included catng Campus

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY.-

was no reason given for their
denial, Norma Munn, chairman
of the local chapter of the
ACLU, said.
However, the fact that the
court turned down the
restraining order doesnt reflect
on the merits of the case. It only
means they dont consider it an
emergency, Mrs. Munn said.
She said there is nothing more
which can be done to secure a
restraining order.
However, the ACLU still has
several possibilities open to them

A motion to reconsider the senates vote against
an elective body was defeated 67-114.
Os the 50 elected members of the senate, 31 were
present. Five administrative council members were
present and approximately 150 full professors.
Professors should not be told they are being put
in the top rank both professionally and
financially, but when it comes to policy were
going to let you take your chances with the
rookies, Physical Education Professor B.K. Stevens
said.
It is hard to believe professors think so little of
their colleagues, education Professor Hal Lewis
said. To say a university should be ruled by an
oligarchy is to take our stand in the middle ages.
Ray Fahien, speaking for the Gainesville Chapter
of the American Association of University
Professors (AAUP) said the group was not
completely satisfied with the amendments but we
feel they have done a good job .
Many senators argued that an elective senate
would become too political.
Executive Vice President Linton E. Grinter said
he has had experience with an elective senate and
the elections, with slogans and placards.
Because the senate voted against the proposed
amendments, the tentatively scheduled meeting for
Dec. 1 has been canceled.

IN PROFANITY CHARGE

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PHIL COPE
THE DEFENDENTS ARE HAPPY
V ... David and Judy Rossi won their case
V,W, ...... ....

University of Florida, Gainesville

in the loyalty oath issue.
Mrs. Munn said the ACLU will
appeal the Connell decision. The
appeal will be questioning the
constitutionality of the entire
oath.
The portions of the oath
which require personnel to swear
they are not members of the
Communist party or of any
organization which advocates
the overthrow of the
government were eliminated in
the case involving an Orange
(SEE 'COURT' PAGE 3)

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RANDY BASSETT
THEY MARCHED FOR LINCOLN
Students at Lincoln High School boycotted classes Tuesday to
march in protest of the phasing out of their school. They marched
through the UF campus and to the Board of Public Instruction, where
they had a frustrating confrontation with Supt of Schools William S.
Talbot. See stories page 2.

INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS will be
guests of local families
for Thanksgiving... page 3
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 14
FSU News 6
Letters 9
Movies 14
Small Society 6
Sports 18

Wednesday, November 26, 1969

Minister Dan Beardsley to testify as an expert
witness on profanity.
Beardsley said he could not say the words
allegedly spoken by the Rossis were profane when
speaking of profanity in the religious tradition.
The committee recessed for 20 minutes to decide
whether or not the words were profane in nature. It
was an early set back for the defense when the
committee ruled the words did constitute profanity.
However, it wasnt long before the defense won
an emotional victory when Mrs. Marcia Heighton, a
secretary in the office where part of the alleged
offenses occurred, spoke out in defense of the
actions of Mrs. Rossi who reportedly interfered with
the actions of police officers.
If my husband had been in the same situation, I
would have acted the same way.
Following the testimony by Mrs. Heighton, the
committee chairman recessed the hearing from 8 to
9 p.m.
Following the recess, Officers Eugene Gladin Jr
(SEE COMMITTEE* PAGE 3)

_^Cq~o9 S.
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V/SKy
MISs^X

Maybe with exams to
worry about they'll forget
all about me.



!. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969

Page 2

Blacks Rally To

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer

They marched all morning.
All afternoon they waited. And
Gainesvilles black community
rallied to keep Lincoln High
School an academic center.
Talbot came. And the
confrontation ended in
frustration.
Such is the summary of events
Tuesday as an estimated 500
Lincoln students and their
parents gathered outside the
Alachua County school board
administration building to
protest changing the areas
largest all-black school to a
vc itional center.
llbot is school Supt. William
S. Tiny Talbot. On him was
placed the burden for the
boards decision to phase-out
Lincoln.
He finally came late in the
afternoon after attending a
conference in Tampa. Waiting
for him was a weary and restless
crowd, anxious with pent-up
emotions.
What resulted was a protest of
black power slogans against what
students called a
white-controlled and dominated
school board and communitys
feelings.
As Talbot drove in, escorted
by Gainesville police all the way,
and strode up too bullhorn mike
provided by Police Capt,
Courtney Roberts, he was met
with jeers and chants.
Amidst sporadic interruptions
Talbot said the phase-out
decision was based on findings
of a planning committee, and
could not be altered because
bond issue last year specifically
allocated funds for a vocational
school at Lincoln.
His comments, which came as
answers to questions from the
crowd, were taken with disbelief
and anger.
We were bom black and
want to stay black, and Lincoln
should stay black, shouted one
student.
Were alienated in our own
community, we dont want that,
cried an older woman, almost
in tears.
Apparently the protest goes
deeper than just the superficial
anxiety over the Lincoln
phase-out. It seems to concern a
deep-rooted hostility between
Gainesvilles long-segregated
white and black communities.
Student Tickets
Still Available
Student tickets for the Gator
Bowl Classic on Dec. 27 will go
on sale again Monday and
Tuesday, Dec. 1-2, from 9 a.m.
to 4:30 pm.
There are still 1,075 student
tickets remaining according to
Ray Dorman, ticket manager.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
* giWlhJp flic, within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears!*! he Floridfs wfll not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insef&iflgf A advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
V for correction before the next insertion.

Interpretive
I
ej £
In a long statement, Don Cue,
17, a Lincoln senior and student
body assistant business manager,
said The black community is in
an uproar. Black youth demand
that some of our black citizens
run for the school board in the
next elections.
The five-member board is
all-white.
The only school board
member present at Tuesdays
confrontation, W.F. Bill
Enneking, a UF professor of
surgery explained the phase-out
decision was made because a
study showed half of Alachua
Countys high school students
don't go on to college. This
showed us a vocational school
was needed, he told the crowd.
Enneking further explained
Lincoln was chosen as the best
school for the vocational center.
He did not say why, but stated
that present desegregation plans
are drawn up including Lincoln
as a vocational school.
In their questions to Talbot
and Enneking, many protestors
expressed fear that although
black former Lincoln students
would be bussed to
now-predominatly white schools
in other areas, many others
would continue at the ex-high
school as vocational trainees.
Whether real or imagined,
these feelings represent a fear
that the school board is trying to
prevent blacks from taking
advantage of an
academically-oriented
curriculum.
The fears are maintained
because blacks feel they are
alienated and are not
represented in decision-making
which directly affects them.
Because blacks live closer to
Lincoln and are unwilling and
are sometimes unable to attend a
more-distant almost all-white
school, they would be more
prone to continue at Lincoln, so
the argument goes.
Blacks apparently feel this is
precisely understood by the
school board, the phase-out is
seen as a plot to keep them from
attaining a higher status in the
community,
#
A member of the crowd asked
Talbot, Why not build a

WAIT ENDS IN FRUSTRATION

Keep Lincoln Academic

vocational school instead of
changing Lincoln?
He answered the public voted
that way by approving the bond
issue, The crowd booed and
mocked his answer.
What further solidifies blacks
feelings is that the school board
did not name the countys new
hjgh school Lincoln, but instead,
over black protests, named it
Lakewood.
The board earlier in the year
had resolved to retain the name
Lincoln when a new school was
built.
As it stands now, Talbot told
the crowd, Lincoln will keep its
name, trophies and traditions,
but it will not be a senior high
school.
The question was raised, why
was Lincoln, and not another
school such as Gainesville High

IL p Jj M
m V J T Wm
RANDY BASSETT
IT WAS A BLACK-WHITE CONFRONTATION
... between Lincoln High School students, left, and Supt. William Talbot
Students March To Protest
Phasing-out Lincoln High

By LINDA DYER
Alligator Correspondent
About 1,200 Lincoln High School students
marched through the UF campus Tuesday morning
protesting the phasing-out of LHS.
We thought that by coming here we could get a
little support, said Charles William Griffin Jr., a
LHS senior.
UF was included on the parade route at the
suggestion of two UF students.
LHS graduate Stanley Williams, IUC, said, I
openly suggested to the leaders of LHS that they go
on strike because Alachua County School Board
would lose about $5.25 per day for each student.
David Freeman, IUC, and Williams made the
suggestion to LHS Student Council President
William Murray after a student rally Monday night.
If we stay out long enough well hurt Talbots
(Superintendent of Schools) pocket, said Senior
Class Vice President Wayne Mosley.
Roads were barracaded leading into LHS and
buses of students unloaded off-campus to begin the
march.
Os the 1,274 students enrolled, approximately 50
showed for classes, according to LHS Assistant
Principal I.H. Cassey.
Cassey, who knew nothing of the march before it

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School chosen? Neither Talbot
nor Enneking attempted an
answer. Their silence brought
shouts of anger.
But, black businessman
Charles Chesnut earlier in the
day may have answered for
them.
The white community
wouldnt stand for the phasing
out of GHS, he said.
His charge was lent support
by a white GHS junior, Joe
Boyd, 16, attending Lincoln on
an exchange program.
A new school could be made
a vocational center a whole lot
easier than Lincoln could, he
said.
Boyd and Yvonne Best, 16, a
GHS senior, also a white
exchange student, said they
decided to march with their
black fellow students when they

The Bikini
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Maybe you can start
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started, said teachers were holding classes as
scheduled.
Whether the students come to school is the
parents responsibility, said Cassey.
He and other administrators were following the
march on the radio.
I imagine as long as our student body marches,
they will remain orderly unless someone from the
outside gets in, Cassey said.
Several UF black students were strong supporters
of the march.
We need something like this to show the
students are together, said Cheryl Rap Brown,
lUC.
Amazed at the large turnout, she added, If we
ever need a revolution, we know where to go.
Williams, who helped coordinate the march, had
three sisters and two brothers among the mostly red
and white clad protestors.
When I have children, I want to look back on
Lincoln and say I graduated from that school, he
said.
Donald Dixon, 3HP, heard rumors of a march but
did not believe that so many would participate.
I think it is the best way to get anything done.
They are going to build new high schools when they
update Lincoln and save money and controversy-

saw everyone else was doing so
When asked what she would
so if Lincoln is finally phased
out, one Lincoln student replied
Dont ask me that. Lincoln
isnt going to be phased-out.
She emphasized her point
Talbots a crook,
Another Lincoln student said
I dont really know where well
go. Were all getting together and
were not going anywhere.
The crowd broke up after a
heavy rain began falling. Wayne
Mosley, senior class vice
president and a strong
spokesman on the bullhorn all
day, gave them no satisfaction.
Apparently the confrontation
is not over. Mosley said students
would boycott the school again
today and plan another march,
this time to the Gainesville Mall
where he said the protest will
reach more of the public.



