Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'>*
rat
A* Ami*

V0L62.N0.47

UF Loyalty Oath Injunction Denied

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
AIISmAm a ff
Alligator own writar
\
The American Civil liberties Union
(ACLU) application for an injunction
against UF's loyalty oath was denied
late Wednesday afternoon by U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black.
Black did not give any reason for the
denial, Assistant Clerk of the Court
Edward Schade said.
Chairman of the local chapter of
ACLU Norma Munn said she is very
d ; ssappointed in the decision.
Mrs. Munn said she doesn't think
anyone should make a martyr of
themselves by refusing to sign the oath.
She said she is sure the decision will be

Plaza Folk Mass
For Thanksgiving

As the warn aroma of
Thanksgiving wafts across
campus this weekend, strains of
folk music giving thanks to the
accompaniment of guitars and
bass drums will echo from the
Baza of the Americas.
Father Michael Gannon, UF
professor of Religion and
THREE GATORS have been
chosen for* the 1969
SEC All-Star football
team page 2
Classifieds 13
Editorials 8
Entertainment 8
FSU News 9
Letters 9
Movies 13
Small Society 6
Sports 21
Whats Happening 6

CHAVIS NEW CHAIRMAN
Hilliard Announces'Rat Reorganized

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
A complete change in organization and a new
chairman of the board for UFs Rathskeller were
announced by outgoing chairman Joe Hilliard at the
clubs first annual evaluation Thursday.
Hilliards resignation became effective
immediately after the evaluation and Marvin Chavis
has been selected to head the Rathskeller board
during its second year in operation.
The board met with a group of 30 students,
faculty and administrators to evaluate the
Rathskellers success during the past year.
Our biggest mistake, Hilliard told the group,
has been to believe that students alone could run
this type of operation.
Because the board has been much displeased
with the actual daily administration of the dub, a
new organizational structure has been set up
induding a professional full-time director, he said.
This would be a non-student employe to handle
the daily business affairs of the Rathskeller. He
would be responsible to the student chairman and
submit daily operating reports.
In order to bring more faculty participation into
the RathdceDer, Hilliard said the board also planned

Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Catholic Student Center
Director, plans to hold a folk
mass in the Plaza at noon
Sunday.
While it is a Roman Catholic
mass there will be a
non-denominational theme and
everyone is invited to come,
Father Gannon said.
He advised students to bring
blankets to sit cm and to dress
casual.
A number of students will
speak on the theme of What I
am most thankful for, and they
will represent various faiths.
The 11 a.m. mass usually held
at the Catholic Student Center
will not be held in lieu of the
folk mass.
There will be no monetary
collection but canned goods and
articles of clothing will be
collected for distribution to
needy families.

SUPREME COURT DECISION

appealed, and there may also be another
case.
There are some fine legal questions
involved which we have to explore
further, she said.
The portions of the oath which
require personnel to swear they are not
members of the Communist party or of
any organization that advocates
overthrow of the government were
eliminated in the case involving an
Orange County teacher, Stella Connell.
A temporary injunction against the
original oath was issued the some day as
the Connell decision by UJS. District
Judge George Young.
Young is a member of a three-district
court. However, he alone issued the

University of Florida, Gainesville

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PHIL COPE
PLEASE DONT CUT OUR BUDGET

Bob Wheeler, left, Samson Business manager, and
Burt Simon, Samson program director, plead their
organization's cause before the Student Senate's

|rathskeller
I IWS WAT w
to reorganize itself. The new board wOl be made up
of three faculty members and six students, with the
student chahman having veto power.
The Rathskeller board is currently a
subcommittee of the Faculty Club, but Hilliard said
it will eventually become incorporated.
Because it is part of the Faculty Club, a faculty
member who wants to belong to the Rathskeller has
to pay $25, while a student only pays $2 a year.
The Rathskeller is not going to come anywhere
near its goal of student-faculty participation until
these is an alignment of student and faculty fees,
Student Body President Charles Shepherd said.

temporary restraining order now in
effect.
When the three judges are impaneled,
the case can be brought in front of them
on appeal, according to Leroy Lambom,
assistant law professor.
Lambom said another possibility
open to the ACLU would be to seek the
same injunction from another Supreme
Court justice.
UF President Stephen C. O'Connell,
three weeks ago, said the loyalty oaths
would have to be signed by Thursday or
employees would not be paid for
November.
However, Thursday morning, Robert
Button, director of university personnel,
said the 5 pm. deadline applied only to

Friday, November 2i, 1969

Budget and Finance Committee. The committee has
received fund requests from 31 groups. See story
page 2.

There was much criticism of the Rathskellers
philosophy, which aims at increasing
communication within the university community.
1 go to a place to drink beer or champagne and
relax, not to face the problems I face all day, UF
Executive Vice President Linton E. Grin ter said.
The Rathskeller has unwittingly created a
scholarly atmosphere of continuing education,
Shepherd said.
Hilliard said the board is attempting to correct
this by steering away from folk singers and poets
next quarter.
Conduct enforcement has become a real pain,
Hilliard said, but the Rathskeller is in a tenuous
position because it is on campus and the Faculty
Dub is legally responsible if minors are caught
drinking.
Student Senate President Jack Vaughn said the
identification checkers at the club are ominous,
creating a stifled atmosphere.
The evaluators generally agreed the Rathskeller
should continue to enforce the law, although Vice
President for Student Affairs Lester Hale asked if
the board had looked into the prospects of serving
Hop-N-Gator, a beer with an alcoholic content
(SEE 'RAT' PAGE 2)

staff and other employes paid oy me
hour.
These employes are paid bi-weekly,
and their pay records had to be sent to
Tallahassee Thursday.
However, faculty members, are paid
monthly. Their next payday is not until
Nov. 27.
As long as we have a loyalty oath
for a faculty member by Nov. 26, they
will be paid for November,** Button
said.
He said he wasn't actually extending
the deadline.
Special Assistant to the President Rae
O. Weimer said there would be no
statement from O'Connell on the
loyalty oath.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, November il, 196 d

Student Government Tight-Knit Organization

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second of a series on Student
Government which compares the
functions of our governing body to the
national system.)
By RONNIE BLOOM
Alligator Corespondent
Student government is a complex,
tightly-knit organization functioning
similar to our federal, state and local
governments.
On the federal level, there are three
branches. The executive branch consists
of the student body president,
vice-president, treasurer, and the
presidents cabinet. There are 13 cabinet
members with several undersecretaries,
each in charge of special projects

Groups Bombard
Senate For Funds

By SUSAN GREENBERG
Alligator Correspondent
For the past two weeks,
Student Senate representatives
have been bombarded by 31
groups requesting funds.
Its all proper precedure
however, as Budget and Finance
Committee members set aside
six afternoons and heard out
respective treasurers, business
managers and others trying to
get some money to operate on
next year.
Committee members
requested budget item
explanations so they in turn can
explain these items to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and the Student Senate.
Committee member, Marsha
Madorsky, said Student
Government budget requests will
be submitted to OConnell and
he then will submit them to the
state legislature.
Groups interviewed are not
only groups funded last year,
but also those who were deleted
last year and feel they can
benefit from Student
Government funds, Miss
Madorsky said.
Last year SG requested
$450,000 but had only
$293,000 available this year.
Consequently, some did not get
all the monies they had
requested.
Miss Madorsky said the
committee is trying to get the
legislature to allocate more

I International I
I Christmas Sale jj
I Dec. 2 & 3 I
| Reitz Union j
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the |
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it hi published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence io the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
- v. for, correction must be given before the ne\t insertion.. ..... .....

sponsored by SG.
The legislative branch is comprised of
unicameral, or one-house form of
representation. This is the Student
Senate. The senate is composed of
elected representatives from virtually
every segment of campus.
Within the judicial branch of SG are
two courts the Honor Court and the
Traffic Court. Honor Court performs
the combined function of a trial court
and a supreme court. As a trial court, it
tries and passes judgement on all
violations of UF's Honor Code, a code
which places the responsibility of each
students conduct upon himself.
As a supreme court, the Honor Court
is empowered to pass judgement on
legislation and contested elections. The
chancellor or judge, the Clerk of the

money to SG so it can give
more to individual groups.
SG gets $4.97 from each $l5O
tuition. Miss Madorsky said SG
did not get a raise when tuition
fees were increased this year
from $125 to $l5O ($175 for
graduate students).
Faith Tulino, budget director,
said the committee asks each
group to explain certain items
on each proposed budget. The
committee can then explain
these items when the Senate is
voting on each budget.
The committee can feel
around for what we think the
Senate will approve, Miss
Tulino said. We can tell them
(group treasurers) how we feel
the senate will feel.
Miss Tulina said the
committee warns groups not to
request out-of-state trips, meals,
entry fees for and
insurance.
For example, when the
University Choir had its hearing
Thursday, committee members
asked business manager, Art
Hey man i to explain the items:
concert tours, concert uniforms
and an accompianist.
Although some groups get
additional money from ticket
sales and donations from past
members, most groups request
more SG funds than they were
allocated the previous year.
Everybody increases the
amount of their requests because
costs increase and the number of
people in organizations increase
each year, Miss Tulino said.

OPERATES ON THREE LEVELS

By LYNNE JOHNSON
Alligator Correspondent
Progress tests in comprehensive English will be
eliminated Spring quarter and replaced by 100
per cent class grades on a trial basis, according to
Nancy Kelley, undersecretary of academic affairs
and head of a Student Government investigation
into the University College prog testing
system.
Similarly, a three-week course of study
determined by individual instructors in the
Humanities Department scheduled for Spring
quarter will require elimination of the
standardized progress tests, she said.
Instead, Miss Kelley said, a 100 per cent class
evaluation, possibly including a final essay test,
will determine a students grade.
Lecture classes have been eliminated from the
required biology course. Institutions courses
which now operate on a 50 per cent class grade,
50 per cent prog grade basis, will not be altered.
Comprehensive testing is not fair to students

Raf' Is Reorganized

FUfrom page one^
low enough to serve minors.
Because the Rathskeller has
had a clean operation, weve
made it possible for other
schools to do the same thing,
Frank T. Adams, dean for
student development, said.
The Rathskeller is currently
showing a S7OO loss, Business
Manager Bob Allison said, but
the board is planning to make up
the loss by bringing in three or
four popular groups next
quarter.

