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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Blacks In Academia Are Beautiful

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first
of a three part series by Alligator
correspondent Larry Jordan concerning
black faculty recruitment at UF. This
installment deals with the availability of
black PhDs and faculty raiding.)
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Correspondent
After decades when being black was a
professional handicap, and then years
when the ethic was never to mention
race, blade today in academic circles has
never been more beautiful.
Black Ph.D.s and masters
degree-holders now are the object
nationwide of the most feverish talent

Alt Amnion

Vol. 62, No. 48

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FATHER MICHAEL GANNON BEGINS FOLK MASS
... with theme of prayers for peace
Blankets And Music:
Campus Folk Mass

By RALPH BETANCOURT
Alligator Writer
Place: the Plaza of the
Americas. Date and time: noon
Sunday. The event: a gathering
of students and residents of the
community all with one purpose
- giving thanks to God.
Under bright sunny skies and
mild autumn weather, an

Only
13 more
cramming
days
until
exam week

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

estimated 2,000 to 3,000 people
gathered on the grass of the
Plaza and participated in the
Thanksgiving Folk Mass
sponsored by the Catholic
Student Parish. They
congregated around the altar in
the shape of a fan, and sat close
together to take advantage of
the warmth both of body and
(SEE THE FOLK' PAGE 21

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
8 | 24 | 25 [ 26 [ 27 [ 28 [
*l2 3 4 5

hunt since the days of harem-scarum
bidding for promising athletes.
Florida A & M University, UFs aster
university and the only predominately
black institution in Florida's state
university system, is feeling the pressure
of this hunt: its faculty is being raided.
Os course we've had raids on our
faculty by white institutions, said Dr.
Benjamin Perry, president of FAMU,
but mostly by schools outside the
state.
State schools have been very
reasonable with me, Perry said. There
is an agreement between the state
university presidents that we don't raid
each others faculty.
Perry has lost 12 faculty members to

University of Florida, Gainesville

SUSPENSION POSSIBLE

Rossis Face Charges
In Profanity Case

See Editorial Page 8
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students Judy and David Rossi go
before the Committee on Student Conduct
today to face charges concerning their
allegedly using profanity to address a
campus policeman. They face possible
suspension from the UF.
Interest in the case has been built up by
the distribution of a leaflet prepared by the
Student Mobilization Committee (SMC)
entitled Legal Harassment Continues- at
UF. SMC says that the Rossis made an
unpardonable' mistake in offering a campus
cop an anti-war leaflet.
At the bottom of the handout are the words
Fight Political Repression.
The hearing will be held in the Spessard Holland
Law Center at 4 p.m. today, room 283.
According to the leaflet, the Rossis were arrested
on Oct. 10 inside Anderson Hall while they were on
their way to class.
They allegedly woe handing out anti-war leaflets
and offered a campus policeman one of the sheets.
The officer reportedly neither accepted nor
refused the handbill but let it drop to the ground,
at which time, he ordered David Rossi to pick it up.
Mrs. Rossi reportedly offered to pick it up, but
the policeman insisted that her husband do it which
Rossi refused to do. He left the scene and went into
a deans office.
At this point, the policeman followed Rossi into
the deans office and told him he was under arrest
for resisting arrest.
While searching Rossi, the leaflet states that Mrs.

white institutions within the last two
years. Most of these have gone to
northern or midwestem schools, but at
least one former A & M faculty member
is now teaching at FSU.
Even with the gentlemen's
agreement between the state university
presidents, the number of faculty
members A & M has lost to state schools
would probably be greater if a Board of
Regents guideline did not severely
restrict raiding within the state
university system.
If you offer a person more money,
Perry said, he's at liberty to take it.
Most of my good people are just staying
(SEE 'BLACIC PAGE 2)

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UF students Judy and David Rossi find
themselves the focus of another campus
issue as they face possible suspension today
for allegedly using profanity to a UF
policeman.
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Rossi allegedly swore at the cop, which resulted in
her being arrested too.
Both were taken to the Gainesville police
headquarters where they were booked, bond was set
and they were later released.
The charges were later dropped, but on Oct. 28,
the Rossis were informed they woe being charged
by the UF administration with public profanity.
The Rossis were not available for comment
Sunday, nor would Student Conduct Committee
Chairman and law professor Henry Fenn (comment
on the case.
Mrs. Kay Ellis, a third year law student and
adviser to the Rossis, said Sunday she cannot
comment on the case until after the hearing. Lou
Tally, a resident adviser in Tolbert area, is also an
adviser.
Committee membership is made up of six faculty
and five students who are appointed by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell and recommend
punishment for infractions of the Code of Student
Conduct ranging in severity from a letter of
reprimand to expulsion.
Regulations state that the hearings are open to
the public as long as the proceedings are not
disrupted by the actions of spectators.
The room in the law complex where the hearing
is being held will accomodate 80 spectators. If there
are more people than the room will accomodate, the
proceedings can be moved to a larger room.

Monday, November 24, 1969

ALUGATOR EDITOR Raul
Ramirez takes national first
[dace in Hearst newswriting
competition page 2
Classifieds 11
Editoriab 8
Entertainment 13
Letters 9
Movies 11
Small Society 6
, Sport*. ........ 17
WHatH Happening............. 6



!, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 24,1989

Page 2

ON CREEPING POLLUTION
'Think-Tank' Airs
Ecology Problems
By ANNE B. FREEDMAN
Feature Editor
If you visit that old swimming hole of your younger years or
even your favorite isolated beach during Christmas vacation, chances
are the spot wont seem quite as beautiful as it did before.
Oil refuse on the sand and on the water's surface, harsh traffic
sounds replacing the gentle whirr of the waves or the conversations
of the birds and garbage floating where fish once swam, might reduce
the natural impact of the area.
Six UF students who attended a government-sponsored all-expense
paid four-day think tank on the problems of environment (Oct.
26-29), have created a UF Environmental Action Group (EAG)
organising at 7:30 tonight in the lecture hall of theLjfe Sciences
Building (Bartram Hall).
When we first came back we didnt want too much publicity on us
until we had an organization to channel the interest into, said Hugh
Emmons, 4JM.
Practically every aspect of the can become involved
theres a place for everyone in this, he said.
Emmons said that 100 college students from all parts of the nation
attended the conference in Airle, Va., which was financed by the
Consumer Protection and Environment Health Service, an agency of
the UJS. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW).
Most of the delegates were in medicine, law, economics, or
ecology. I was the only one in journalism, Emmons said.
UFs delegation of six was the largest at the conference. Each
student was in a different field, ranging from economics to
psychology and sociology to ecology.
Emmons said he became interested in attending the conference
when he saw an ad in the Alligator in late September which invited
students to attend an all expense-paid weekend forum.
1 was already interested in the problems of environment from my
work with CBS. There are a lot of very prominent people in
broadcasting who are concerned with environment, he said.
He has woriced as a production assistant for CBS for the past 16
months and is currently filming a 15-minute film on the
Cross-Country Barge Canal for Channel 4 in Miami.
ACCENT 7O has given the EAG one day in its week-long activities
to present a speaker and a series of discussion groups.

Black Ph. Ds Subjects Os Faculty Raiding

WON PA6E OWE
because of dedication.
Raiding was never a problem when
Floridas university system was smaller.
But, with expansion and several new
state schools about to be opened,
staffing has become an acute problem.
Newer institutions are having
problems finding faculty members of
any color. With student demands for
black-studies programs, and for more
black faces on faculties, their problems
have intensified.
A survey completed last fall by the
Ford Foundation showed that of
37,500 doctoral degrees awarded
between 1964 and 1968, by a
representative group of 63 major
universities, only 294 less than 1 per
cent went to black Americans.
Added to this severe scarcity of
available black Ph.D.s is the fact that
many black scholars on predominantly
black campuses want to leave.
Black colleges have been noted in the
past for inadequate facilities,
authoritarian administrations, low
salaries and an anti-intellectual
faculty-student atmosphere.
All of these things, together with the

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR k the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and k published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editoriak represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator k entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors ok ejtfkfipus
k given to the Advertising Manager within jmM/Wverwfcnwm 8
for correction must be given before the next insertion.

desire of white institutions to add black
faces to their faculties, are causing an
increasing exodus from black campuses
each year.
What college and univeristy circles are
seeing in pandaromatic detail is the law
of supply and demand operating with an
extra added push the desire to leave
black campuses that have been
wastelands for many black scholars.
Any hope that the sellers market can
be relieved by a dramatic upsurge in the
numbers of black Ph. Ds is folly
according to current logistics.
Last Years Ford Foundation survey
found that the number of blacks now in
graduate schools would have to multiply
sevenfold, and the annual output of new
black Ph. Ds upped 15 times, to bring a
ratio of black scholars equal to the
percentage of blacks in the total U.S.
population.
All the current black recruitment
programs will not bring off such
increases, the study said.
Long-range alleviation of the
problem, many experts say, is
dependent upon more programs to
encourage and fully finance more blade
undergraduates into winning academic
credentials for college teaching.

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#
RAUL RAMIREZ
... wins contest
Gator Editor
Takes Hears!
First Place
An article on commuters
scorn of luxury bus service won
first place national honors for
UF journalism student Raul
Ramirez in the first monthly
competition of the tenth annual
William Randolph Hearst
Foundation Program.
Ramirez, a senior and editor
of the Alligator, won an SBOO
scholarship and an identical
grant for UFs College of
Journalism for his story. It was
written during his summer
internship with the Wall Street
Journals Detroit bureau.
As first place winner Ramirez
is eligible to compete in the
writing championship to be held
in April. He was also a
championship qualifier in his
junior year.
Another UF student, Carol
Sanger, executive editor of the
Alligator, received a foundation
scroll for placing between
eleventh and twentieth in the
competition.

Citrus Club
FRUIT
SALE
NOV. 24 DEC. 8
CALL 392-1996 or
Come by Rm 1177 McCarty
$3.50/46 lb. carton Grapefruit

UF has several such programs now
getting underway in Agriculture,
Education and through the office of
minority Students Affairs.
What these programs will mean for
the future is still a matter of
speculation. In the meantime the black
institutions of Florida are prime targets
for faculty pirating.
UF itself is feeling this pressure, but
many chief administrators say raiding A
& M is not the answer.
I wouldnt approach any A & M
faculty member without first consulting
with President Perry,
Vice-President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale, who recently hired UFs
first black administrator.
It would be unfair unless there was
complete understanding about the idea
between the presidents of the two
universities, he said.
Out of respect for Dr. Perry and his
situation, and for A & M as a sister
school, I would not do this sort of
thing, Hale said.
Hale echoes the sentiments of many
UF administrators who feel that raiding
black colleges within the state is
absolutely taboo.
There is an absolute rule that under

The 'Folk Worship
At Mass Sunday

|£ HK)M PACE OWE
soul which dominated the
gathering.
Most brought blankets to sit
and lie on, and cans of food or
articles of clothing which were
deposited in front of the altar,
later to be distributed among the
communitys poor.
The celebrant of the Mass was
the Rev. Michael Gannon of the
religion department, who is also
chaplain of the Catholic Student
Parish. Before beginning Mass,
Father Gannon welcomed all
there, and for the benefit of the
large number of non-Catholics
who attended, explained the
significance of each vestment
which he would wear while
celebrating the Mass.
Each came to worship his own
conception of God, and
somehow they were all very
similar.
The air rang out with music
emanating from the enthusiastic
crowd and led by an equally
enthusiastic folk group. The
latter was composed of the
group known to its members
as the Mass Media which
sings at the 11 a.m. Mass every
Sunday at St. Augustine
Catholic Church; the group
which sings at the 5:30 pm.
Mass and five seminarians from
St. Vincent DePaul Seminary
near Cocoa Beach.
A number of songs including
Day is Done, Get Together,
and America the Beautiful
were sung with the aid of two
guitars, an electric bass, drums

Youijg Democrats
"Pre-Final Meeting with Speaker
N0v.25 7:30 9:00 Rm 347 JWRU
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and tambourine. The people
sang, swayed and clapped.
The altar was adorned by a
large basket of various fruit and
flowers and by bright banners
donated by the architecture
department. Moppy-haired kids
snotty babies and restless mutts
added to the reality of the
gathering.
The sermon was given by
Father Gannon and seven
students of various faiths each of
whom spoke for 30 seconds on
those things for which he was
most thankful. Among them was
Carlos Alvarez, who said he was
very thankful for beating
FSU, and was most thankful
of all for the peace movement
throughout the world.
For the non-Catholics, the
Folk Mass was very different
from Catholic Masses they may
have heard of or attended just a
few years ago. For the Catholics
it was another sign of progress,
modernization and involvement
in the people by an institution
which, just those few years ago,
was desperately clamoring for all
three. For all it was a sign of
hope that someday soon all
people will be able to worship
together in universal unity,
unhampered by barriers of
difference in religious
denomination.
An exhuherant Father
Gannon ended the Mass by
asking, Is everybody happy?
The crowd echoed with a roaring
Yes! And all left with smiles
shining on their faces.

no drcumstances will we raid black
colleges of their faculty or students,
said Hal Stahmer, assistant dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
** * v ,- v . i
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We will encoimgge them (blade
faculty and students) to come to
graduate school here if similar facilities
are not offered at their schools. But we
will not raid their schools, he said.
This is not a unanimous view of UF
administrators and faculty members.
I have no objections to raiding,
said Dr. Irving J. Goffman, an
economics professor and a member of
the Presidential Committee on the
Disadvantage.
There is no reason why bright
people should not be paid whatever the
market requires that we pay them, he
said. To have hands off policy on
black scholars from predominantly
black schools would, in Coffmans
opinion, penalize outstanding black
faculty and prevent them from gaining
prominence in their field.
Goffman is, however, against raiding
that would academically cripple black
institutions.



