Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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VoL 62, No. 49

HORNET MAKES 4TH RECOVERY
Astronauts Get Home
In Time For Turkey

SPACE CENTER Houston
(UPI) Three more
Americans who went to the
moon and felt its magic came
home Monday marvelling at
the gorgeous pink and blue
sight of the earth eclipsing
the sun.
Charles Pete Conrad, 5
feet 6 inches tall, and his
lunar buddies Alan L. Bean
and Richard F. Gordon
plummeted toward splashdown
in a balmy South Pacific to
close out mans first
incredible decade out of his
world.
The old carrier USS Hornet
sailed in moderate seas and
temperatures in the 80*s 405
miles southwest of Pago Pago
to make its fourth and
probably its last recovery of
American spacemen.
The three Navy fliers
brought back in Yankee
Clipper not only another
sample of the moons 4.5
billion-year-old crust but also
parts of a robot spacecraft
exposed on its surface since
1967.
Conrad and Bean, the
second pair of moonwalkers,
left on its surface a
nuclear-powered laboratory
which will send back lunar
Inside
HEW will probe UF Dec. 8
and 9 for possible
violations of the 1964 Civil
Rights Acts page 2
Classifieds 9
Small Society 4
Editorials IS
Letters 7
Movies 9
Sports.. 10

ACLU Requests Restraining Order Against Oath

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The American Civil liberties Union (ACLU)
presented a request for a restraining order
against Floridas loyalty oath to Supreme Court
Justice William O. Douglas Monday.
*No decision been made on the request
yet, but Douglas has seen the brief, according
to a clerk in his office.
Justice Hugo Black denied a similar request
Wednesday. No reason was given for the denial.
Since the request was denied by only one
justice, it is possible to present the case to
another. Norma Munn, chairman of the local
chapter of the. ACLU, said plaintiffs* have the

The
-'' t ~
Florida Alligator
C * ? V '
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Spacemen left a small nuclear
lab on Moons surface

secrets for more than a year
and opened the way for new
and more scientific adventures
beginning with Apollo 13 in
March.
As the spaceship built up
to a maximum speed of
24,600 miles per hour before
its scorching re-entry into the
earths atmosphere, the
astronauts were treated to
what Bean described as the
most spectacular sight of the
whole flight.
What we see now is the
sun eclipsed by the earth and
what its done is illuminate
the entire atmosphere all the
way around the earth, he
said.
It has blues and pinks in
it, Conrad joined in, but
instead of being banded, its
segmented which is very
peculiar. I dont know why.
Maybe its the difference
between earth and water.
Conrad said they could see
lightning and thunderstorms as
they approached the earth,
like fireflies down there
blinking on and off.
Were starting to look out
for other manmade satellites
now he said. We sure
would hate to run into one
up here.
Yeah, said Houston
control communicator Paul J.
Weitz.
Apollo 12 started out with
a scare when electricity
crackled up the Saturn 5
rocket and spaceship moments
after launch from Cape
Kennedy 10 days ago, but
from there on it was smooth
sailing.
Conrad put the lunar lander

University of Florida, Gainesville

Intrepid down only 700 feet
from the Surveyor 3
picture-taking robot compared
to the four-mile margin that
Neil A. Armstrong
accomplished on Apollo 11.

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RANDY BASSETT
AND THEY WAITED -.

While no faculty or staff tickets remain for
the Gator Bowl, 1,500 student tickets
remained unsold at the close of regular selling
times Monday.
*
Starting today, students may purchase two
tickets instead of one. Tickets wilt be sold at

APPEAL TO JUSTICE DOUGLAS

option of presenting their cases to any of the
justices.
Anyone seeking a liberal decision would
naturally turn to Black or Douglas, she said.
When a case is presented to the Court, the
opposition must be notified, Mrs. Munn said.
However, Monday afternoon, UF attorney
Tom Biggs had not heard anything of the
second case.
We had not anticipated they were going to
do it, so we havent planned a response, he
said.
The announced deadline for signing the oath
was Nov. 20. However, at least four people
have still not signed the oath, according, to Mrs.

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PHIL COPE
BEFORE CONDUCT COMMITTEE
Hearings continued late Monday night for UF students Judy
and David Rossi before the Committee on Student Conduct on
charges of using profanity to address a University policeman.
With Rossi is legal aide Mrs. Kay Ellis.

Munn.
Biggs said the statute is clear. Those who do
not sign should be fired.
The portions of the oath which require
personnel to swear they are not members of
the Communist party or of any organization
which advocates the overthrow of the
government were eliminated in the case
involving an Orange County teacher, Stella
Connell.
A temporary injunction against the original
oath was issued the same day as the Connell
decision.
However, the ACLU is now seeking' an
injunction against the entire oath.

gate 13 from 8:30 a.m. until 8 p.m. today or
until tickets are sold out. Os 800 tickets
originally allotted to married students, some
200 still remain according to Ticket Manager
Ray Dorman. Pictured here is part of the
faculty and staff crowd waiting Monday
morning for game tickets.

Tuesday, November 25, 1969



!, The Florida Alligator, Tueeday. Nowmber 25,1969

Page 2

OConnell Aids
Drug Council;
House Found

Hotels Offering
Student Discount

The Sheraton and Hilton
hotel chains are offering a
special student discount rate
at their hotels and motels.
The discount will vary
between five and 15 percent,
depending on location,
Secretary of Consumer Affairs
Ralph Glatfelter said Monday.^
We urge students to use
this service. If it works well,
possibly we can get discounts
in other areas, Glatfelter
said.
The discounts will be
available for the Thanksgiving
holiday, and for weekends
and holidays after that.
The discount will be
available when the students
will be able to use it,
Glatfelter said.

Senate To Vote On Reapportionment

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
s
Proposed amendments to reapportion
University Senate in committee for nearly a
year wf be brought before the senators for
final approval this afternoon.
And if the senators cant agree on the
controversial amendments to UFs constitution
today, UF President Stephen C. OConnell has
scheduled another special meeting Dec. 1 to
insure they will be completed.
Its been on the agenda for so long, the
pieside.it thought we ought to get it done,
Rae O. Weimer, special assistant to the
president, said Monday.
But there promises to be a good deal of

ORANGES
$2 bushel
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MODEL HOMES
Orange Lake Shores
13 mi. South on Hwy. 441
Phone: 591-1143

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right ro regulate the typographical tone of
aO advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator ftjft trot rtspbasible for) more
incorrect insertion of an advertblmdltt schedule*
By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs infant drug council moved a step closer to
operation this week with the announcement that a house
has been found for the drug group, and the initial funding
has come from UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
OConnells donation of a SSOO honorarium for a speech
represents the first of many donations promised to the
program. The donation will be used for rent and utilities
of the facility.
The facility grew out of formulation of a drug policy
this summer. It was first proposed at a drug retreat in
June which was attended by representatives from many
areas of the student body and administration.
A board of governors will oversee the day-to-day
operation delegated to Barbara Eisenstadt, who is currently
employed as a graduate assistant in the office of student
development.
Plans are to begin operation of the service no later than
the beginning of the winter quarter. The first six weeks
the service will be run on an experimental basis in order
to develope a permanent policy. In addition to helping
persons with a drug problem on a personal basis, plans

To receive a discount at
the Sheraton hotels, one must
present his special discount
card when registering.
Cards will be available
today at the front desks in
the living areas or in the
department of consumer
affairs in the Student
Government office.
With the discount, students
will be able to stay at a
Sheraton hotel in Ocala for
$8 a night, or $6.50 per
person for a double room.
If students let SG make
their reservations at Sheraton
hotels, 10 percent of the cost
of their bili will be given to
the Gator Loan Fund,
Glatfelter said.