* TACO i7£T ~~ 0
g RAWHO t (fJjP Fri., Sat., & Sun. S
£ Mexican £
§ Foods $ FIESTA PLATE K
Our delightful Mexican dinner includes NOW K < 0
b Jaco -Filled with beef, cheese, lettuce M \
V Tamale Garnished with our Jose Chili 6
V l n F : ,joleS Whipped Mexican beans & Cheese s/
Mexican Salad Our own special thing s7
£ Ranchitos Broken corn Tortillas

Honor Court and 16 justices,
representing each of the schools and
colleges on campus, are elected by the
student body.
The second court in the judicial
branch is the student Traffic Court. This
court accepts payments of fines for
parking violations and conducts hearings
for appealed tickets.
The state level ot SG consists of
Interhall Council, composed of
representatives from the residence halls
on campus; the Association of Women
Students, composed of all single
undergraduate women living on and off
campus; the Interfratemity Council, the
governing body of all fraternities; and
Panhellenic Council, governing body of
all sororities.

-English Progress Tests
Get The Axe In Spring

Mike Brown, publicity
director for the club, said he is
considering sharing expenses and
profits with Student
Government Productions to
bring in some of the groups.
Your Fathers Mustache, a
Miami group that played at the
clubs opening, has been booked
for early next quarter at the first
anniversary celebration. Also
planned is a confrontation
night, where students will pick
a person they would like to talk
with or an issue they would like
to talk about.

Also on the state level is the Mayors
Council, the representative body for the
married villages on campus; and the
Council of International Organizations
the policy-making body and
coordinating agency for several
international student organizations on
campus.
The local level consists of the
remaining student organizations on
campus. Most students dont realize that
these groups are funded by SG, but
operate autonomously.
Some of these include Accent, Gator
Loan Fund, Student Productions
Samson, and the India, Latin American,
European, Chinese and Persian Clubs.
The last part of this series will
explore the activities of the
organizations on the local level of SG.

who dont test well, she said. We are working
for at least a 50/50 set-up, 50 per cent class grade
and 50 per cent standardized tests, in all
University College courses. We want what is
fairest for the greatest number.
Franklin Doty, Dean of University College
commented that a 50 per cent class grade and 50
per cent standardized test grade was
reasonable. He said students who are studying
the same material ought to be tested in a uniform
manner.
The Lewis Report, a UC study completed last
year which indicated serious weaknessess due to
progress testing and course content is the basis
for this years SG investigation.
In regard to the Lewis Report, Doty said:
The Lewis Report called for a thorough
review of University College and thats exactly
what I intend to do. The students are divided
with no sense of direction on what they want. I
think it is fairer the way we do it and I cant lose
any sleep over it they have to be tested some
way.

MINI-POSTER
IS THIS
tis THING ON ?



Is Computer Matching
Secret Os Happiness?

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Assistant Nam Editor
Can a computer lead the way
to love and happiness?
Seeking the answer to this
burning social issue of the
decade, 1 accepted my Alligator
assignment.
I picked up the application
for my computer date at the
College Library- an innocent
beginning. It asked the
conventional questions and then
some: Do you mind if your date
gets drunk? Do you believe
premarital sex can be justified?
Do you believe in kissing on
a. first date, b. second date,
c. later on, and d. not at all?
I sent the questionnaire in
with my $3 and waited.
Three weeks later the
computer spewed out the
answer:
The following were selected
as your computer dates. Expect
a call from them ... Happy
dating. It was followed by 10
names Spanish, French,
Italian, Irish, Oriental and
assorted American.
As I read off the list, my
boyfriend peered over my
shoulder.
How come you never told
me about this? he asked.
Oh, its just an assignment,
I replied, smiling innocently.
Ill have to get some
assignments of my own, he
growled back.
It looked like great fun
until the phone started ringing.
And ringing. And ringing.
I panicked. After all, these
were strange men. My three
helpful roommates rold me scary
stories about girls being
attacked, and we debated the
merits of tear gas bombs, police
whistles and jumping out of
moving cars.

Senate Committee Proposes
Eliminating Write-In Votes

By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator Correspondent
Write-in candidates may be a thing of the past at
UF if a proposal to strike out provisions for these
candidates from election laws is passed by the
Student Senate.
Other proposals coming from the open meeting
of the Student Election Committee Thursday were
that proposed amendments, voting procedures and a
list of polling places would be required by law to be
published in the Alligator.
In addition, an opinion question concerning
election hours will be included on the Spring
election ballot.
There is a section of the election laws now which
states that for votes for a write-in candidate to be
valid the candidate must pay the $5 qualification
fee before the polls close on election day.

f Kentucky fried Aicken |
M 214 N.W. 13th St. 114 N.W. 34th St. K
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I Srjgj SNACK I
M 3 Pc. Chicken m
I SST BRING COUPON 1
gg** _ _____ __ jm

Within 24 hours I worked up
the nerve to stay home, answer
the telephone and take my
chances.
Seven out of the 10 called.
The conversations were
mostly drawn out and took
hours away from studying. The
computer was, naturally, the
favorite topic for discussion:
Oh yes, and what did you
put down for question three?
I thought I'd take a little
survey to see how my matches
had answered one question
which asked which part of the
newspaper do you read first?
Hoping for an intellectual, I'd
answered editorials. The first
three guys I asked told me
theyd answered sports,
classifieds and don't read
newspapers.
After that I gave up
questioning.
Soon I began to enjoy
answering the phone.
Hello Helen, said one
mysterious voice with a thick
Spanish accent. It really sounded
romantic.
He called back five times and
persisting in telling me stories
about Latin lovers were myths
and that he was really very shy. I
was never fully persuaded but
then, he never did get the
courage to meet me.
A couple of callers added a
little spice to my assignment.
When I told one I worked for
the Alligator, he asked what I
did.
Layout, I told him.
Just you and one other
guy? he asked.
I knew how he had answered
the question about premarital
sex.
Another called and in an
Oriental accent asked me to
explain a few obscene words to
him.

Secretary of the Interior Kevin Davey said this
makes for an impossible situation. First, write-in
candidates cannot be programmed on the voting
machines. And second, a write-in candidate would
have an unfair advantage.
The committee recommended for Senate
approval that proposed amendments and absentee
ballot procedure be published in the Alligator five
days prior to election day. The other proposal was
that a list of polling places and voting procedures be
published two days before the election.
Jimmie Bailey, a member of Young Americans
for Freedom, asked to eliminate requiring a fee card
to vote and to have the polls open from 7 a.m. to 7
pjtl instead of 8 a.m. to 6 pm.
It was decided to include an opinion question on
the Spring ballot asking students which election
hours they would prefer.

As it turned out, the
opportunity for a practical joke
had been too great for my
roommates to pass up. One of
them had gotten two friends to
impersonate the real dates.
I met several of the
computer's choices. At first it
was scary, thinking of meeting
the guy I really deserved, but
then I decided I'd been tricked.
When one guy and I compared
notes, we agreed on less than
half the questions. I had gotten
so many dates because the boy
applicants outnumbered the girls
better than three to one.
Another guy turned out to be
one of my roommate's
boyfriends roommate's
girlfriend's roommate's
boyfriend. Really a small world!
When he came to visit, three
cockroaches scrambled out of
hiding places, the only bugs we'd
seen all quarter. I think it was an
omen.
When the third date came to
call, I tried hard to be
complimentary.
What a cute little car you
have, I said, admiring his sports
car.
If there's one thing ihate,
he said, it's having my car
called a 'cute little car.' I guess
I was destined to be a loser.
Finally I actually did go out
on a date.
As my computer partner and I
left for the movies, one of the
campus buildings caught on fire.
(An interesting beginning to an
evening.) As we joined the
crowd of spectators, who should
we run into but all three of my
boyfriend's roommates.
They couldn't wait to rush
back and tell him I was out with
another guy.
After leaving the fire, we
arrived at the theatre and found
the movie was sold out. On to

Could you run our applications through again? We don't
agree on any subject!

another theatre iO minutes
late for the show. The minute
we got there, I got dust in my
eyes, my contact lenses began
acting up and the tears streamed
down my face. It wouldnt have
been so bad, except the movie

t Climb aboard
e S.S. Winnjammer* ft
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to §A
Midnight Wj
i Bernie Sher //
I at tho Organ on Thuraday, Friday & Saturday 11
] Oysters & clams on the half shell #M
Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty
Vj
Cocktail Lounge tit 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager \t
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. rl
NO PEACE
FOR NIXON
the war has not ended
After Washington,what
next for SMC?
SMC
GENERAL MEETING
SUN. N0V.23
8:00PM
ROOMS 361-62-63 REITZ UNION
FILMS
The Pentaflon 1967 mobilization
&
Time of the LOCUST

Friday, November 21.100a. The Florida Alligator,

was a comedy.
Well, the computer didnt
exactly lead the way to love and
happiness but then, who
wants a computer running your
date life anyway?