MAYBE TWO WEEKS AWAY m>
Definite UC Reform Proposals Due Soon

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
one of two parts cm UF's
much-debated University College
and the reforms planned for it.)
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Definite proposals for long
awaited changes in University

Dead Center Gunshot
Hits Sigma Chi House
A .22 caliber bullet struck the already vandalized Sigma Chi cross
dead center at about 4 ajn. Wednesday, Jacob Stuart, Sigma Chi
president said Sunday.
No one was injured, but if the bullet had struck a window it could
have killed someone.
Stuart said he has kept the incident quiet but had to release the
truth concerning the matter because of rumors which have been
circulated about the shooting.
The truth is, we're not pointing the finger at anyone yet but we
have some strong leads and are expecting some arrests soon.
However, Stuart said all the information that has been gathered is
being kept confidential by the fraternity and the police until there is
enough evidence to make an arrest.
This is a serious problem that has gotten past the stage of
vandalism, he said.
A damage estimate has not been completed yet, but Stuart said the
projectile destroyed about nine feet of neon tubing.
Whoever fired the shot thought the bullet would shatter the cross
into a million pieces, however, plexiglass doesn't shatter.
This was the fourth in a series of attacks on the house at 8
Fraternity Row since the end of fall rush, causing more than S3OO in
damage.
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College are due soon, in two
weeks if Vice President for
Academic Affairs Frederick
Conner has his way.
In talks that have facetiously
been compared to United
StatesSoviet disarmament
negotiations, proposals for
changes are being hashed out
among Conner, University

College Dean Franklin A. Doty
and the college's policy
committee.
The basis for the talks are two
proposals that were worked on
separately during the summer by
Doty and Conner.
Conner has hopes for a
common proposal to emerge
from the talks but still admits
deep differences of opinion that
may not be resolved. Both Doty
and Conner said it was entirely
possible that two or more
separate proposals for the
curriculum committee may
result.
Sources within the college
have there is disagreement
on every issue among those
involved in the talks and gave
little hopes of anything concrete
for a few months.
But that timetable is
ridiculous Conner said.
While he is stiD striving at this
point for as much agreement as
he can, he is not going to delay
getting some kind of proposals

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To steak or
not to steak.
Money is not the question
at Bonanza.
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BONANZA
SIRLOIN PIT.
2445 S.W. 13 ST. TAKE OUT 378-0946
GATOR ADS SELL
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out into the open.
I'm going to have to make
up my mind, Conner said.
He will not publicize the
nature of any of the proposals
until that time, because of the
nature of the discussion in which
compromise is still the keynote.
What I may say one day,
may not be what I want five
days from then, he said.
In all of the talks Conner does
not want any all-out fights. No
one is going to be done in by
.any of the proposals, he said.
He means that if certain
changes would leave anybody
out of a job, he is going to see
they get another place in the
college, or university.
No one is going to be fired
because of changes, he said.
An example of differences
that would leave little room for
compromise is the existence of a
college as a separate entity.
Doty has flatly said he is not
interested in his present
position if the faculty for a

Monday, Novambar 24,1980, Tha Florida Alligator, I

university college did not have
its own separate budget. He
would rather go back to
teaching, he said.
Admittedly conservative,
and stubborn Doty has definite
ideas on how the University
College should be run. At this
stage of the game, however,
things are still open, and he has
indicated that he may
compromise on some issues.
Just how much of the
proposals in the end will bear
the Doty stamp is a guess even
to Doty.
But all agree, particularly
Conner, that this is the year to
start change, and he is anxious
about the decision he will have
to make in a few weeks. Conner
stated his utmost respect for
Doty, and other colleagues in
spite of differing opinions.
These men are my friends,
he said.
(Next: Some issues at stake
and history of UC.)

Page 3



IThiFlarMa AHiftor, Monday, Nowmtwr 24,1909

Page 4

Singing Apollo
Swings Back
Toward Earth

GOOD PUBLIC RELATIONS
Service, Involvement
SG Projects On Move

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the last in a three part
series on the operations and functions of Student
Government at UF. This article deals with the
agencies of SG which most directly involve and serve
the student body.)
By RONNIE BLOOM
Alligator Correspondent
Most of the organizations the average student is
aware of are those on the local level of Student
Government. These groups are funded by SG, but
operate autonomously.
Accent, in the past three years, has brought
nationally prominent speakers to the UF campus
including Richard Nixon, Supreme Court Justice
William O. Douglas, Sen. Strom Thurmond, former
Sen. Wayne Morse, pollster Louis Harris, and noted
attorneys Melvin Belli and William Kunstler.
Student Government Productions has featured
top entertainment such as Donovan and the
Goldovsky Grand Opera production La Traviata.
Scheduled are the Jefferson Airplane, a folklore
ballet called Danzas Venezuela, the Florida
Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Winnepeg Ballet,
die Houston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston
Symphony Chamber Players.
The Gator Loan Fund, which last year enrolled
over 7,000 participants in its financial aid to
students program, sponsors the annual Camigras and
promotes numerous projects to collect money for
needy students.
Samson, another student organization, exists to
help underprivileged Gainesville youth. The groups
staff tutor childn refer them to medical assistance
when needed ai d spend many afternoons of
recreation with them at Camp Wauburg.
Whether students have realized it or not, SG
constantly strives to bring the utmost in
conveniences such as reasonable rates and

Elmore Accepts
Advisory Cowell
Invitatioa
Vice President for Business
Affairs William E. Elmore has
accepted an invitation to serve
on the national advisory council
for the United Student Aid
Funds.
Primary function of the group
is to advise on matters of policy
and planning as they relate to
the guaranteeing of student
loans and to serve as a sounding
board for new programs and
policies that relate to the 1,000
schools and colleges where the
fund operates.

Hove You I
Bought Your I
1970 I
Seminole I
Yet? I

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI)
Yankee Clipper and the Apollo 12
moonmen Sunday hurtled toward their
Monday splashdown, playing rock n
roll records and joking with the ocean
recovery force to be on target because
we have energy for only one pass.
Charles Pete Conrad, Alan F. Bean
and Richard F. Gordon were due to
return to earth at 3:58 pm. EST
Monday in the South Pacific near
American Samoa where weather was
clearing after winds up to 35 miles an
hour during the final pickup rehearsal.
Passing the halfway mark home
Sunday evening, the lunar trio had
127,540 miles to go. At that time the

comfortable living conditions.
The SG Book Sale enables you to sell your old
books and purchase new ones for less than the
prices at the campus book stores.
The convenience counter at Jennings was created
to sell grocery items below the costs in local food
stores. Soon, residents of Jennings and all living
areas will be supplied with refrigerators for their
rooms.
The Babysitting Agency is another convenience.
Married students needing babysitters and babysitters
needing married students can call SG offices and
receive from their files a list of desiring participants
in this new program.
The Camp Wauburg Development Commission is
working on the plans to develop the UF owned
waterfront property into a gigantic recreation center
where students can swim, have beach parties, play
all kinds of sports, dance, and have picnics.
The proposed construction of the sl7 million
University Activities Center is another way SG is
striving to make more livable and enjoyable your
stay at UF. The new structure would feature
outdoor and indoor pools, an indoor track, an
amphitheater, classrooms, and several other
facilities.
SG initiated a Course and Teacher Evaluation
program, now directed by ODK and a Grade
Appeals Board. These programs are designed to
carefully examine courses and teaching procedures
and offer the student a chance to effectively
complain about what he considers an unfair grade.
By next quarter, students will probably be able to
use a Bankamericard or Master Charge card to pay
tuition. Hopefully, automatic post offices will be
erected across campus. SG is working with the local
telephone company on a program which will allow
students to pay their phone bills at a strategic
location on campus.

Drop out of
college.
(For a late study break at Capt. Wishbone's.)
Free Capt. Wishbone
posters lor all Gator students and faculty.
J
704 S.W. Second Ave. Wichh^lld
201 16th Ave. at S. Main St. TV IMIIMIUv
1026 S.E. 4th at Williston A division of Jackson-Atlant c, Inc.

Clipper was traveling at 3350 mpn witn
speed constantly increasing '> *J J
of earths gravity until it reaches 24,833
mph when it slices into the upper
fringes of the earths gravity.
Apollo 11, mans first landing on the
moon, excited and enthralled more, but
Apollo 12 accomplished infinitely more
in the scientific field*
Shortly after awakening Sunday
Conrad, Bean and Gordon sent a
message to the carrier USS Hornet
addressed to Rear Adm. Donald C.
Davis, commander of the recovery fleet.
It read: ~
Dear Red Dog: Apollo 12 with three
tailhookers on board expect recovery
ship to make it PIM Pinpoint recovery

... to
everywhere
with
better
care

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TV & BILLIARDS"!
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GATOR FANS!
Gator-Miami Breakfast
B:3OAM Saturday, November 29,1969
Assembly Room of The DuPont Plaza Hotel
(Downtown Miami)
A delicious. Hot Buffet Breakfast
Plus
Go Gator Pep Rally
Featuring Special Guests
President Steve O'Connell Head Coach Ray Graves
Alumni Association President, Doyle Rogers
Florida's Finest Our 12 Gator Cheerleaders
And The
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Price: $3.50 Per Person
Tickets will be held at the door in your name. No tickets
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as we have energy for only onTpT*
Signed Pate, Dick and Al.
The term taflhookers refers to
Navy flyers as are all three who
lower a hoc* from the tail of their plane
to catdf an arresting cable as they land
on a carriers flight deck.
Then they radioed that it was now
Pete Conrads recreation time aboard
the Yankee Clipper.
What is the flick in the ward room
tonight? Gordon asked.
We got one called Lost in Space
communicator Ed Gibson replied.
The astronauts then turned on a
record, Hey, little Woman, with the
lyrics, Youve Got to Come Into My
World and Leave Your World Behind.

HOUSE
OF
TRAVEL
34 1 5 W Umv. Ave
Westside Shopping Center
378-1601



if eights Aitmatiw

Protests Cant Be Allowed

NEW YORK (UPI) Vice President Spiro Agnew
declared Sunday that demonstrations, even when
non-violent, cannot be condoned** if they interfere
with the rights of others.
Agnew made the statement in a guest editorial
written at the invitation of life magazine to explain
his reasons for speaking out in recent weeks against
war protestors and the news media.
The vice president said he was not acting to
accomodate the White House but because like the
great silent majority, I had had enough.
I had endured die didactic inadequacies of the
garrulous in silence, hoping for the best but
witnessing the worst for many months. And because
I am an elected official, 1 felt I owed it to those I
serve to speak the truth,** Agnew said in the
column.
Agnew warned that frightening forces have been
set in motion as the public has become conditioned
to precipitate action rathefThan quifit discussion.
The announced decision of the more extreme
antiwar groups continue and to escalate their
disruptive activities proves this,** he said.
Agnew called the Vietnam Moratorium not only
negative in content but brutally counterproductive
because it encouraged the North Vietnamese and
undermined the Presidents policies.
The vice president said the response from across
the Country to his views has been both extensive
and gratifying and affirmed the importance of his
office.