International Gators Spice
Local Turkey Day Dinners

Exotic seasoning will add a
touch of worldly spice to the
cranberries and turkey
drumsticks for many local
families during Thursdays
pilgrim feast.
UFs international students
will provide the additional
flavor, as guests of many
churches, organizations and
families in the greater Gainesville
area.
A program sponsored by the
Gainesville Council of
International Friendship enables
foreign students here to share in
Thanksgiving and Christmas
festivities.
The organization, strictly
volunteer, works in cooperation
with Col. Glenn Farris, foreign
student advisor at the
University.
Mrs. Charles Sarle, chairman
of the home hospitality
committee of the council, said

Committees'Only Choice
Finds Rossis Innocent

PA6E OWE
and Kenneth Overstreet of the University Police
Department were asked to testify as to the alleged
conduct of the Rossis.
At this point in the hearing, it became obvious
that contradictions in testimony were being
recorded especially when Mrs. Rossi took the
witness stand and gave her rendition of what
happened.
Mrs. Rossi said she and her husband had been
leafing the campus or distributing pamphlets
concerning the Oct. 15 moratorium.
David said, Tor once in my life Ill go up to a
police officer and be nice to him.
Rossi handed Gladin a leaflet. The leaflet fell to
the officers lap. He stood up and it fell to the
ground, she said.
This action conflicts with Officer Gladins
testimony which stated that the leaflet was
stuffed in his arms.
At this time, Mrs. Rosa said her husband walked
off toward Anderson Hall and into the building
when Gladin yelled, Hey you! Hey boy!
Officer Gladin said he addressed Rossi with the
term sir when he asked him to stop another
conflict.
Mrs. Rossi testified that after the leaflet dropped
to the ground, Officer Gladin told her husband to
go back and pick it up, and if he didnt, the officer
threatened to arrest him.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Rossi said she had already
picked the leaflet up but the officer insisted that her
husband would have to do it.
By this time Rossi was listening to the officer and
said, This is ridiculous, and walked off, Mrs. Rossi
said.
After the officer had followed Rossi into the
building and brought him back down the stairs, Mrs.
Rossi said her husband asked the officers what he

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recently that more international
students will participate in the
program this year than ever
before.
About 60 students are
expected to receive personal
invitations Thursday.
According to Farris, another
32 students have received
advanced invitations from
friends or professors. There are
about 550 foreign students
not including 378 Cubans on
campus whose permanent

Offices Closed For Holiday
Smell the turkey and dread the finals ... that's the picture at UF
Thanksgiving week. All offices will be closed and classes dismissed
Thursday and Friday for the holidays.
Classes will end for the fall quarter Dec. 8 with examinations
beginning Dec. 10. All grades are due in the Registrars Office by noon
Dec. 18. Commencement is scheduled for Dec. 20.
Only a skeleton staff will maintain minimum operation of such
University facilities as the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the
Campus Police Department during the holiday recess.

should do with his books.
The officer indicated by actions and words that
he wanted to frisk Rossi, at which time Rossi raised
his arms in the air and Overstreet knocked his books
out of his hands so that they fell all over the
ground.
David was shoved up against the wall. They
handcuffed our hands behind our backs. Overstreet
kept pushing me. I almost fell. Overstreet kept
saying that he hadnt arrested us because my
husband has a beard and I have long hair.
At this point in the hearing, Mrs. Rossi was asked
if she had used the words which were used in the
charge.
She denied having used th<. words but said that
the words were those of the police officers. I dont
use those types of words.
The closing statements in the hearing were
presented by Mrs. Ellis and co-advisor Lou Talley, a
first quarter law student. David West, a local lawyer
and representing the prosecution but also able to
advise a defendent according to regulations, refused
the privilege of presenting closing remarks.
Mrs. Ellis said the arrest grew out of a
misunderstanding between the Rossis and the
arresting officers.
She said public profanity does not occur when a
stone mason drops a brick on his toe. This was that
type of incident.
Also, Mrs. Ellis pointed out the fact that the
officers were not familiar with the student code of
conduct and should be properly informed of the
regulations contained in the code.
Lou Tally pointed out the many contradictions in
the testimonies and said the defense has the
strongest case.
He said the police were involved in a genuine
but misguided attempt to carry out their duties.
Following the closing statements, the committee
recessed for 45 minutes, after which time, they
returned the verdict of not guilty.

residence is outside the United
States. The others either eat
with roomates or prefer staying
home because of academic work.
The paramount task of
finding hosts belongs to Mrs.
Sarle.
Anyone from the
community may host an
international student, says Mrs.
Sarle.
This years response has Mrs.
Sarle working extra hard to find
hosts for all the students.

Wednesday, November 26,1966, The Florida Alligator,

| Supreme Court |
| Denies Appeal I
i |
ffROM PAGE ONgJ
S County teacher, Stella Connell. s
55 However, it will take three to six months to get the appeal
| before the Supreme Court, Mrs. Munn said. g
g The university personnel department told Assistant Law &
: :5 Professor Leroy Lambom signed oaths would have to be turned g
s;i by S p.m. today. Department chairmen will be asked to fire §
anyone who refuses, Mrs. Munn said.
*5 However, she said November paychecks will be issued g
55 whether or not an oath is received. s:'
x Mrs. Muiin said she knows of at least two people who are not
*5 going to sign the oath. g
*5 Director of University Personnel Robert A. Button said an g
§ inventory of the number of employes who do not sign the oath %
§ will be available at 10 ajn. today. s:j
The personnel office has most of the oaths, but about 40 $;
are outstanding, he said. 5?
However, these may be outstanding because of reasons other >5
5: than refusal to sign, Button said. is
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Page 3



, Tlw Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1966

Page 4

f Destroy All Germ Weapon Stockpiles

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon announced
Tuesday the United States was
renouncing biological warfare,
even in retaliation for an enemy
attack, and ordered the Defense
Department to destroy its germ
weapon stockpiles.
Mankind already carries in
its own hands too many of the
seeds of its own destruction,
said Nixon, who declared that
U.S. biological research will now
be restricted to protective
measures, such as immunization.
As for chemical warfare, the
President reaffirmed
long-standing U.S. policy against
the first use of lethal chemical

Rocks And Solar System Secrets
Locked In Houston Quarantine

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) The first batch of
Apollo 12 moon rocks and soil,
precious stuff containing secrets
of the solar system, arrives at
Houston Tuesday locked in
quarantine and under guard.
Touchdown of the Air Force
cargo jet dubbed Moonrock
One, carrying the first of two
silvery lunar rock boxes, was
expected at Ellington Air Force
base near the space center
almost a day to the minute after
Apollo 12*s Pacific Ocean
splashdown.
A sheriffs escort waited to
speed the rock box, sealed inside
a germ-proof government
quarantine container and in a
white space agency van, to the
lunar laboratory at the space
center where Apollo 12s pilots
also will be isolated when they
arrive in Houston Nov. 29.
A second airplane carrying the
other box of lunar treasures
gathered by Charles Pete
Conrad and Alan L. Bean during
two moonwalks was to reach
Houston late Tuesday or early
Wednesday, the space agency
said.
Corad, Bean and Richard F.
Gordon, whose flight was the
first expedition for true
scientific exploration of another
world, were relaxing in a
trailer-like quarantine van
aboard the USS Hornet, the ship
that {ducked them out of the
South Pacific Monday after
splashdown.
The quarantine of the crew
and the moon rocks is a measure
designed to protect the earth

Stfonal
Sale
Dm. 2(3
11a.m. to
9 p.m.
Reitz Union
Ballroom,^,

litfii
iMpil
weapons, such as nerve or
mustard gas, in warfare.
And he extended this policy
to permit only retaliatory use of
chemical agents which merely
incapacitate.
Nixon exempted tear gas and
chemical defoliants, which are
used in the Vietnam War, as well
as riot-control agents, officials
said.

against any possible harm from
moon germs that might have
existed in the dusty, cratered
area where Apollo 12 landed
with pinpoint precision
Wednesday.
The three moon pilots were
reported in excellent health after
their long, thrilling voyage.
But Bean had several stitches
in a half-inch cut above his right
eyebrow, received when a movie
camera broke loose during the
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NIXON ORDERS DEFENSE PEPARTMjNJ

The United States is
abandoning germ warfare as an
initiative toward peace, he told
newsmen after conferring with
congressional leaders, including
members of the House and
Senate Foreign Relations and
Armed Services committees.
Biological weapons have
massive, unpredictable and
potentially uncontrollable
consequences, he said. They
may produce global epidemics
and impair the health of future
generations.
The President said he would
submit to the Senate the Geneva
Protocol of 1925, which he said

splashdown impact and
slammed into him, and all three
had minor skin irritation from
biomedical sensors worn during
the 10-day, half-million mile
voyage.

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prohibits first use in war of
asphyxiating, poisonous or other
gases and of bacteriological
methods of warfare.
The United States and Japan
are the only major natiorts in the
world which have not ratified
the treaty. More than 80
nations, including the Soviet

Trial Training SKp Okayed,
Must Meet Strict Conditions
WASHINGTON (UPI) Transportation Secretary John A. Volpe
Tuesday tentatively approved a one-year trial operation of a training
strip in south Florida provided local officials meet strict conditions
intended to safeguard the nearby Everglades National Park.
Volpe outlined these conditions: Insure against interfering with the
park water supply; prevent use of insecticides in the area; zone to
prevent any residential or business development in the area.
I doubt if the conditions can be met, Rep. J. Herbert Burke,
R-Fla., told reporters after a conference between Volpe, Florida
congressmen, and representatives of the Dade County government.
I think the ultimate result is they will get together with Dade
County and have a better working arrangement so conditions can
either be met or the training strip moved to another site. >
Volpe was expected to make a formal announcement after holding
a followup conference with congressmen in the early afternoon.

Union and Communist China
have adhered to it.
The treatys language actually
bans all use of gas and germ
warfare, not merely first use of
such weapons, although many
signatory nations reserved the
right to retaliate if attacked with
these weapons.



_ u,. wifi ,cj\ i9afr<*vovi
DISTRIBUTED DAY AFTER ALLEGED MASSACRE
Army Publication Reported 128 Downed

QUANG NGAI, South
Vietnam (UPI) An official
U.S. Army publication
distributed the day after the
alleged massacre at Song My
reported 128 enemy killed there
in an American attack supported
by artillery and helicopters, it
was learned Tuesday.
The newsletter of the U.S.

Weather Prevents US, Viet
From Returning Communist Fire

SAIGON (UPI) Communist
gunners fired scores of mortar,
rocket and recoilless rifle shells
into the Bu Prang Green Beret
camp Tuesday in hazy weather
which prevented American and
South Vietnamese planes from
striking back at the gun sites.
At least two of the defenders
were killed and 11 wounded in
the three attacks on the isolated
outpost along the Cambodian
border 112 miles northeast of
Saigon.
One American artilleryman
was killed and five others
wounded when 82mm mortar
shells struck their position just
after dawn, military sources said.
Bu Prang and a sister Green
Beret outpost at Due Lap nine
miles away have been under
siege since Nov. 1.