Page 3



Page 4

L, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1969

Vandals Hit Sigma Chi

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Painting the Sigma Alpha
Epsilon lion is a tradition on
campus, but doing the same to
the Sigma Chi cross is
vandalism; pure, simple, and
criminal, according to Miles
Wilkin, executive vice president
of Interfratemity Council (IFC).
Painting the front of a house
is juvenile and malicious. This is
a criminal act. We are doing all
we can to apprehend the
culprit.
Wilkin is refering to the
pouring of paint on the cross
and front of the Sigma Chi
house at number eight
Fraternity Row on Thursday.
Since the end of fall rush the
house has been the target of
three paint-throwing attacks.
Damage to the structure is
estimated at S3OO.
The Sigma Chi cross
symbolizes the ideals of
Christianity, is the badge of the
' fraternity and is used in the
fraternitys rituals.
Normally this type of attack
doesnt raise much of a fuss. The
SAE lion was painted nine times
last year, and this year, there
have been five attempts to paint
the symbol three of the five
have been successful.
But die Sigma Chi house
pamtings are different, their
fraternity symbol, the cross, is
structured from plexiglass and is
centered on the front of the
house.
When hit by paint, not only
does.the cross suffer damage,
but several picture windows, and
most of the front of the house,
are also covered by streams of
olive drab, purple, and beige
paint.
What group or individuals is
responsible for these acts? This
is a question that has caused
headaches and ~ nors in the
fraternity system.
After the first attack at the
end of rush week in September,
Sigma Chi pointed the finger at
Sigma Phi Epsilon, but became
of a lade of evidence, nothing
could be proven.
We have been, blamed, but
the finger is no longer pointed at
us, Rimmie MacLaren,

Action Group To Meet
Returned Peace Corps Volunteers who wish to serve their
community but lack the funds to do it will be able to discuss their
problems Monday at 7:30 pm. in room 357 of the Reitz Union.
The Office of Voluntary Action (one of the newer additions to the
Peace Corps organizational chart), is examining the advisability of
establishing a private, non-profit foundation outside the Peace Corps
to provide seed money to returned volunteers who have started or
wish to start community development projects in the United States.
At the outset, at least one million dollars is envisioned to begin the
foundation.
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
THE
CHECKERS
,
TAKE TEN
1222 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

president of Sigma Phi Epsilon
said Sunday.
MacLaren said his fraternity
was upset because they had been
turned in for dirty rush by the
Sigma Chi president, but
doesnt remember the incident
now.
Sigma Phis were placed on
social probation for contacting
pledge prospects before the
beginning of rush week, a
practice which is against IFC
rules.
Destruction is out of place in
the fraternity system. Its like
slum and gang warfare. We are
fairly certain that our people are
not involved, MacLaren said.
Investigator Gene Watson of
the campus police said his
department is in the process of
photographing fingerprints left
on two paint cans taken from
the roof of the house after the
attack on Thursday.
When we have enough
evidence the charges will be
destruction of property and
vandalism; a misdemeanor.
Along with the chance that
the fingerprints will turn up a
suspect in the case, the police
are also working on the
possibility that one of the
brothers at the Sigma Chi house,
who is now in the service, may
have been involved in the
painting.
However, Watson emphasized
that this information is rumored
and it may take a while to
break this case.
Also, along with IFC and
police attempts to solve the case,
Jay Stormer, assistant dean of
men, says his office is interested
in the acts of vandalism.
The incidents are completely
juvenile. The maturity of the
students involved in these acts is
in question, Stormer said.
Meanwhile, Sigma Chi
President Jacob Stuart has been
discussing with members of the
fraternity the possibility of
hiring an armed guard to protect
the house from future attacks.
We have talked about hiring
a guard but the cost would be
too prohibitive, and having
brothers and pledges guarding
the house would only turn this
thing into a game.
Going through proper

channels has been the plan of
attack for the fraternity.
There havent been any
physical conflicts. Some of the
members of our fraternity
wanted to retaliate, but instead
we have gone through the proper
channels.
What happens if the house is
attacked again?
Stuart said, We cant afford
to react violently. This has to
stop, but whoever is doing this
doesnt seem to be getting the
message.
A policy of wait and see is
what Stuart is recommending to
house brothers.
This is the first time this has
happened in the five years that
the fraternity has been located
here. I hope the incident last
week was the last one.
Reservations
Before leaving on a trip make
reservations for the overnight
stops, says the Peninsula Motor
Club, AAA. Avoid the last
minute rush for accomodations
and the necessity of driving an
extra twenty to fifty miles.
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1
Jennings Guys
Go On The Air
By PAT DUARTE
Alligator Writer
Instead of sitting around and playing cards on Friday night, some
Jennings ground floor residents operate a radio station.
Asking to be identified by their radio names only, Peter Harry,
Lance Boyle, Harry Rutehed and Frends Pissinini comprise the
Bouncing Buddies of WFUK Radio.
Their Fm station goes on every Friday from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., and
can be found around the number 92 on the dial.
Rutehed, an accounting major from St. Petersburg, explains the
station is mainly designed as Friday night entertainment for dateless
Jennings' men.
DJ Boyle, a sophomore from Daytona, says: We never intended
this to be THE Jennings radio station. That way, we dont get
Jennings in trouble if we get in trouble.
The station, however, cant be picked up outside of Jennings, or
even throughout all of it. To operate legally without a license, the
boys keep their power below FCC limits of 2/10 of a watt.
Programs are made up of music, news, fashion commentary, mode
commercials, and other features, such as poetry reading and piano or
kazoo playing by dorm residents.
We have two reporters-at-large that call in if something happens,
sayd Harry. We report it as it is. But we may ham it up a bit.
Fashion commentary is handled by Pissinini, a pre-med student,
who claims he has his ideas about how a girl should dress. Pissinini
says he talks effeminately, and makes humorous comments on current
fads.
Contests are also featured occassionally. On Halloween we had a
Holloweenie contest, says Boyle. We hollowed out a weenie, hid
it, and gave clues over the radio.
Musical requests are accepted, and announcements are made over
the air as a free service to Jennings residents.
WFUKs transmitter, built by Boyle from plans in an electronics
magazine, is smaller than a transistor radio. The group got the idea for
the station about a month ago, when Boyle showed his new
transmitter to the would-be Buddies.
Although the DJs claim its more of a guys station, they would
like to expand it to the womens wing. However, they stUl dont know
how to go about it.
We cant expand to the girls side unless we move the station out
farther. Then the guys wouldnt pick it up, Boyle said.
To date, WFUK has had only one female staffer. Nicknamed
Moose, she did mostly weather predictions. Moose dropped out
for lack of time, the Buddies said.
The boys have only had two complaints about the station so far.
One was from the Jennings paper, the Eye, who commanded them
to dean up or shut up.
For guys, the worse you are, the better, explains Rutehed, but
because we now have an audience, and because there might be a girl
out there, weve cleaned our programs up.
'We censor ourselves, says Harry, and we file everything that
goes in the programs so if were ever approached with a complaint,
well have written evidence of what was said.
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Friday, November 21,1969, The Florida Alfltor.

Page 5



Page 6

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1969

Tom Warner Resigns
From Accent Position
Accent 7O Finance Chairman Tom Warner resigned recently.
I take this action for no other reason except that my outside
duties and responsibilities will not allow me to devote the necessary
time to perform the job well, Warner said in his letter of resignation
submitted to Accent Chairman Joe Hilliard.
Vicki Krezdom will replace Warner.
Ed Boze will replace Rusty Skinner as personnel chairman of
Accent. After Skinner graduated in August, Alligator Assignments
Editor Janie Gould was appointed. However, because of a possible
conflict of interest, Editor Raul Ramirez asked her to resign from
Accent. She was later allowed to remain as community affairs
chairman of Accent.

A&S SC Invites Rep. Reed
To Talk About Legislature

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A resolution inviting State Rep. Don Reed
(R-Boca Raton) to discuss with them the role of the
legislature in the university system was passed by
the Arts and Sciences Student Council (ASSC)
Wednesday.
The resolution, introduced by David Chafin, 3AS,
was a response to Reeds plans to tour the state to
listen to student groups representing the silent
majority on campuses.
In other business, Alligator reporters were banned
from all future meetings of the ASSC except on

r
WHAT'S HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
GOBBLE GRAB: Not since the days of Robin Hood or William Tell
have arrows pierced their objects for such a good cause. Shoot an
arrow into the air and have it land a turkey for you. This Saturday,
between 8 and 5, the University City Lions Club is sponsoring a
turkey shoot at the B&B Sports Center on north highway 441. For a
mere dollar youll have the chance to win a turkey and provide
assistance for the clubs sight conservation work.
MOBILIZING THE MOBILIZATION: The SMC Will have a general
meeting on Sunday to discuss future plans after Washington. An
award winning film, Time of the Locusts, will be shown in room
361-363 of the Reitz Union.
BETWIXT AND BETWEEN: Tolbert, Murphree and Broward Area
are sponsoring a dance with an added attraction, a light show. All the
activity is free Saturday night in the Murphree Area Courtyard.
GOTTA BE AN UNDERSTANDING: Aquarius has planned a
discussion with participant; in the March on Washington for Saturday
at noon. Anyone interested is invited to attend and bring a lunch.
Meet at Buckman dorm, room 53.
REACTIONARY REVOLUTIONARIES: College life, sponsored
by Campus Crusade for Christ, will meet at the Phi Gamma Delta
house at 9:13 pjn. on Sunday.
TOM TURKEY TIME: There will be bins for canned goods and
containers for cash gifts in the lobby and at the information desk on
the first floor of the Reitz Union today and Monday so that holiday
baskets may be provided for less fortunate people in the community.
(This does not include residents of Murphree Area.)
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direct invitation.
One of the reasons for the motion which passed
134 was some members dissatisfaction with recent
Alligator articles about the ASSC and its actions on
the foreign language requirement.
No official proposal has been passed by the ASSC
on language requirements, Chairman Tom Blackmon
said.
Other members said they felt inhibited by the
presence of a reporter when they were discussing
certain problems they have encountered in classes or
with their instructors.
The ASSC meets regularly to discuss proposals
concerning language requirements, high honors
departments and grade appeals boards.