Auto Death*
More than 55,000 persons
were killed on U.S. highways last
year. One-third of the fatal
accidents involved a driver under
25, 40 per cent of the deaths
occured on weekends, 80 per
cent on dry roads in clear
weather and 55 per cent at
night.
...
fy* a **************
i> > >

>
j. j*
j. >
> Bloody Mary j;
\ Cuba Libre >
j; Gin and Tonic j;
j! Moscow Mule j
j; Screwdriver j;
j Tom Collins )
j; Vodka Collins ] [
i John Collins )
j; Jack Rose \'
j Pink Squirrel >
\ [ Rob Roy l
>; Side Car J;
j 1 Singapore Sling j >
j; Sloe Gin Fizz j;
j > Brandy Alexander j >
j; Whisky Sour j;
j Grasshopper J
j: Pink Lady j!
Stinger j;
j; Manhatten j
J Martini j;
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j: All 55 < each >
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| ji
1; 633 webiw.jL-4^.

The game of ridicule the vice presidency
played so enthusiastically over the years, is wearing
thin on the people of the country,** he said. They
know that vice presidents are people, not cartoon
characters.**
Agnew said he made his speech in New Orleans
Oct. 19 attacking leaders of the Vietnam
Moratorium because I believe and believe deeply
that, while the right of lawful dissent is sacred, the
purposes behind any civil dissent are subject to
question.
Moreover, he said, perpetual street and
campus demonstrating can erode the fabric of
American democracy.
Agnew said there were important distinctions**
between various kinds of non-violent civil
disobedience.
The non-violent breaking of a discriminatory
law enforcing segregation in a restaurant, later
declared unconstitutional, has a retrospective
justification, he said.
But the non-violent breaking of a law unrelated
to discrimination for which redress is sought, such
as lying in the street to block traffic as a protest
against the denial of equal employment
opportunity, cannot be condoned. The rights of
others not involved in the dispute to their freedom
of locomotion are thereby disrupted, he said.

m half-truth \
M ...
m the whole half-truth \
Li H
* I | I
You see ads like that every day. Maybe you even think 1
you 7 re not being told the whole story. Well, maybe I
they're only telling you about the benefits. 1
SB The Commercial Bank of Gainesville would like to clear |
H the air. You see, we have a Free Checking Account. In ml
fact, as long as you maintain a 100.00 minimum daily 1
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Monday, novouimt 24, i n iotki Aiviyiiur, i

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florid" AWfrtor. Monday, l96d

Get Excited And Wake Up,
Maddox Warns Baptists
SUMMERVILLE, Ga. (UPI) Gov. Lester Maddox, preaching
Sunday in a Baptist Church, said it's tune for Christians to get
excited and be awakened to the problems of the nation.
Too many Christians are at ease in 71 0 n, Maddoz said. Too
many people with their names cm the church rolls are not being true
to Christ.
Maddox said Americans were being at ease while our national
government moves us closer to the edge of fiscal collapse and closer
toward a welfare state and slavery... at ease while anarchy,
immorality and treason move to bring this nation to its knees.
It is time we had a meeting with Almighty God, Maddox warned.
AGAINST AGNEW S ATTACKS

Broadcaster Defends Media

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
head of a broadcasters group
said Sunday that when Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew
criticized the television
networks, he was in a sense,
taking on all of broadcasting.
- Willard Walbridge, board
chairman of the National
Association of Broadcasters,
said, however, he did not
interpret the speech as an
intimidation of the news media
or of broadcasting itself.
He said, Although
broadcasting news on a network
level was criticized, station
affiliates across the nation have
the final say on what goes into
their markets, so if indeed the
vice president were seeking to
limit his criticism to the
networks he was, in a sense,
taking on all of broadcasting.
Walbridge said in a television
interview (Face the Nation
CBS), Most network affiliates
around the country ... accept

WHAT S HAPPENING
I, By BRENDA GEVERTZ ,
THE MORNING AFTER: So, here it is Monday morning, and no
doubt youre wondering what bits of wisdom shall spring forth from
this column. Not to disappoint you, and certainly to keep my record
(but for what?), let me say that there just isnt too much happening.
After all, here it is in the final stretch of one busy, busy quarter and
most everyone is all tuckered out. Blue Key put the topping or
finish, as the case may be on most politicos quarter. That leaves the
rest of us with jusi finals to worry about. So relax a bit before they
start, and stop in at the Rat Tuesday night the entertainment
promises to be great.
ONLY HAMLET COULD HAVE SAID IT BETTER: To Be Or
Not To Be is the topic in discussion for the campus speakers series.
Tonight at 7:30 the contemporary problem of abortion will be
discussed in Lounge 123 of the Reitz Union.
FOLK IN THY RAT: Sholom Carlebach, international folk singer,
will be appearing at the Rathskeller tomorrow night at 8:30 and
10:30,
fnibersitj) 3§>fjop
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE UNIVERSITY PLAZA
S hooded Melton
Coat
Zipout lining in
navy, red, grey & camel
Sizes XS, S, M, L
*3O

flMpaw.
the network news as one more
source of opinion. They
themselves put on three to four
times as much local, national and
regional news as they accept
from the networks.
He also defended the six
television newsmen referred to
in Agnews speech in Des
Moines, lowa, Nov. 13 when he
said the power on television is
concentrated among an elite few
persons on the East Coast.
Walbridge, who operates a
television station in Houston,
Tex., said, The Northeast, as
the vice president said, does not
necessarily dominate. The whole
flow of information around the
country is such that in the final

the small society by Brickmon
YOU t*?NT HEAP
MUCH AgotiT A<&MeW MAVge
4 THESE BAYS BAYS/
/ BAYS/ WHITE
Weehiwften S %mr

analysis the public has come to
trust us more and get their full
news from our full service more
than any other kind of news
media.
I know the six people
involved the commentators
and our broadcasters do across
the land. They often dont agree
with them in some of the
opinions they put forth but they
have never, never questioned
their integrity.
They know them as
responsible, industrious,
hardworking, really
hardworking, patriotic citizens
and to question their loyalty is
unthinkable.
Blood Donors
The states of New York and
California have enacted
legislation permitting people 18
to 21 to donate blood without
parents consent, says the
American Association of Blood
Banks.

I ftatijsbellcr
I The Hillel Foundation.
and
I The Center of Man
I Bring to the UF a New Dimension
I in Folk Entertainment
Shlomo
Carlebach
World-wide appearances
- Jerusalem, Paris, London,
Amsterdam, Rome. A
"The world is my
I headquarters."
Appearing at the Rat
Tuesday, November 25 Tickets available at
8:30 and 10:30 PM JWRU, RAT, HIUEL
I ton Knew tat

r 2K STBK SNA K~ ]
Student Special
| (With The Coupon)
I Regular 93< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
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THE SOUNDS OF I
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AT THE
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9 PM 'TIL
ALIBI
Lounge *4;
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| Whats i, ||
I Ummagumma \ I
I |IIIHI nrl nil il 1 1 ill n 111
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of u^toVyVrom'which* point | -pi Lnn,l()f j l thr lias always !m ; wi the same. ...anliinn it with traditional rnusic. * I com o piete ,r,7 nr 6r orial I rir, > w,th 2 ~ u in, li4ooo Watch for one English HI
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m.'. . fMfl 11 nRoTKMy r IVOWfIIDw r lUi hn

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 24,1969
K. A

Speaking Ou t ** $
| |
Choir Members Duped \
*By Edith Duose £

Since 57 members of the UF choir have seen fit to publicly support
Dr. Keisters position regarding performance of the choir at the
Veterans Day ceremony, I deem it necessary to caution the reading
public that the facts presented in the choirs declaration are totally
meaningless unless they are augmented by the more important fact
that the choir was committed to participation before the vote was
allowed.
This is typical of the so-called democracy practiced by the
executive committees and the director of the choir. Other typical
examples? Yes. The choir was committed to at least five other
non-scheduled performances (three to take place during the week
prior to final exam week). The choir was assigned several extra
two-hour rehearsals for scheduled performances.
At no time was the choir allowed to vote on participation in the
non-scheduled performances, nor was the choir polled as to most
generally acceptable times for the extra rehearsals.
I was one of the three members who voted against participation in
the Veterans Day ceremony and the only member who refused to
participate in it on the grounds that participation violated my
personal beliefs. Consequently, I was chastised by the director
personally.
Since that time, I have successfully petitioned to drop the choir. I
no longer want to be associated with an organization so lacking in
democratic spirit. It saddens me to see 57 students duped by
one man and his executive sycophants.

Your Husband Will Not Be Home This Evening
How Long Has He Been Criticizing The President Os
The United States?

Can Nixon Handle The Upcoming Revolt?

WASHINGTON On the whole, it would appear
that Richard Nixon has won this round.
The orchestration was brilliantly conceived and
carried out in a fashion which made Lyndon
Johnsons performance look primitive.
It began ,with Clark Mollenhoff, the former
newspaperman turned White House counsel, calling
his former associates fraudulent. It went on to
Spiro Agnew and the spectacle of a Republican
dinner in lowa being treated as though it were a
moon shot.
The result is that many who have been
embarrassed since the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy
was censured feel like patriots again and are
swamping television stations with obscene phone
calls. Doubtless the polls will reveal a great upsurge
in presidential popularity and an almost
corresponding drop in the number of the George
Wallace faithful.
The real problem however, is not Mr. Nixons
popularity, but whether the President can handle
the revolt which is on the horizon. To make an
analogy with recent history, we appear in a period
rather like that between 1932 and 1936. Old
structures were then as now under attack. The
question then was whether the President (Franklin
Roosevelt) could move fast enough to keep the
revolt within the system. The world knows that he
did.
Mr. Nixon and his men are behaving, on the other
hand, rather as Herbert Hoover and his men did.
Prosperity is just around the corner has a familiar
ring as compared with reassurances about Vietnam.
And the mobilization of the Liberty League is
surely comparable in weight if not in technique with
the White House instigation of Bob Hopes
counterdemonstration on Veterans Day which drew
a crowd generously estimated at 8,000 and to which
television gave its time in equal proportion to that
afforded the largest political rally in history.

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Frank Mankiawicz Mankiawicz_
_ Mankiawicz_ Tom Bradon
The President is as has been pointed out -a
brilliant politician. Right now he is playing the
averages. The averages tell him that the American
voter is 45 years old, earns $8,600 per year and is, if
male, a veteran. Common sense tells him that this
voter is on his side and against the college youth
who poured into Washington to protest.
But to look carefully at those who marched is to
predict a future radicalization of American politics
as clearly as hindsight affords the knowledge that
the years from 1932 to 1936 predicted the
radicalization of American economy. They were
almost entirely upper-middle class. They were
serious; they were well-educated.
In 15 to 20 years they will be congressmen,
senators, judges and mayors, and long before that
they will be voters.
Their business as voters Richard Nixon, John
Mitchell, Spiro Agnew and others having given them
the backs of their hands will be to revolutionize
the political system, just as a previous generation
scorned by Herbert Hoover, W. R. Hearst and the
Liberty League revolutionized an economic
system.

editorial
The Ghost Os
Christmas Past
The ghost of Christmas past has come back to haunt the
UF, and his vision is even uglier than before.
More than a year ago, UF student Lavon Gentry was
arrested and tried for posting signs on university property.
The mimeographed sheets Gentry had taped to a building
advocated withdrawal from Vietnam.
After months of verbal battling and legal entanglements,
charges were dropped against him.
But the university is apparently at it again.
This time the victims are Judy and David Rossi, and the
charges are even more ridiculous.
They were arrested for offering an anti-war leaflet to a
noble man in blue -a University Police officer.
He let it fall to the ground and ordered Rossi to pick it
up.
Then, when Rossi went to a deans office to report the
incident, he was arrested for resisting arrest. His wife, who
reportedly swore at the officer, was arrested and charged
with public profanity.
It all sounds like a scene from Easy Rider, and the
after-taste is about the same ... the bitterness of nausea.
What purpose does this cheap censorship of dangerous
ideas serve?
Is the administration that afraid that they must resort to
supporting one policeman who abused his power and bring
these two students before the Student Conduct Committee?
Is their position that tenuous that these students must be
forced to face suspension from this university?
Out of 22,000 students, are these two students that
dangerous to the structure of this institution?
We doubt it.
We also question why it is always those on the left who
are being dragged before committee after committee, court
after court.
Why is the threat of what these students say so gr ut?
And why must the administration muzzle their views
through these councils, and persist in using the thinly veiled
threat hanging like a sword from a thread.
These tactics, presented at this university on a miniscule
scale, are the tactics which threaten a democratic society.
Not the freedom of expression exercised by those students
like Judy and David Rossi.
Leave them alone.
And look at yourselves.
And tell us where the danger lies.