Mississippi Guilty Os Federal Fund Misuse
In Needy Children Educational Money

WASHINGTON (UPI) The U.S. Office of
Education Tuesday accused the state of Mississippi
of misuse of federal funds intended for needy
children.
The money, the office said was used to further
racial discrimination.
The conclusion is -that, there were wide
disparities in the state of Mississippis educational
system in an agency report said.
Five improper practices were cited:
Supplanting state and local funds with the
federal funds provided by a section of the
elementary and secondary education act.
Excessive use of these funds for construction.
Use of the funds to maintain racial and social
isolation of children.
Use of the funds in areas without heavy

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Americal Division made no
mention of civilian casualties
and reported the attack as a
mission against a Viet Cong
stronghold.
Jungle warriors (the Uth
Light Infantry Brigade) together
with artillery and helicopter
support hit the village of My Lai
early yesterday, March 16,1968,

UPI photographer Dennis
Cook, reporting from Bu Prang
Tuesday, said U.S. and South
Vietnamese pilots were able to
fly only five air strikes during
the day because of bad weather.
Those helicopters able to land
came under recoilless rifle fire,
he said.
South Vietnamese military
spokesmen said government

concentrations of poor children.
Use of the funds to serve the general needs of
schools rather than the special needs of children.
The Mississippi Department of Education has
taken a number of steps to assure compliance with
the basic title I requirements,* the report added.
The $1.12 billion federal program is aimed at atimproving
improving atimproving the education of Americas most deprived
children.
Mississippi schools received $38,716,873 in title!
funds during the 1967*68 school year and spent an
estimated $28,647,694 last year. The state is still
receiving money through the program.
U.S. Education Commissioner James E. Allen, Jr.,
set a Sept, 1970 deadline for the state to meet
federal spending regulations with the implied threat
of cutting off the funds.

morning,* the newsletter said*
Contacts throughout the
morning and early afternoon
resulted in 128 enemy killed, 13
suspects detained and three
weapons captured.
My Lai is a hamlet in Song My
village.
The newsletter did not
mention names and made no

troops killed 20 North
Vietnamese soldiers Monday in a
tight due east of Bu Prang which
cost the Saigon force six killed
and 15 wounded.
But the spokesmen said 109
other bodies were found on the
battlefield, most of them North
Vietnamese regulars killed in
artillery barrages on Sunday.
Elsewhere, U 5. Ist Air
Cavalry Division troops
operating 65 to 75 miles north
of Saigon Monday reported
killing 46 Communist soldiers in
four actions.
Most were killed by gunships,
artillery bombardment and
bombing runs, spokesmen said.
The only reported U.S.
casualty was an American
helicopter crewman wounded by
groundfire, officials said.

reference to Ist Lt. William L.
CaOey, die 26-year*okl platoon
leader who has been charged
with murdering 109 civilians in
the village.
Calley, of Miami, Fla., and
Waynesville, N.C., is being held
for a general court martial at Ft.
Benning, Ga.
Another edition of the
mimeographed, one-page
newsletter said the attack on
Song My was part of a larger

|Nixon To Host Special Dinner |
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon will fly to his vacation
home at Key Biscayne, Fla. late Thanksgiving Day for a weekend with
his family, the White House said Tuesday.
The President and Mis. Nixon wfl eat Thanksgiving dinner in the
White House with 200 elderly dtiaaa tan the Wellington area. The
dinner is scheduled at 1 pjn. EST.
The family will leave for Florida tan! 5 pan. and is expected to
return to Washington late Sunday
Nixon is expected to spend nta if *v* tae in Florida working on
the 1971 budget that he wfll pNMnt in January.
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mission known as Operation
Muscatine.
It said six Viet Cong were
killed in the area March 17 as
troops from Task Force Barker
pushed through rice field around
Quang Ngai City, eight miles
from Song My.
The Aug. 1, 1968, edition of
the America] Division weekly
newspaper, The Southern Cross,
said two battles were fought
near Song My.

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969
'***

Davis Named SDX VP
H.G. Buddy Davis, UF professor of journalism, has been
elected vice president for campus affairs in the national Sigma
Delta Chi (SDX) journalism society.
Davis responsibilities will include guidance and advice to
student chapters and service on the board of directors for the
society.
The organization is composed of 101 professional chapters
across the nation and 105 student chapters.
Davis has served as faculty adviser to UFs student SDX
chapter for 13 years. He teaches newswriting, public opinion
and senior seminar in the College of Journalism and
Communications. He has been at UF since 1954.

LARGEST CLASS EVER

Florida Blue Key Taps 43

Florida Blue Key tapping for
the fall 1969 quarter took place
this past weekend. Jay Scheck
and Bruce Bokor, of the tapping
committee, said this is the
largest Blue Key class.
This class consisted of Roger
Lloyd Blackburn, Homecomiiig;
Thomas Blackmon, Student
Government; Bruce Gordon
Bradbum, Orientation; Ronald
Wayne Brown, Student
Government; Thomas Miles
Clark, Homecoming; David
Richard Doucette, Alligator;
William Allen Evans, Law
Review.
Jeffery Mai Fenster, Accent
69; H. Robert Fogle,
Orientation; Robert B. Glenn,
Student Government; Alan
Graham Greer, Honor Court
(Moot Court); Bruce M. Harlan,
Union; R. Michael Hembree,
Homecoming; Richard Allen
Horder, IFC; Thomas V.
Infantino, student politics;
David Leon Jackson,
Homecoming; Robert D. Jones,
Homecoming; David Eugene
Kaplan, Athletic Association.
James Walter Kersey,
Homecoming; Herbert Langford
Jr., Homecoming; Robert Craig
Lawrence, Honor Court; Ernie
T. Litz, Alligator; John F.
McPhail 111, Military (ROTC);
Griffith Ross McSwine 111,
Homecoming; Kenneth Paul
Mingledorf, Homecoming.
William R. Modlin, Student
Government: James Shelton
Moody Jr., Seminole; John M.

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Parker, Course and Teacher
Evaluation.
Sergio Daniel Ponce,
Homecoming; Grover C.
Robinson 111, IFC and Athletic
Association; Joseph George Sahl,
Student Government; Joseph
James Scafuti Jr., IFC and
Athletic Association; Gary L.
Self, Student Government;
Steven Olson Tannen, athletics;
Michael Carl Taylor,

news
STAFF FSU Comptroller George Fortin will seek a three-month
delay in implementing pay schedule changes by the Board of Regents.
The change which would effect 758 staff workers would require
that an employe work for a two-week period and then receive a check
for that period two weeks later. Implementation of the change now
would result in the delay or withholding of two weeks pay.
CAMPUS SECURITY The disarming of campus security officers
will be discussed by a five-member campus security advisory
committee recently named by Student Body President Canter Brown
and Student Body Vice President Wayne Rubinas.
HEW FSU black students aired their grievances to a review team
from the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare Monday
morning. In an open meeting held to determine if FSU is complying
with the 1964 Civil Rights Act, members of the FSU black
community and international students were present to discuss their
problems with the team.
SORORITIES Student Senator Chuck Sherman and Kick
Johnson who have requested the right to review sorority constitutions
from files of the Office of Student Activities will have to go directly
to the sororities, Mrs. June Dugger reaffirmed her refusal to allow the
two senators and Jack Whitley, Student Body President Canter
Browns nominee for university ombudsman, access to the
constitutions.
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Homecoming; Jeffery Wayne
Warren, Student Government.
Robert C. Wattles, Student
Government; Jeffery Thomas
Weil, Accent 69; Gerald Joseph
Yakatan, Student Government;
Robert Lewis Moore,
Homecoming; Kenneth C.
Howell, student politics; Jim
Bowen Thagard, Homecoming
and Thomas Edward Wade,
outstanding engineering student.

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Course Stresses Latin American Involvement

Students acting as delegates from
Latin American countries will discuss
such issues as freedom of the press and
insurgence in Latin America in a mock
assembly of the Organization of
American States (OAS).
It will all happen in a new course
offered next quarter by the history
department under the direction of Prof.
German Tjarks, who will act as
moderator of the assembly.
I want students to get involved in

BSU Confronts FTU President
For Two Black History Courses

Six black students met with the president of
Florida Technological University Friday and asked
that black history courses be established at the
university.
The students led by. Dan Slatter, were
representatives of the Black Student Union. They
urged that two upper division black history courses
be started at the University in the Spring quarter,
and taught by a black professor.
FTU President Charles Millican said he would do
everything in his power to get the courses started.
There are approximately 25 black students
presently attending FTU.
The students asked that the courses one 300
level and one 400 level cover black history from

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Latin American problems, Tjarks said,
its the best way to teach this course.
The course (Hy 599 for
undergraduates and Hy 630 for graduate
students) will meet once a week for
three hours. Meeting will be conducted
as model sessions of the OAS with
member nations represented by teams
of students. Business will be conducted
in a realistic fashion with policy
decisions, motions and ballots being

I \
V r \
We encourage job-hopping.
We do try to keep it \
intramuralwithin \
Du Pont that isand we
do have a more formal
title for it, \
planned mobility. a
/ \v" N
w It only means we dont
I v put you in a training
| Saylor Gilbert, CH.E., program. We put you in
. V.P.1., 1062, growth iobsto help you
tells it like it is. get to the top of your
1 held the way you want
| to get there.
C
I Take a good look around you,
" and youll see people at Du Pont
Y whove had a lot of movement
\ through very different kinds
of jobs. Theres no doubt that
- this diverse experience helps you.
For example, I had four
\ assignments concerned with
\ different aspects of polymerizing,
4 casting, stretching and finishing
our polyester film base.
\
Having had all this, I feel X
I was better prepared for my
present position of training
supervisor. But aside from the I "__
fact that variety can help you, rcc J ult r
I believe most people just like wiU be a guy like Saylor..
a change after working at one him a^out pl an ne( i.
job for a period of time. + mobility-or anything else
x you d like to know about
Du Pont. Mailing the
Du Pont Company coupon is the surest way.
+ Room 6687 to get in touch with him.
f Wilmington, DE 19898 Ta
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Chemical Engineers at Du Pont \
Mechanical Engineers at Du Pont O
wto Engineers at Du Pont
f Accounting, Data Systems, Marketing, Production f
f t Name.
W i i University f
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Vj Relations

STUDENTS WILL ACT AS OAS DELEGATES

Africa to the present and be called Afro-American
History. They also asked for the courses to be
started in time for the Spring Quarter.
A meeting between the black students and the
administration has been scheduled for Dec. 3 to
discuss the matter further. Millican asked Charles
Micarelli, dean of the College of Humanities, and
the chairman of the history, humanities, political
science, sociology and English departments to
decide how the courses could be implemented.
Millican said there was little chance the courses
could be started before the next school year, citing
a lack of appropriations for new teachers from the
Board of Regents and the difficulty of locating a
teacher in the middle of the school year.

determined by the students on the basis
of national traditions and current
situations of the Latin American
nations.
Students will get the chance to see
current events as the Latins themselves
see them, Tjarks said.
Tjarks says he wants to get away
from the reading list type of course and
open avenues for independent research
and teamwork among students. There

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will be no tests, lectures or a professor,
in the formal sense.
I feel students will learn much more
and easier this way, Tjarks said.
In addition, Tjarks will have speakers
attending the meeting among them are
one Major Ramsey, expert on Latin
American insurgence, from the UF
ROTC department and Luis Alberto
Sanchez, President of the University of
San Marcos in Peru.

Page 7



Page 8

, Thr Florida Alligitory Wednesday, November 26/1989

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
\ */ Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
1? afa
A /l/l Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
Executive Editor News Editor
JK lucuam
frif'UM9ffiS§| te
draft l | VIOUniRS SUBJECT! 11l
BOARD ft*- [ f
Credit Resistance / LiVS

We were sitting in the comer talking
and the waiter brought us another glass
of tea.
It was a small room and there was a
large, ugly wood-burning stove standing
in the exact center. Long, silvery pipes
made their way upward and along the
ceiling toward a window where dirty
smoke was exiting into the cold night.
Almost every seat was occupied as
moustached men sat around playing
tavla or some other game, talking and
laughing, sipping and smiling.
An elderly gentleman contentedly
smiled a toothless smile as he sat near
the stove and smoked a nargfle which
rested on the floor beside him. The large
coil with its nipple-end looked like a
diamondback snake in his hands, and
the smoke from his mouth slowly made
its way upward to mix with the other
odors in the small coffee-house.
It was like that every night: the same
smells, the same games, the same smiles,
the same talk, the same people. Jokes
were often repeated and similar topics
were covered a number of times. Yet no
one seemed to realize, no one seemed to
care. Being there was enough. It had its
own pleasantness, its own atmosphere,
its own security.
1 was sitting with four other men, all
of them moustached except myself, and
one man took out a photograph of his
son.
Mehmet, he said as he handed me
the photo. Then he practiced what little
English he knew: Mehmet, my son. My
boy. He smiled.
I smiled back as I looked at the photo
of his son's circumcision. I
congratulated him in Turkish and he
laughed and nodded his head and put
his hand out for me to shake.
Mehmet had been circumcized two
weeks earlier and I remembered his
father standing proudly beside the boy
and shaking everyones hand. Mehmet
wore a white shirt and shorts and had
Masallah written in sparkling letters
on his hat and across his chest. The boy
was tall and proud as he stood there
with money pinned to his clothes. He
was becoming a man. Then the
ceisqtqny H! &egan and everyone was
invited.tie watch. The Hoca from the,