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Towers 24-Hour Open House Efforts Delayed

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
All efforts by Interhall to achieve 24-hour open
house for the Towers are being delayed until the
beginning of next quarter, said Interhall President
Sue Johnson.
It is getting too dose to exams to do anything
right now; she said.
The Student Senate Committee on Student
Rights is also studying the problem in an effort to
revive the campaign for extended hours that was
brought to a standstill by a refusal to approve
24-hour open house by Vice President for Student
Affaks Lester Hale.

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CAMPAIGN REVIVAL PLANNED NEXT QUARTER

David Dowling, senator from the Towers area and
a member of the student rights committee said,
The administration has got their minds made up.
We want to work out something where we can go to
them and say this is the way it is, please give it to
us.
Mostly it's a matter of what we do next, he
said. Maybe we can get the hours increased as a
stepping-stone to 24-hour open house.
John Rowe, Towers resident who worked on
circulating a petition among residents to end the
restricted hours said there is nothing formally
organized at this time in regard to a campaign of
letters to Hale from parents and students.
It hasn't come of age yet. We haven't been able

Friday, Novambar 21,1968, Tha Florida Altifetor,

to form a committee to handle it, he said.
People are wondering if anything will make a
difference, he said. We might not get much of a
response to a letter campaign and the lack of
enthusiasm wouldn't be due to apathy but because
nothing has happened so far.
Dowling said, Hopefiily, when students go
home for Thanksgiving, they will discuss the open
house with their parents and if they agree, have
them write to Hale. This might counteract negative
letters he receives.
Dowling said too many groups were trying to
accomplish the same end at different times. We
need to get into one gigantic mass group and unite
on this.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Novambar 21,1968

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is t^,e exercise of responsibility
Raul Ram rez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
FaU
A M Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
S' Executive Editor News Editor
j\ \xiCam
Thanks, Fire Fighters
MR. EDITOR:
The Gainesville Fire Department would like to express appreciation
to the UF students for their assistance during Friday nights fire at
Frazier-Rogers Hall.
The students actions were a sharp contrast to the behavior of
students during a fire at Simpson Hall two weeks ago. Friday night,
students were most helpful in pulling hoses for the firemen, laying
lines and keeping paths open for firefighting equipment, the type of
assistance most vital to fighting a fire.
We also appreciate the services of the University Police Department
and the electricians and plumbers who were at the scene.
PM. BOOTHBY
Assistant Chief
Gainesville Fire Department
Science Students
Need ISE 350
MR. EDITOR:
There was a small piece of misinformation in Eileen Feinbergs
report of ISE 350 in the November 1.4 issue. The Wildlife Ecology
curriculum in the School of Forestry has required ISE 350 for two
yean. We do so with the conviction that the best management of
complex systems can be achieved only through the employment of
computer tools.
It is thus imperative that the education of modem resource
managers and environmental technologists incorporate at least a
modest introduction to computer programming. I, personally, cannot
understand why ISE 350 is required for all Engineering students,
but remains only an elective for most other university departments.
Surely we are at a point in time when an introduction to the
computer should be a foundation course for all students in science
and technology. Only by this way can the computer become less a
mystery and more of a tool.
GEORGE W. CORNWELL
Associate Professor
Wildlife Ecology
We Support Dr. Keister
MR. EDITOR:
Be it known that the undersigned were in agreement with and fully
support Dr. Elwood Keister in his handling of the matter involving the
choir performance at the November 11th Veterans Day ceremony
held at the Plaza of the Americas ;
and further, that a vote of the attending members was taken during
the regular class session the day before and that there were three
members which voted not to support the ceremony.
57 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CHOIR MEMBERS
I f M

EDITORIAL
Oath Os Paranoia
Promotes Disloyalty

The much-cursed, McCarthy-inspired
loyalty oath is still with us.
And the decision, upheld yesterday
afternoon by Supreme Court Justice Hugo
Black says sign the oath or be removed from
the payroll.
This is the poorest decision, the pettiest
reasoning, ever to come out in a
democratic society.
It smells of the starve em out tactics of
low rank fascist regimes.
Perhaps this government figures that by
refusing to pay those who refuse to sign the
oath these people will change their ideas.
What a farce.
By pressuring individuals to put in writing
that they believe in what you want them to
believe is about as worthless as the paper its
writter on.
And it gives the Constitution about as
much worth.
This is apalling, and it is disgraceful.
America should be bigger than this, but
apparently the narrow minds of paranoic
officials have even infiltrated the Supreme
Court.
Some people would say I told you so
years ago.
Most sane Floridians, if there are any left

Strawberry Fields

A Hot Poodian Affair

Harken! It is a day in time to
come the day of the great
Poodian Trumpeted Jousting
and Merriment Tournaments.
Brilliance and light have
descended upon all of the
kingdom this day, and all greater
and lesser nobles and ministers
of state do gather and
congregate with the peasants
recently freed from their
strawberry fields.
Hordes and scads of ox-carts
do converge upon the Land of
Poo from any and all directions.
The Keepers of the Poodian
- Roads, greatly beset and
"distressed by the multitudes of
ox-carts which do clog and jam
the dusty by-ways of Poo, stand
in great and growing awe at the
abounding masses.
And with great glee does
Charles the Shepherd, kind and
benevolent ruler of all of the
Land of Poo who is in this his
second reign, call the festive
multitudes to order.
But forsooth! There is a dark
and growing omen which does
hang and threaten over the land
this day.
Voluminous numbers of
carrion birds do circle and
swoop over the Gym of the
Poodian Peasants and cast eerie
shadows over all who do
innocently and ignorantly sit in
the fortress below.
Methinks there is something
, of dark and sinister nature which
does fester and invade the
kingdom on this day of little
woe, Jack of the Vaughn
speaketh to King Charles.
Mayhap it is only the
hangover most severe which does
plague thy being and cause thee
great discomfiture, Charles the
Shepherd thundered into the
; warm and warming air of the

gym which had seen many
battles and many kings before
his time.
Nay, spake up Katherine of
Spellman, Poodian minister and
greater noble, Deep within my
soul there lurks a feeling most
perplexing and of grave nature
also.
Verily, the carrion birds do
circle above in the brilliance of
the Poodian skies, the king did
speak out as deep and deepening
furrows clouded his regal brow,
but the hour of the great
Trumpeted Jousting and
Merriment Tournaments is now
upon us and it is my duty to call
for the festivities to begin.
And with great gusto the king
gave the word and the carrion
birds who did swoop and caw
above were forgotten this day in
Poo.
But lo! Far with the distant
and recessed crevices of the great
and merry hall did one foolish
and ignoble peasant unwittingly
and without malice strike a flint.
Woe to all of Poo in this day
that has not yet come, for with
great and frightening speed did
the flames leap and rapidly
engulf the Gym of the Poodian
Peasants.

Alligator Staff
ftMSandan Mary Tooanay JmitGould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley Anne Freedman
Assistant News Editor Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications. 0
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reit/
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
__ n
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

who havent been sent scurrying into the
bathrooms of this state to throw-up, will say
so now.
Floridas governmental practices are sick.
The loyalty oath is only part of the
stench.
But by refusing to sign the oath you will
only cut your own throat. You will only give
the festering paranoids of this state
something else to feed on ... more than you
will have once removed from the payrolls.
Follow your conscience.
We cannot and will not urge those to sign
the oath who, on principle, cannot force
themselves to do so.
We can only urge those with objections to
the oath to consider what you are signing, its
worth, how it will change your thinking.
You are signing a piece of paper that
means only what you let it.
It is worth about a penny per sheet.
And can only serve to cement your
thoughts if you do not agree.
If there are enough citizens with
objections to this McCarthyite farce this
government may find itself over-thrown in
spirit, if not someday in fact, by its own
hand.
And we say it probably deserves it.

*By Carol Sanger

With great and growing shouts
and loud cries did the peasants
and greater and lesser nobles try
to flee from this scene of despair
most deep. But forsooth, many
were caught and trapped most
tightly in halls and foyers of
small and cramped nature.
And the warlords behind the
Tigert Fortress were greatly
upset, as were the greater nobles
and ministers in all provinces
surrounding Poo, and they only
then began to gather monies for
the Coliseum of Poo.
And with much consternation
and grief did the remaining
greater and lesser nobles
forlornly pace to and fro in the
long and brilliant halls of
Poodian state, bemoaning this
plight most grim.
And Charles the Shepherd did
thunder and rant throughout all
of the kingdom, decreeing that
he had proclaimed many and
numerous times that this
pestilence of grave nature would
someday strike in the Land of
Poo.
But none had listened to the
words of the king then, nor read
his vociferous decrees, and
darkness descended upon all of
the land.