II Mr. Rays
IpTYLE & BARBER SHOP
H Haircuts from $2.00 UP.
II WaSpecialize in Long hair.
Appointments Available.
Four Barbers to serve you.
W. UNIV. AVE. 372-3678

MINI-POSTER
REM£MO£R:
UNPER6ROONP
TESTING
O
HELPS CONTROL
mole pmkbe
To get a discount at a
Hilton hotel, a student only
has to show his ID when
registering.
In Orlando, using his
discount, a student can stay
in a Hilton hotel for $10.50
a night, or $8 per person for
a double room.

debate over several points in the proposals.
Non-resident faculty members are not
represented on the senate and the proposed
amendments dont provide for their
representation in the future. Mainly this affects
the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS) extension program, the College of
Engineerings GENESYS program and the
College of Medicine.
A statement calling the provision
undemocratic and signed by IS non-resident
faculty members of IFAS was presented to the
senate early in October.
The professors asked that:
they be extended the right of
representation and be allowed to vote for

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0 A J
provide for encounter groups, sensitivity groups and a
email crafts center.
Dave Doucette, chairman of the board of governors, said
the program is quite flexible. It will also be unique
becausTlTfe probably the first of its kind on a college
campus, he said. .
With the policy and house it is students trying to do
something for students, Doucette said Our main
problem is that we have been proceeding too slowly. We
dont know what kind of reaction we will get because we
have no previous information to go on.
One primary rule of the house is that no drugs of any
sort may be used in it. The program is trying to turn
people off drugs, to turn people on to the world,
Doucette said. ... ..
The house will be operating within the recently adopted
drug policy that stresses helping students who are
experiencing difficulties with drugs and are desiring help
without imposing disciplinary action. Only individuals
suspected of the sale, manufacture or purposeful
involvement of others in drugs will be subject to
discipline.
Beyond OConnells donation, assistance has been
promised from various community church and service

OConnells Signature
Not Yet On PE Bill

A bill passed by the Student Senate in September abolishing
mandatory physical education has not yet been signed by UF
Presiden Stephen C. OConnell, according to the presidents
special assistant Rae Weimer.
Weimer said Monday that difficulties in the availability of
so-called personal development courses which could be taken
in place of the physical education requirements is one of the
reasons OConnell has delayed signing the bill.
The bill stipulates students earning six quarter-hours in
personal development courses of a participatory nature beginning
next fall. The courses must be outside the students major field.
Some departments are having problems arranging their courses
for this purpose. The art department has only one course
available for non-majors.
Prof. E.E. Grissom, Chainnan of the arts department, said
they only have four classes of Art 210 (their only course
available for non-majors) and that in order to accomodate more
students the administration would have to give the department a
new building and some teachers.

We dont have the space and we dont have the budget,
Grissom said.

senate elections.
they be considered in computing the
number of seats occupied by IF AS.
t they be permitted to hold a seat in the
senate.
Another point of disagreement in the
amendments is the provision allowing for 10
voting student members. There are presently
five student members in the senate but they do
not have a vote.
Other changes the proposed amendments
provide for are a reduction in size to 200-250
members and election of a president pro
tempore who will preside at meetings if
OConnell is unable to attend.
The senates regular business meeting has
been changed from Dec. 4 to Dec. 3.

nai
N* Sale
I HI Dec 243
I mIM 11a.m. to
Reitz un o
5 pj, (yin Ballroom
I Sponsored J



HEW Officials
Will Probe UF
By CHRIS MOORE
Alligator Correspondent
Officials from the U.S. Department of Health, Education
and Welfare will probe UF Dec. 8 and 9 for possible
violations of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
School administrators and student leaders will meet with
the HEW to determine if UF is complying with Title 6 of
that law.
The section prohibits use of federal funds by public
institutions where there has been discrimination in terms
of color, race or national origin.*
The visit by federal investigators is part of a routine
check being made this month to all of Florida's state
universities.
Compared to other Florida state universities, UF has the
lowest percentage of black students enrolled with .5 per
cent. The percentages of black enrollment at other schools
are 5.3 at Florida Atlantic, 2.1 at West Florida, 1.7 at
South Florida, 1.4 at Florida Tech and 1.2 at FSU.
Chancellor Robert B. Mautz attributed UFs low
percentage to problems at the freshman and junior levels.
He said UFs freshman admission standards are high and
discourage students who cannot meet this achievement
level. Another factor he mentioned was that UFs
scholarships were not attracting many bright black students
who could get much larger scholarships .at other
universities.
At the junior level, Mautz felt that UFs efforts in
recruiting black junior college students were not aggressive
enough. Programs to correct this are now being initiated
by Roy Mitchell, coordinator for disadvantaged and
minority students.
He cited an exchange program between FSU and A&M
as an example of the states efforts to comply with the
Civil Rights Act.
Under the existing program, students from both
universities have been provided an opportunity to take
courses not available at their own institutions.
UF has not been involved in this program before
because of its highly specialized curricula. Most students
from A&M have transferred to UF if they wanted to enter
a specialized field such as architecture.
Implementation of a program at UF similar to that at
A&M and FSU is being investigated. As soon as the winter
quarter, UF may participate in this exchange.
Universities in Florida now receive S2O million in federal
funds for their operating budgets. Os these funds, UF
receives approximately half.
If UF is found not to be in compliance with the Civil
Rights Act, the university would be given an order to
show progress in the solution of its problems. No
immediate strong action would be taken, according to
Mautz, unless UF took no measures to correct the
problems.
In that event, UF would be denied access to federal
funds and would possibly be closed.
Several black universities ordered to close because of
discrimination are still fighting the decisions in the courts.
No decision has been reached yet on their status.

Student Conservatives

The Students for American
Conservatism (S.A.C.) are
presenting two films tonight
at the Reitz Union.
The first film, entitled
Communist Blueprint for
World Conquest, is a State
Department release of 1951.
It concerns tactics used by
the Communist One World
Movement, to subjugate the
United States and other
countries into slavery, said

THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
QUICK-WAY COPY CENTER (QUICK-SAVE)
L vd i /w

Jimmey Bailey 4JM campus
conseivative.
The second film, Anarchy,
U.5.A., deals with the civil
rights movement and alleged
Communist participation in it.
The films will be shown in
the ballroom of the Union
from 7-11 p.m. and admission
is 25 cents.
Baily said a question and

MEETING SET TONIGHT

Senate Seeks New Home

The Student Senate will
meet in the Engineering
Building tonight in its
continuing search for a
permanent home.
The group will convene at
7:30 in room 512 of the old
Engineering Building, just
south of the stadium. The
room is a large classroom that
will hopefully accomodate
visitors and the 80 senators
more easily than! the regular
meeting place, room 349 of
the Reitz Union.
They will consider a
resolution condemning the
Gator Bowl ticket distribution
policy that only made 3,200

IFC Retreat Theme
Relevancy In 70s
The Inter-Fraternity Council met at the Desert Inn Hotel in
Daytona Beach Friday and Saturday to discuss the relevancy of
the fraternity system in the 70s, at the IFCs annual retreat.
The purpose of the retreat was to develop new approaches
to the solution of fraternity problems and to provide a forum
of thinking between fraternities on campus.
IFC President Steve Zack welcomed 170 current and potential
officers of UF fraternities at a banquet Friday night.
Gov. Claude Kirk spoke briefly at the dinner.
A keystone address by Vice President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale preceded the main retreat address by Dr. Kenneth
Brasted, national executive chairman of Delta Chi.
Discussing the relevancy of the fraternities in the 70s were
panel members Dr. Benjamin Barger, UF psychologist; Brasted;
Frank Adams, dean of student development; Jake Schickel, an
SAE at UF and IFC district president and Edward J. Kirchner,
executive vice president of Phi Kappa Theta. Members of the
audience were encouraged to take an active part in the
discussion.
Seminars on fraternity management and finance, scholarship
and kitchen management were held on Saturday.
An evaluation of the past years rush techniques and programs
were discussed during an afternoon forum.
During the retreat, a fraternity showcase was displayed. The
exhibit consisted of various local and national fraternity
publications such as rush booklets and pledge annuals to be
shared with the other fraternities.
Retreat Chairman and IFC President Miles Wilkins termed the
weekend highly successful because of the large attendance and
exchange of ideas that took place.
Present Films Tonight

answer period would follow
the films.
It is in large part a
testimony by Negro F. 8.1.

Airplane Tickets On Deadline

Tickets for the Jefferson
Airplane concert Dec. 2
will continue on sale today
and tomorrow.
Tickets for the show are

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tickets available to students.
The Us was allotted a total
of 11,060 tickets. The rest
went to university and state
officials, boosters and alumni.
They will then consider a
resolution urging the campus
planning committee to
designate new locations for
fraternity and sorority
housing. The committee has
delayed any decision, leaving
three new national fraternities
homeless.
The senate will study a
ruling that prevents any
senators from holding major
positions in other branches of
Student Government. This is

agents who infiltrated the civil
rights movement and proved
it was Communist-inspired,-led
and-financed, said Bailey.

priced at $1.25 and $3,
and must be purchased
before the Thanksgiving
break. There will be two
concerts at 7:30 and 10
p.m.