Evening Visit To The Coffee-House

The Adventures Os
Joe Torchia
Peace Corps
Volunteer

mosque sung out his deep chant as
everyone listened in silence. Mehmet
was brave; his eyes were watery but he
didnt cry and he even tried to smile
when it was over.
I passed the photograph around the
table and each man in his turn
congratulated Mehmets father as he
kept nodding.
Not far away, the photographer was
playing tavla with the baklava-maker.
The game was going so fast that I could
hardly make out what was going on.
Dice would fall. Be picked up. Fall
again. Checkers moved. Erol would yell
Ses-bes! and laugh and the
baklava-maker would snort and take a
small puff on the cigarette resting in the
corner of his mouth. An ash would fall
on the tavla board, but there was no
time to brush it away.
Erol usually won, so the
baklava-maker usually paid for the tea
or coffee.
A short, unshaven man with a plaid
scarf quickly made his way into the
coffee-house, went directly to the stove
and began rubbing his cracked hands
over the heat. As he ordered a glass of
tea from the waiter, someone yelled,
Cmon, Orban, join us, and he was
soon sitting at our table.
Orban said hello to everyone at the
table and everyone said hello back to
him. Politeness. Then Orban asked me
how his son Ali was doing in school. I
said fine. There were at least 40 Alis in
the school and I didnt know which one
was his son. Then the waiter brought his
tea and the conversation turned to
sports.
There ware, l more than ten

CDITORIAL t
Death Os An Idea

Dont look now, but somebody just
clogged up this universitys proper
channels, and there is a whole lot of sewage
backing up.
For after almost a year ot
reapportionment talk, which raise
everyones hopes that soon there might be a
little more justice in the composition of the
University Senate, the senate axed the entire
idea in two hours Tuesday.
It seems the thrill of power held by this
elite corps of all full professors, 50 elected
members and the ex-officio members (deans
and administrative council members) is just
too much to give up.
Why should a university body such as the
senate be democratic anyway?
Why should anyone under the rank of full
professor have anything to say?
After all, we all agree oligarchy is the best
form of government, dont we?
N .
And apparently the senate itself didnt
agree last year either. For the nudge to
reapportion came from that very body.
But now they argue that an elected senate
would become too political.
We ask if it is better as it is unpolitical
(which we cannot help but question) and
unrepresentative.
And we ask how they can presume to call
themselves a University senate.
A faculty senate, or a partial faculty
senate, maybe, but not a University Senate
because they do not represent anyone, and
apparently do not want to.

Wm ..
MP'aHHwi: $W j. v %

coffee-houses in the village. It was the
center of small-town society and each
man had his own coffee-house. Os
course no woman ever entered
they had a society of their own. The
women met in their homes as the men
met in the coffee-houses. If an
American female had lived in the town
as long as I, she probably would have a
completely different story to report. It
was olmaz (out of the question) for
me to have any sort of friendship with a
woman in the town.
Every night I visited the coffee-house
for a while, I was expected to. I was a
teacher (albeit a foreigner, but
nevertheless a teacher) and I was
expected to sit and talk for a while each
evening. Besides, it was the easiest way
Fan Letter
MR. EDITOR:
The following letter is addressed to
Mr. Joe Torchia.
Having never before written a fan
letter, I am somewhat baffled about
how to tell you what I feel regarding
your series on Peace Corps experiences
in Turkey.
So, to make it brief, Ill simply say
that I have been touched by the depth
of your feeling for the people, and
impressed by the quality of your feeling
for the people, and impressed by the
quality of your writing.
You should certainly consider
publishing a collection of your articles.
" KENNETH C. POLLOCK, Ph.D.
ASSOCIATE PRO^SOk

Then what is the purpose of this body
which ranks itself with the almighty and
refuses admittance to any but its self-chosen
few?
Had the senate reapportioned, there was
more than a 50-50 chance that 10 students
would have been placed on the membership
rolls, along with assistant and associate
professors elected from the various colleges
and schools making up this university.
This would have constituted a University
Senate.
But that is all behind us now.
The golden doors have been shut and
firmly sealed.
There is only one man who can force
these doors open again. The president of this
university.
We urge President OConnell to reopen
this issue, to bring it before all segments of
this institution before all credibility is lost in
the senate
A Constitutional Convention has been
suggested by some who are as disenchanted
and saddened as we.
This is a plausible possibility.
It could be done, and done before all that
OConnell and the more progressive
segments of the UF have attempted to do is
undone at the hands of these petty tyrants.
It should be done.
We urge OConnell to either open the
senate, or close it down before UF drowns in
the mire of the backwash.

to learn Turkish.
Sometimes men would dance to tunes
they would hum. Sometimes they
would tell long stories about the war, or
about the wolves, or about a place they
had visited. The coffee-house never
failed to fascinate me. I never felt as
much a part of the village as I did when
I was sitting there, talking, smoking,
playing or joking. There was something
about the way the smoke would hang in
the air, almost frozen; something about
the overworked politeness everyone
extended to everyone else; something
about the old chairs, the cracked tables,
the whitewashed walls, the pictures of
Ataturk, the cigarette butts on the
floor.
It was warm, comfortable, cozy and
it was alive.
I stood up, shook everyones hand
and said goodbye. When I asked the
waiter how much the bill was, the other
men at the table refused to let me pay. I
knew they wouldnt, but I was expected
to offer. So I insisted. And they refused.
And I insisted harder. And they harder.
They never let me pay, so I placed a
2.5-lira coin on the table and quickly
made my way out into the cold before
anyone could stop me.
I paused at the door and smiled at
them. They smiled back, waved and
yelled, iyi Geceler.
Outside in the darkness I buttoned
my jacket, put my hands in my pockets
and started home. The only noise was
the click of my heels on the cobblestone
streets and the ringing iyi Geceler in
my ears.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Janie Gould Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices
Phone392-1,631^0*392-1683.



Friendships Arent Temporary Thinas

AJjoia
dm
DiAAwt
'There is no hope
for the complacent man

V liter
- Credit LNS

Keep Politics Off Stadiums P.A.

MR. EDITOR:
I am among those who, while
acknowledging the pockmarks
that mar our nations face,
Frats Ruin
Games
MR. EDITOR:
I would like to congratulate
the UF fraternity system. They
have proven once again that
nobody can ruin a football
afternoon like the fraternities.
The events of Saturdays game
have shown them to be drunken,
rude, crude, immature, and
totally lacking in any sense of
decorum. The best arguments
for the abolishment of the
fraternity system are the actions
of the fraternity men
themselves.
I can only conclude by saying
that we owe the fans and team
of Kentucky a sincere apology,
and that in the future I shall
listen to the football games on
the radio.

CHARLENE P. TALLY, 7AS

Rebuild Lincoln, Make Whites Integrate

MR. EDITOR:
For four hundred years, the
white man has taken away all
that the black man has ever
possessed. He has taken away his
manhood, his womans
womanhood, their children,
their joy, love, history, pride,
rights, exploited his talents and
achievements, and now theyre
trying to take away one of the
things we as blacks take pride
in... our schools.
Lincoln High School, the all
black Negro high school is about
to be phased out because the law
of the land says that there must
be integration regardless. Its
about to be phased out because
America is finally waking up to
the historical fact that she has
been cheating the blacks all
along even if they do have a law
stating that they are
She w&iitsiit6i tafc& the-otfasyii a

MR. EDITOR:
Have you ever asked yourself
what a friend is? Friendships are
not manufactured by
institutions. An institutionalized
friendship is too impersonal.
Any friendship that is worth its
salt demands that the two
parties involved make a
conscientious effort on an

nonetheless proudly join in
singing the national anthem at
sports events.
This past Saturday, at the
Florida-Kentucky game, I
remained silent as the flag was
raised. Why? Because the
stadium announcer had the
unmitigated gall of politicizing
(and thereby bastardizing) a
usually-inspiring event by

MI fOm.

needed facilities to Lincoln High
and send her white kids to an all
black high school. America
would rather phase Lincoln out
and send the black kids to
G.H.S., a predominate white
school.
Why do black students that
live within a block of Lincoln
have to go out of their way to go
to G.H.S. because the white man
fails to realize that blacks are
human beings that have pride,
love, loyalty, and feelings for the
i c same t tings that they do? Why
h dead of oha^jng f LmcoliL,

WITH NATIONAL ANTHEM

'The white man
doesnt realize
that blacks...
have pride,
love, loyalty...

difficult about this? If it werent
for the other blacks going to
your school, G.H.S. would be
phased out also because the
blacks, and not you are doing
the integrating.
White, racist, school board,
hear me out! I am not a high
school student. I am a freshman
attending UF, but being black
makes me feel a part of this
situation. Start thinking, school
board. Would you send your
kids to a school nU i
facilities, to a school that is
Jftaotomantly black^o, ri yqi*
o

intimate, personal level.
Friendship requires honesty 1
For this reason, the trained
friend, the professional
counselor, fails to do his job. His
position demands that people
communicate on a personal
level. His purpose is to help
people with their personal
problems. His condition
demands impersonableness, for

none-too-subtly suggesting that
the singing of the anthem would
testify to our endorsement of
the current administrations
foreign policy (all this was
paraded beneath the familiar
banner of national unity ).
While contemptuous of our
noxious Far Eastern policy, I
like to consider myself a patriot.
A patriot yes, a super-patriot no,

he deals with the great masses of
people, the public.
As you may have guessed, this
writer has little faith in the
modern institution of
professional counseling.
Friendships are not temporary
things as one or two trips to the
professional counselors office
become a one shot deal. True
friendships are worth more.

and I resent this cheap attempt
to involuntarily (if only
momentarily) put me in this
latter category. Lets keep
partisan political
pronouncements off of the
stadiums public address system.
ARTHUR NEWMAN
ASST. PROF OF EDUCATION

wouldnt. How do you expect
Lincoln to have integration
then? Be realistic! This
integration bit is designed so
that you, the white man, will
always benefit and stay at the
top of the pyramid.
Is this why you want to take
away my black brothers and
sisters pride and joy. Is this why
you want to take away that
which they feel that they are a
part of? Where will the teachers
go? Will you accept them?
Probably not because they lack
the training that you place much
emphasis on.
When will you take out the
hatred and let the warmth into
your heart? When will you think
of the black man as no longer
your puppet on a string? I ask
you White America, when will
nyoib begin fothinktandieel?
i,.gfioq ynmtiNEMtfE LaBsRIDffSON, l ut q

Wednesday, November 26/1969, The Florida Alligator/

Neither do the hippies have
the answer with their grass,
their LSD, or their long beards.
Such people are not really
honest with themselves or with
others. Their friendships last
only as long as their beards or
their hangups on drugs. So the
hippies have no answer either.
Shallow too is the friendship
of the fraternity or sorority. The
Greeks require money and
membership to maintain
themselves. Their size demands
that they be impersonal. Their
condition requires the same.
True friendships are made and
kept. They sometimes take years
to create, and once they are
made, they may stay with you
for the rest of your life. Let me
give you an example of what I
call a true friend.
Several years ago on the
Central Florida Junior College
campus, I met a student for the
first time.. His name is
unimportant here, but at the
time, he and I became good
friends. That boy and I are still
friends today. Now, he is in the
armed service awaiting orders for
active duty. He and I correspond
regularly with our own personal
problems. On his six day leave at
Thanksgiving, he is to
Gainesville just to see me when
no one else I call friend\wil] visit
me without my invitatiort.
A friend, you say! He is a true
friend indeed. There is no finer.
And with this kind of friendship,
who needs drugs or institutional
hangups to build ones
character?
TIM STERLING
Greek Bloc
In Stupor
At Game
MR. EDITOR:
If there had lingered any
shred of doubt in the minds of
UF students as to the
obsolescence of todays
fraternity system in an
institution of higher learning,
such doubt was surely dispelled
by the greek bloc at last
Saturdays football game. Most
of us have learned to expect
such excesses from these
children but this last exhibition
of insanity has surpassed all
bounds of acceptability.
I cannot speak for others but
my purpose in attending such
festivities is to cheer Gator
teams, not to inebriate myself
into an obnoxious stupor. I dare
say that I will not be missed, but
if these infants continue to be
aided in their sand-box activities
by allowing them the privilege of
bloc seating, I will order my
seats in the future on the West
Side.
LOUIS A. TALLY, ILW
LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the
Alligator, letters must be typed
signed and double-spaced and
should not exceed 300 words in
length. A writer's name may be
withheld from publication only if
he shows just cause. No letters
signed with a pseudonym will be
accepted for publication. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of space.
> TOItteJW W
rtttist i

Page 9



Page 10

l/Tht Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday. Noa*mb*r2B,lo69

Ik
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7WG
Going on a winter safari? Wrap up in our cordoroy
coat by Eli. Pants are also Elis in the wool look of
grey and beige plaids. Modeled by Judy.
MAAS BROTHERS
Horse blanket-plaid is not the only thing good about
this poncho. The wrap around style and price, $lB,
are also great assets. Matching berets and scarfs
complete the look. Modeled by Cindy.