USF President Allen May Resign

By RON CRESPO
Alligator Cormpondent
University of South Florida
President John S. Allen has not
made any further
announcements concerning some
resignation hints he made last
week, but rumors around the
Tampa campus say he will resign
by June.
In a prepared statement last
week Allen said he had thought
of retirement prior to the
mandatory age, but added,
when I am ready to resign, I
will tell you.
But the feeling around
campus is that Allen intends to
resign soon. A spokesman for
The Oracle, USFs campus
newspaper, told the Alligator
Thursday they have learned
from inside sources that Allen
will resign in June.

news
from... s£fll*lFSU
)" 1 1
TIMM Dr. OJC. Timm, a member of the FSU hospital staff for
more than one year, Thursday was named director of student health
services by FSU President J. Stanley Marshall.
Student members of the committee named earlier by Marshall to
nominate candidates for the directorship, expressed shock at the
action. No recommendations had been made by the committee.
Jack Whitley, student member, expressed disgust over the action
and said he would never again accept an appointment on a committee
created by Marshall.
HEW A review team from the U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare will be on the FSU campus Monday and
Tuesday to determine if FSU is complying with the 1964 Civil Rights
Act.
SENATE Student Senate Wednesday night failed to pass a bill
that would have required all student groups to register with Student
Government. A majority voted for the measure, but it did not receive
a two-thirds required for constitutional amendment.
Police Ball Saturday

University police will shed
their uniforms Saturday night
and don coats and ties when
they gather for the annual
Fraternal Order of Police
Policemans Ball.
The semi-formal dance
beginning at 9 pm. at the Moose
Lodge, 1500 N.E. 23 Blvd., will
attract policemen and citizens in
Gainesville in an attempt to raise
money for FOP functions.
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RUMORS FLY ON CAMPUS

Two days after Allen issued
his statement, an editorial in The
Oracle said, His (Allens)
official announcement of his
resignation is, for all practical
purposes, imminent. Such
announcement, official or
otherwise, has not yet been
made.
Allen had called a press
conference for Monday of last
week in which, it was rumored,
he was going to announce his
retirement. These rumors
brought a response from State
Board of Regents Chairman D.
Burke Kibler who said in a story
in the St. Petersburg Times, I
cannot imagine him making any
announcement of that kind
without prior liaison with me.
Kibler said the Regents do not
want to have another lame
duck president and that if
Allen does intend to retire, he

Musical entertainment will be
handled by the Tradewinds.
Tickets are $5 per couple and
may be purchased by anyone at
the University Police
Department.
Attention
Business Majors
Run your
own
enterprise
on
our money.
Total
investment;
one
postage
stamp.
Write
Federated Department Storeslnc.,
Director of
Executive Resources,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Well tell you
. about ik.

will have to retire effective
immediately and not next
June.
It appears that Kibler
contacted Alim prior to the
news conference and dissuaded
him from announcing his
resignation.
Allen, who according to an
editorial in The Oracle, has been
characterized as appearing
somewhat like an army colonel,
ran into some opposition from
USF Student Government and
some faculty organizations after
he refused to allow revisions on
restructuring the Student Senate
to remain on the Senates
agenda.
Dauer Speaker
Manning Dauer, chairman of
the political science department,
1 will be the guest speaker tonight
at the initiation banquet of
Alpha Pi Mu, industrial
engineering society.
The dinner is scheduled for 8
pjn. at the University Inn on
S.W. 13th St.
Lindsey
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Following this action Allen
was censured by both the
Student-Faculty Association and
the American Association of
University Professors. USF
Student Government Vice
President Chuck Tonkin said if
the proposal did hot reach the
Senate floor for discussion
there could be trouble** on
campus.
However, no troubles
developed and the USF campus
has remianed quiet** according
to the spokesman for The
Oracle.
(pp!' : v r: mam
3 s || i"
Kk. \
l
HHMNRk'v WKmtm
Protest!-Heritagp
of the Pilgrims?
Snipers hold our police at bay.
Sit-ins make authority a farce.
Violence shakes cities as the cry
Protest! becomes a shout. The
attitude grows: If you think the
law is wrong-break it!
Whats your stand? Our coun country
try country was founded on rebellion rebellionon
on rebellionon the right to protest. But can
open defiance be defended? Is
this a right... or a national
outrage?
Many dissenters justify their
stands on the issue of personal
creed. The Vietnam war is im immoral!
moral! immoral! is their cry. This dual
loyalty to state and convictions
has been a dilemma for centuries.
But how often are men governed
by emotion or human opinion opinioninstead
instead opinioninstead of spiritual facts?
What are these facts? Our
booklet The Christian and His
Country discusses the current
ferment from a Christian point
of view. It offers yardsticks for
measuring unquestioned loyalty
and valid dissent. It reminds
citizens in this Thanksgiving
season that to keep our freedoms,
our very right to protestthey
MUST act to create laws within
which they can live. Send for it!
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a copy of the booklet: THE CHRISTIAN
AND HIS COUNTRY.
NAME
ADDRESS
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Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Novembar 21,1969

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Religion And Arts:
Awareness Course
By ALAN HAYNES
Alligator Correspondent
It is an awareness course, said Dr. Corbin S. Camell referring to
the Religion and the Arts course that he teaches.
The course is designed, he said, to let you do your own thing
while making you aware of the deep religious roots of our culture.
Students are encouraged to explore new cultural possibilities,
student Melissa McDowell said. They are urged to go to art galleries,
art or other meaningful Dims and folk masses and to relate them to
the course. They are. encouraged to express themselves with and
without words.
The course deals with several media and their influence on culture cultureparticularly
particularly cultureparticularly the film, which Camell calls the most significant
influence since the 19405.
This generation is much more at home with the electronic medium
than mine was, he said.
This course uses different media to search for new forms.
All this can be and is related to religion, Carnell said. The
Church has always had an alliance with the arts and has never moved
far away.
The arts are important in understanding religion, he said. You
cant understand religion without understanding the nature of myth
and allegory.
Religion as dealt with in this course, however, is by no means
orthodox or even the standard type of modem theology.
The Church as an institution has to change, Carnell said.
Students today are turned off by the old intellectual arguments.
Worship is discussed in terms of new forms. Judy Collins sings
Crucifixion in one class. On another recording, an experiment mass
is sung by nuns. Hymn, as written and played by Peter Yarrow, is
heard.
The class, which meets twice a week for four credits, has one hour
of lecture, one hour of film presentation and two hours of discussion.
This discussion part he calls encounter work, which is the part I
like best.
The format is flexible and subject to change, however.
There is no point in tests, he said. He gives a few quizzes, but
the major thing is the journal he requires students to keep.
A presentation is also required, in which tapes, picture slides, and
choreography may be used. Voluntary student presentations are also
frequent.
The response is always good, Carnell said. It sometimes takes a
while, but the students are almost always eager to express
themselves.
Camell said, Everyone has a creative gift if you can fan the flames,
but the educational system all but quenchesTt.
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Conner Selected
Alumni President
Doyle Conner of Tallahassee,
second from left, was chosen
1971 president of the UF
Alumni Association during the
annual meeting on campus last
Saturday. Conner, Florida's
commissioner of agriculture for
the past nine years, will take
office Jan. 1,1971. He is shown
discussing alumni matters with
1969 President Doyle Rogers of
Palm Beach, left; University
President Stephen C. O'Connell,
second from right, and 1970
President James Ade of
Jacksonville. Conner is a 1952
graduate of the university and
served as chairman of the
association's 1968 Annual
Giving Program that produced
more than $200,000 from
alumni and friends of the
University.



Friday, November 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

PARIS (UPI) Ambassador
Henry Cabot .Lodge resigned
Thursday as chief negotiator at
the Paris peace talks because of
Communist failure to negotiate.
Both the Viet Cong and the
North Vietnamese indicated his
move would not budge them
from their hard bargaining
position.
The White House announced
in Washington that Lodge and
his deputy, Lawrence E. Walsh,
had resigned over the
Communists refusal to negotiate.
Spokesmen for the two
Communist delegations said
Lodge was merely following
Washingtons orders and that
they were looking for a change
in Washington policies, not
negotiators.
At Thursdays session the
Communists accused the United
States of committing monstrous
war crimes in South Vietnam

20 N. Viets Slain In Two Hour
Battle Near Bu Prang Outpost

SAIGON (UPI) South
Vietnamese troops riding
armored personnel carriers
reported killing 20 North
Vietnamese soldiers in a
two-hour battle Thursday near
Bu Prang. Combat around the
Green Beret outpost contributed
to a sharp increase in US.
casualties last week.
Military sources said four
South Vietnamese were killed
and nine wounded in the
fighting Thursday 14 miles
northwest of Bu Prang, a heavily
fortified base along the
Cambodian border where about
500 government troops and a
handful of Americans have been
under siege for more than three
weeks.
North Vietnamese gunners
continue to fire artillery and
mortar shells at Bu Prang despite
saturation air raids by US. Air

BOOK
and
RECORD
@SAL£Orv
25-

NO. 2 SPOKESMAN ALSO QUITS
Lodge Resigns As Paris Negotiator

and again called for total war.
withdrawal of American troops Madame Nguyen Ghi Binh,
as the only means of ending the the foreign minister in the Viet
Nixon Accepts Resignation
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon Thursday accepted the
resignation of Henry Cabot Lodge as chief US. negotiator at the
Vietnam peace talks in Paris.
No successor was named but the administration insisted this did not
mean the United States was downgrading the talks.
Lodge said in a letter to Nixon that the Communist negotiators had
flatly refused to engage in meaningful negotiations.
The White House said Lodge told Nixon over a month ago that he
wanted to leave the post as the talks showed no sign of getting
anywhere.
The No. 2 man in Paris Lawrence E. Welsh also quit, citing
Communist intransigence. Both Lodge and Welsh resigned as of Dec.
8.
No successor was named for either man and there was no
indication when new negotiators might be appointed.
But the State Department rejected any suggestion that this might
mean the United States had given up hope of negotiating an end to
the war at Paris.
A spokesman said in reply to reporters questions: Lodges
resignation should in no way be interpreted as any downgrading of the
talks or abandonment of hope for the negotiations.

Force jets against surrounding
jungles, some in Cambodia.
Waves of the eight-engine
Stratofortresses flew eight
missions late Wednesday and
early Thursday near Bu Prant
and a sister Green Beret camp at
Due Lap.
U.S. headquarters said 113
Americans were killed in action
in the seven-day period ended
last Laturday, 16 more than the
toll for the previous week and
the highest weekly losses for
U.S. forces in two months.
South Vietnamese, North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
casualties were also significantly
higher as Hanoi pressed what has
been described as its winter
campaign.
South Vietnam lost 497 men
killed last week, highest

Page 11

casualties in nine weeks, and
tommunist losses were placed at
3,013 men killed, heaviest toll in
three months.
Only scattered ground action
was reported across South
Vietnam in the 24-hour period
ended at mid-afternoon
Thursday. Communiques issued
in Saigon said at least 175 North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong were
killed in fighting that cost six
Americans killed and 27
wounded.
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Congs provisional government,
opened Thursdays 43rd session
of the Vietnam peace talks with
an attack on President Nixon
and a recital of alleged U.S.
atrocities.
Xuan Thuy, the leader of the
North Vietnamese delegation,
moved to squelch suggestions
that progress towards a peace
settlement was being made in
secret sessions while the public
sessions are deadlocked.