TOMday, November 25,1968, The Florida Alligator, I

designed to prevent .conflicts
of interests and provide for a
more effective separation of
powers.
A bill appropriating nearly
$19,000 for four handball
courts behind Norman field is
expected to receive final
approval.
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ALLIGATOR
I ADS I

Page 3



t. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 25,1969 1 £

Page 4

U.S., Soviets Ratify
Nuclear Arms Treaty
WASHINGTON (UPI) The United States and the Soviet
Union formally ratified the nuclear nonproliferation treaty
Monday, a pact which President Nixon said was designed to
make our world a safer home for all mankind.
Nixon signed three copies of the treaty, bound in blue
leather, in his White House office, Simultaneously, the Presidium
of the Supreme Soviet parliament met in Moscow and
completed the ratification process for the Soviet Union.
The President expressed hope that 19 other countries would
follow suit quickly to bring to 43, including the United States,
Britain and the Soviet Union, the number of signatories required
to put the treaty into effect.
The treaty, which the Senate approved last March 13, forbids
the transfer of nuclear weapons, materials or manufacturing
information from nuclear powers to non-nuclear nations, which
likewise are forbidden to acquire them.
However, the United States, for instance, would be free to
maintain atomic weapons on foreign soil if it retained control
over their use.
The treaty requires nuclear powers to share their technology
for peaceful uses of atomic energy and directs them to seek a
nuclear arms control agreement.
The Russians decision to ratify the pact at this time was
believed by new West German Chancellor Willy
Brandts assurance he would bring Germany under the treaty
provisions.
France and Communist China, which have a nuclear
capability, were not expected to sign the treaty, which was
initialed by Washington, London and Moscow on July 1, 1968.

8 Americans Wounded in
First Use Os Ground Force

SAIGON (UPI) Officials
Monday reported eight
Americans wounded in a dash
that marked the first use of
U.S. ground forces in support
of Saigons counteroffensive
against North Vietnamese
troops near the Cambodian
frontier.
U.S. headquarters said the
casualties were suffered
Sunday by a unit of the 4th
Infantry Division in 15
minutes of fighting against
North Vietnamese near Ban
Me Thuot, about 175 miles
northeast of Saigon.
Ban Me Thuot is the allied
headquarters for the defense
of Bu Prant and Due Lap
along the Cambodian border.
There was no report of
North Vietnamese losses in
the fight, and communiques
Monday did not mention any
new action in the area.
Elsewhere, only scattered
action was reported Sunday
and Monday. Spokesmen said
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong gunners shelled 13
targets in the 24-hour period
ended at 8 a.m. Monday,
fewest since Oct. 8.
The U.S. command gave no
explanation of why American

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RICHARD PARKER
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9 PM 'TIL
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infantrymen had been
committed to the Bu
Prang-Cue Lap campaign
which had been seen as a test
of South Vietnamese forces to
go it alone against North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
units.
South Vietnamese troops in
the mountainous region have
received American air and
artillery support but major
infantry forces have been
withheld as part of the
program to Vietnamize the
war.
Fatal Shooting
Ends Tea Party
ATLANTA (UPI) A
woman whipped a .22 caliber
pistol out of her brassiere at
a tea party Monday and
killed another woman during
an argument, police reported.
The shooting occurred at a
tea sponsored by the Friendly
Saving Social Club.
Mary Lois Rooks, about
27, was fatally wounded when
hit in the side by a bullet
and Delores C. Campbell, 37,
was charged with murder and
discharging Firearms in the
city.

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p(2aAFTfeP P&ALp(2aAFTfeP THAT

IN SALT TALKS
Similar ViewsOnArms Limit Voiced

HELSINKI (UPI) The United States and
Russia have voiced similar views on offensive
and defensive nuclear weapons for arms
limitation negotiations, diplomatic sources said
Monday.
This similarity continued through todays
session at the preliminary Strategic Arms
Limitation Talks (SALT), the sources said.
It was emphasized that so far both sides
have expressed only general ideas on weapons
systems which could be the subject of fullscale
negotiations next year.
Todays meeting lasted two hours and was
the third since the talks began Nov. 17.
Details were withheld as both sides

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And listened. The light changed but nobody
moved. It changed again. Three more times.
The driver of the next car leaned through
his window and shouted: gonna tell my kids
I saw Stu Ramsay and Chicago Slim.
The light changed and everybody drove on.
Singing.
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maintained complete secrecy, but it has emerged
that exchanges have touched on the new
multiple warhead long-range missiles (MIRVS),
anti-missile defense systems (AMBMS),
missile-firing submarines and strategic bombers.
The two delegations, headed by Gerard C.
Smith for the United States and Vladimir S.
Semenov for Russia, are expected to meet again
on Friday after their Wednesday session.
Preliminary discussions probably will continue
through this week and the next week after
that, the sources said.
By then it is hoped to reach an
understanding on the basis for concrete
limitation negotiations in January or February.



ARMY INVESTIGATES ORIGINAL INQUIRY
Casey Court Martialed In Viet Massacre

WASHINGTON (UPI)
The Army Monday ordered a
court-martial for Ist Lt.
William L. Calley Jr. on
charges of the premeditated
murder of 109 South
Vietnamese villagers during a
sweep in Quang Ngai province
last year.
Simultaneously, the Army
began an investigation to
determine whether the original
field inquiry into the alleged
GI massacre of residents of
Song My hamlet March 16,

An 'Epidemic of Fear Strikes Boston Jews

BOSTON (UPI) Violence
against members of the Jewish
community in parts of Boston
has increased substantially in
the past few months, creating
what one resident described as
an' epidemic of fear.
Attacks, robberies and
beatings have become so
frequent that many elderly
persons have stopped
venturing away from the
safety of their homes on

Floridians Seek Cape Name
Change Back To Canaveral

WASHINGTON (UPI) An
array of Floridians said
Monday they didnt want to
detract from the name of the
late president, but they would
like to have the name Cape
Kennedy changed back to
Cape Canaveral.
Sens. Spessard L. Holland,
D-Fla., told the Senate
Interior Committee their joint
House-Senate resolution would
not affect the Kennedy Space
Center.
The Floridians approved the
action of former President
Johnson in renaming the
space center on Nov. 29,
1963, shortly after Kennedys/
death, but say he went too

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1968, was adequate.
That investigation concluded
that no massacre had taken
place.
Calleys court-martial will
be a capital proceeding under
the order issued by Maj. Gen.
Orwin C. Talbott, commander
of Ft. Germing, Ga., where
Calley is stationed on an
unrestricted basis.
The Pentagon said this
means that if convicted,
Calley will receive a minimum
penalty of life imprisonment

Friday nights to go to
synagogue, one rabbi said
Monday.
Its a terrible situation,
said Rabbi Mordecai Savitsky.
It happens very often,
almost every couple of days.
The increase in violence
prompted members of the
Jewish community to invite
Rabbi Meir K. Kahane,
president of the 7,000-member
Jewish Defense League (JDL),

far in renaming the cape as
wefl.
Johnson changed the name
of the space center by an
executive order but changing
the geographic name technically
required action of Board of
Geographic Names,
representing 11 departments
and agencies.
Holland pointed out the
board acted within a single
day although this required
unanimous concurrence of the
Departments of State, Army
Navy, Air Force, Interior,
Post Office, Library of
Congress and the Central
Agency. ~

and that the court, by a
unanimous vote of its five
officers, can sentence him to
death.
Calley, 26, of Waynesville,
N.C., was a platoon leader in
the Armys 11th Light
Infantry Brigade during the
sweep of Song My.
The court-martial
specifications accused him of
the murder of at least 109
civilians including a
2-year-old child.
The impression in the

to Boston this past weekend
to explain how that
organization works to protect
the community, particularly in
New York City.
Rabbi Kahane, of New
York City, told about 75
elderly Jews at the meeting

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specifications was that Calley
personally shot the victims
with a rifle. But the Army
had said earlier that an order
to kill someone, can be
murder under military law
even though the person giving
the order did not carry it
out.
The Army has reported
that 25 other soldiers or
former servicemen besides
Calley are under investigation.
One of them, S. Sgt. David
Mitchell, 29, of St.

that there is an epidemic of
fear here. Its gotten very bad
in the past six or eight
months.
He said people are dying,
getting beaten and shot.
Rabbi Savitsky said the
violence has increased
substantially in the last couple
of months.
The people are afraid and
have stopped going to
synagogue. They are beaten
and robbed going to
synagogue to pray on Friday
nights, he said.
He told of one elderly
couple that was attacked
practically inside the

The Bikini
Originated in France
Maybe you can start
a little something there.
Call 392-1655 or cow by 310, JWRU

Tuesday, November 28,1969, The Florid* Alligator, I

Franciville, La., stationed at
Ft. Hood, Tex., has been
charged with assault with
intent to murder.
Calleys trial was not
expected to begin at Ft.
Beiming for a month or
more. He was to have been
mustered out of the Army on
Sept. 5 but was held back
when he was charged with
murder.
He now is a special
assistant to the deputy
commander at Benning.