The depth of their feeling and the massiveness of
their demonstration raises a great many questions
including the political question of how long Mr.
Nixon can keep the generation gap on his side. If
the young can mobilize politically as ably as they
mobilized for a march, it is conceivable that they
can turn things around quite rapidly creating, say,
the same kind of vague impulse for change which
brought Franklin Roosevelt into power in 1932.
If they cannot do this in time for 1972, their
political strength seems certain to grow as their age
grows.
Mr. Nixon on the winning side as of now
may thus escape vengeance. But the
Administrations carefully rehearsed efforts to
minimize the march will imprint the minds of the
young as Mr. Hoovers refusal to see the collapse
around him imprinted the best young minds of an
earlier day. The Newtonian theory that every
action has an equal and opposite reaction is true,
and not of physics alone.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
j [ the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.**



There is no hope
for the complacent man

Pre-Kindergarten Error

MR. EDITOR:
Tuesday, October 28, the
Alligator featured an article on
the Pre-Kindergarten School for
black culturally deprived
children. Members of the staff
feel they were quoted out of
context and therefore not only
their feelings toward the
program but the purpose of the
program itself was
misrepresented to the public.
The Pre-Kindergarten, a
self-supported program, which
is run according to the
Bereiter-Ingleman method, was
set up in Gainesville by members
of the Christian Action and
Community Service Committee
of the Ist Christian Church. It
has now been serving the
community for three years.
This is the first time UF
students as an organized group
are members of the volunteer
staff. The purpose of the school
is not to change their subculture
but to expose the children to the
experiences which an average
middle class child has so that
they will be prepared to
function successfully in the
public schools.
The Catholic Student Center
and the Hillel Foundation
support the program financially,
provide the physical plants, and
organize the voluntary help, but
the students chief contribution
is that they have become
genuinely interested in each
child and therefore can give the
children the positive experience
of I am important enough for
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld
only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the
right, to edit letters, for.
bne aioitis 3ftJ 1o isii
space. ",,bn(

Black Voices

I t|J> WW C V I*4 tV/ITI *V f I 9 f TVJf'.t
Workers At UF.. An Interview

This article is to serve as a
supplement to the article printed
November 4, entitled Slavery
Still Exists by Mr. Ernest K.
Johnson. It is to also serve as
educational material for Ronnie
Clark and Justin Mainor, who
entered articles on November 10
and 13 respectively attacking
Mr. Johnson,
The following are the results
of an informal meeting with
master Herlong, maintenance
supervisor of Murphree Area and
three black UF students.
To begin with, Herlong was
somewhat reluctant to give out
the information we requested,
and when he spoke it was with
the vocabulary and basic
knowledge of a below-average
third grader.
We were informed that:
There were basically two
supervisory positions on the
janitorial staff of 46. They were
janitor supervisor and crew
leader. There was one janitor
supervisor and 3 crew leaders.
We were told that only those
four men were needed for the
efficient functioning of the staff.
There are no parking
spaces for white or colored

someone to care.
Volunteers were quoted as
saying, Some dont have any
idea what you are talking about.
It is frustrating. and Their
only emotion is aggression. They
dont know how to show
affection. The comments
referred to the childrens
reaction to the preschool
Inventory Test which is
presented in middle class
language and therefore is an
obstacle to some of the children
who are not verbal.
To test questions such as
What does a policeman, mother
and father do?, they typically
answer, kill you, whip you,
beat you up. However, the
children in their interaction with
their teachers and each other, as
a rule, are friendly, happy and
cooperative.
The article stated that a
graduate student in personnel
service, is using the program for
her psychology class. She was
assigned to develop a
relationship with a child. We
do not use the children as our
homework. But the program is a

Class Attendance Doesnt Matter?
Take A Look At The Statistics!

MR. EDITOR:
Sophisticated sophomores, you who can no longer be dropped for
shortcomings in attendance, would you listen to an ex-student from
Old Eli who once cut his departmental chairmans lectures seventeen
times in a row?
After the recent mid-term exam in CHN 251,1 made a statistical
study of my two sections, with the following results:
Number of absences Average percentile ( Number of
from class score in the mid-term students
involved)
0 71st (16)
1 55th (13)
2 45th (12)
34 42nd (14)
5-6 41st (6)
7-15 36th : (6)
ini
w- is small* the evidence is striking: There ivi

people on our staff of maids and
janitors. Therefore the janitors
and the maids must park their
cars at the Physical Plant over on
34th Ave., and ride buses to
work. When he was asked about
the crowded conditions on the
buses he replied it wouldnt be
economical to hire another bus
to take the few who have to
stand. (I have seen as many as
12 either standing or sitting in
the aides.)

Herlong was somewhat reluctant
to give out the information we
requested, and when he spoke it
1 was with the vocabulary and basic
knowledge of a below average
third grader . Upon my
insistance that the black workers
* not be referred to as colored
people, but as black, Herlong
began repeatedly to call the
people ~n iggra(s)n

f (It was reported to us by a
maid that when she enters a
room she often finds the
resident lying or sitting
playing with his sexual
organs). Herlong answers. It is

growth experience and as such is
integrated into our professional
preparation.
Finally, the photograph
accompanying the article does
not depict the typical child in
the program. He happens to be
David Thomasson, the two year
old son of Dr. Thomasson, a
physician at the Student Health
center whose mother is the
arithmetic awareness teacher at
the Pre-Kindergarten.
More helpers are welcome if
interested just show up at the
Catholic Student Center or at
Hillel Monday, Wednesday or
Friday anytime from 9 to 11
a.m.
We regret if the volunteers
interviewed were not as clear as
they could have been in
presenting their personal views.
We felt it necessary to clarify
our position because of the
current emphasis in preschool
education. The staff is grateful
to the Alligator for recognizing
the value of the work they are
trying to accomplish.
MARTA PADRON
. STUDENT CHAIRMAN

not my responsibility, it is the
concern of housing. I know the
boys don't do it because the
maids are colored. (Upon my
insistence that the black workers
not be referred to as colored
people, but as black, Herlong
began repeatedly to call the
people niggra(s).
All the boys are hired on
probationary basis. (Herlong
displayed an evaluation sheet
with which he had the power to

make the employees fearful of
his very existence.)
i The janitors and maids
were.hired by personnel but he
had the power to fire.
t Herlong supervised 3 skilled
laborers in Murphiee Area.
t Skilled labor is considered
to be that labor which
encompasses unstopping
toilets, removing furniture,
fixing Venetian blinds, and
putting the UF stamp on all
articles in Murphree Area.
There were 2 blacks on his staff
of 3 skilled laborers.
t Unskilled labor is
sweeping, mopping and polishing
the floors, emptying the
wastepaper baskets and cleaning
windows.
% Each employee worked on
the average of eight hours a day,
forty hours a week with very
little overtime.
Workers were given three
breaks during the course of a
day. If a worker is absent from
work on any other excuse other
than illness, he has a chance to
be the main concern of
Herlongs pen and evaluation
sheet. The workers have a
luxurious eating place over in
30S Sledd. Upon inspection of
this pen we found hardly
comfortable sitting room for ten
people, hardwood tables, a chair
stuck in every comer that was
possible, no luxurious decor. It
was clean. This was quite an
improvement over the boiler

clear and positive correlation between class attendance and
achievement on the test.
JOHN W. PRICE
M ML U !_ 1 i
viiodiJf Jtsril 'I n ji'i ni l i ijil
.ril3)? a .Htilutl fit '(lliii ItiaiJitoq tesgi&l hsbiotlfi

M. Wl, Tfw Flo>H> AWttor.

By Earl J. Wilcox

room in the Physics Building and
the stock room in McCarthy
Hall. In leaving Herlongs office
we saw about 25 bfack workers
who evidently found the little
dark comer outside his office
much more to their Hung than
305 Sledd.
Employees were hired at the
minimum wage. Herlong has the
authority to recommend
increase in wages. (All he has to
do is take a look at his
evaluation sheet.)
Mr. Johnson only reported
what he saw. He did not look
into the past 100 years. He
viewed racist practices as they
exist on the UF campus in 1969.
Prejudice is a consciously
induced means of justifying
ruthless economic exploitation.
Who is being outrightly
exploited, intimidated and
dehumanized all for the sake of
perpetuating a racist society?
To you I ask, have you ever
had to dig ditches eight hours a
day, five or six days a week, 52
weeks a year knowing that this
would be your only livelihood?
Don't mention the trivial
back-breaking work youll do
three months out of your entire
life. The next time you walk
pass a black man digging a hole,
try to think, then ask yourself
what has he to look forward to.
Slavery once existed as an
institution legally and morally
based upon an economic and
political foundation. The
objectives of American racism
400 years ago are still visible,
only slightly submerged in the
fabric of present day society.
Today the government has
enacted laws that say were free,
in theory, but in reality we still
carry the bonds of our
forefathers.
Im puzzled about you. All
these years weve tried through
constructive change and careful
planning to make corrections in
your decadent society whereby
it may serve both black and
white. White America thus far
has shown a negative response.
The black colony sees that
criticism of your institutional
structures to meet our needs will
not free us from bondage. The
people are rapidly realizing that
revolutionary change is
necessary in order to determine
their fate.
All the power to the people.
Black power to black people.

Page 9



). The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 24,196$

age 10, The Florida Alligator, Monday,November 24,196$
; f I
jw Campus Crier I
|* 1 |f SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT jj
| TT ttttt^w^*^t^^*********** tt i,it ' Mi ***' f *************
WHAT IS THE SOLUTION?
| | T |" |J
. | |
Is it revolution? tokenism? integration or separatism? The question is almost impose** to answer at this stage. But there are
problems and we must start somewhere, someday confronting them squarely in the face. Student Government's Department of
Minority Group Affairs offers you a chance to help explore this new frontier now. You'll work in an area completely devoid of
precedents, help shape policies that will affect UF for many years to come, and make a worthwhile contribution to American society
in doing so. It probably will be difficult. It may not be immediately rewarding in any way that can be measured. But, it will be
worthwhile.
STAFF POSITIONS OPEN
1. Director Black Student Recruitment Call: Larry Jordan, 392-1665
2. Director Black-White Educational Program
3. Director Black Week Celebration
fl UNHAPPY Poor.
_ UNOER fSO } 7ROUBLEO
I SHELF OF LonELY LonELYpOR,CfOJT£N
pOR,CfOJT£N LonELYpOR,CfOJT£N t O\JSTY SooKS
I Happy £/cw,
| i - CAPefkee, hell fed
/|/\ | OP SsCi/AE
Well oseo
p=j y, gj ECfrop c Books
O TUDENT jj cveZNtoeNT SooK Ex CHANGE
Dec \-(o ~ Collection of GooKS ~ IphEFM
OeC Jf-lZj\r+ 16 Collection 4NO SALE /EM -Sfty
- {{(*) C-l-B (oneirz Onion CoarYNAoe
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE i
Bulletin board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material 20 copies of each
sheet, to student government offices and you will set free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.