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Thuy said there had been no
private talks.
His statement came less than
24 hours after diplomatic
sources said Hanoi and the Viet
Cong rejected a Vatican-backed
plan to get secret talks going
earlier this week.
Lodge made a fresh attempt
to get negotiations started on
the release of war prisoners by
both sides but instead he ran
into charges of war crimes.



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1909

INTREPID REDOCKS 'BEAUTIFULLY ;
Apollo 12 'Coal Miners' Off The Moon

By EDWARD K. DELONG
UPI Space Writer
SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) Bathed in moon dust,
the Apollo 12 explorers blasted
off the lunar surface Thursday
and maneuvered back to the
command ship Yankee Clipper,
which will spend another day
scouting the alien world for new
landing sites.
Youre home free, boy,
command ship pilot Richard F.
Gordon cried out when the lunar
lander Intrepid, carrying Charles
Pete Conrad and /dan L. Bean
redocked with the Yankee
Clipper in moon orbit about 60
miles above the lunar surface at
12:59 p.m. EST.
The two ships locked together
with a gentle jolt and Conrad
exclaimed: Super job, Richard,
that was beautiful.
Gordon did the final delicate
maneuvering that brought the
spaceships together while the
Intrepid held its position.
Since the color television
camera aboard the command
ship was working perfectly,
earth viewers got a closeup view
of the docking.
There were only a few
minutes of television of the
moon walks during the Apollo
12 mission because the camera
Conrad and Bean took to the
lunar surface with them failed.
Otherwise, the moon landing
mission mans first truly
scientific expedition on the
lunar surface was a glowing
success.
The two explorers gathered
about 80 pounds of lunar rock
and soil samples, plunged an
American flag into the moons
crust, and set up a nuclear
powered scientific base which
will function for at least a year.
The astronauts tramped their
deep-ribbed footprints in the
dusty durface ova* a roundabout
route that totaled a mile and a
half in two separate moon walks,
but never got more than 1,300
feet away from Intrepid.
The highlights of these
expeditions was during the
second walk early Thursday
when they visited Surveyor 3, a
2 Vt year-old robot camera ship,
and cut off pieces of it to return
to earth.
Their landing site on the arid
DL 75150
... is when it all started.
And it's ail here: "Over
the Rainbow", "The
Trolley Song", and "On the
Atcheson, Topeka, and
the Santa Fe".
Judy Garland's
Greatest Hits.
That pretty much says it all.
D/

We look like a couple of bituminous coal miners at the
moment, but we re happy. Conrad .i
The two explorers gathered about 80 pounds of lunar
rock and soil samples, plunged an American flag into the
moons crust, and set up a nuclear powered scientific base
which will function for about a year.
WSWfiWMWTOOWSSSM!B I !SJSWO O!fI^WWKWK*K K : ,^W;W^, K K

Ocean of Storms was far dustier
than the spot where Apollo 11
pilots Neil A. Armstrong and
Edwin E. Aldrin made mans
first lunar landing last July 20,
and Conrad and Bean tramped a
lot of the dust back into their
lander.
Man is it dirty in here,
Conrad told mission control.
We look like a couple of
bituminous coal miners at the
moment, but were happy.
So are a lot of people down
here, mission control assured
him.
The crucial takeoff from the
moon came at 9:26 a.m. EST.
Had the ascent engine of the
Intrepid failed, and had Conrad
and Bean been unable to correct

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the problem, they would have
been doomed to death on the
moon.
There would have been no
way to rescue them.
But such dire thoughts
apparently were far from the
minds of Conrad and Bean. They
were exuberant during the
liftoff, as they have been
throughout the mission, and
Conrad borrowed a line from
Jackie Gleason when he cried
out and away we go.
Looking back on the lunar
landscape as their frail little ship
climbed out from among craters,
a faint note of nostalgia crept
into Bean's voice.
Boy, this place is fascinating,
absolutely fascinating, he said.

The Intrepid rocketed into
lunar orbit seven minutes after
blastoff, and then began the long
% 290 mile chase to catch up with
Yankee Clipper.
When the Intrepid was about
a mile away from the command
ship, Gordon told his colleagues:
You sure look strange down
there among all the sand dunes.
Sorry about that, Conrad
shot back.
A few minutes later, there was
this exchange as the pilots tried
to re dock their ships in the
strange world of space.
Gordon: Hey, can you drop

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down a little, Pete?*'
Conrad: Toward where?
Gordon: Toward the moon.
Conrad: 0K... How much
down do you want me to
go? ... I think he wants
me ... When you say down,
that's up to me, pal. I'm upside
down.
Gordon: I said toward the
moon.
Sorry, I dont know where
the moon is, said the man who
had just spent 32 hours on its
surface and guided Intrepid to
an amazingly accurate landing.



Orange and

address campus calendar
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

board of trustees of
the flqrida bankers
educational
FOUNDATION will meet on
Dec. 10 to review
scholarship-loan applications for
the winter quarter. All
applications and supporting
papers must be in the Dept of
Finance & Insurance office, 204
Matherly Hall by Nov. 21.
WORK-STUDY JOBS are
immediately available for UF
students. Students can work up
to 15 hours per week during the
quarter and 40 hours per week
during break. Basic
qualifications are parental
income below $7,500.
Applications and information is
available in the Student
Financial Aid office. Room 23
Tigert Hall.
END OF QUARTER
NOTICES pertaining to the fall
quarter should be sent to the
Orange & Blue, Bldg. H
(392-0186), in time to appear in
the Alligator on Nov. 25, Dec. 2,
5 and 8. The Alligator will not
be printed Nov. 27-28 said the
Dec. 8 issue will be the last for
the fall quarter. Winter
publication will resume Jan. 5.
THE UNIVERSITY SENATE
will meet Tuesday, November
25, 1969 in McCarty
Auditorium. The following items
are on the agenda:
1. Future Action Item of
June 26,1969 Agenda
2. Action Item 3 of
September 25,1969 Agenda
3. Attachment to President
O'Connell's memorandum of
November 10, 1969 calling a
meeting of the General
Assembly.
If the business of the meeting
of November 25 is not
concluded, another special
meeting has been scheduled for
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8t Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
DEC. 1: HENDRY COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; MARION
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
PINELLAS COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; COLLIER
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
JACKSONVILLE EPISCOPAL
HIGH SCHOOL, FLA.;
DEKALB COUNTY SCHOOLS,
GA.
DEC. 2. TAYLOR COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.;
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA; SARASOTA
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS,

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GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Administrative Notices

GA.; MONROE COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.
DEC. 3: DADE COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; BAKER
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
ALACHUA COUNTY
SCHOOLS, FLA.; VOLUSIA
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
WASHINGTON D.C. SCHOOLS;
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS,
FLA.
DEC. 4: HERNANDO
COUNTY SCHOOLS, FLA.;
POLK COUNTY SCHOOLS,
FLA.; SOUTHERN BAPTIST
CONVENTION, TENN.
DEC. 5: PINE CREST
SCHOOL, FLA.
FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES:
Widespread scheduling of final
examinations prior to the time
provided in the published
Schedule of Courses results in
disruption of the final week of
classes and hardships to the
students involved. Therefore, the
following policy is in effect:
- No examinations, class
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five class days of
a regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
- All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses of the Schedule and
Calendar Committee. Requests
submitted to the sub-committee
for changes in the examination
time must be justified and
include a specific stat* ment of
the effects on the students of
such a change.
- It shall be the
responsibility of department
chairmen and deans to enforce
this policy.
Laboratory sections of many
courses may be exempt from the
above policy provided such
exemption has been approved by
the Sub-Committee on
Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires use of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination has
traditionally been given at the
last meeting of the lab, and
3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.
In the case of laboratory-type
courses, the request shall state
that traditionally no provision
has been in the final
examination schedule for such
courses.
In some cases a policy of
continuing exemption may be
established with respect to

BLUE BULLETIN

laboratory sections and
laboratory type courses.
GENERAL NOTICES
CAN GOODS AND
ARTICLES OF OLD
CLOTHING are being collected
in the Plaza of the Americas on
Sunday, Nov. 23, from 12 noon

Friday, November 21
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Diabetes Information Program,
355 Union, 3:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Dirty Dozen,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 81
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m. Please Bring Sets.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 22
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Dirty Dozen,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi banquet,
Arredondo Room, 7:30 p.m.
Kappa Psi Dance, "The
Celebration," Union Ballroom,
8:00 p.m.

REITZ UNION THEATER Admission 50* I
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FRIDAY & SATURDAY 5:30, 8:00,10:30 PM
1 1

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

to 2 p.m. These will be
distributed to the needy in the
Gainesville area for
Thanksgiving. Sponsored by the
Catholic Student Parish.
RETURNED PEACE CORPS
VOLUNTEERS will meet to
discuss proposed local
community action program
supported by the Peace Corps on

Sunday, November 23
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
Folk Mass in the Plaza for
Thanksgiving, Everybody
Welcome, 12:00 noon
Senior Recital, Carol McDowall
Gebhardt, Union Ballroom,
4:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 6:3Q p.m.
University Film Series,
"Breathless," Union Aud.,
7:00 8t 9:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
College Life Meeting, Phi
Gamma Delta Fraternity
House, 9:13 p.m.
Monday, November 24
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Reitz Union Lecture: Forum on

Friday, Novambar 21,198, The Florida AMfator,

Monday, Nov. 24 at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 357 Reitz Union.
CAMPUS TELEPHONE
DIRECTORIES for personal use
will be sold only to students,
faculty and staff at the Campus
Shop and Bookstore for sl. The
University student or staff I.D.
card must be presented when the
directory is purchased.