synagogue a couple of weeks
ago by a couple of youths.
More recently, he said, a
sexton was followed into a
temple and robbed of S3O.
Members of the Jewish
community plan to meet soon
to establish a local JDL
chapter. Almost all those
attending Sundays gathering
said they had been attacked
recently while walking in their
neighborhood. None wanted
to be quoted for fear of
reprisals.
Some residents carry a can
of hair spray to ward off
assailants, while others carry
small cans of tear gas.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 25,1969

Page 6

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

m*m cjwKiiJr nr^***
The President Says Ignore Them.
He Does
Mr. EDITOR:
I can't help it. I do advocate the violent
overthrow of the government of Florida.
GEORGE D. WINIUS
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

Expect More From Spiro

' As anti-war sentiments continue to
reverberate throughout America, we can
expect a continuation if not an
escalation of Vice President Agnews
demagogic rhetoric.
President Nixon began his
administration with the promise to
Bring Us Together, but the
polarization of America has if
anything picked up speed since
Nixons inauguration.
And now comes Spiro Agnew with his
condemnation of all impudent intellectual
snobs who dare oppose what has already
become Nixons war.
And, while President Nixon has
apparently made a feeble attempt to
appear to be a President for all people
by talking out of both ends of his
mouth, Agnew has begun to engage in
tile partisan petty harangues that should
be beneath the dignity required of the
Presidents office with Nixons silent
blessings.
The Nixon administration may benefit

Refutes Hollis
Jim Hollis in his Nov. 19 letter issued a public challenge.
Although the editorial pages are not the place to carry on a
personal feud, I believe the issues art of concern to most of
the campus and ask your forbearance for a reply.
Mr. Hollis challenged me to prove my allegations that Mr.
Mathews used half-truths, inuendos and our-right lies in his
Nov. 11 Veterans Day speech. I accept this challenge.
Mr. Mathews gave us a short hsitory lesson on Vietnam.
According to him our involvement there started in 1956 when
the independent nation of South Vietnam asked for American
help in repelling Communist aggression.
He neglected to mention that our involvement started much
before that.
From 1950 to 1954 we gave the French two and one-half
billion dollars to help than repress the struggle for
independence in their colony of Vietnam. When the French
were driven out in 1954, we took over support of the colonial
government and agreed to honor the 1954 Geneva Accords that
the country be temporarily divided in half, to be reunited in a
national election in 1956.
When it became obvious that the government in the southern
half of Vietnam under colonial premier Ngo Dinh Diem would
lose the election to Ho Chi Minh, we broke our agreement and
refused to let the elections take place. We then declared South
Vietnam to be an independent country and moved our advisors
in.
Mr. Mathews omission of this portion of our Vietnam
involvement is know as half-truth.
Mr. Mathews made the mistake of equating disagreement on
the Administrations Vietnam policy with lack of patriotism.
Patriotism is love of ones country, not love of its elected
officials.
If you saw your child or parent making a grievious error,
you would try to convince him of his error. To remain silent
would show lack of love and concern.
Mr. Mathews implication that anyone not supporting the
Administration s policy is unpatriotic does a disservice to the
millions of patriotic Americans veterans among them who
think their country has made a mistake. This implication is
known as inuendo.
Mr. Mathews spoke of the democratically elected
government of South Vietnam. It must be noted that
neutralists and anti-westerners were not allowed to run in the
" the candidate that came in second was
arrested and is still in jail!
Tf meU Ky regime democratic is an out-right He.
, \* r ex Pj anation of our Vietnam involvement were
r;iH W l ShOUld i h getting out at 3111 If it were true we
worth it y American Hves lost would be
Unfortunately, this explanation is not true.

in the short run from the controversies
aroused by Agnew, since at least
temporarily the press and the public
have taken their minds away from the
Vietnam slaughter and other thorns on
Americas side.
But, if the present administration was
sincere in its promises of unity,. it
certainly is not showing it. Americas
own domestic conflicts are difficult
enough without the germination of the
seeds of hatred and division Agnew is
spreading so generously.
We could never argue that Agnews
election to the Vice Presidency should in
effect ban his right to express his
feelings however nauseating they might
seem to us.
But the Vice President seems bent on
deepening the gaps of mistrust already
prevalent in America.
And, at a time when reconciliation
seems vitally needed, Agnews politics
seems much less than statesman-like.

Editorial

K.R.Scholtz



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Shagnasty Deflowered
MR. EDITOR:
Re the advertisement appearing in the paper Thursday,
November 20, on page 23, I would like to protest that the
allegation that I am a virgin is damaging my reputation.
I don't know who on the paper doesnt like me, but since
the ad ran, I have been turned down for dates by three UF
coeds. In fact, an additional 27 have telephoned me and said
they wouldnt go out with me even if I did ask them.
I have carefully built up a reputation as a good Florida man,
and felt I needed no introduction. Now, all this is shot to hell.

Reconsider Faculty Senate Plan

MR. EDITOR:
The University Senate is a
body which, along with the
Administrative Council and
the Student Senate, will
largely determine the future
course of our university. Thus
a discussion, hopefully
constructive, of the proposed
basic reorganization of the
University Senate, soon to be
voted on by the Senate,
seems appropriate for this
newspaper.
Good government uses
officials with varying terms of
office, with long terms and
even life-tenure to provide
stability and independence
from transient and special
political pressures for some
officials, and with short terms
to insure the proper political

Alligator Staff
. ~ Mary Toomey
Janie GouM Editorial Assistant
Assignment Editor Neal Sanders
Anne Freedman Assignment Editor Helen Huntley
Anne Freedman Assistant News Editor
Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Pubis aborts.
o Artwur'kinu offices in Room 330. Reit/
Editorial. Business. Advertising one
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392 1683.
or .rdtfiKWS&awb

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BOLLIVER SHAGNASTY, 3FY

responsiveness of other
officials.
Whereas, a few years ago,
with a foil professorship as
sole qualification, all Senate
faculty members had senate
tenure terminated only by
retirement, the present proposal
goes to the other extreme
with three-year elective terms
for all faculty members.
Furthermore, as membership
criteria the nationally
recognized scholarly
achievements requisite to a
professorship are now to be
replaced largely by the local
social and community
activities which produce the
local prominence necessary for
election.
It would seem that an
intermediate system combining
good features of both

Speaking Out

CRA A Disappointment

Those who hoped for an analysis from the
University Center for Rational Alternatives
(CRA) of the crises on university campuses
must have been disappointed by A Call To
Freedom, a statement by the CRA on
academic freedom (Alligator Oct. 3rd). This, the
Center's first offering, is a bland collection of
woolly rules and principles to which anyone
may subscribe without much thought.
In the introduction, it is suggested that all
members of the university community as well
as various public officials endorse the statement.
It is puzzling why such a request should be
made; surely it is not yet another attempt at
separating the sheep from the goats. It is say,
too, that the Alligator staff should relinquish its
responsibility to analyse and criticize.
Is the purpose of the CRA's statement to
extend the protection of academic freedom to
the political statements of members of the
university community? Does the CRA realize
that the range of expressed political thought
and advocacy at UF is distressingly narrow and
that any widening of it requires a drastically
changed atmosphere? I think the answer must
be no to both questions.
Several sympathetic readings of the statement
reveal it to be, in the main, a collection of
vague rules of conduct in which academic
freedom may be given the most narrow
interpretation, and the infringement of rights
. the widest.
r If a free and open academic process is no
ihore than the pursuing, the giving and the
receiving of a term grade without questions or
interruptions, then indeed there is little
importance to be attached to academic freedom.
If an infringement of rights is the interruption
of a normal circuit of classes to discuss the
brutality of war and its alternatives, then we
have successfully defined education as a
classroom, blackboard and chalk affair.
Let us consider several specific items which
the CRA should have pronounced on. One
could mention the names of two or three
faculty members who are no longer here
because their rights were not effectively
protected, but I shall instead concentrate on
items which affect a larger portion of the
university community.
UF requires of all its employees, including
faculty, teaching assistants and scholarship
holders, a loyalty oath. Recently, the Dean of

extremes is called for a
system with desirable degrees
of independence, political
responsiveness, stability, and
recognition of the primacy of
the University's academic
interests. For example, half of
the Senate's faculty members
could be elected by vote of
the entire faculty with a
three-year-minimum three-year-minimumemployment
employment three-year-minimumemployment requirement for
election eligibility and a
one- year-minimum-employment
requirement for voting. The
remaining Senate faculty
members would be full
professors who automatically
serve one two-year term every
six years.
The reorganization proposal
also provides for ten voting
student members. The recently
implemented principal that
each of the Universitys three
governing bodies should hear
representatives of the other
two is excellent and should
contribute to the soundness
of the decisions of all these
bodies. However, granting the
vote to these representatives is
meaningless tokenism and
blurs the lines of
responsibilities. Preferably,
students should not vote in
the University Senate and
faculty should not vote in the
Student Senate.
mmtmaJkET A. SAWYER