Page 10

FRESHMAN COUNCIL MEETS TONIGHT

There will be a meeting of the
Freshman Council tonight at 8 o'clock in
room 347 of the Union.
Dr. Harold Riker will answer questions
concerning the hike in dormitory fees.
All interested freshmen are urged to
attend.
If you have any questions or problems,
contact a Freshman Council
Representative in your area:
BROWARD: Jill Yagoda, Pam Brown,
Lo HWl^'S; to^ e Tony Satamap

GRAHAM: Chris Gallen, Ira Gordon,
Allan Gross, John Middleton
JENNINGS: Lynn Barksdale, Steve
Lewis, Charlie Shelter
MURPHREE: Bernie Accoe, Mike
Drucker, Alan Ezrin, Ken Haas, Norman
Katz, Scott Lewis, Gary Nevins
RAWLINGS: Kathy Doane, Andrea
Shiftman
TOLBERT: Tom Andrews, Randy
Chastain, Jeff Crane, John Gillespie, Ann
Woodward
If VULEE: Bit) GUroore, John Knowles,

.44? '4. 1 *4? r 4>

ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CABINET, STAFF, AND AFFILIATED
ORGANIZATIONS DESIRING
PUBLICITY IN THE CAMPUS CRIER,
MUST TAKE THEIR INFORMATION
TO THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT
OFFICE BY 5:00 WEDNESDAY
AFTERNOON OF EACH WEEK IN
ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN
MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
THANKS.
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF
COMMUNICATIONS
STUD E N T
GOVERNMENT V v

STUDENT SPOUSE
ID CARDS HERE
STUDENT SPOUSE IDENTIFICATION
CARDS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. THESE
CARDS, A SERVICE OF STUDENT
GOVERNMENT, OFFER THE USE OF AND
STUDENT RATES WHERE APPLICABLE TO
THE FOLLOWING FACILITIES: CAMP
WAUBURG, FLORIDA PLAYERS. GOLF
COURSE, SWIMMING POOL. REITZ UNION
FACILITIES, AND THE MAIN LIBRARY.
THESE CARDS MAY BE PICKED UP BY
EITHER THE STUDENT OR THE SPOUSE
AT THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 FOR SALE |
sjsxyyx?xxwx*xcc4>x-sowsS!XS!X?fe
You buy well cry 1968 Enduro
Yamaha 250 scrambler 1-yr old 2700
miles PERFECT condition two new
helmets S6OO. Call Brad or Gary
376-85 24. (A-st-44-p)
G u nsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak .matching
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewriter
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
(A-7t-42-p)
2 Falls 1 dk. brown, real hair, barely
worn, $25.1 Platinum, real European
hair, worn once $35. Cali
378-4671.(A-st-45-p)
Honda 150 cc, 1965 fair condition,
dependable transportation, also
Canon Pellix camera 1.2 lens Cycle,
$l5O, Camera, $175. Call Jeff
378-6819. (A-st-45-p)
ROYAL Office Electric TW w/ Cb.
and Cloth Ribbons elite free
stand and Cb. Ribbons sl6O.
378-0384. (A-3t-46-p)
Furnished mobile home 68. 2
Bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central air
& heat & other extras. Call Liz after
6:30 373-2210 take over payments.
67 Triumph 650 TRG-C. Best offer.
Phone 378-7191. (A-st-46-p)
Kawasaki 250 SS Scrambler. Perfect
condition. Sacrifice S4OO. Call Dan
378-1713 after 5:00 p.m. (A-3t-46-p)
1956 MGA good mechanically S2OO.
Martin 0018 C guitar with case $175.
Four 15" wire wheels S6O. Two Shur
prof, mikes $l5O. One Roberts & 1
Norelco mike with stand SSO.
372- after 5. Must Sublease. College Terr. Apt. 1
blk. from campus. $120.00/mo. Utl.
Included. Call 378-4190. (B-st-46-p)
We have tame boa constrictors for
you. From $7.00 up. From 8 ft.
down. The Underground Zoo is a
bizarre pet bazaar. 7 N.E. Ist.
373- WOW! (A-2t-47-p)
FREE CATS All ages, colors, and
sexes Call 392-1591, between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (A-st-47-p)
KAWASAKI 120 T R. Excellent
condition. Only 2000 miles. S3OO.
372- (A-lt-48-p)
Great Book of Western World comp,
set over 75 vol. $250. Call Jan at
392-1200 also free half shepherd
pups. 6 for good homes. (A-lt-48-p)
MAKE YOUR ROADRUNNER,
SUPER BEE, ETC., REALLY RUN.
Factory hi-perf. parts. CHEAP. Call
392-9362. (A-3t-48-p)
FOR RENT |
Sub-let Village 34 1 bedroom apt.
Available mid-Dec. Pets allowed.
Easy drive to campus. Call 372-6020
before noon or after 6:00 p.m. Dec.
rent paid. (B-7t-48-p)
I bdr furnished apt. New, clean,
quiet. $lO3 mo. starting Dec. 1.
Prairie View 6315 S.W. 13 St. Apt.
II (South on hwy 441) 378-5171.
(B-3t-48-p)
Sublease one bedroom Frederick
Garden Apt., large furnished,
carpeted with pool. $l2O mo. Dec.
16 available. 376-5808. (B-3t-48-p)
Must sublet. JanJune. 2 bdrm. apt.
AC, 3 blocks behind Norman. Call
373- after 5 p.m. (B-3t-46-p)
f RADUrV METZORR f
*7* 44MW Production / .UU
r ST
PLUS \\ I / cSStS
CO-HIT \ V / AOm7Tt
CIRCLE \ V
OF LOVE"
AT 9:00 VgP

FOR RENT I
1 bedroom apt. 328 S.W. 34th St. in
village 34 fully furnished air
conditioned, quiet, close to school
slls per month call 372-2103
(B-4t-45-p)
Furnished mobile home 68* 2
bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central
Air & Heat & other extras. Call Liz
after 6:30. 373-2210. Married
Students Only. (B-4t-46-p)
WANTED 1
Female Grad Student needs
roommate. Beginning winter quarter. ''
Efficiency apt. fully furnished. Call
373-2612 after 6:30 p.m. (C-3t-46-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share new four bedroom, two bath
Spanish style apartment just off
sorority row. Private bedroom,
carpeting, central heat and air, all
electric kitchen, pool and barbecue
grills. Reasonably priced, all utilities
furnished. Call June at 372-5345.
(C-ts-47-c)
Wanted one coed roommate to sublet
College Terr. Apartment. Rent is $65
a mo. utl. inc. Vr blk from campus.
Call 3 78-8345 after 5 p.m. Rent Paid
until Dec. 10 (C-st-45-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters.
Available Dec. Ist. -$45.00/month.
Call Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5
p.m. (C-3t-46-p)
Male Roommate Landmark Apt.
Available December 15 December
rent free. $46.50/month. Pool, A/C,
carpet, dishwasher. Call 378-0727.
Grad Student to share unbelievable 2
br townhouse w/ senior law student.
Unique not in Sin City! A steal at
SBO beginning January. 373-1612.
(C-3t-46-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Luxury and privacy at a price YOU
can afford! Four bedroom, two bath
townhouse with carpeting, central
heat and air, Spanish decor, pool and
barbecue grills. Walk to campus.
Phone 372-5344. (C-ts-47-c)
WANTED: Riders to Jackson, Miss,
and points between. Leaving Dec. 12
and Dec. 15, returning Jan 3 or 4.
Call 373-2612 after 6:30 p.m.
(C-3t-46-p)
Male roommate wanted to share 4
BR plush La Mancha apt. with 3
grad. Students. $ 70/mo. incl. utilities.
Ready now or Jan. Call 376-1337.
(C-st-45-p)
FRENCH QUARTER will have room
for 2 coeds winter quarter by the
pool. Good for your head! Save you
bread. Apt. 97. Call 376-0613.
(C-4t-4 8-p)
Competent In Physical Chemistry?
Small library project on critical
phenomena. Call 372-6061 after:
11:00 p.m. Good pay. (C-3t-48-p)
Female roommate to sublet starting
winter qtr. Walk to campus. Air and
heat. Call 378-2793. (C-st-48-p)
1 or 2 coed roommates wanted. 2 BR
and IVz bth. Tanglewood Townhouse
Apt. SSO mo. 376-1015. (C-st-48-p)
1 roommate needed for winter
quarter. Landmark Apts. 163.
373-2276. (C-st-48-p)
Female Roommate for Village Park
Apt. 42.50 + /4 util. Avail. Dec. 12.
No rent till Jan. 5. Call 378-3157
after 5 p.m. Ask for Jeannie.
(C-3t-48-p)

AHI \
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(k'J' > | gfc 7:50 9:50
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Monday, November 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

i HELP WANTED I
: >
wxx*-x<-x*x*:->>:*x.va*:*:'>x*x*x*:*:*:-v.v.v!
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua." (E-llt-42-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
the Business and Administration
Offices of Student Publications. Call
Mr. Myking at 392-1681 between the
hours of 8 and 5. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-ts-47-c)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBMs new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminole and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
vw 1966 Black with red
interior, one-owner, 53,000 miles.
$950. Call Mike at 373-2349.
(G-st-45-p)
Comet 64. 6 cyl. white, red vinyl
shift. 500Q0 mi. New clutch, tires,
generator shocks, tran'm. bearing. No
oil loss. Top shape. Leave country.
Must sell, ask S7OO. Call 372-5221 or
392-2929. (G-3t-48-p)
VW 1966 BUG GOOD
CONDITION 26,000 MILES, DARK
GREEN, RADIO. $925. 372-5796.
(G-st-44-p)
PERSONAL
>:
Graduate Students Locating Teaching
Jobs Revolutionary approach.
Directories of Positions to Candidate.
Candidate to schools. Inexpensive
Deadline December 1, 1969.
Applications write: Intercept, Box
317, Harvard Sq., P. 0., Cambridge,
Massachusetts 02138. (J-3t-45-p)
UNDERGROUND DYLAN ALBUM
WHITE WONDER, now available
exclusively in Gainesville at the
Subterranean Circus, 10 S.W. 7th St.
while they last. (J-st-46-p)
FRtE KITTENS BLACK AND
WHITE CALL 373-1737. (J-st-47-p)
BJW LOOKING FORWARD TO Ist
OF MANY Tgs. I love you. KTB
(J-lt-48-p)
Need ride to Washington, D.C., Dec.
13. Will share expenses. 392-8690,
Diane. (J-3t-48-p)
13 fJiif/plfCi Tt\ iSl J7JSI §73?§
I trrtfffi flhrfr e
MnapwiMf I 1 e
£S|3iA3ltw iJ .
f yotiN* w.7msf*V * J
LAST 3 DAYS
COLOR'*
John Wayne %
Sock Hudson*
Undefeated , l
TOE TO TOE
OR SIDE BY SIDE
< THRU THE
APVENTURE*
THAT ROCKED
THE NATIONS
V.
LJSSUSSiawQSjN
I H U. W.
I WANT
m LAST 4 DAYS*
Downtown OotaQtvW* 1
1 3H#l illUa
231 W. Uolvnlty Av. J
** SHIRLEY #*
* MACLAINE \*
SWEET cmSy

Page 11

| PERSONAL |
tewwwwimx.vr.%wvwoeeooc oow $
Happy Birthday to the worlds
greatest wife. I love you, I love you, I
love you and think you are pretty
sweet too. Larry. (J-lt-48-p)
NEED YOUR TERM PAPER
TYPED? Will type anything. Only 50
cents a page. Broward Hail on
campus. Call 392-9760. (J-lt-48-p)
| SERVICES |
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction Instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
. iti
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
Health foods, natural vltimins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
cohating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electric Service, 603 SE 2nd St.
378-7330. (M-ts-46-c)

Tennis racket restringing. Free pick
up and delivery. M&R Tennis
Services. 378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Cali
376-0710. (M-45-ts-c)
I LOST & FOUND i
LOST: Green suede coat. Sat. DU
House. Call 376-2530. (L-3t-46-p)

I Today, Tuesday and Wednesday Specials
Dresses 98<
$1.40 Value
5 Shirts 99$
(SAVE SK)
TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 NW 13fK ST. 209 NE 16th AVE
ai
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
Mushroom Gravy JL
Hash Brown Potatoes / f £
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
!4 BROILED CHICKEN
Y ,ow sl.o 9
1 -v GAINESVILLE MALL
SHOPPING CENTER 1

| LOST & FOUND |
FOUND: Monday a.m., mens
black-rimmed glasses near Music
Building. Claim In Room 104 of
Building R. (L-3t-48-nc)
Lost: Gold mens watch between
stadium and Norman Hall after last
football game. Identifying engraving
on back. Tremendous personal value.
Reward. Call 372-6448 or 392-1496.
(L-St-47-p)
LOST medium size reddish-brown
female dog, in vicinity of Newberry
Road and <-75. Looks .'lke cocker
spaniel with long tail. If found call
376-1077 or 392-0792. Her name is
Taffy. (L-3t-46-p)
Lost: Black-and-white female Basset
puppy. Lost Sunday near Catholic
Church. Reward. Call 378-5409.
(L-st-45-p)
Lost: One wallet. Brown. Lost on
East-West Drive. Reward offered.
Contact Carl. Phone 2-7131 after 6
p.m. (L-3t-46-p)
Albert Claus says:
'SHOP
alligator
ADS



The Florida Alligator Monday, November, 24, 1969

Page 12

' y o a o o o o o O O
; j|^
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e o g > > o



Let Freedom Ring
Tells Os U.N. Plot

By KENNETH W. ANDERSON
Alligator Correspondent
Every few weeks an ad
appears in the Alligator classified
section asking readers to dial
378-5600 to hear a patriotic
message.
The message tells of a
Communist plot to take over the
world. The plot is called the
United Nations. The message is
provided by an organization
called Let Freedom Ring, the
GOCEK'S PAMPHLETS
... U.N. conspiracy