Abortion, Rabbi Monson, Dr.
Elizabeth Philp, said Dr.
Henry Blank, 122 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Environmental Action Group,
211 Life Science Bldg., 7:30
p.m.
Maccabee Lecture and Movie,
Three Shorts on Israel, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Dept, of Romance Languages
Movie, 'The Hunt," Spanish
with English Subtitles, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, November 25
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Center of Man & Hillel
Foundation, "Shlomo
Carlebach," Rathskeller, 8:00
& 10:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
"Jefferson Airplane," $3.00
& $1.25.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 FOR SALE |
s S
You buy well cry 1968 Enduro
Yamaha 250 scrambler 1-yr old 2700
miles PERFECT condition two new
helmets S6OO. Call Brad or Gary
376-8524. (A-st-44-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading" supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and let
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak matching,
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewriter
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
{A-7t-42-p)
1966 Harly Davidson 175 cc.
Excellent Condition $225. See Rich
at apt. 29 LaMancha. (A-st-43-p)
68 Suzuki 500 cc. 6000 mi. left on
warmt. tmmaculate condt. Bags,
hlmt., and more incld. Very fast. Call
collect 904-496-3017 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-43-p)
2 Falls 1 dk. brown, real hair, barely
worn, $25. 1 Platinum, real European
hair, worn once $35. Call
3 78-467 I.(A-st-45-p)
Honda 150 cc, 1965 fair condition,
dependable transportation, also
Canon Pellix camera 1.2 lens Cycle,
$l5O, Camera, $175. Call Jeff
378-6819. (A-st-45-p)
CAMERAS Canon 1.8 50mm
serenar-1000th to 1 sec & optima
compur auto 35. light
meter-tripod-access, carry cases for
all.-Sawyer rotodisc slide projector
SIOO for all. 376-9538 before 9p.m.
Bob. (A-3t-45-p)
CAMPERS Must sell this week.
Step van camper S2OO. Colliers
Encyclopedia yearbooks childs set
book case SIOO. Before 9 p.m.
376-9538. Bob. (A-3t-45-p)
ROYAL Office Electric TW w/ Cb.
and Cloth Ribbons elite free
stand and Cb. Ribbons sl6O.
378-0384. (A-3t-46-p)
AUCTION New Used Antique
Merchandise. Saturday night 7:30
p.m. November 22nd. C&J Auction
House, Archer, Fla. (A-2t-46-p)
Furnished mobile home 68. 2
Bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central air
& heat & other extras. Call Liz after
6:30 373-2210 take over payments.
67 Triumph 650 TRG-C. Best offer.
Phone 378-7191. (A-st-46-p)
Kawasaki 250 SS Scrambler. Perfect
condition. Sacrifice S4OO. Call Dan
378-1713 after 5:00 p.m. (A-3t-46-p)
1956 MGA good mechanically S2OO.
Martin 0018 C guitar with case $175.
Four 15 wire wheels S6O. Two Shur
prof, mikes $l5O. One Roberts & 1
Norelco mike with stand SSO.
372-7024 after 5. (A-st-45-p)
Basset puppies, AKC reg., shots,
wormed, 7 weeks old, tri-colored
Army officers dress greens with hat,
make offer. 372-7980. (A-lt-47-p)

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AT ... 1:53 3:50 5:49 life
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James Garner I r
Gayle Hunnicutt | EIBBIBBMIaHBaMBIIiWBi

Page 14

L, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21, 1969

j5% .x-x-x*x-yvx-x-x*x*x-x-x-x.x.v.v.y.
FOR RENT
A >:
Must Sublease. College Terr. Apt. 1
blk. from campus. $120.00/mo. Utl.
Included. Call 378-4190. (B-st-46-p)
We have tame boa constrictors for
you. From $7.00 up. From 8 ft.
down. The Underground Zoo is a
bizarre pet bazaar. 7 N.E. Ist.
373-2681. WOW! (A-2t-47-p)
FREE CATS All ages, colors, and
sexes Call 392-1591, between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.rri. (A-st-47-p)
Perfect apt. for married couple. One
bedroom, pool, air cond., carpet,
curtains, near shopping. Occupy right
after finals, slOl a mo. Call to see at
376-8958 after 4:00 p.m. (B-3t-45-p)
1 bedroom apt. 328 S.W. 34th St. in
village 34 fully furnished air
conditioned, quiet, close to school
slls per month call 372-2103.
(B-4t-45-p)
Furnished mobile home 68 2
bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central
Air & Heat & other extras. Call Liz
after 6:30. 373-2210. Married
Students Only. (B-4t-46-p)
Must sublet. JanJune. 2 bdrm. apt.
AC, 3 blocks behind Norman. Call
373-1230 after 5 p.m. (B-3t-46-p)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
livingroom completely furnished, ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo., cable TV.
Colonial Manor Apts. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Univ. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals
$220/quarter. Some financial aid
available. 378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
£-x:-wxvxvx-xx*xy-x-x-x-vx-x*x*X>>
f WANTED
< :
Xxxxx-x-x-x.vx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.x.v.vx-xv.
Female Grad Student needs
roommate. Beginning winter quarter.
Efficiency apt. fully furnished. Call
373-2612 after 6:30 p.m. (C-3t-46-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted to
share new four bedroom, two bath
Spanish style apartment just off
sorority row. Private bedroom,
carpeting, central heat and air, all
electric kitchen, pool and barbecue
grills. Reasonably priced, all utilities
furnished. Call June at 372-5345.
(C-ts-47-c)
Wanted one coed roommate to sublet
College Terr. Apartment. Rent is $65
a mo. utl. inc. '/? blk from campus.
Call 3 78-8345 after 5 p.m. Rent Paid
until Dec. 10 (C-st-45-p)
Quaint house with fireplace and
garden is lon6ly. Looking for female
roommate. SBS monthly includes
everything. Call 378-6 366.
(C-3t-45-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters.
Available Dec. Ist. $45.00/month.
Call Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5
p.m. (C-3t-46-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
French Quarter apt. $45.00 per
month Poolside. Call after 5 p.m.
3 73-2209. (C-st-43-p)
-Male Roommate Landmark Apt.
Available December 15 December
rent free. $46.50/month. Pool, A/C,
carpet, dishwasher. Call 378-0727.
(C-3t-47-p)

sovvoc':*x-x.s*.vx*:*:-x-x-:.:.:.v.*.x04<_
I WANTED jj
V/iW.w.vWvXX+V-^'.^WvX-XwSVAW
Grad Student to share unbelievable 2
br townhouse w/ senior law' student.
Unique not in Sin City! A steal at
SBO beginning January. 373-1612.
(C-3t-46-p)
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Luxury and privacy at a price YOU
can afford! Four bedroom, two bath
townhouse vvith carpeting, central
heat and air, Spanish decor, pool and
barbecue grills. Walk to campus.
Phone 372-5344. (C-ts-47-c)
WANTED: Riders to Jackson, Miss,
and points between. Leaving Dec. 12
and Dec. 15, returning Jan 3 or 4.
Call 373-2612 after 6:30 p.m.
(C-3t-46-p)
Male roommate wanted to share 4
BR plush La Mancha apt. with 3
grad, students. S7O/mo. met. utilities.
Ready now or Jan. Can 3 76-133 7.
(C-st-45-p)
.;~'X*X*X*X*X*X*XVV.*.%*X*X X*X*X*XvXX-X'.
HELP WANTED I

y ...... '#
Need extra sales help for Christmas
selling. Apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-44-c)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBMs new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminole and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua." (E-l lt-42-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
the Business and Administration
Offices of Student Publications. Call
Mr. Myking at 392-1681 between the
hours of 8 and 5. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-tf-47-cj (E-tf-47-cjxx^w^x^x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.v;:
xx^w^x^x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.v;: (E-tf-47-cjxx^w^x^x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x.v;:
AUTOS
&svX"X-XX-x-X'Xxvx*x-x-X'X-v-Xvx*X':v
VW 1966 BUG GOOD
CONDITION 26,000 MILES, DARK
GREEN, RADIO. $925. 372-5796.
(G-st-44-p)
1964 VW; New engine, brakes, tires,
mechanically excellent visually
catastrophic; must sell before Friday.
$475. Will bargain; Call 378-7693
after 6 p.m. (G-2t-46-p)
VW 1966 Black with red
interior, one-owner, 53,000 miles.
$950. Call Mike at 373-2349.
(G-st-45-p)
TRIUMPH TR-4 1964, roll-bar, wire
wheels, radio, heater, luggage rack,
good top & tonneau, very good
condition: call 372-7980. (G-lt-47-p)