the Graduate School required holders of
university stipends to sign an affidavit stating
that the stipend holder had not been convicted
of disruption of the university. Both items are
required under threat of loss of pay.
A recently passed state law (House Bill No.
590, Chapter 69-279) removes the alternative of
disagreement with university policies by students
and employees of state institutions, and
threaten employees and students with dismissal
or suspension for undefined caused.
Another law (SB 989, Chapter 69-366)
provides for a student chaiged by the civil
authorities with infraction of drug laws to be
suspended from classes before his case is heard
in court and to be automatically expelled if
convicted.
Characteristically, no amends are made to the
student if he is found innocent or his case
dismissed. This last law surely ranks close
behind preventive detention, no-knock search
and abscenity laws as inviting selective abuse by
law inforcement agencies.
These are only a few of the many items
which should concern any group of persons
interested in the health and welfare of the
university community. But do they interest the
CRA? I surmise not, but would be delighted to
be corrected.
Since the second world war, U.S. government
agencies have become preeminent in the
financing of research at American Universities.
The major portion of this support comes from
the military, and a significant amount of the
resulting research is classified. In what way does
the phrase free and open used thrice in the
CRA statement apply to such research? Why is
the protection of academic freedom extended to
supportive research into the uses of chemical
and biological agents in warfare, while that
protection is denied, under the guise of
professional responsibilities, to statements and
observations by University personnel on the
politics of the day? How would the CRA
change this rationally.
In eonclusion, I should like to point out that
I will be glad to support the CRA as soon as
it has proved to me that meaningful academic
freedom does exist here to be supported, and
as soon as it has put forward a viable plan for
effecting change when change is opposed by an
authority which limits the alternatives.

Ten forty-three.
In exactly TWO MINUTES
I*ll ring the
FIRST BELL and
they'll all
stand stilll
So I'll SCREAM at 'em
and take their NAMES
and give them FIVE
DETENTIONS and EXTRA
HOMEWORK! NEXT time
they won't move
after the first
bell! x
Mr f \

Tuesday, November 26, 1960, The Florid* Alligator, I

By A. R. Todd

All, that is, except
your potential DEVIATEI
Tour fledgling REBELI
Tour incipient BOAT BOATROCKER!
ROCKER! BOATROCKER! THEY'LL try
to move all right!
THEY'LL have to
learn the HARD
way not to move!
Non-movement \
after
the first H
bell is fM.
the 1 ild
backbone f i
of Western I ]
Civilization! / /
1 \

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 25,1969

Page 8

Orange a d

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

WORK-STUDY JOBS are
immediately available for UF
students. Students can work up
to 15 hours per week during the
quarter and 40 hours per week
during break. Basic
qualifications are par::tal
income below $7,500.
Applications and information is
available in the Student
Financial Aid office. Room 23
Tigert Hall.
END OF QUARTER
NOTICES pertaining to the fall
quarter should be sent to the
Orange ft Blue, Bldg. H
(392-0186), in time to appear in
the Alligator o> Nov. 25, Dec. 2,
5 and 8. The Alligator will not
be printed Nov. 27-28 and the
Dec. 8 issue will be the last for
the fall quarter. Winter
publication will resume Jan. 5.
THE UNIVERSITY SENATE
will meet Tuesday, November
25, 1969 in McCarty
Auditorium. The following items
are on the agenda:
1. Future Action Item of
June 26,1969 Agenda
2. Action Item 3 of
September 25,1969 Agenda
3. Attachment to President
O'Connell's memorandum of
November 10, 1969 calling a
meeting of the General
Assembly.
If the business of the
meeting of November 25 is
not concluded, another special
meeting has been scheduled
for Monday, Dec. 1.
FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES:
Widespread scheduling of final
examinations prior to the time

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
SCHEDULE
1969 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
, Nov. 26 Nov. 27 Nov. 28 Nov. 29 Nov. 30
College Library 8- 6 Closed 8 5 8-5 2pm-11pm
Research Library 8 6 Closed 8 5 8 -6 2pm-11pm
PKY Lib. of Florida
History (4th floor) 8:30-5 Closed Closed Closed Closed
Special Collections
(sth floor) 8:30-5 Closed Closed Closed Closed
Architecture 8i Fine Arts
201A AFA 8 5 Closed Closed Closed 6pm-10pm
Chemistry Library 2pm-spm
216 LEI 8-5 Closed Closed Closed 7pm-10pm
341 NRN 8-10:30 Closed 9__s Closed 2pm-10:30pm
Engineering & Physics 2pm-spm
410 ENG 8-5 Closed Closed Closed 7pm.in nm
Health 8< Phys. Ed. R. R. E
305 FLG 8 5 Closed Closed Closed 7pm-10pm
Health Center Library :
LIOSMSB 8:30-12M Closed 8:30-5 8:30-12N 2pm-12M
Hume (Agriculture)
C MCC 8-5 Closed Closed Closed 7pm-11pm
Journalism & Communication ~
337 STA 8 5 Closed Closed Closed Closed
Law Library 8 -12 N
Law School 8 -11 ?pm-11pm 8 -11 8 -11 8:30-11
Mead Library (PKY Lab ~
School-Yong Bldg. F) 8 4 Closed Closed Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office 8-12, 1-5 Closed Closed Closed Closed
Record Room 8-12, 1-5 Closed Closed Closed 2-5,6-10

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provided in the published
Schedule of Courses results in
disruption of the final week of
classes and hardships to the
students involved. Therefore, the
following policy is in effect:
-No examinations, class
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five class days of
a regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
- All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses of the Schedule and
Calendar Committee. Requests
submitted to the sub-committee
for changes in the examination
time must be justified and
include a specific statement of
the effects on the students of
such a change.
-It shall be the
responsibility of department
chairmen and deans to enforce
this policy.
Laboratory sections of many
courses may be exempt from the
above policy provided such
exemption has been approved by
the Sub-Committee on
Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires use of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination has
traditionally been given at the
last meeting of the lab, and

BLUB BULLETIN

3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.
In the case of laboratory-type
courses, the request shall state
that traditionally no provision
has been in the final
examination schedule for such
courses.
In some cases a policy of
continuing exemption may be
established with respect to
laboratory sections and
laboratory type courses.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in .advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
DEC. 1: HENDRY COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; MARION
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
PINELLAS COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; COLLIER
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
JACKSONVILLE EPISCOPAL
HIGH SCHOOL, FLA.;
DEKALB COUNTY SCHOOLS,
GA.
DEC. 2: TAYLOR COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.;
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; SARASOTA
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS,
GA.; MONROE COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.
DEC. 3: DADE COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; BAKER
COUNTY SCHOOLS. FLA.;
ALACHUA COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; VOLUSIA

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
WASHINGTON D.C. SCHOOLS;
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS,
FLA.
DEC. 4: HERNANDO
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
POLK COUNTY SCHOOLS,
FLA.; SOUTHERN BAPTIST
CONVENTION, TENN.
DEC. 5: PINE CREST
SCHOOL, FLA.
GENERAL NOTICES
CAMPUS TELEPHONE
DIRECTORIES for personal use
will be sold only to students,
faculty and staff at the Campus

Tuesday, November 25

Seminole Student Portraits,
346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Students for American
Conservatism Film,
Communist Blue Print for
World Conquest", Union
Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Election of Officers, 355
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, &
D Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 118
Union 7:15 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Young
Democrats Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Center of Man & Hillel
Foundation, "Shlomo
Carlebach", Rathskeller,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.

I I
!;! Albert Claus says : 'i
5 $
Â¥ $j
v
A ?
$ I
' SHOP I
I ALLIGATOR 1
! 1
11
.y*>ywwvAY*wjv.%v.sN%Vt:.y.v.v/.\%v.v.v.v.v.y.y.:.v.v.v.v.%;.v.;.v.;.v.v.v;.;

Campus
Calendar

Shop and Bookstore for sl. The
University student or staff I.D.
card must be presented when the ~
directory is purchased.
NAVY RECRUITERS from
Jacksonville will interview
students in Gainesville on
Friday, Dec. 5, in Room
M-112 of the Medical Science
Building.
STUDENT PHYSICAL
THERAPY ASSOCIATION
will meet at 6 p.m. on Dec.
2 in Roon A-91, Health
Center. All persons interested
are invited to hear a speaker
from Vista.