Photos On Show At Art Gallery

The UF Art Gallery is
presenting Photography in
Printing, a collection of
lithographs and intaglio prints
by nationally acclaimed artists.
The display ending Nov. 26
features works by pop artist
Andy Warhol.
The show was contracted
from Associated American
Artists, a New York firm renting
exhibits to art galleries across
the nation.
Other shows planned for the
year are an architecture show, a
faculty show, a Mayan show and
a student show.
Presentation Through
Documentation,*' a display of
photographs and graphic records
from the National Park Services
Historic American Buildings
Survey, will be on display Nov.
30 through Dec. 21.
The gallery will have an
annual exhibition of paintings,
prints, sculpture, photography
and ceramics by the university
art faculty, Jan. 9 through Feb.
15.
THE*SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
ky...young and old...tome just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene*
fits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
USt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
tying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
jpggj Waldo Road

Telephone Network.
The Gainesville head of Let
Freedom Ring is Edward S.
Gocek. Gocek says the avenge
person doesnt know about what
he considers an impending
Communist takeover of the
United States.
Gocek, along with UF
conservative leader Jimmey
Bailey, sponsors Let Freedom
Ring.
Gocek said Let Freedom Ring
is an educational program
designed to present the true
l facts about Communism.
Let Freedom Ring is a
| non-profit organization with no
political ties. Its offices are in
Sarasota.
Started in 1965 by Dr.
William Campbell Douglass, a
Sarasota physician, the
programs messages are written
by Douglass and mailed to
approximately 150 cities in the
network. His staff consists of
one full-time secretary.
The Gainesville headquarters
of Let Freedom Ring is Gocek
Brothers Electronics, 16 NW 7th
Ave. Inside, on Goceks desk, is
a small tape recorder with the
weekly message on the United
Nations conspiracy. Outside, an
American flag waves.
Goceks desk is piled high
with pamphlets Let Freedom
Rings listeners are encouraged

A major exhibition of
photographs, slides and artifacts
from Mayan sites in the Yucatan
Peninsula and Guatemala
originated by the University
Gallery will be presented Feb.
26 through April 2. The display
called Maya, will be presented
by the gallery in conjunction
with the Center of Latin
American Studies.

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I 19 SS 845 259 740 500 H 5 ri/hUm, sh- U 8 15.... SIS 7IS 11 IS 215 SIS I
. IN 10 30 800 I 19 99 I br PtntnenU, Flm... ''.......1t. 240 919 ... II 99 A A 10 10
I ..... 7152 19 11 40 1 130 I .... Or Pmammdig.. It 10 50- 499 999 I I 630 I
19 99 945 2SS 443 T Ar TtlUkmtttt, FU- Li 8 15.... 9IS 719 I I 513 I
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ft f f f f Sibn 1 f f ...... f I f I
105 9 20''. 455 950 700 350 Shamrock.. 540 100 500 0.55 | 3.10,
f f :: f f f f .... Crocs City. f .... f f f I f
ff f f f f Old Town f t f I I j I
ila I "£ 18"i's lil'io's 100 I Boo t tflii is*i ft 8 t
|I T T I | T SS?a-=: \ i j I
I1 { [ { i { I T T \ \
I 225210 55 3 5, iSSSS!:::::::::::::::::: < V* f 35
250 306 11 105 11 15 550 3 409 55 I K 155 110
lift f 1 t 1 loral City 11 t f I
315 330 11 45 430 12 10 615 Ar 3159 30 145 830 12 45
I f | f Masaryktown I l f It
lift f f f Midway It t t i
I SIR 49012 45 1 *45 15 530 40 115 l"l5 7157 15 FI* ...la ?30 _2 158 900*9 15 1246 TOO _ls 8 35. 1145 I
| T4S "Too ~06 200 "TB 12 01 7457 45 U Tamp., FU Ar 155 159 Ar 820 905 1315 12 15 446 445 7SQII 25
I 605 220 10 50 720 320 Ift 900 Pnlmrtf..... 12 35 12 45.... 706 11 00 T 330 6JS 10 05
, cl 6 230 ****** 11 00 7 5 330 1 9 910 ArsAafan 12 25 12 35.... 655 10 50 320 62S 955
= ii= i i t i. ilJ.:te=3iir= !8~ii... I1 11
= i f,= r,= I*= r, = {. L= te= s*= 'll f| ii
I- L ll= il-= *.- II lat.aafc= H il= 88::== ?. ill ia
ABBREVIATIONS 4 Seat Reservations.
CMThru bus Chieaco-Miami or reverse. bus Miaaai-Los Anaclcs. f Flag Stop AM-Ugkt Rasa. |
I fMM__Tkm Kuo nllii m or ivtns* bui MioiniMobil. na_ M rr-
I 22~~Thrn hut Knoxrille-Miami. SLMThru bus Bt. Louio-Miami or moriFe. M Station Stop M MaM Fan.
StSro bis Miami-Atlanta. TLlThru bus Tallabassee-Miami. Times shown in ITALICS indicates service via connecting trip, j
V 527 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE 372-6327 /
\ _

W
Iv.
mM' y
EDWARDS. GOCEK
... "Let Freedom Rinq"

to send for. Sample copies from
Goceks collection include such
titles as: C.F.R. (Council on
Foreign Relations), Conspiracy
To Rule The World; The Truth
About UNICEF; Plans for World
War HI, and copies of American
Opinion, the magazine of the
John Birch Society.
Gocek operates the tape
machine 24 hours a day,
advertising with Alligator ads
every few weeks. The entire Let
Freedom Ring operation costs
about S3O a month. Gocek and
Bailey split the costs, with the
help of occasional contributors.
Gocek says that an average
day might bring 700 calls,
mostly at night. During the
20-minute interview with Gocek,
the Let Freedom Ring
Anti-Communist Network phone
rang only once.

Exhibits are chosen by Roy
Craven Jr., director of the
University Gallery, and Steve
Hodges, assistant director.
The gallery is open daily,
except Saturdays and holidays,
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 pun.
The gallery is in the
Architecture and Fine Arts

building.

Library Time Schedule
For Holidays Announced
All UF libraries will follow normal open-hour schedules through
Wednesday.
Over the Thanksgiving holidays (Thursday through Sunday) the
following libraries will be open:
Thursday Law Library, 8-12,7-11.
Friday Education Library 9-5, J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Library 8:30-5, Law library 8-11.
Saturday Health Center Library 8:30 a.m.-12, Law 8-11 pjn.
Sunday Architecture and Fine Arts Library 6-10, Chemistry
library 2-5, 7-10, Physical Education 7 pjn.-10, Education Library
2-10:30, Engineering 2-5, 7-10, Health Center 2 -12,Hume 7-11 pm.,
Law 8:30 am.-l 1, Teaching Resources Library 2-5,6-10 pm.

GOLF
a par 60
DRIVING RANGE
W§ CLUBHOUSE
ELECTRIC CARTS
OPEN 7 DAYS
ffHgfe Ist NINE $1.25
Jjnpr $2.25 FOR IS
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLFCOURSE
3K Ml. WIST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

t Climb aboard C/
e S.S. Winnjammer* /j
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to Ik
L Midnight W
' J Bernie Sher //
1 at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
) Oysters & clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager \i
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. /I
Closed Sundays

-CLIP AND SAVE

Monday, November 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator

UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
1802 W. University
Adjacent King's Food Host
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB
X-TRA quick watch repair
Diamond Setting
I Ring siting
e Jewelry npihi
Trophys ptaques
BECK" BECHTOID 373-IQ2E

Page 13



V Th> Florid* AHjtii r, Monday, Hamnbu 24. 1968

Page 14

CLUB HOiereteiHKlES CLASS

Jujitsu Is Thriving At UF

By DAVE HARPER
Alligator Correspondent
One thousand nine hun hundred
dred hundred and sixty years ago a
certain Nomino Sukane grappled
with and killed Taimano Kehaya
in the seventh month of the
seventh year of the eleventh
Emperor Suinin of Japan. They
had no idea, but they started the
art of unarmed self-defense
known as Jujitsu.
It has come a long way, as
attendance at one of the UF
Jujitsu Clubs meetings on
Tuesday and Thursday nights
will show.
Sponsored by Dr. Harold A.
Letch and the Intramurals
Department, the concepts of
Jujitsu are taught to beginners in
this new club by three brown
belts, two of whom logically
enough are the president and
vice-president of the club.
Mason York, president and a
sophomore majoring in political
science and Jim Catlett,
vice-president and a senior in the
same major, teach with the
assistance of Akraffi Nassar, who
at third degree brown belt is two
steps behind the others.
Although the club is new,
the concepts or art formed the
basis for karate and judo, York
said. Both karate and judo clubs
have been on the UF campus for
some time.
Thirty-five members are on
the rolls, with 20-25 attending
regularly. We put the club on
trial basis, but the response has
been just great, Catlett said.
The response has been enough

Carlos Montoya Stars
At Celebration ( 70

By RALPH BETANCOURT
Alligator Writer
Carlos Montoya and James
Wright are among the headliners
of CELEBRATION 70 and an
attempt is being made to book
James Brown.
CELEBRATION A
Festival of the Arts is
sponsored jointly by Omicron
Delta Kappa, mens leadership
fraternity, and Student
Government.
Now in the process of
booking artists, CELEBRATION
will be from April 1 May 16.
It promises to delve into all
facets of the arts, including
music, dance, poetry and visual
arts. Chairman David Rouse calls
it an attempt to bring both the
students and the community
into active participation in the
arts.
Montoya, a Flamenco
guitarist, will perform April 17
and on April 28, the Paul Winter
Contemporary Consort, a
seven-piece instrumental jazz
group which combines classic,
folk and jazz music from 25
countries will perform. They
have toured North and South
America extensively, including a
performance at the Newport
Jazz Festival.
An attempt is being made to
book soul singer James Brown.
Soul is a definite form of
ethnic art, Rouse said. The
interest in James Brown for
CELEBRATION springs not
only from his music but also as
an effort to involve the entire
community, including young
blacks, in the program. Also
Jton(4ju.ia6>nnal t#

/ \ /I // k
Vw^l
w
to prompt the instructors to
plan for another beginners class
next quarter, while continuing
the class that started this term.
We would also like to start a
girls class next quarter, said
Catlett. The club at this time has
no girls as members.
The membership in the club
is closed about the fourth week
of the term, York said. This
permits the instructors to
concentrate on the students as a
group without having to start
over every week with a beginner.
Describing the main

session with Brown before his
performance.
In the field of dancing,
Percival Bordes The Talking
Drums will be performing May
9. A program of African and
West Indian dance, legend, and
song, The Talking Drums has
appeared throughout Africa and
the United States, taking the
audiences into a compelling
journey through Africa and the
Caribbean,
In the visual arts, a program
of filmwork will be presented by
professionals and amateurs alike,
and a photography exhibit will
be headlined by the works of
UFs own Jerry Uelsmann.
CELEBRATION is also
intended to combine well-known
professionals with local and
student artists. Twenty to 25
groups and individuals will be
performing throughout the
afternoon on all Fridays during
the festival. Among them will be
students and faculty.

iamEai
I PLENTY
If the name is $!
| SEMINOLE j

differences between Jujitsu and
' its offsprings karate and judo
- Catlett said to advance in this
art you have to learn to repair
all damage that might be done.
This involves first aid and other
recuporatory aids Swedish
massage, water safety (Instructor
Rank).
Catlett described the other
L main differences as permitting
the pupil of Jujitsu a range of
response in the use of the
techniques. It is not a sport
like Judo or a deadly weapon
like Karate, he said, indicating
that there are times when you
either wouldnt want to hurt the
opponent or conversely be hurt
by him.
Although athletic ability helps
the average person can be good
at this, said Catlett, bringing
out that the rankings (white,
green, purple, three degrees of
brown, and on to 10 degrees of
black) are won on technique not
sparring or actual competition.
It takes abouth four to five
weeks to earn the fifth or
highest degree of white belt,
said York. Both York and
Catlett are going for the first
degree of black belt, to be
earned by next March.
When asked the difference
between his brown belt and a
black belt, Catlett replied, It is
somewhat the same as the
difference between white belt
and a brown belt. These belts
are all only to be awarded by an
established black belt, who for
the UF club is Bill Beach, an
instructor and black belt from
Jacksonville.
iseoi
3 RSNCHO |
g Rods §
* OLE/
£ FOR A NEAT TREAT £
V MON. & TUES. SPECIAL M
V V
£ TACOS £
o TOSTADAS W
X, FRIJOLES s/
\ ANY 3 ft
V 60f V
1624 S.W. 13th St. K
(Across from Sin City)

' ;*T
- i* i . c 1 - , .-, -i, >
>*& \%J\ s *: w **' V- --*.>
BOOKS
and
RECORDS
JitSALEA
raw
EVERYONE? j
((If NOVEMBER I
jjf 24 % 25*, 26* S
m 9:00 4:00 Jj
SPONSORED BY THE IT;
HEALTH CENTER
BOOK STORE I
J. HILLIS MILLER pl.i 1 ili!
HEALTH CENTER p-! !i! j
SECOND FLOOR Wl j i
CROSS FROM the A]A P
AUDITORIUM (j 1 fl
H jlll % V
Itt iM 1 kiil iE m J i Ek I
Hfl i it It IMM it JJJ4 IJj I IM-'Mi ili / 4 I i ii I i J | u



The
Florida
Alligator

Abortion Discussion Today

To be or not to be, is the
question posed for todays
Campus Speakers Series program

IF W jn_ mMtmjp
w dB
dd jfl ' B"* l_-
JpTV HHbak
t|H HbHHHHEHh
TWO MORE BOOMS THIS SEASON
Andy D'Ambrosio (left) and Ted Twitched stand ready to sound
forth on the drum with "The Biggest Boom in Dixie." The drum has
become a trademark of the Gator Band and will be traveling with the
football team to Miami over Thanksgiving and to Jacksonville for the
Gator Bowl game Dec. 27.

turkey on November 27, then
come back to Gainesville and
have some White Rabbit on
"JEFFERSON AIRPLANE.
featuring
Glem McKays Headlights
aIM starring
Vince Martin from The fuck"
' r
Tues., December 2, in f lorida gym. 7pm &10pm
Tickets are $1.25 & $3.00 each
on sale now at: Reitz Union Box Bar ~
| v £ OOIA .nungoiq arb ni t &
'bmncftm m di iW.