B a B I*B
BBi jSfl B Bare
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FIGURE FAIR
Be well dressed for the holidays lounging in our
Dila Ann culotte of nylon and acetate in black with a
gold braid trim. The trim is featured around the neck
and down the front. In sizes 10-14, about S2O
Modeled by Kathy. U

SUSAN SCOTT
The poncho coverage! A smashing
cool days. Wear them long or i
pants. Available in stripes and
Shelley. SOi
w f f | '^
I I
F~ #
rt)w)9t
I a 6£<1601
a%>
ei)£pt} p
i
l)/eai)^ei)
ccl/25ia5
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5/1
Silvermans has the
romantic moods or sp
Innocent is feature
made of see-through
acrylic. Flirt your f*
billowy sleeves, butto
with a satin ribbon.
fashion
photo#



Mver-up for those
ol with skirts or
als. Modeled by
11
.B K i 4iV'
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SH *. ' Cjsv *[; - a*.
H i> "£'* .' : ij .&s§§*
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kiiHpy
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GERMANS
perfect outfit for your very
ial dates. The dress by Young
1 a golden orange colour. Its
ble cloth lace of cotton and
nity with the scoop neckline,
down the front, and tied off
leled by Ingrid.
yout by. . joyce gehrke
hy by. .. mathews and o heal

SEARS
Sweet as cotton candy is this pastel, plaid wool
jumper with matching sweater. The outfit is topped
with a teddy bear plush coat. Be ready for the
holidays ahead with the help of Sears Junior Bazaar.
Modeled by Sharon.
wuwwwfcawwww StM at^^S^Bb
Wt HIH
j? ? .J||^HBkbM|Bmmm|
:^ < MB
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mW ~^l
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Mmmm i
11 J HSlgt r* .. 1
IHp j BBHn^i^s^"^Vr
-M wSgjm
I .bBRFJSBII

STAG AND DRAG
Bev is patriotic in this red, white, and blue dress
from Stag and Drag. The outfit features a white, crepe
blouse over which is a blue jersey skirt, and matching
vest with red piping with four brass buttons to top it
off The perfect outfit for the tailored-look of fashion.
DONIGANS
Emily M Tunic vest and skirt in ice cream
Alvin Duskin presents the perfect outfit for yous%
holiday entertaining. Step lively in a brilliant orange
pants outfit, only at Donigans. Modeled by Tanya.
BBC* V/:
m F tsf Wll
mm **
m E lr MSSSt.
Jllpl
ML, '%> JIT
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4;
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VMnwlay, November 26,1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE 1
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
4450. Buy SellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
r reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
FREE CATS All ages, colors, and
sexes Call 392-1591, between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.rh. (A-st-47-p)
*67 Triumph 650 TRG-C. Best offer.
Phone 378-7191. (A-st-46-p)
1956 MGA good mechanically S2OO.
Martin 0018 C guitar with case $175.
Four 15 wir> wheels S6O. Two Shur
prof mikes 50. One Roberts & 1
Norelco mi..j with stand SSO.
372-7024 after 5. (A-st-45-p)
MAKE YOUR ROADRUNNER,
SUPER BEE, ETC., REALLY RUN.
Factory hi-perf. parts. CHEAP. Call
392-9362. (A-3t-48-p)
8 x 42 2 bedroom mobile home.
Air conditioned, redecorated; with
utility shed. Call 372-3112 or
372-8032. $1750 or best offer.
(A-st-49-p)
1967 12x47 Mobile Home. 1
bedroom, air cond., carpet, storage
shed, built in bookcase, in nice
park on large lot.' $2700. Call
378-4567. (A-3t-49-p)
1968 12x60 Mobile Home. 2
bedroom, air cond., central heat.
Available Dec. 20. Down payment
and assume low monthly
payments. Call 372-2225 after 5
p.m. (A-st-49-p)
1968 Fiat 850 Convertible. No
equity. Take over payments on
less than SIOOO. Call 378-5321 up
to 5 p.m. 454-1659 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-49-p)
Two Miami tickets. Cali 392-6070
(3:30 5:30) 372-2398 (after
5:30). (A-lt-50-p)
Brace yourself for a thrill the first
time you use Blue Lustre to clean
rugs. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-50-p)
| FOR RENT
I bdr furnished apt. New, clean,
quiet. $lO3 mo. starting Dec. 1.
Prairie View 6315 S.W. 13 St. Apt.
II (South on hwy 441) 378-5171.
(B-3t-48-p)
Females Help Roommate
going to Calif. Must sublet
Landmark Apt. for yr. or just
winter quarter your choice.
Sauna, groovy neighbors.
378-5762. (B-3t-49-p)
Sublease 2 bedroom Gator Town
apt. Jan-June. Furnished. Call
378-7879. (B-2t-49-p)
Must sublease College Terrace Apt.
1 blk. from campus. $120.00/mo.
utl. included. Call 378-4190.
(B-st-46-p)
Must sublet 2 bdrm. Landmark
Apt. Jan thru Aug. $lB5 a mo.
Can move in Dec. 15. Call
378-6095 or Landmark Apt. 140.
(B-3t-50-p)
Furn. attic apt. available Jan.
Close to campus; some cooking
sac. Clean and cozy; ac & heat;
$75/mo. single, S9O dbl. utl Inc.
378-6708. (B-3t-50-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt. no.
23-1001 SW 16 Ave. Complex has
laundry facilities and pool. Call
378-3552 after 5 or anytime on
weekends. (B-st-50-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try
Georgia Seagle Co-Op. 1002 W.
Univ. Ave. Installment plan
rm-meals $220/quarter. Some
financial aid available. 378-4341.
(B-st-35-t>)

r#

XOMOO
I WANTED jj
1 roommate needed for winter
quarter. Landmark Apts. 163.
373-2276. (C-st-48-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Luxury and privacy at a price
YOU can afford! Four bedroom,
two bath townhouse with
carpeting, central heat and air,
Spanish decor, pool and barbecue
grills. Walk to campus. Phone
376-7224. (C-ts-47-c)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share new four bedroom, two
bath Spanish style apartment just
off sorority row. Private bedroom,
carpeting, central heat and air, all
electric kitchen, pool and. barbecue
grills. Reasonably priced, all
utilities furnished. Call June at
378-7224. (C-ts-47-C)
One female roommate needed by
January. Beautiful Williamsburg
Apt. with dishwasher, etc. Move
-in anytime after finals. Call
372- (C-st-50-p)
Roommate wanted: female. La
Mancha Townhouse. Private
bedroom, no utilities. 914 SW 8
Ave. Call 372-2890. (C-3t-50-p)
LANDMARK APTS. TOOMMATES
NEED EXTRA GUY STARTING
JAN. CALL SKIP 372-5007.
(C-3t-50-p)
Female roommate for winter
quarter. Private room La Mancha
Apts. Phone 376-6871. Apt. 39.
(C-st-50-p)
FRENCH QUARTER will have room
for 2 coeds winter quarter by the
pool. Good for your head! Save you
bread. Apt. 97. Call 376-0613.
(C-4t-48-p)
Competent in Physical Chemistry?
Small library project on critical
phenomena. Call 372-6061 after
11:00 p.m. Good pay. (C-3t-48-p)
Female roommate to sublet starting
winter qtr. Walk to campus. Air and
heat. Call 378-2793. (C-st-48-p)
1 or 2 coed roommates wanted. 2 BR
and lVz bth. Tanglewood Townhouse
Apt. SSO mo. 376-1015. (C-st-48-p)
Female' Roommate for Village Park
Apt. 42.50 + V util. Avail. Dec. 12.
No rent till Jan. 5. Call 378-3157
after 5 p.m. Ask for Jeannie.
(C-3t-48-p)
Female roommate beginning winter
quarter. Private room. La Mancha
Apts. Phone 373-2895 or come
see us in apt. 51. Poolside
Townhouse. (C-3t-49-p)
Roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment 2 blocks from campus.
Available immediately. $36.25 PM.
Call 372-7550. (C-st-49-p)
Female roommate to share 4
bedroom apartment near campus.
Central heat, air and pool. No
utilities. $75 month. Call
373- anytime. (C-3t-49-p)
PLUSH! 1 Male Roommate needed
to share poolside, townhouse, 4
bedroom, fully carpeted and air
cond. La Mancha apt. Immediate
occupancy. Call Alan after 4 p.m.
at 378-8824. (C-2t-49-p)
HELP WANTED £
Clerk Typist full time. Begin
immediately. Salary $329 to $360
per month depending on
experience. Call 372-0096 or write
P.O. Box 14286. (E-2t-49-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
the Business and Administration
Offices of Student Publications. Call
Mr. Myking at 392-1681 between the
hours of 8 and 5. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-ts-47-c)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969