Wednesday, November 26

Seminole Student Portraits,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00 r
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union.
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 27
THANKSGIVING
Friday, November 28
Union Movie, 'The Wrong
Box", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
SGP: "Jefferson
Airplane", $3.00 & $1.25.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE 1
GunsGuns Guns lnventory TTVW
4.50. Buy Sell Trade Repair. /
Reloading supplies. Custom;
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer. Micanopy. 466-3340.
( A-ts-6-p)
2 Falls 1 dk. brown, real hair, barely
worn. $25.1 Platinum, real European
hair! worn once $35. Call
3 78-4671.(A-st-45-p)
Honda 150 cc, 1965 fair condition,
dependable transportation, also
Canon Pellix camera 1.2 lens Cycle,
$l5O, Camera, $175. Call Jeff
378-6819. (A-st-45-p)
FREE CATS All ages, colors, and
sexes Call 392-1591, between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (A-st-47-p)
Must Sublease. College Terr. Apt. 1
blk. from campus. $120.00/mo. Utl.
Included. Call 378-4190. (B-st-46-p)
Furnished mobile home 68'. 2
Bedroom, 2 bath 81 Study. Central air
& heat & other extras. Call Liz after
6:30 373-2210 take over payments.
r 67 Triumph 650 TRG-C. Best offer.
Phone 378-7191. (A-st-46-p)
1956 MG A good mechanically S2OO.
Martin 0018 C guitar with case $175.
Four 15 wire wheels S6O. Two Shur
prof, mikes $l5O. One Roberts & 1
Norelco mike with stand SSO.
372-7024 after 5. (A-st-45-p)
MAKE YOUR ROADRUNNER,
SUPER BEE, ETC., REALLY RUN.
Factory hi-perf. parts. CHEAP. Call
392-9362. (A-3t-48-p)
8' x 42' 2 bedroom mobile home.
Air conditioned, redecorated; with
utility shed. Call 372-3112 or
372-8032. $1750 or best offer.
(A-st-49-p)
1967 12x47 Mobile Home. 1
bedroom, air cond., carpet, storage
shed, built in bookcase, in nice
park on large lot. $2700. Call
378-4567. (A-3t-49-p)
1968 12x60 Mobile Home. 2
bedroom, air cond., central heat.
Available Dec. 20. Down payment
and assume low monthly
payments. Call 372-2225 after 5
p.m. (A-st-49-p)
1968 Fiat 850 Convertible. No
equity. Tal less than SIOOO. Call 378-5321 up
to 5 p.m. 454-1659 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-49-p)

MIKE FLYNNS
M.S.S. Nx/AX SYSTEM
Simonize Paste Wax Your Car
in 30 MIN. (NO WAITING)
GUARANTEED 6 FULL MONTHS!
Special Student Rates $6.95 others slightly higher
NOBLE'S ATLANTIC STATION 1410 S.W. 13th
Across from Arbys Phone: 3 78-593
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
V 2 BROILED CHICKEN
* $l .O 9
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti
L GAINESVILLE MALL jj

FOR RENT I
Sub-let Village 34 1 bedroom apt.
Available mid-Dec. Pets allowed.
Easy drive to campus. Call 372-6020
before noon or after 6:00 p.m. Dec.
rent paid. (B-7t-48-p)
I bdr furnished apt. New, clean,
quiet. $lO3 mo. starting Dec. 1.
Prairie View 6315 S.W. 13 St. Apt.
II (South on hwy 441) 378-5171.
(B-3t-48-p)
Furnished mobile home 68 2
bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central
Air & Heat & other extras. Call Liz
after 6:30. 373-2210, Married
Students Only. (B-4t-46-p)
Females Help Roommate
going to Calif. Must sublet
Landmark Apt. for yr. or just
winter quarter your choice.
Sauna, groovy neighbors.
378-5762. (B-3t-49-p)
Sublease 2 bedroom Gator Town
apt. Jan-June. Furnished. Call
378-7879. (B-2t-49-p)
MlHI 8
I WANTED
Female Grad Student needs
roommate. Beginning winter quarter.
Efficiency apt. fully furnished. Call
373-2612 after 6:30 p.m. (C-3t-46-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share new four bedroom, two bath
Spanish style apartment just off
sorority row. Private bedroom,
carpeting, central heat and air, all
electric kitchen, pool and barbecue
grills. Reasonably priced, all utilities
furnished. Call June at 372-5345.
(C-ts-47-c)
Wanted one coed roommate to sublet
College Terr. Apartment. Rent is $65
a mo. utl. inc. V? blk from campus.
Call 378-8345 after 5 p.m. Rent Paid
until Dec. 10 (C-st-45-p)
Male Roommate Landmark Apt.
Available December 15 December
rent free. $46.50/month. Pool, A/C,
carpet, dishwasher. Call 378-0727.
(C-3t-47-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Luxury and .privacy at a price YOU
can afford! Four bedroom, two bath
townhouse with carpeting, central
heat and air, Spanish decor, pool and
barbecue grills. Walk to campus.
Phone 372-5344. (C-ts-47-c)
1 roommate needed for winter
quarter. Landmark Apts. 163.
373-2276. (C-st-48-p)

Tuesday, November 25,1969. The Florida Alligator,

§ WANTED "''J.
Male roommate wanted to share 4
BR plush La Mancha apt. with 3
grad, students. $ 70/mo. incl. utilities.
Ready now or Jan. Call 376-1337.
(C-st-45-p)
WANTED: Riders to Jackson, Miss,
and points between. Leaving Dec. 12
and Dec. 15, returning Jan 3 or 4.
Call 373-2612 after 6:30 p.m.
(C-3t-46-p)
FRENCH QUARTER will have room
for 2 coeds winter quarter by the
pool. Good for your headl Save you
bread. Apt. 97. Call 376-0613.
(C-4t-48-p)
Competent In Physical Chemistry?
Small library project on critical
phenomena. Call 372-6061 after $
11:00 p.m. Good pay. (C-3t-48-p) $
Female roommate to sublet starting >
winter qtr. Walk to campus. Air and
heat. Call 378-2793. (C-St-48-p)
1 or 2 coed roommates wanted. 2 BR
and lUz bth. Tanglewood Townhouse
Apt. SSO mo. 376-1015. (C-st-48-p)
g
Female Roommate for Village Park
Apt. 42.50 + A Util. Avail. Dec. 12.
No rent till Jan. 5. Call 378-3157
after 5 p.m. Ask for Jeannie.
Female roommate beginning winter
quarter. Private room. La Mancha
Apts. Phone 373-2895 or come
see us in apt. 51. Poolside
Townhouse. (C-3t-49-p)
Needed: male roommate. Apt. IV2
blks. from- campus. A/C,
$ 50/month + utilities. Call
378-7757. (C-2t-49-p)
Roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment 2 blocks from campus.
Available immediately. $36.25 PM.
Call 372-7550. (C-st-49-p)
Female roommate to share 4
bedroom apartment near campus.
Central heat, air and pool. No
utilities. $75 month. Call
373-1466 anytime. (C-3t-49-p)
PLUSH! 1 Male Roommate needed
to share poolside, townhouse, 4
bedroom, fully carpeted and air
cond. La Mancha apt. Immediate
occupancy. Call Alan after 4 p.m.
at 378-8824. (C-2t-49-p)
I HELP WANTED f
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
the Business and Administration
Offices of Student Publications. Call
Mr. Myking at 392-1681 between the
hours of 8 and 5. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-ts-47-c)
CLERK-TYPIST il position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. You'll be using
IBM's new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminole and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
Clerk Typist full time. Begin
immediately. Salary $329 to $360
per month depending on
experience. Call 372-0096 or write
P.O. Box 14286. (E-2t-49-p)
Experienced Sales Person for
Lingerie Shop. Age about 25 years
and married. Immediate opening.
Call 378-5136. (E-3t-49-c)
WUWU RADIO NEEDS STUDENT
TO WRITE RADIO
COMMERCIALS "THAT CAN
SELL. CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT ONLY IF YOU
ARE EXTREMELY CREATIVE
AND HAVE GOOD WRITING
ABILITY. PREVIOUS MEDIA OR
AGENCY EXPERIENCE
HELPFUL. PHONE 376-2688.
(E-2t-49-c)
f KADUCY METZGER -m # am
PLUS \\ I /
CO-HIT \V / AMmrt
"CIRCLE \ V
OF LOVE" (MS
AT 9:00