: : :|:-iiiiiiiilKiiiiifc:i*iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiMii^
K*X%B;S|>x- la Tm im- :: Jim Hi . mr
i^. : ra- l :PI. I fII f 1 Pii P IS 1
n W w W m W"W m p # ww- Wf? P w--w

in the Reitz Union. Abortion is
the subject.
Sponsored by the Union

Program Office, the speakers
series is designed to bring UF
personalities to the Union to
discuss important and timely
subjects.
At 7:30 pm in Lounge 123
of the Union, a panel will discuss
the contemporary problems of
abortion.
Rabbi Monson, Hillel
Foundation Director, Dr. Blank,
a medical law professor, and Dr.
Philip, a general practitioner,
will compose the panel.
Admission is free.
Have An
International
Christmas
Searching for an unusual gift
for the brother, friend or parent
who has everything?
The Reitz Union International
Christmas Sale can easily solve
your problem.
Boasting items from the world
over, the sale will be held in the
Union Ballroom Dec. 2 and 3
from 11 a.m until 9 p.m.

in- i" a iim m jw ,i? %iu m""Mwrwrr 'mi
v < it *' i-e if -V??%
TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
fcS* V ' , ;
, *<>. v t v ' i v > #
: k li : -- 4 i

Monday, Novambar 24,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

I Review 'Easy Rider j
A pair of free passes are being offered by the Plaza Twin Theatres
manager for the three best reviews of Easy Rider turned in to the
Alligator.
Signed reviews and comments will be printed in Wedensdays
Alligator and after Thanksgiving if response is great enough.
Send reviews and comments to: Ted Remley, Entertainment
Editor, Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Room 365 or drop them by the
Alligator office.
AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS!
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED fgUdUPjsSW
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ...
LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT, ROBBERY, WBSS
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE. wPOHHI
LOBS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING. \ jMFfI
ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE. wSteSM
[REGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY RlNcl\
HATCHERS JEWELERS
2 EAST UNIV. AVE 376-6892

Page 15



Page 16

* a Via - i
V r VwrfOV MilledlUi, rffijvmay f iTvfSni)Br 4*l, ImW

The
Florida i
Alligator :

MAC STEENS DILEMMA

Dentistry Or Pro Football

By JEFF KUNKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
Before last Thursday, Mac
Steen had thought about playing
professional football, just like
many boys and young men think
about playing professional
football. That was all. It was just
a thought.
Steen is a senior in the UF*s
School of Business
Administration and he also plays
offensive tackle for the football
team.
Mac has thought about
playing football hes even put
the thought into words at times
but in reality, hes always
pictured himself going into
dental school after graduation.
The situation took a change
last week when a major wire
service poll picked him on the
All-Southeastern Conference all
star team at offensive tackle.
Mac is draft bait now the
professional football draft, that
is and hes got decisions to
make.
Steens dilemma is this:
should he spend his upcoming
years pulling teeth or knocking
them out?
It depends, Mac said, how
the situation presents itself.
Steen means, for example,
how high he is drafted, if he is
drafted, by a professional team
when the annual draft takes
place in January.
Id like to fit dental school
in with playing professionally at
the same time, Steen said. But
UF Hamers
First In State
Jack Nason and team captain
John Parker paced the Gator
harriers to their triumph in the
Florida State Collegiate Cross
Country Championship here
Friday.
The Gators led the meet with
27 points, Florida State was
second with 45 and the
University of South Florida was
third with 54 points. Low score
wins.
Florida States Ken Misner
took the individual honors as he
ran the course in a record time
of 18:32.2. Nason and Parker
followed in the second and third
spots.
Ftminint First
Mrs. Charles HI wood Dumell
of Missouri was the first woman
to own a Kentucky Derby
winner, El wood, in 1904.
4iBjNBHINE
v^ v ar-B-Q
Taka out Mnrtoa"
ASSORTED
BOX LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
BY THE POUND
CaN ahead ltll he
wattki for you.
1202 NS oth AVS.
(NEXT TO TRIANGLE
PACKAGE STORE)

* .' 1

Jjfl Bit; ;
Wmm
MAC STEEN
... pro football?
its difficult to do.
Billy Cannon, who plays tight
end for the Oakland Raiders did
it. He won the Heisman trophy
at LSU in 1959 and got his

M\ SOB
fcN m'mm' up.'* r *>uuwn aqr

The CPA: hes
whereithat.


. *! Wit
ll§|bhL,
IwwMKttjooor

degree in dentistry last month.
Apparently, Mac doesnt want to
wait 10 years.
Steen has been considered by
many as Florida's outstanding
lineman this fall. The coaching
staff grades its linemen after
every game on a three point
basis. A 3.0 would be a perfect
game, in other words. No
lineman has received a 3.0 this
season but Steen did get a 2.9
for his work in the Auburn game.
Norm Carlson, the UF sports
publicity director compares
Steen with Guy Dennis, a 1968
guard who is now starting for
the Cincinnatti Bengals. Hes as
good as Dennis, Carlson said,
but Steen shrugs it off.
Steen stands 6-3 and weighs
223, not particularly big for an
offensive lineman. But making
the all-star team certainly
enhanced his chances at being
drafted this winter.

A 3Wd Z\ V T *UiQ I

UF-Miami Breakfast
Slated For Saturday
The biennial Florida-Miami football breakfast, sponsored by the
UFs Miami Alumni Club, is planned from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Nov.
29 at the DuPont Plaza Hotel.
Breakfast speakers will include UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Football Coach Ray Graves and Alumni Association
President Doyle Rogers of Palm Beach. Jacksonville sports caster Dick
Stratton and Ocala humorist Red Mitchum will share the emcee
duties.
Reservations and payment for tickets at $3.50 each now are being
accepted by Chairman John W. Gilbert, 10196 NW Seventh Ave.,
Miami.
Restaurant
ASK ANY OLD TIMER ABOUT US
. AND OUR FAMOUS
LONDON BROIL STEAK
CHOKED SALAD FRENCH HUES ROUS A RUTTER
$ 1.15
AND THE BEST SELLER M TOWN
BLACK ANGUS STEAK
AN TH Trimmings S 1.45
BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAT
'WE BELIEVE WERE THE BEST RESTAURANT IN TOWNf
AjiflMtA OPEN raOM *3O AM TiL 3.00 AM
1225 w UN|V AVE 372-6666

When theres a tough business deci decision
sion decision to be made, the Certified Public
Accountant is a man everybody wants
to have around.
His advice often makes the differ difference
ence difference between success or failure.
Hes a key man in developing and
interpreting economic data.
And in every type of enterprise.
You name it: television, steel, oil,
government, hospitals, aerospace.
What qualities should a CPA have?
He should be able to think creatively,
analyze problems, and come up with
imaginative solutions. And he should
be the kind of man that people can
put their confidence in.
A CPA might join an accounting
firm and eventually become a partner.
Or he might open a practice for him himself
self himself and go it alone. Or he can work
in almost any type of business he
chooses. What other profession offers
so many choices?
You can select courses now that
could earn you your CPA certificate
soon after graduation. Or you might
want to go on to graduate work. Ask
your faculty adviser about it.
Weve prepared a booklet with the
whole CPA story. Just drop a card or
note (mentioning the name of your
college) to: Dept. 15, AICPA, 666 Fifth
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10019.
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants

.....



Lukco Leads Varsity Over Freshmen

By Alligator Services
The Gator varsity, led by
junior right wing Ed Lukcos 20
points, squashed the
highly-touted Gator freshmen
basketball team 99-68 Friday
night in Florida Gym.
The contest, which was billed
as the annual Orange and Blue
Game, was sponsored by the
Gator Loan Fund and was the
first organized game between the
two squads this year.
Assistant coaches handled the
coaching duties as Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett viewed with a

TOM PURVIS (24) BATTLES FOR REBOUND
... pulled down 14 rebounds and scored 13 oointi

Bowl Bound Florida Gators
Rewrite The Record Books

With one game remaining and
a Gator Bowl bid in its pocket,
the 1969 UF football team has
already gone into the record
books with more team and
individual marks than any
previous group of Gators.
As a team, the 1969 Gators
have broken single game records
for most yards passing, fewest
yards allowed rushing, most
passes attempted, most passes
completed and most touchdown
passes.
The 1969 team already holds
season records for most first
downs, most yards total offense,
most passes attempted, most
passes completed, most yards
passing and most TD passes.
Add to this the individual
records of the sophomores,
quarterback John Reaves and
split end-flanker Carlos Alvarez.
Reaves now holds single game
records for most yards total
offense, most yards passing,
most passes attempted, most
yards passing, most passes
attempted, most passes
completed and most TD passes.
The Tampa ace holds season
records for most yarda total
offense, most yards passing,
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
AND
101 N. MAIN ST
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS

watchful eye as a spectator.
Mike Leatherwood has control
of the freshman and Jim
McCachien was in charge of the
towering varsity.
Lukco pumped in his 20
points hitting on 10 field goals
out of 16 shots before losing a
contact lens in the final period.
He was high point man for the
varsity.
Varsity captain Andy Owens,
who had his troubles with rim
shots at the outset, added 19
points and the Jacksonville
University transfer Tom Pervis
added 13.

most passes attempted, most
passes completed and most TD
passes.
Alvarez is tied for the single
game record for most passes
caught and holds the mark for
most yards caught on passes and
most TD passes caught. He holds
the season record for most
passes caught, most yards
passing and most TD passes

UF'S REPRESL .TATTVES
Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl Phil Tarver
l Skip Lujack Mel Ward
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Unhr. Ave.
376-1208
PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEW
PJtzzaiim
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favorite pizza, Pizza inn
Pizza.... .prepared from a secrete /Hr \
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I W '*
The 6-foot-5 Owens paced
varsity rebounders with 16 while
Purvis cleared 14 off the boards.
Ken Van Ness led the
freshmen with 12 points. Hans
Tanzler and crowd-pleasing Tim
Fletcher each added 11.
Fletcher, who uses a
behind-the-back pass with ease,
connected on four of nine from
the floor and was three of four
from the foul-line. Van Ness
made six straight from the line.
Every available player saw
action in the game.
Varsity members Tony Duva,
Gary Waddell and Hal Kelly, all

UF VARSITY (99)
fg reb. P F TP
Ceravolo 2-2 0-0 0 2 4
Hoover 3.6 0-0 2 14
Agee 1-6 0-0 8 12
Miller 2-3 0-0 114
Findley 2-7 0-0 4 2 2
Purvis 6-19 1-1 14 4 13
Fotiou 3-10 1-3 9 0 7
Houston 4-6 1-2 2 2 9
Lukco 10-16 0-0 1 0 20
Cox 2-5 0-0 114
Owens 6-16 7-7 16 6 19
Boe 4-9 1-2 9 2 9
UF FROSH
fg ft reb. PF TP
Totals 44-105 11-15 73 22 99
Peace 1-9 2-5 7 5 4
Fletcher 4-9 3-4 5 1 11
Hinson 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Sharp 2-5 2-2 4 0 6
Kiley 1-1 0-0 012
Lorenz 0-1 0-0 0 0 0
Nagel 3-10 1-2 8 0 7
Tanzler 4-7 3-7 6 0 LI
B. Miller 0-1 2-2 0 0 2
Bowles 0-1 4-4 10 4
Thompson 0-3 0-0 6 1 0
T. Miller 4-14 1-1 2 0 9
Van Ness 3-9 6-6 6 2 12

caught.
In addition, sophomore
placekicker Richard Franco has
broken Wayne Barfields mark
for PATs kicked in one year,
having 30 now.
Final opportunity to improve
on these records will not be an
easy one, that being Saturday
nights season-ending game
against Miami. v

***" 'l *" **--,* ** * * V*- -ti % -%S r *>' w

missed the game with injuries
and viewed it from the stands.
Lukco, Jeff Miller, Dan Boe,
Owens and Earl Findley started
the game for the varsity. Findley
jumped center and yielded

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immediately to Cliff Cox.
The Gators open their season
in the Jacksonville Qvitan
Tournament Dec. 1 against
tough Morehead State of
Kentucky.