HEIP^WANTED :
Experienced Sales Person for
Lingerie Shop. Age about 25 years
and married. Immediate opening.
Call 378-5136. (E-3t-49-c)
WUWU RADIO NEEDS STUDENT
TO WRITE RADIO
COMMERCIALS THAT CAN
SELL. CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT ONLY IF YOU
ARE EXTREMELY CREATIVE
AND HAVE GOOD WRITING
ABILITY. PREVIOUS MEDIA OR
AGENCY EXPERIENCE
HELPFUL. PHONE 376-2688.
(E-2t-49-c)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBMs new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminoie and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
i will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua. (E-llt-42-p)
. PMWKWi:
jj. AUTOS |
Comet 64 6 cyl. white, red vinyl
shift. 50,000 ml. New clutch,
tires, generator, shocks, transm.
bearing. No oil loss. Top shape.
Leave country. Must sell ask
$650. Call 372-5221 or 392-2929.
(G-3t-48-p)
1965 Mustang, 2+2; V 289,
excellent condition, WSW, radio,
heater, console, must sell soon.
Call Jim Carter, 372-5703 or
392-0834. (G-st-50-p)
PERSONAL
Â¥ x
.\v.:.y.
THANKS to the UNION BARBER
SHOP for their donation of
REFRESHMENTS which insured
the success of our outing THE
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR.
(J-3t-nc-50)
SSO REWARD for Information
leading to return of 1965 CBI6O
HONDA, Black, stolen from SE
7th St. V.l. No. 1031740.
373-2915 evenings. (J-st-50-p)
Gail The shortest, happiest,
most wonderful year of my life
ends Dec. 10th. I only wish for
100 more just like it. Love
Always, David. (J-lt-50-p) >
Lambchop Heres hoping that
your birthday is the best ever,
and mat Thanksgiving in P.C. will
find a GREAT surf! love C.J.A.
(J-lt-50-p)
CONQUER THE COLD. FREE
KITTENS. VERY WARM.
3764918. (J-2t-50-p)
WUWU Radio promises you the
best in smooth popular music!
Sorry... no screamers and no
bubblegum! Try us and
see . DIAL 1390! (J-lt-50-p)
UNDERGROUND DYLAN ALBUM
WHITE WONDER, now available
exclusively in Gainesville at the
Subterranean Circus, 10 S.W. 7th St.
while they last. (J-st-46-p)
FREE KITTENS BLACK AND
WHITE CALL 373-1737. (J-5t47-p)

| PERSONAL
Sigma Pi is forming a colony at
UF. All present Sigma Pi brothers
.or anyone interested in joining a
new and growing UF frat call
John, 392-7416. (J-3t-49-p)
Need ride to Washington, D.C., Dec.
13. Will share expenses. 392-8690,
Diane. (J-3t48-p)
The Friday- Afternoon Club wont
meet Thanksgiving weekend.
(J -2t4 9-p)
I LOST & FOUND §
j; v
IS;.;.;.;.;.;.;.v.y v*vv*v.x-XvX'X-X
FOUND: Monday a.m., mens
black-rimmed glasses near Music
Building. Claim in Room 104 of
Building R. (L-3t48-nc)

PswulS^
ALL-COLOR GREAT I
EDGAR ALLAN POEI
| HORROR CLASSICS I
2BIG DAYS
AND SAT NOV 28-291
C STARTS
SUNDAY
NOV^OtIJ
Vi ii
***" iffi lM' 'Ri v
ipjiiiij: ; ;
: -c ;l j yjk<
.;;*s¥: VHiHHH j ¥ :>S£$: : S^V
.3p^-. Sfe

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| LOST & FOUND |
Lost: Gold mens watch between
stadium and Norman Hall after last
football game. Identifying engraving
on back. Tremendous personal value.
Reward. Call 372-6448 or 392-1496.
(L-st-4 7-p)
| SERVICES |
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
Health foods, natural vitlmins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

|
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair
forever. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist (over 20 years
experience) 372-8039. By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)

I Albert Claus says:
1 / / \1 WWW / A.
. II M j
II ** 'SHOP I
ALLIGATOR
II ADS |
H Make
U Christmas
HI I
I last all year.
I Admit it. Most Christmas Give something in December I
I gifts just don't last. that will be remembered in I
I May.
They wear out, get used up,
go out of style. We wouldn't have mentionedl
it if we couldn't help.
I Put a lock on time. Order a ft J
Quarterly Gift Subscription. flOrUtil 1
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for Fall, Winter, and Spring CjliClTlClllj
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only $3.00). A book for all seasons. I
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Florida Quarterly
330 Reitz Union
Gainesville, Fla.
lam enclosing $ for Quarterly gift subscriptions ($3.00 each).
I ar n enclosing $ for Quarterly subscriptions (for myself). I
I NAME of giver I
ADRESS STATE _ZIP I
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t =aal

Wednesday, November 26,1969, The Florida Allioator

I SERVICES

FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
***** instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
Instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you can't beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area.
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)

Page 13

| SERVICES |
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-45-ts-c)
professional typing
SERVICE has a staff of typists
who can type your manuscripts
professionally and In good form.
We also have a XEROX machine.
Call Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160
(M-7t-25-p)
ANYTHING^ YOU WANT I
E FEATURES:
1:36 3:33 5:30
7:31 9:30
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL WINNER!
Best Film By a New Oirector'
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DINNER
at MORRISONS
TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING MENU
Tender Roast Turkey with Pecan Dressing
Rich Gtblet Gravy Fluffy Mashed Potatoes
Choice of Garden Vegetables
Combination or Tossed ween Salad
with Choice of Dressing
Oven-Fresh Hot Bread with Butter
Choice of
Delicious Custard, Apple or Spicy Pumpkin Pie
Choice of Beverage
Complete Meal
.->*l.69
served if Kindi and dimer
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The
Florida
Alligator

Vince Martins Name Now In Small Print

By MIKE HUTSON
Alligator Reviewer
If you look at the fine print
on your ticket for the Jefferson
Airplane concert, you will see
(in even smaller print than Glenn
McKays Headlights what an
insult to any musician!) the
name Vince Martin. Whos he,
you say? Unless you happen to
live in the Miami area and saw
him at the Flick you would
never know.
Now everyone can enjoy his
music on his first album, If the
Jasmine Dont Get You... The
Bay Breeze Will (Capitol
ST-231).
The man has a lot of
potential. Capitol Records seems
to think so anyway. They took
him to Nashville (you know, the
place where everbody goes since
Bob Dylan made the trip) and
even got Ken Buttery and

Art Professors Ceramic Pots
Featured In One-Man Exhibit

A one-man exhibit of
ceramics by Phillip A. Ward,
Associate Professor of Art at
UF, will open Monday in the
Teaching Gallery.
Although his pots have always
been shown in the Annual
Faculty Exhibit, this will be
Wards first one-man show in
Gainesville. Included will be
work done under a Faculty
Development Grant for 1968-69.
Ceramics, to me, is a
constant challenge, Ward said.
I am interested in the
extremely shapeless plasticity of
clay, yet fascinated by its great
strength and rigidity. The
endless forms and colors possible
in this medium are a source of
great excitement to me; a
perfect foil for the question,
What else can I do with it?
At present I am involved in
developing luster glazes and
exploring their use with a dark
clay body. This combination has
interested me for some time, and
to it I have recently added high
color. I find the paradox of
these sophisticated glazes and
the earthy crudeness of clay a
powerful creative stimulus.
I believe that the artist has
an obligation to rework former
concepts and develop new ideas
in the light of todays new
materials, at the same time
drawing from history and his
own experience. He must
constantly search and
experiment, for he is a
pace-setter; an innovator who
influences tomorrow, he said.
Many of Wards pots are the
result of a combination of wheel
and slab construction. One pot
will consist of two symmetrical,
wheel-worked sections serving as
GOLF
IS PAR 60
DRIVING RANGE
-CRIB HOUSE
ELECTRIC CARTS
MSJML* OPEN 7 DAYS
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IfTlk $2.25 FOR 18
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
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NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721


ENTERTAINMENT

Charles McCoy, who did back-up
work for Dylan, and Lloyd
Green and several other
musicians to record with him.
The result is several well done
songs. There is a Hank Williams
song, I Cant Escape From
You, to let you know you are
in Nashville and Vince Martin
writes about Snow Shadows,
Summer Wind, Yonder
Comes the Sun, and the title
song plus an adaptation of
Danville Girl.
Side one is nice folk sounds
with country twang, while side
two is a get together for a little
country guitar pickin sing out
with a lot of vocal adlibbing by
Vince Martin.
You only have to play side
one once to like it, but side two
takes several times through to
sink in. Not so much because of
the music as the length of the

a base and top for an angular,
box-like body produced by the
slab method. While some pieces
are glazed with very brilliant
yellows and oranges, others are
visually very quiet, their effect
depending on multiple layers of
subtle glazes which change color
as one moves around the pot.
Ward, who has been teaching
ceramics since he joined the
faculty in 1959, graduated with
highest honors from The School
of the Museum of Fine Arts of
Boston and received his MFA
from Tulane University.
He has been included in many
important exhibitions including
the 1969 Florida Craftsmen
Exhibition at the Jacksonville
Art Museum; the 1969 Loch
Haven Invitational at Orlando;
the 1969 Boca Raton Art Guild
Contemporary Florida
Craftsmen Invitational; the
Piedmont Craft Show; Mint
Museum of Art, Charlotte, N.C.;
and the Syracuse National
Ceramic Exhibition, the
Emerson Museum of Art in
Syracuse, N.Y.
In 1968 his work was
exhibited along with Mrs. Wards
at the Center of Modem Art in
Micanopy and he participated in

Climb aboard C^l
y The S.S. WinnjammeH> /
f Meals served from 11:00 AM to Z 1
U Midnight
V Bernie Sher //
| at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
j Oysters & clams on the half shell |i\
Michelob on draft \n
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
ft
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager \/
Reservations Accepted 520 s w 2nd Ave ./I
Closed Sundays i'
- j i
jw w* jXruOrLeaurMJi rr.

BIGGER THINGS IMMINENT

songs. Two songs make up side
two- one eight minutes long
and the other thirteen.
At first you ask yourself,
Just who does this man think
he is fooling? The fault is in the
vocals which are strung out with
unbearable repetition of lyrics in
an apparent attempt to fill up
side two.
However, side one is good
music and you cannot put the
man down completely. After all,
if the songs had been done by
Dylan they would sell on name
alone, but Vince Martin is just
another folk singer doing some
nice songs and he will have to
make a name for himself.
I approach Vince Martins
performance with the Jefferson
Airplane with the same
anticipation I had for Dions
performance at the Rathskeller
some good folk music; But I

three-man show at Jacksonville
University.
His work is in many
permanent collections including
those of Tulane University, the
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston,
and the Johnson Wax Collection
Objects USA.
He has juried both regional
and national craft exhibitions
and is presently Chairman of the
Southeastern Regional Assembly
of the American Craftsmens
Council.
The Teaching Gallery Display,
consisting of approximately 50
pots, will run through Dec. 30.
The Gallery will close for
Christmas on Wednesday
afternoon, Dec. 24, and will
re-open Dec. 29 for the final two
days of the exhibit. Gallery
hours are from 9 ami. until noon
and 1:30 until 5 p.m.
English Winning
HELSINKI German is
losing out to English in Finnish
schools.
In 1968, 71 per cent of the
students took English as their
foreign language, compared with
65 per cent in 1964-65. Only 28
per cent studied German. Before
World War 11, the main first
language was German.

TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969

Page 14

hope that I will come away with
the same feeling of having
watched a performance that
could never be reproduced on

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Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl Phil Tarver
p Lujack Mel Ward
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THE WRONG BOX
* s the right movie
liiP m H and an irresistibly
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r -NBC-TV Today Show
Presents
BRYANoFORBES Pr "<
(THEUUROMG"ii^
Starring
JOHN MILLS
RALPH RICHARDSON
| MICHAEL CAINE SFSEP 1
PETER COOK* DUDLEY MOORE
NANETTE NEWMAN
TONY HANCOCK
as the Detective
.ns PETER SELLERS
as Dr. Pratt
Written for the Screen and Co-Produced by LARRY GELBART and f
BURT SHEVELOVE Music Composed and Conducted by JOHN BARRY
Directed by BRYAN FORBES A Salamander Film EASTMAN COLOR
ssggYr4wgir. .

record that I got from Dion.
Vince Martin may make a
name for himsef with many
people next Tuesday night.