Page 9

j HEIF WANTED §
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua." (E-l lt-42-p)
fAUTOS |
VW 1966 Black with red
Interior, one-owner, 53,000 miles.
$950. Call Mike at 373-2349.
(G-st-45-p)
PERSONAL
i X
UNDERGROUND DYLAN ALBUM
'WHITE WONDER', now available
exclusively In Gainesville at the
Subterranean Circus, 10 S.W. 7th St.
while they last. (J-st-46-p)
FREE KITTENS BLACK AND
WHITE CALL 373-1737. (J-5t^47-p)
Need ride to Washington, D.C., Dec.
13. Will share expenses. 392-8690,
Diane. (J-3t-48-p)
The Friday Afternoon Club wont
meet Thanksgiving weekend.
(J-2t-49-p)
CHI PHIS today is your day!
Good luck in the championship.
We love you. Pumpkin and Pixie.
(J-lt-49-p)
DALE LEWIS REPRESENTS
GREATNESS. Fan club meeting
tonight 9 p.m. outside in front of
Research Lib. Wear black shirt.
(J-lt-49-p)
YOUNG DEMOCRATS Pre-finals
meeting Tues., Nov. 25, 1969.
Reitz Union Rm. 347. 7:30
9:00 p.m. Speaker, Off-campus
get-together following with FREE
BEER. (J-lt-49-p)
WIN CASH and free record
albums every morning on WUWU
Radio! It's easy... all you need is
a phone and a radio! Wake up
and win on 1390 radio!
(J-lt-49-p)
Sigma Pi is forming a colony at
UF. All present Sigma Pi brothers
or anyone interested in joining a
new and growing UF frat call
John, 392-7416. (J-3t-49-p)
I LOST & FOUND 1
v %
Lost: Black-and-white female Basset
puppy. Lost Sunday near Catholic
Church. Reward. Call 378-5409.
(L-st-45-p)
FOUND: Monday a.m., mens
black-rimmed glasses near Music
Building. Claim in Room 104 of
Building R. (L-3t-48-nc)
13 fnlf! FWCitfltZM I JTiPi I7&Â¥
Chefr
Msitiisitv i j
st.v Iyr J
LAST 2 DAYS
*M : \ color's
Ml. John%ne\ \
Rock Hudson*
wsr -tte ::
* IfiflW Unseated
TOE TO TOE
JKpi rjamt or side by side
thru the
TlaS'Mti? arventure*
M&- THAT ROCKED
G THE NATIONS
£<>,:
Pswsfow OeinssvWs
last 3
DAYS
231 W. University 4v, J
# SHIRLEY j
MACLAINE \.
* SAMMY J
'* #

I LOST & FOUND |
Lost: Gold mens watch between
stadium and Norman Hall after last
football game. Identifying engraving
on back. Tremendous personal value.
Reward. Call 372-6448 or 392-1496.
(L-5t47-p)
j; SERVICES 1
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair
forever. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist (over 20 years
experience) 372-8039. By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pHot flight instruction commercial
flight Instruction Instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you can't beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
'Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-45-ts-c)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
cohating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Health foods, natural vitimins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
I RED PM qX I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM Att
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
/ X
/ emms \
/ hh >
I STARTS|yjBEH WED
I now yon can SEE
f anything yon want
I A at
I Alices
I RESTAURANT
I starring ARLO GIfTHRIE II
I |r I COLOR by DeLuxe
United Artists
\ w issKBS-irrsof *\ i %/
f LAST 3 DAYS
/ AT... 2:15 4:04 CSbuIA
/ 5:53 7:47 9:41 KIW |
/ easy
\ U|OER mSS
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The s
Florida |
Alligator s

Manning: SEC Player Os The Year

ATLANTA (UPI) In
early September, 1968,' Ole
Miss coach Johnny Vaught
introduced a group of visiting
sportswriters|| to a lanky,
red-haired Sophomore and
said:
Gentlemen, this is Archie
Manning. Mark my words, Ive
had some All-America
quarterbacks but this boy is
going to be better than any
of them.
Today, 15 months later, in
keeping with Vaughts
prophecy, Archie Manning was
named Southeastern
Conference Offensive Player of
the Year by United Press
International.
It was no contest. Manning
won by a whopping 6-to-l
margin over his only rival,
sophomore quarterback John
Reaves of Florida, in balloting
by sportswriters and
sportscasters from throughout
the seven-state region.

Buckeyes Drop To Sixth ;
Gators Unranked By UPI

NEW YORK (UPI) The
University of Texas,
capitalizing on the upset of
the year, Monday bumped
Ohio State from the no. 1
ranking among college football
teams for the first time this
season.
The Longhorns, idle last
Saturday, backed into the no.
1 spot when Michigan stunned
Ohio State, winner of 22
consecutive games, 24-12.
Texas captured 30 first place
votes and 344 points from
the 35-member United Press
International board of coaches
to easily rank first in the
nation.
The loss dropped the
Buckeyes, who ended with an
8-1 mark, down to sixth.
Penn State, unbeaten in nine
games this season, was second,
followed by Arkansas,
Southern California and
Missouri.
Louisiana State was seventh,
Michigan eighth, Notre Dame
ninth and UCLA 10th.
Tennessee headed the
second 10, followed by
Nebraska, Stanford, Mississippi,
Auburn, Houston and West
Virginia. Three teams

| W & Chicks!
(TUESDAY SPECIAI{
I Perch Dinner [
with coleslaw & french fries a
m am a ma m MMue Beieieieieeiv

GATOR

The 6-foot-3, 200-pound
junior from Drew, Miss.,
pulled the Rebels together

I ll
TOM KENNEDY
JOHN REAVES PLAYER OF YEAR RUNNERUP
.. statistical leader of the Southeastern Conference

Purdue, Arizona State and
surprising San Diego State
tied for 17th.
Texas (8-0) will play Texas
A&M in their traditional
Thanksgiving Day battle
before meeting Arkansas Dec.
6 for the Southwest
conference title and a Cotton
Bowl berth. The winner meets
Notre Dame and the loser
takes on Mississippi in the
Sugar Bowl.
Penn State downed
Pittsburgh 27-7 to remain
unbeaten and Arkansas was
idle. Southern California won
an unprecedented fourth
consecutive Rose Bowl trip
with a 14-12 victory over
UCLA while Missouri blasted
Kansas 69-21 to capture a
share of the Big Eight title
with Nebraska, a 44-14
conquerer of Oklahoma.
Louisiana State beat Tulane
27-0 and Notre Dame
struggled past determined Air
Force 13-6. Tennessee edged
Kentucky 31-26, Stanford
nipped California 29-28 and
Mississippi and Auburn were
idle.
Houston swamped Wyoming
41-14 and West Virginia
Finished 9-1 with a 13-10

REAVES RUNNERUP IN THE VOTING

after a shaky start and led
them past Georgia, Louisiana
State and Tennessee to the

victory over Syracuse. Arizona
State trounced Colorado State
79-7, Purdue bombed Indiana
44-21 and San Diego State,
small college champion for
the past three seasons before
joining the majors this year,
ripped North Texas State
42-24 to boost its record to
9-0.

JRatfjsfeeUerl
The Hillel Foundation.
and
The Center of Man
Bring to the UF a New Dimension
*
in Folk Entertainment
Shlomo
Carlebach
known
-Numerous college pF
appearances
'He has the people with
him ... he can ask
for no more. I
Appearing at the Rat |
'TONIGHT Tickets available at |
I

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Sugar Bowl.
Yet his finest individual
performance came not in
victory but die night Alabama
edged Ole Miss 33-32 in a
nationally televised game: That
was the night Manning passed
and ran for an amazing 540
yards.
With defensively weak
Mississippi State yet to be
played Thursday, Manning has
gained a total of 1,946 yards
an average of 216 yards
per game. While most of that
yardage came via passing
(1,553), he has run for a
dozen touchdowns while
passing for nine.
Reaves has a big statistical
edge over Manning, having
gained 2,519 yards and
thrown 22 touchdown passes.
But, where Ole Miss beat
Georgia with Manning, Florida
and Reaves got only a tie.
Floridas toughest foe was

EDY

SAVE!
I I STARKE. FLORIDA
SOONER OR LATER YOUR FAVORITE DEALER"
I HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
[GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 25.1969

Page 10

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Auburn and the Tigers won
38-12, intercepting nine of
Reaves' passes. Ole Miss'
toughest foe was supposed to
be then 3rd-ranked, unbeaten
Tennessee but Manning led
the Rebels to a haqUo-believe
38-0 victory.
Manning's been a candidate
for Offensive Player of the
Year honor since his varsity
debut last year. He was
named Southeast Offensive
Player of the Week three
times in 1968 and twice so
far this year.
Before the Ole
Miss-Tennessee game, the Vols
kiddingly asked Archie
who? and geared their
defenses to contain Manning.
Statistically, they held
Manning below his average
but, by concentrating on
Manning, opened the door for
his backfield mates.