Page 17



Page 18

I ThtFkiH* awiMtnf llnnriwf Nnwmbw 24 1909

GATOR OPPONENTS

Miami Tops Wake Forest

By Alligator Services
University of Miamis athletes
did their best to get critics off
Coach Charlie Tates back
Friday night in the Orange Bowl
by slaughtering Wake Forest,
49-7, in a warmup for next
Saturday nights traditional
finale with Florida.
Six Florida scouts saw three
different Hurricanes throw
touchdown passes for the first
time in 43 years of UM football.
Sophomore quarterback Kelly
Cochrane hit two, halfback Tom
Sullivan pitched one, and
back-up quarterback David Teal
connected on another.
Cochranes two pay-dirt tosses
ran his total for five games as a
starter to 10, equaling the record
logged by George Mira in both
the 1962 and 1963 seasons.
The Hurricanes didnt beat
much. By the time the Miamians
fired a 21-point salvo in the
second quarter for a 28-0
halftime lead, it was obvious the
Deacons couldnt even make it
interesting.
Miami wound up with 545
yards in total offense, not too
far off the school record
582-yard production set against
little Elon College in 1941.
The ball even took the right
bounces for the Hurricanes... a
welcome change for the 4-5
Miami squad that will be facing
Florida's 7-1-1 Gator Bowl
bound team Saturday.
Miamis big running back
Vince Opalsky started the
scoring for the Hurricanes when
he blazed 13 yards with a

Houston Drops Dolphins
In Rain-Soaked Contest

MIAMI (UPI) Pete Beathard
threw two touchdown passes
and Roy Gerela kicked three
field goals to lead Houston to a
32-7 win over Miami Sunday and
give the Oilers a firm grip on
second place in the American
Football League's Eastern
Division.
Gerela kicked field goals of
21, 10 and 18 yards and added
two conversions on a cloudy and
showery day in Miami's Orange
Bowl.
Roy Hopkins scored
Houston's first touchdown with
4:35 left in the second quarter
when he bulled into the end
zone from a yard out to cap an
80-yard drive that included 18
and 20-yard Beathard passes to
rookie Jerry Levias.
With less than two minutes
remaining, Beathard threw a
six-yard touchdown pass to Jim
Beime.
Miami rookie defensive end
Bill Stanfill scored the Dolphins
lone touchdown on a pass
interception. Stanfill grabbed a
Beathard pass on Miamis
17-yard line, stiff-armed one
tackier and shook off two others
before lumbering into the end
zone with his second touchdown
of the year. Karl Kremser made
the conversion.
Beathard's 21-yard
touchdown pas to Levias came
with 6:35 left in the third
quarter. Levias caught the ball
sassing down on the four and
crawled into the end zone
untouched.
The Oilers scored & safety
three minutes affc; the final

pitch-out in the first quarter.
Then Sullivan located Dave
Kalina all alone with a 38 yard
halfback pass in the second
period. f;
Fullback Bobby Best took a
flat pass from Cochrane and
weaved 45 yards for the third
touchdown and then flanker
Ray Bellamy took a 66-yard
bomb from Cochrane for
Miamis fourth score of the first
half.

flpnS
MIAMI READIES FOR GATORS
... teams meet in Orange Bowl Saturday

period began when Houston
defensive end Elvin Bethea
tackled Dolphin quarterback
Ride Norton in the end zone.
With 1:48 remaining in the
game, Beathard lofted his
six-yard touchdown pass to
Beime to round out the Oiler
rout.
Some 27,218 Orange Bowl

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Bennett Corfs Treasury
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Nancy Mitfords
The Sun King
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Campus Shop & Bookstore

The Hurricanes scored three
more times in the second half on
Rick Strawbridges six-yard pass
from Teal, a 70-yard run by
punter Pat Barrett and finally a
three-yard plunge by Sullivan.
After bombing the poor Wake
Forest secondary for 208 passing
yards, the 19-year-old Cochrane
put the finishing words on the
Deacons when he said, T really
felt sorry for them. They were
just outmanned all the way.

fans who braved the intermittent
rain saw Miami lose its eighth
game of this dismal season.
Norton, playing for injured
Bob Griese, threw poorly all
afternoon and managed to pass
for only seven yards in the first
half. The Dolphins never
mounted a serious scoring threat
during the game.

Jesse Owens Makes
Alabama Hall Os Fame
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) Eight persons, including Olympic
track star Jesse Owens, will be installed into the Alabama Hall of
Fame Jan. 23.
The group, second inducted into the hall, includes football coach
John W. Heisman, former Auburn track coach Wilbur Hutsell, former
Alabama coach Hank Crisp, former Major League baseball players
Joseph W. Sewell and Early Wynn, Alabama football player William
(Bully) Van de Graff and former Alabama coach Wallace Wade.
Owens, who was bom at Danville, was a record-breaking trade star
at Ohio State before going on to his famous conquests during the
Olympics at Munich, Germany.
Heisman, one of Americas greatest college football coaches,
coached for 36 years at Auburn, Clemson, Georgia Tech,
Pennsylvania and Washington.
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SEC Battle Goes Down To The Wire

ATLANTA (UPI) The
Tennessee Vols will have to re find
themselves, and quickly, if they
want to win the Southeastern
Conference football crown.
The lOth-ranked Vols,
apparently still reeling from last
weeks 38-0 loss to Ole. Miss,
gave up a record 440 passing
yards Saturday and barely
squeezed past Kentucky, 31-26.
Meanwhile, the Vanderbilt
Commodores, who close against
the Vols season next Saturday at
Knoxville, routed Southern
Conference champion Davidson
63-8 for their third straight
victory.
And, it might be noted, in
their previous outing two
weeks before, the Commodores
trounced Kentucky 42-6.
The SEC race, seemingly
locked up by Tennessee a couple
of weeks ago, thus goes right
down to the wire. The Vols, 8-1
over-all, are 4-1 in league play

Vols Line Outstanding

KNOXVILLE If its been
said once, its been said
thousands of times: no runner or
passer can succeed without
blockers up front. And the
University of Tennessee is
certainly no exception.
Except during last weeks
38-0 thrashing by Ole Miss, on a
day when nothing went right for
the Volunteers, UTs line has
exceeded pre- season
expectations by clearing wide
holes for a talented corps of
Orange runners. Assistant Coach
Ray Trail has brought a youthful
M&gb
CHIP KELL
... 225 pound tackle

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ARCHERY WINNERS
mpner^£^^ a i^ CherY^ip m f^l^
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from Winn-Dixie.

jf^J
and tied with eigth-ranked
Louisiana State which wound up
its season Saturday night by
beating independent Tulane 27-0
for a 9-1 record.
That was all the action
involving the SEC since six of
the league teams didnt play.
Elsewhere in the Southeast:
Memphis State won its second
Missouri Valley title in as many
years as that conference by
crushing Louisville 69-19; Miami

UF versus
Tennessee

contingent of blockers, all of
whom will return next season,
along at a rapid clip.
The offensive line launched
the 1969 season with three
newcomers tackles Joe
Balthrop and Steve Robinson
and center Mike Bevans. Bevans
and Robinson were reserves last
season (Bevans at guard
position) and Bahhtop was on
the freshmen team but they all
earned first team positions.
Chip Kell, All-Southeastern
Conference center as a
sophomore, has been the leader
after switching to guard. Kell, a
255-pounder with frightening
strength, was a pre-season
All-American selection by
Playboy Magazine and is
generally recognized as one of
the top blocking linemen in the
country.
Don Denbo, Kells running
mate at guard, is the little

VOLS-LSU READY FOR FINAL

beat Wake Forest 49-7; and
Florida State beat North
Carolina State 33-22.
West Virginia, 9-1 and Peach
Bowl bound, edged Syracuse
13- Chattanooga beat The
Citadel 10-5; Southern
Mississippi beat East Carolina
14- and Tampa blanked
California State 53-0 for its eighth
straight victory after an opening
loss.
Sophomore Bemie Scruggs,
one of three quarterbacks
Kentucky used, hit on 16 of 22
passes for 266 yards against
Tennessee. The Vols, who led
21-7 at halftime, were saved by
their linebackers who came
through with key interceptions
and fumble recoveries.
Sophomore quarterback
Watson Brown ran for three
touchdowns and passed for
another as Vanderbilt rolled up
40 first downs fnd 768 yards
total offense. Brown personally

man in the Tennessee line. The
5-11, 215-pounder earned a
starting berth at the very
beginning of his sophomore
season last fall and has been one
of the unsung members of the
line. Though his relatively small
size puts limitations on his
ability, Denbo realizes his
capabilities and does the things
that he can do best. And many
opposing linemen can tell you he
does many things well.
Mike Bevans was inserted in
Kells center position and the
220-pound junior has developed
into one of the top centers in
the Following
Tennessees 17-3 victory over
Georgia, Atlanta columnist
Harry Mehre, former Georgia
coach, had this to say: I cant
remember when Ive seen a
better center if ever.
Robinson came to Tennessee
without aid of a scholarship and
his is a classic example of a boy
developing into a top-notch
football player through a
self-imposed conditioning
program and hard work. He has
been one of Tennessees most
consistent performers and has
graded out high in every game.
Balthrop is destined to be one
of Tennessees stars of the future
and, as his coaches point out, is
far advanced for a sophomore.

ran for 119 yards and passed for
177 and Doug Mathews, who
already had the SEC season
kickoff return yardage record,
helped to set a Commodore
rushing record of 721 yards by
rushing for 138 yards, 131 in the
first half, t
Louisiana State held Tulane
to a minus four yards rushing to
win the national defense defenseagainst-rushing
against-rushing defenseagainst-rushing title with a 38.4
yards per game average. Thats
the best mark by a major college
football team since 1960 when
Syracuse held its foes to a 193
average.
This weeks action begins on
Thanksgiving, when Ole Miss

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Monday, November 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator

tunes up for its Sugar Bowl date
with either second-ranked Texas
or fourth-ranked Arkansas in a
visit to Mississippi State.
Saturday, Alabama, which
plays Colorado in the Liberty
Bowl, meets Auburn, enroute to
the Bluebonnet Bowl, at
Birmingham; Florida, which
plays Tennessee in the Gator
Bowl, will be at Miami; Georgia,
which plays Nebraska in the Sun
Bowl, is at Georgia Tech; and, of
course, Vanderbilt is at
Tennessee.
Also, Florida State is at
Houston. West Texas State at
Southern Mississippi and Florida
A & M is at Tampa.

Page 19



1. The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambf 24,1969

Page 20

M§ : wam i wn i
wJT BONANZA
M SIRLOIN FIT
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PLAYER of the WEEK of the Week
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Study Lamps This week's Player Os The Week goes to cross country runner
Jack Nason for his performance in the Gator's winning effort in
is Cl the Florida state coegiate cross country championships. lL A |AI|CUD^|I|C
college oeal Nason finished a dose second with a time of 18:49.2behind llf 6 Vs
Ken Misner of Florida State. Misner's time of 18:32.2 set a new
Mascot Stationary record for the UF course.
7 Nason's time just edged out Gator captain John Parker by
Film and Developing '-nlCKeil PlOCe.
_ Nason has been one of the most consistent harriers this year
Service and has been a member of the starting seven for Coach Jimmy
Carnes' strong team.
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-8
today as Flonda tries for a high finish in the National Collegiate
SATURDAY 9-12 *£* Association cross country championships at Manhattan I And what it is is the best
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