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November 26
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Page 15



Page 16

t, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969

HAS EIGHT ENVIRONMENTS
Dec. 5 Happening Slated

Architecture and drama
students are currently working
together to produce a happening
Dec. 5 on the Reitz Union patio.
Eight dramatic situations will
be created in a joint effort of
students from these two
departments of fine arts. They
will be designed by architecture
majors and acted out by drama
students.
Dr. Leland Shaw, professor of
architecture, said, The project
is intended to unite the arts on
the UF campus and will be a
pilot study to see if it can
become ah annual event which
will eventually involve all phases
of fine arts.
Commenting on the reasons
behind the happening, Shaw
said, We Want to learn from
these kinds of experiences and
attempt to make education

r MORE TO COME
Bold Comments
On 'Easy Rider
(EDITORS NOTE: Printed below are some of the comments
received so far on the movie, Easy Rider, now playing at the
Plaza II Theatre. Deadline for turning in comments and reviews
is Sunday, 3 p.m. The three best reviews and additional
comments will be printed next week.)
* *
Easy Rider is a religious parable and a philosophic treatise;
it is a heavy Passion Play, with a tripping three-personed God.
- David Miller
* *
Ive just come from seeing Easy Rider. Im crying, not
because it could have been me that was on one of those bikes,
but because Ive met thousands of people it could have been:
And because Ive met thousands of people that could have been
in that truck. And because that is America.
Sheldon Zipkin
* *
The one thing about Easy Rider that makes it memorable
is the incredibly accurate supporting performance by Jack
Nicholson. His role is short and when hes gone the film reverts
to mediocrity.
Watching him for those few minutes, however, was a delight.
Nicholsons delineation is one in a million, probably the best
cinema performance of 1969. Its really too good to deserve an
Academy Award.
* Louis NobO
* *
Easy Rider is a tragic story of two beautiful people living
life as they think it should be lived. Captain America and Billy
(Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) the main characters, lived by
a set of moral values which may or may not be different from
yours or mine.
What differentiates them from most of us is that they were
honest with themselves. They were disciples of a new breed,
which like it or not is here to stay.
If there is a lesson to be learned from Easy Rider it is: if
we could all live without fear and hate, what a groovy place
Earth would be.
Michael Patrick

the'SWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
USt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
ntroductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS in the air
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road
*

exciting by freeing architecture
designing from the classroom.
Larry Robinson, president of
Florida Players, also has reasons
behind participating in the
happening. One of the principle
aims of this effort for drama
students is to take the theater
out of the normal enviroment
and try to do our thing outside
of a physical theater, he said.
Hopefully we will be able to
establish a communication
between the students of art on
campus, Robinson said.
Perhaps one artist will become
aware of what an artist in
another field is doing.
All the students involved
have been working very hard and
are very excited about this. We
hope the student body will share
the enthusiasm with us,
Robinson said.

THE NOW OUNDS OF
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'Til
ALIBI
Lounge
NW l4th ST ft wmwm .w sod |

The events will range from
melodrama, modem dance and
improvisations to a combo
recital.
All eight environments will
have action going on
simultaneously and will compete
with one another for attention.
Band Boasts
New Outfits
The band with the Biggest
Boom in Dixie will be decked
out in new uniforms for the
Thanksgiving bout between UF
and the University of Miami.
According to Richard Bowles,
director of bands, the uniforms
consist of orange pants with
blue, white and orange coats.
We will have the effect of a
color change when we do our
turns, he said.
Lamar Sawyer, head drum
major, described the new
uniforms in vivid terms.
The new uniforms have
bright orange pants with a wide
blue stripe running down the
side, he said.
He explained that the back of
the coat is orange with blue
panel inserts at the ribs.
The hats, topping off the
uniforms, have the insignia of
the Gator Band in front and are
completed by an eight-inch
ostrich plume, Sawyer said.
15-day money-back guarantee.
2-yr. unconditional guarantee parts &
labor no charge, at local warranty station
or factory.
Trade-inshighest allow. Send your list.
Most items shipped promptly from our in inventory,
ventory, inventory, fully insured.
25 th yr. dependable serviceworld wide.
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239-S East 149th St,

Reitz Union Provides
Thanksgiving Action
Reitz Union will provide entertainment for those students staying
on campus over the Thanksgiving break.
Pool, bowling, ping-pong, checker or chess games are good for
study breaks. The games area will be keeping regular hours 9 a.m.
until midnight.
The Wrong Box, with John Mills, Ralph Richardson and Michael
Cain will be playing in the Union Auditorium Friday and Saturday
nights. Showings will be at 5:30,7 and 9:30 p.m. and admission is 50
cents.
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 878-8320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
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[JDAMAMD I
AT THE [ I
Campus Shop & Bookstore I
***^ > *"* r ***-' jrs- * w aa (



Handels Messiah
Traditional Work

By MAGGIE COE
Assistant Entertainment Editor
For many years the UF
Department of Music has
presented Handels Messiah.
Handel composed the
Messiah in 24 days, getting his
inspiration from a text brought
to him by a friend, Rev. Charles
Jennens. The beauty of the
language as well as its intensely
devotional character made such
a profound impression on
Handel that he immediately
began to compose the whole
work.
The first performance of the
Messiah was given on April
13, 1741, at the Musick Hall in
Fishamble Street, Dublin,
Ireland, and was given in aid of
the Society for Relieving
Prisoners, the Charitable
Infirmary and Mercers Hospital.
An early reviewer for the
Dublin Journal wrote: Words
are wanting to express the
exquisite delight it afforded to
the admiring, crowded
audience.
Handel became popular. Until
his death he gave annual
performances of the work at the
Foundling Hospital, in which the
children of the hospital took
part. This laid the foundation
for a tradition of annual
performances.
Handels many other
oratorios, both sacred and
secular, contain many fine
individual numbers, particularly
among the choruses but the
Messiah occupies a unique
place in the music life of the
average music-lover.
There is little doubt that the
work is the most frequently
performed oratorio in

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B:3OAM Saturday, November 29,1969
Assembly Room of The DuPont Plaza Hotel
- - (Downtown Miami)
A delicious. Hot Buffet Breakfast
Plus
Go Gator Pop Rally
Featuring Special Guests
President Steve O'Connell Head Coach Ray Graves
Alumni Association President, Doyle Rogers
Florida's Finest Our 12 Gator Cheerleaders
And The
Fightin' Gator Band
Price: $3.50 Per Person
Tickets will be held at the door in your name. No tickets
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English-speaking countries.
The Messiah is divided into
three parts. Part I represents the
Prophecies and the Narrative of
the Nativity; Part 11, the Passion
and the Resurrection; and Part
HI, Mans hope of his own
resurrection.
There is a short overture in
the French style, which is a
slow movement repeated,
followed by a quick fugue
encompassing an entire
movement.
The only other purely
instrumental number is the
Pastoral Symphony. It is an
interlude supposedly based on a
bagpipe tune played by Italian
shepherds.
The music in the various
numbers is directed in their
appeals to cover almost every
emotion.
UFs own semi-annual
performance will be Dec. 7 at 4
p.m. in the University
Auditorium.
Air Sorvico
Executive Airlines operates a
complete schedule of flights
from throughout Florida to
Atlanta and maintains a
complete charter service.
UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
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Music Ability Have Any?

UF students are being invited to enter a contest
based on their musical ability. Cash awards are
offered.
Broadcast Music, Inc., of New York City is
sponsoring its tenth annual Varsity Show
Competition.
Offering $1,500 in prize money, the firm is
attempting to encourage and direct young
composers and lyricists on college campuses toward
the musical theatre.
Rules for the contest include:
The musical comedy or revue must have been
presented in the 1969-70 college year under the
auspices of an organization or club which is a
recognized student activity of a college or university
in the United States or Canada.
The music and lyrics must be the original work
of undergraduates written and produced prior to
their graduation.
To enter the competition the following must
be submitted: a) Lead sheets with lyrics of all songs
(full piano part is not necessary); b) demonstration
record or tape of all songs, (songs only no
dialogue); c) script, if available.
t All material submitted will be returned when
the judging is completed.
All works will remain the property of the
authors and composers, or their assignees.
Due care will be used in protecting all

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Wednesday, November 26, 1969, The Florida Alligator

WIN MONEY

manuscripts received from applicants but each
applicant specifically releases all persons,
associations and corporations, and each of their
representatives on the contest committees or
otherwise,-as well as the judges, from any and all
claims and dangers arising out of the loss or
destruction of submitted compositions* however
caused.
As of Oct., 1969, 61 groups had entered the
Varsity Show Competition.
A Different Kick,'* a musical produced under
the sponsorship of the Triangle Club of Princeton
University, was the winner of last year's contest.
Judges for the competition included Jerry Bock
and Sheldon Hamick, writers of the current success
"Fiddler on the Roof' and the Pulitzer
Prize-winning Fiorello!; producers Ira Bernstein,
Morton DaCosta, Morton Gottlieb, Larry Kasha,
Albert W. Selden and Edward Specter.
Albert Hague, composer of "Plain and Fancy
and "Redhead; record company executive Andrew
Wiswell; Lehman Engel, musical director and head
of Broadcast Music's Musical Theatre Workshop and
Robert B. Sour, BMI vice chairman were also judges
in last years contest
Entries in the Varsity Show Competition should
be sent to Allan Becker, Broadcast Music, Inc.. 589
Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10017.

Page 17



Florida
Alligator

Alvarez Named To UPI All-American

NEW YORK (UPI) Carlos
Alvarez, Floridas pass-catching
ace, was the only sophomore to
make the 1969 United Press
International College Football
All-American Team.
Alvarez topped the voting in
his receiver position with 39
votes. Jim Mandich of Michigan
was next with 34 votes.
Gator defensive halfback
Steve Tannen was named to the
second team, while quarterback
John Reaves made honorable
mention.
Steve Owens, Oklahomas
record breaking touchdown
man, was the top vote getter
overall with 132 votes.
The Sooner running back,
who has smashed the three-year
record for scoring touchdowns
with 54 to date, including 21
this year, approached a perfect

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PHIL BANNISTER 1
ALL-AMERICAN CARLOS ALVAREZ
... only sophomore to make UPl's All-College team
North Shrine Coach Named
MIAMI (UPI) Purdues Jack Mollenkopf has been selected to
coach the North team in the Annual Mahi Shrine North-South College
All-Star Game Christmas Day in the Orange Bowl, it was announced
Monday.
The announcement was made by William C. Brown, chairman of
the game. The South coach has not been named.
Were very fortunate in getting Mollenkopf as a coach in our
game, Brown said. He has a great record at Purdue and certainly is
one of the top football coaches in the nation.

ferl
bhuumb

score as he was named on 132
ballots. The two-platoon honor
squad was chosen directly by the
votes of 142 of the nations
sports writers and broadcasters,
the only team so chosen.
Mike McCoy, Notre Dames
giant defensive tackle, was the
runner-up in total votes with
100, tops on the defensive
squad.
However, Ohio State and
Penn State tied for team honors
by placing three men each on
the 22-man squad. Southern
California and Notre Dame had
two places each.
En route to All-America
honors, Owens rambled for 100
yards rushing in 17 straight
games until he fell below that
figure last Saturday. Four times
this season and four times last

THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
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TANNEN ON SECOND TEAM

season he was named to the UPI
Backfield of the Week and he
needs six touchdowns in his
closing game against Oklahoma
State Thursday to break in three
years the all-time record of 59
touchdowns set by Armys
Glenn Davis in four years.
Here are the players chosen as
the best in the land:
OFFENSE
ENDS Carlos Alvarez,
Florida, and Jim Mandich,
Michigan.
TACKLES Sim Smith,
Southern California, and Bob
McKay, Texas.
GUARDS Chip Kell,
Tennessee, and Larry Dinardo,
Notre Dame.
CENTER Rodney Brand,
ArlraneaQ
QUARTERBACK Mike
Phipps, Purdue.
RUNNING BACKS Steve
Owens, Oklahoma; Jim Otis,
Ohio State; and Bob Anderson,
Colorado.
DEFENSE
ENDS Jim Gunn, Southern
California, and Phil Olsen, Utah
State.
TACKLES Mike McCoy,
Notre Dame, and Mike Reid,
Penn State.
MIDDLE GUARD Jim
Stillwagon, Ohio State.
LINEBACKERS Steve
Kiner, Tennessee, and Dennis
Onkotz, Penn State.
HALFBACKS Jack Tatum,
Ohio State; Tom Curtis,
Michigan; Neal Smith, Penn
State; and Buddy McClinton,
Auburn.
Onkotz, who made the squad
last year as a junior, was the
only repeater from the 1968
All-America.
This years squad includes 17
seniors, four juniors Kell,
Dinardo, Stillwagon, and Tatum,
and one sophomore the
pass-catching Alvarez.
The South got the largest
number of first and second team
berths combined, 11 out of 44,
against 10 each for the Midwest
and Southwest, five each for the
Far West and East, and three for
the Rockies.
Named to the second team
were:
OFFENSE
ENDS Elmo Wright,
Houston, and Charles Speyrer,
Cackles John Ward,
Oklahoma State, and Bob Asher,
Vanderbilt.
GUARDS Alvin Samples,
Alabama, and Bill Bridges,

SAM PEPPER CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor
a

Page 18

Houston.
CENTER Ken Mendenhall,
Oklahoma.
QUARTERBACK Archie
Manning, Mississippi.
RUNNING BACKS
Clarence Davis, Southern
California; Steve Worster,Texas;
and Charlie Pittman, Penn State.
DEFENSE
ENDS Bill Brundage,
Colorado, and David Campbell,
Auburn.
TACKLES Leo Brooks,
Texas, and Steve Smear, Penn
State.
MIDDLE GUARD Carl
Crennel, West Virginia.
LINEBACKERS Mike
Ballou, UCLA, and Don Parish,
Stanford.
HALFBACKS Glen
Cannon, Mississippi; Steve
Tannen, Florida; Ted Provost,
Ohio State; and T im Foley,
Purdue.