M lli g||
II
W'
II

THREE BACKS IN CONTENTION

Heisman TrophyVoteToday

NEW YORK (UPI) The 35th Heisman
Trophy, presented annually to the nations
outstanding college football player, will be
announced at 1 p.m. EST Tuesday, with
quarterbacks Mike Phipps of Purdue and Rex
Kern of Ohio State and Running Back Steve
Owens of Oklahoma the leading contenders.
The award, sponsored by the Downtown
Athletic Club of New York, is determined by
balloting of more than 1,000 of the nations
sports writers.
O.J. Simpson, the former Southern California
running star now with the Buffalo Bills of the
American Football League, won the trophy last
year.
Phipps, one of the top collegiate passers in
the nation, has been among the leaders in
passing and total offense all through this

Ohio State Takes Its Place
Among The Classic Losers

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UPI)
- 1969. A year to be
remembered. By the Baltimore
Colts, the Baltimore Orioles
and, now, Ohio State
University.
Wrody Hayes Buckeyes
made the year of the classic
loser complete Saturday when
his team, only one game
short of its second straight
unbeaten and national
championship season, was
humbled, 24-12, by 15-point
underdog Michigan.
Michigan thus took its
place with the New York Jets
and Me* as the upset winners
of the year. Southern
California now gets a chance
to slay the giant-killer Jan. 1,
1970, when the two teams
meet in the Rose Bowl.
The record college crowd

Want your money to
be worth something? kAK-
Just 20 minutes away North on 441
Lower prices eTroined technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
JIM DOUGLAS CHEVROLET

COLLEGE FOOTBALL'S TOP AWARD, THE HEISMAN
... Owens, Kern, and Phipps favored in this year's voting

of 103,588 was deafening in
its approval of first-year coach
Glenn Bo Schembechlers
team, which wound up 8-2
overall and shared the
conference title with Ohio
State at 6-1. The Buckeyes
ended their season 8-1, their
22-game winning streak, 17
straight in league play,
finished.
We did it because we
knew that it wasnt going to
be a slaughter, commented
Schembechler, who became
the only coach since the
Wolverines Fielding H. Yost
in 1901 to make the
Pasadena trip in his initial Big
Ten coaching season.
We knew that we couiu
contain certain phases of their
game and make certain phases
of ours work. We knew we

season. Kern, a daring quarterback who passes
and runs well, led Ohio State through most of
its last 18 victories previous to the Buckeyes
upset loss last Saturday.
Owens, Oklahomas workhorse fullback, has
been consistently over the 100-yard per game
rushing mark throughout his career and is
among the nations leading rushers.
Phipps and Owens are seniors and Kern is a
junior.
Notre Dame players have won the award six
times and the service academies have taken five,
three going to Army and two to Navy. No
player has ever won the Heisman Trophy twice
and only two linemen ends Larry Kelley of
Yale (1936) and Leon Hart of Notre Dame
(1949) have ever won the trophy. No
interior lineman has ever won.

couldnt make the mistakes
that other ( ms made. We
couldnt let them get the
drop on us.

rGaior PAWN SHOP
guns
f LOANS ] CAMERAS
e RADIOS & TVS
BUY-SELL-TRADE
"We specialize in Gtrior-Aid"
1334 E-UNIVERSITY 378-5575

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Orange Bowl
A Sellout

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (UPI) The Orange Bowl football
game New Year's Day between Penn State and Missouri is a
sellout, a spokesman for Penn State announced Monday.
The spokesman said Penn State's allotment of 12,500 tickets
had been sold and Missouri also had disposed of its allotment.
There will be no tickets sold the day of the game.

Pi Lambda Phi Wins
'Nose Bowl f Contest

Before Pi Lambda Phi and
Tau Epsilon Phi played their
14th annual Nose Bowl
football game Sunday
afternoon, Alan Levi, the
coach of Lambda Phi said:
Were going to make it four
straight.
The football establishment,
generally speaking, was
shocked by Levis confidence
and possibly annoyed. A Joe
Namath he isnt.
But today Levi qualifies for
a crystal ball award. Lambda
Phi whipped the TEPs for
the fourth consecutive year,
18-12.
TEP received the opening
kickoff but Lambda Phi
linebacker intercepted a pass
to put his team in business.
Lambda Phi scored minutes
later on a touchdown pass
from Rick Goldberg to Tom
Harton.
TEP came back with' a
touchdown pass from Elliot
Wolf to Bruce Schwack.
Lambda Phi made the score
12-6 before halftime on a 40

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ntotay, Nombf 26, If. Ttw Florida ABaator,

yard touchdown pass to
Harton again.
Lambda Phi opened up the
game early in the third period
after a TEP pass was
deflected by three defenders
and intercepted in the end
zone by Mitch Heller.
The TEPs scored their final
touchdown on a pass to Ed
Goldstein, who got by three
defenders.
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Page 11



Page 12

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuesday, 1969

GATOR SPARKPLUG

Lukco: A Complete Cager

Hard work, a knee
operation, an understanding
wife and plenty of talent has
made Floridas Ed Lukco a
complete basketball player.
The 6-2, 185-pounder from
Warren, Ohio was named to
the All-Southeastern
Conference basketball team
last season and is hopeful of
capturing more honors this
season.
Lukco missed the 1967-68
season due to a serious knee
injury that required surgery.
But, after much hard work
and encouragement from his
wife, Vonnie, Lukco worked
his injured knee bade into
shape.
During his sophomore year,
Lukco averaged 9.9 points a
game and was helpful in
leading the Gators to a berth
in the NIT. He scored 21
points against Furman and 19
against Georgia for game highs
during the 1969 season.
Coach Tommy Bartlett
hopes Lukco will lead the
Gators to many victories
during the 1970 season. In
the annual Orange and Blue
game prior to the season
opener, Lukco looked
exceptional, connecting on 10
of 16 attempts for 20 points.
Ed gives a good outside
scoring threat, said Bartlett.
Hes always working to

Basketball Begins Dec. 1

The 1969-70 Gator
basketball team opens its
season on Dec. 1 against
Morehead State in the first
round of the Civitan-Sunshine
Classic in Jacksonville, and
Coach Tommy Bartlett has
listed eight starting players.
The new look for the
Gator basketball team will
have Jerry Hoover or Jeff
Miller at point guard, Dan

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GATOR CAGER ED LUKCO
... "good outside scoring threat"

improve his play and has
been an excellent leader to
our younger players.
Lukco, a Business
Administration major, is
specializing in the area of
Finance. The Lukcos are
proud parents of a son,
three-year old Steve.

Boe or Tom Purvis at the
low post and Earl Findley or
Cliff Cox at left wing.
Only two Florida players
are assured of starting berths.
Returning starters from last
years squad that posted a
189 record and a berth in
the NIT are Andy Owens and
Ed Lukco. Owens gets the
nod at the high post and
Lukco at right wing.

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Try a delicious, delectable
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A crisp, cool, green salad with
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A steaming-hot buttery
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A big chunk of Texas toast
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LSU Left Home
For Holiday Bowls
ATLANTA (UPQ If its any consolation to the frustrated
Bengals, Louisiana State's final statistics reveal what a lot of
folks have been saying all along:
The bowl-conscious Southeastern Conference never left a
better team at home for the holidays.
The Bengals swept past Tulane 27-0 Saturday night to close
their season at 9-1, their best record since 1961. And, although
there are six SEC teams which do have bowl berths, only one,
Tennessee, has a chance to equal the Bengals' won-lost record
and that's not a lot.
The lOth-ranked Vols, apparently still thinking about that
humiliating 38-0 loss to Ole Miss the previous week, barely got
past Kentucky Saturday 31-26 while Vanderbilt, which plays
Tennessee next, crushed Southern Conference champion Davidson
63-8.
The Bth-ranked Bengals, with only a three-point (26-23) loss
to Ole Miss to mar their record, outscored every team in the
league over the past 18 years and youd have to go back 31
years to find a better ground defense.
LSU wound up with an average of 34.9 points per game.
That hasnt been topped since 1951 when then unbeaten
Tennessee, which went to the Sugar Bowl that year, averaged
373.
The Bengals appear to have won the national
defense-against-rushing title. Thanks to holding Tulane to a
minus four yards on the ground, the Bengals posted an average
yield for the season of only 38.4 yards per game.
Thats the lowest mark nationally since 1961 when Syracuse
had a fantastic 193 average and the lowest in the Southeastern
Conference since way back in 1938 when Alabama set the
league record of 33.9.