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i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 26,1969

. s v
Jj I Hf Ff'
STEVE TANNEN
... second team defense



"GATOR QUARTERBACK

Cochrane Hard To Judge

As Told To JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
I dont know Kelly Cochrane personally I met
him for a few seconds after Miami beat us in the
freshman game last year.
He came over to me and said that I played a great
game. A lot of players wouldnt have done that. I
remember it, though. I thought it was a nice gesture.
Cochrane is pretty fast that I remember from
the freshman game. I recall he ran the option well.
This season? Well, Ive only seen films of Miamis
game with Houston. See, when we look at films up
here, the offense gets a look at the opposing defense
and the defense looks at the other teams offense.
But from the Houston game, I can see that
Kellys got a strong arm. Im no expert but he
looks good, sets up well, and is pretty flashy with
those white shoes.
Dont get me wrong, the white shoes business
doesnt mean a thing to me. I mean, every player
has his little things that he thinks will make him
play better.
I tape up my socks, for example. I feel if I look
good, I can play good. I guess Kelly feels the same.
About the shoes, well, I could care less whether
he wears white shoes or whether he wears purple

HURRICANE QUARTERBACK

Appreciates John Reaves

As Told To AL LEVINE
Special to the Alligator
MIAMI John Reaves has
had a fantastic year for Florida.
Hes got all kinds of records.
More power to him. I appreciate
a good quarterback.
Im not going to take a jealous
outlook about this thing. Im
not concerned with what he
does individually Saturday night
in the Orange Bowl.
Its not a game of individuals.
In this case, Reaves and I are just
two players on two units and
one of the units will win the
game, not one of the players.
Ive glanced over Floridas
statistics in the paper from time
to time this season. I follow
what they do only because Im
interested in sports. I watched
Reaves play Georgia on
television for a half and Ive also
seen him in films against Auburn
and Houston.
Reaves has got a tremendous
amount of composure. He has
Grand Slam
WIMBLEDON, England
Don Budge of the United States
only one of two players to sc~/e
a grand slam in four mens
singles tournaments, won
back-to-back Wimbledon titles in
1937 and 1938. Rod Layer of
Australia is the only other player
to win the Australian, French,
English and U.S. crowns.

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good size, too. He doesnt seem
extremely quick but he gets the
ball in the air. He seems to have
a good head. I dont know if hes
cocky or not. I just dont know
that much about him. Ive heard
hes quiet. He cant be any more
confident than me.
Hes definitely got a good
combination of talent and good
receivers going for him. Florida
has outstanding wideouts and
the backs seem to do a good job

Tale Os The Tape
JOHN REAVES KELLY COCHRANE
6- height 6-3
204 weight 203
19 age 19
Sophomore class Sophomore
7- record 3-3
7 for -50 knock downs 9 for -69
2,519 total offense 1,500
2,550 yards passing 1,415
54.4 percentage 51.0
22 touchdown passes 10
13.3 average yards completion 14.4
16 interceptions 13
76 long pass 76
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BY JOHN REAVES

shoes. Does he get the job done, .thats the
important thing.
I like to watch opposing quarterbacks. I like to
see if he s better than me. When the offense comes
off the field, were spectators. I really cant watch
the other quarterback as much as Id like because I
have to start thinking about what were going to do
when we get the ball. And Ive got to talk to coach
(Fred) Pancoast (offensive coach) some of the time.
So it s hard for me to really judge another
quarterback.
I understand that Kelly has a lot of confidence
that s good. So do I. If the quarterback is confident,
he can convince the team that he can do the job and
that they can do the job.
As far as Cochrane being a flashy player is
concerned, it doesnt bother me but it might bother
some people. Certain guys will want to get
him ... put a dent in his bubble.
It happens to me sometimes. There was a story in
the paper about me having a sexy smile or
something right before the Auburn game. During
the game, Auburn players kept yelling to me, Lets
see that sexy smile, John. With about three
minutes left in the game, someone from their bench
yelled it to me so I turned and smiled at them.

BY KELLY COCHRANE

of catching the ball running out
of the backfield.
When we were freshmen last
year, Reaves had a better game
statistically but we won the
game. He threw 50-some times.!
was 10 for 20, I think, but he
threw 30 more passes.
Im not worried about a
personal duel Saturday night. It
will take care of itself in the end,
Im sure. Like Ive said, I
appreciate a good quarterback.

Wedneadev, November 26,1966. The Florida Alligator.

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Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, Nawmhsr 26,1960

*
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. ./rjaM 'k, y> : !^9p|HnH^M^HHH|^^^^^^^H|^^HH^BHH|
Ih TURKEY TROT DRAGS
Tom Chastang in his double-A fuel dragster will be one of the
celebrities on hand this weekend at the Gainesville Dragway for the
strip's $15,000 Turkey Trot. The races feature both double-A
dragsters and funny cars.
£;:: INTRAMURALS
jSAE Orange Champ|
dmtmmmmmMeMmiMNm. STEVE ROHAN s
ORANGE FOOTBALL SAE spoiled the Beta Theta Pi dream
story of the year by upending the surging Betas 13-12 to capture the
Orange League football championship.
After a swimming championship and a third place finish in
volleyball, the Betas shook off an early defeat by the Lambda Chis
and defeated the Pi Lams, Lambda Chis and Pikes to face the SAEs.
The Es killed the SPEs 51-24 as a prep to the Beta match.
The SAEs went into the game counting on Mike Rollyson, a steady
defense, and a consistent offense.
The SAEs struck on a ten-yard scoring strike from Ed Cimino to
Ricky Miller. The first half ended with the Es leading 6-0.
The Betas struck like lightening in the second half as Henry Salzlar
lofted two 40-yard scoring bombs to Jimmy Scott who made two
great catches to put the Betas out in front 12-6.
With only a minute and a half left on the clock Ted French
intercepted a Beta pass deep in SAE territory and the Es drove down
to the Beta goal line despite two penalties against them. With 30
seconds remaining, Cimino popped a strike to Mike Rollyson to tie
the score and then came back with the same combination for the
winning extra point.
DORM BASKETBALL Towers V took their division title with a
thrilling 25-24 victory over Jennings V. They had clinched at least a
tie Wednesday night with a 58-16 win over Reid IV.
Bill Weedons 19 points proved to be the difference against Reid
but it was the outstanding defensive play of Soul Jones that took
the honors against Jennings. Haying-coach Red Telfer was high point
man against Jennings with eight points.
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PHIPPS PLACES SECOND

Owens Gamers Heisman

NEW YORK (UPI) Steve
Owens of Oklahoma, one of the
most prolific scorer and ball
carriers in college football
history, was named winner
today of the 1969 Heisman
Trophy as the nation's
outstanding collegiate player.
Owens, who also ran away
with the voting for a running
back position on the 1969
All-America team announced
today, is the second Oklahoma
University and big eight
conference athlete to win the
coveted award. Billy Vessels, a
halfback, won the honor in
1952.
The 6-foot-2, 215-pound
senior from Miami, Okla., edged
Mike Phipps, Purdue
Quarterback, 1,488 points to
1,334, in the Heisman balloting
conducted by the Downtown
Athletic Chib. He was named
first on 294 of the 992 ballots
cast by sportswriters across the
nation.
Rex Kern, Ohio State
quarterback, finished third in
the balloting with 856 points.
Phipps received 226 first place
votes and Kern 154.
Archie Manning, University of
Mississippi quarterback, was
forth with 582 points and Mike
Reid, defensive tackle for
unbeaten Penn State, finished
fifth with 297 points. Another
tackle, Mike McCoy of Notre
Dame, was sixth with 290.
Others, in order, were Jim
Otis, Ohio State fullback; Jim
Plunkett, Stanford Quarterback;
Steve Kiner, Tennessee
Linebacker; Jack Tatum, Ohio
State defensive back; Bob
Anderson, Colorado running
back; Lynn Dicky, Kansas State
quarterback; John Isenbarger,
Indiana running bade; and Bill
Cappleman, Florida State back.
This is the greatest thing
thats ever happened to me,

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Owens said by a long-distance
phone hookup form Norman,
Okla., to the Athletic Club.
I knew I was in the running,
but I didnt dream I had a
chance. It's something that every
player dreams of but never
thinks it could come true. Its
just the greatest thing that ever
happened to me.
Owens said I really wasnt
thinking about the Heisman that
much. I was primarily interested
in our season and in winning ball
games.
He said he is looking
forward to play professional
football.
11l be happy anywhere I
go.
John H. Ott, president of the
Downtown Athletic Club who
announced the winner, said
Owens will receive the award at
the 35th annual Heisman Dinner
on Dec. 4 in New York. Col.
Felix Doc Blanchard of the
U.S. Air Force, winner of the
1945 Heisman award while
playing for Army will be the
principal speaker.
The annual award is named in
honor of the late John W.
Heisman, a former college
football player and coach and
former director of athletics at
the Downtown Athletic Club.
Owens is tied with Mack
Herron of Kansas State for the
national scoring lead and ranks

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fourth in rushing.
With one game remaining,
Owens has carried 303 times or
1,262 yards and 21 touchdowns.
A touchdown in the Sooners
final game against Oklahoma
State would practically clinch
the national scoring title for
Owens.
Owens also needs 147 yards
to tie Cornells Ed Marinaro
(1,409) for the lead in the
rushing department. Marinaro
and the no. 2 and no. 3 rushers,
Joe Moore of Missouri and
Clarence Davis of Southern
California, have completed their
seasons.
Owens has broken the
three-yean touchdown mark of
51 TDS set by Armys Glenn
Davis, tiie 1946 Heisman Trophy
winner, and the big eight rushing
record established by Gale
Sayers of Kansas.
He set an all-time NCAA
record for carriers last season
with 357 and has surpassed the
three-year rushing mark of 3388
yards set by Eugene Mercury
Morris of West Texas State a
' year ago, Owens has a three-year
rushing figure of 3,606 yards
with a game remaining.
Owens gained 100 yards or
more in rushing in 17
consecutive games before having
the streak halted by Nebraska
last week.