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I Ij I v*t vAioirtSt
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Liza Minnelli Wendell Burton -Tim Mclntire
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CIIIETT BROADWAYS SMASH MUSICAL
_ O%MUFjFc)I NOW THE MOST EXCITING
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TECHNICOIOR*/PANAVISION*



v.v^ViWX'WKWX'KWXX
CLASSIFIEDS
,v,'v#**'**XOXOX # X X ( C # X X X*X*I!*!X KO
f PERSONAL
Graduate Students Locating Teaching
Jobs Revolutionary approach.
Directories of Positions to Candidate.
Candidate to schools. Inexpensive
Deadline December 1, 1969.
Applications write: Intercept, Box
317, Harvard Sq., P. 0., Cambridge,
Massachusetts 02138. (J-3t-45-p)
Fun on Fridays! All singles over 21
come to The Lamplighter from 5:30
to 7:30 this and every Friday.
Doubles 65 cents; all other drinks 50
cents. 25 cents cover (to pay for ads,
etc.). Spread the word and come
relax after a week's work!!
(J-3t-46-p)
Looking for something to do Sat.
night? Why dont you come over to
the Murphree Area Courtyard and see
the Celebration perform. It will be
a Gator Hop show put on by Tolbert,
Murphree and Broward from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. on Sat". Nov. .22. (J-2t-46-p)
UNDERGROUND DYLAN ALBUM
WHITE WONDER', now available
exclusively in Gainesville at the
Subterranean Circus, 10 S.W. 7th St.
while they last. (J-st-46-p)
FREE KITTENS BLACK AND
WHITE CALL 373-1737. (J-st-47-p)
Insulted by your environment?
Environmental Action Group Mon.,
Nov. 24, 7:30 Bartram 211.
Organizational meeting for those >
interested. (J-lt-47-p)
21 and finally free! You and me and
number 3. Ma and Pa and Pookie too.
No longer have a hold on you. To
this I have one thing to say. It's
FANTASTIC! HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
(J-lt-47-p)
Tired of motel-like apt.-living?
Charming two bdrm house with
fireplace, garden and dog pen needs
female roommate. Pamper yourself.
No. 378-6366. (J-3t-45-p)
Need writers for off campus mag.
Open positions for comics, cartoon,
satire, humor column or story. Call
Stan Ratoff eve. 378-4824.
(J-st-41-p)
DEAR H: HAVE A HAPPY
BIRTHDAY, WISH I COULD SPENT
IT WITH YOU. REMEMBER I
LOVE YOU VERY MUCH AND
ALWAYS WILL. I'LL BE
THINKING OF YOU. LOVE, L.L.
(J-lt-46-p)
DALE LEWIS REPRESENTS
GREATNESS. Fan club meeting
tonight 9 p.m. outside in front of
Research Lib. Wear black shirt.
WALT on this my entire thoughts are
with you my 99 16 tumor lives 25
more days just you wait. Love, The
Kid. (J-lt-46-p)
LOST medium size reddish-brown
female dog, in vicinity of Newberry
Road and 1-75. Looks tike cocker
spaniel with long tail. If found call
376-1077 or 392-0792. Her name is
Taffy. (L-3t-46-p)
LOST: Green suede coat. Sat. DU
House. Call 376-2530. (L-3t-46-p)
Lost, large female Siamese cat
wearing a flea collar, answers to name
Taffy. Lost in vicinity of N.E. sth
Ave. Reward. 376-0529. (L-3t-45-p)
Lost: Black-and-white female Basset
puppy. Lost Sunday near Catholic
Church. Reward. Call 378-5409.
(L-st-45-p)
LOST Pair of gold rimmed glasses
in black case. Contact Tom Kennel),
392-9965. Reward. (L-3t-45-p)
Lost: One wallet. Brown. Lost on
East-West Drive. Reward offered.
Contact Carl. Phone 2-7131 after 6
p.m. (L-3t-46-p)
Lost: Gold mens watch between
stadium and Norman Hall after last
football game. Identifying engraving
on back. Tremendous personal value.
Reward. Call 372-6448 or 392-1496.
(L-st-47-p)
SERVICES I
Health foods, natural vitimins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
cohating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-45-ts-c)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
Instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
station, 378-4480. (M^tf-5-c)

ousmv 7 c 7
I HOFFMAN I
I JON VOK3HT I
I "MIDNIGHT COLOR i.v DeLuxe^j
I COWBOY" I
H PERSONS UNDER 17 POSITIVE PROOF I
C^ N 0 ,D,,r,t OF AGE REQUIRED U
PLUS AT 9:26 I
I bo*!sd3Si. cwolraker!
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA^
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato
79C
GAINESVILLE MALL
I were I
I MEN THAT'S ALL I
1 THAT MATTERED I
I IvOMANfjS

NIGHT WITH COLOR
FRI. ANDSAT.
STARTS SUNDAY NOV. 23RD V>
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Friday, November 21,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 15



Page 16

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Novambar 21,1969

FROM FEDERAL REGISTRATION LAW
Senate Exempts Shotgun Shells, Rifle Bullets

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate
gave final congressional approval
Thursday to legislation exempting
shotgun shells and high-power rifle
bullets from the federal law requiring
registration of ammunition sales.
The repealer affects only shotgun and
rifle ammunition used by hunters. Sales

Heated Senate Debate Geared
At Undecided Justice Voters

WASHINGTON (UPI) A Southern conservative
and a Northern liberal Thursday debated the
Supreme Court nomination of Judge Clement F.
Haynsworth Jr. on the Senate floor while
last-minute jockeying for the few remaining
uncommitted votes went on behind the scenes.
The Senate prepared to vote on the nomination
at 1 p.m. Friday. The outcome was still in doubt
because of the undeclared.position of a handful of
senators.
It was doubtful if the remaining hours of debate
would switch any votes, or influence the undeclared
senators to one side or another.
But Sen. John L. McClellan, D-Ark., an ardent
Haynsworth backer, and Sen. Clifford P. Case,
R-NJ., an opponent of the judge, tried in formal
Senate floor speeches.
Sen. Mark 0. Hatfield, R-Ore., meanwhile
reported he had been threatened with conservative

Bill Gives Tax Break
To Job-Training Firms

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Herman E. Talmadge, D-Ga.,
proposed Thursday the
government give a tax break to
businesses which hire people on
welfare and which spent funds
on job training.
His bill would allow firms to
deduct from their taxable
income $1 for every $lO they
spend on job training programs
and $1 for every $lO they pay in
wages to persons who were on
welfare when hired.
The tax credit could apply to
wages paid during the first 12
months of employment.
Talmadge estimated his
proposal would cut government
revenues by S2OO million a year.
This is a small price to pay
for the long-term employment
of individuals in the lower
income groups and the employe

Drop put of
college.
(For a late study break at Capt. Wishbone's.)
Free Capt. Wishbone
posters for all Gator students and faculty.
704 S.W. Second Aw.
201 16 h Am. at 8. Main St. Ts CMIIImMIv
1025 B.E. 4th at Williston A division of JacksorvAtlantic, Inc.

of all other types of shells and bullets
will still have to be registered.
Registration still will be required for
purchases of .22 caliber shells, which
comprise the bulk of rifle ammunition
sold in this country.
Sen. Wallace F. Bennett, R-Utah,
tacked the repeal amendment onto an

training which the bill would
provide, he said.
Hie senator said during the
1968 campaign, President Nixon
proposed comparable tax
incentives as away to offer job
training to the unemployed.
However, he said, it
appears that President Nixon has
retreated from his previous
position on the desirability of
such an approach.
Since six of every seven jobs
in the country is in private
industry, Talmadge said, it
makes sense to let industry
rather than the government train
workers.
There is a much greater
assurance that the skills learned
by those retrained will be
economically useful and that the
trainees will find permanent
employments, he said.

opposition unless he votes for Haynsworth.
~~ A very good friend of mine has reported to me
that among a number of financial contributors in
past campaigns has come the word that a vote
against Haynsworth can become a trigger to set up a
conservative candidate against me in the primary,
Hatfield said.
He added the threat will make no difference in
his vote.
The Oregon lawmaker was one of 16 senators
who have yet to take a public position on the
nomination. But he was thought to be leaning
against confirmation.
A continuing UPI poll showed there were 44 solid
votes for Haynsworth and 47 against him. The poll
counted confidential as well as public statements.
This count reduced the uncommitted senators to
nine four Republicans and five Democrats.

Have You
Bought Your
1970
Seminole
Yet?
Ah

riKatpSeiTer
The Hillel Foundation.
and

The Center of Man
I Bring to the UF a New Dimension
I in Folk Entertainment
Shlomo
Carlebach
World-wide appearances A
I Jerusalem, Paris, London, fc
Amsterdam, Rome. f^fPr
"The world is my
I headquarters."
Appearing at the Rat * _,
Tuesday, Nov.mb.r 25 T cl<6,, avoilabl
Bi3o and 10.30 PM JWRU, RAT, HILLEt
DONT FORGET TGIF ZZIX
*R -*- 'lt' mt? a if jmm mm. a .a. m

obscure bill extending the interest
equalization law to March 31,1971.
Sen. Mike Mansfield, D-Mont., said
the ammunition repeal amendment was
necessary because the Internal Revenue
Service exceeded the intention of
Congress in administering the law. He
said the act required only the

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Get a Fair Shake.... See ELROD
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DR. ELIZABETH PHILP
(INFIRMARY G. P.)
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(MEDICAL LAW)
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Mon., Nov. 24 7:30 LNG 123 UNION

registration of the name, age and
address of a buyer of sportsmens
ammunition.
But he said the IRS expanded the
forms required to be filled out to several
pages, leading to a burdensome
record-keeping task.



ASSESSMENT SAID UNCONSTITUTIONAL
Ruling Could Hamper Law Enforcement

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
court of record ruling that a
special $1 assessment against
certain law violators is
unconstitutional could severely
handicap the statewide campaign
to improve law enforcement,
officials said Thursday.
The levy, to be assessed
against every person convicted
of violating a state criminal
statute or local ordinance, was
: set in a 1969 law. The revenue
was earmarked to support a state
police academy and to match
federal funds for improving local
law enforcement Under the

Reform School 'Mom
Knows The Ropes

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
housemother at the maximum
security cottage at the state
school for incorrigible gills near
Ocala is a companion in crime'
with her young charges.
She works a 40-hour week
with two days off but spends
it mostly ready, watching
television and seeing visitors
from the outside" since she is
not allowed to leave the
institution.
A convicted felon, serving
time for forgery at the nearby
correctional prison for women,
she is pioneering a pilot program
to see if the rapport" a
lawbreaker might have with
young juveniles can help in
rehabilitation.
We think it is tremendously
effective," said Mrs. Anabel
Mitchell, acting superintendent
at Lowell, the states only prison
for women. Lowell and the girls
reform school at Forest Hills are
just a few miles apart.
We believe that a mature
woman, as a colleague in crime
may very well be able to
establish a rapport with young
offenders, she said.
The Miami woman chosen to
launch the program is a
50-year-old first offender who
PORTRAIT OF VIVIAN OLIVER
Only 21 portrait days till
Christmas.
Come in now and have
your portrait finished by
the last day of classes.
There is no finer Christmas
gift than a lasting personal
portrait by by
- by JOHNSTON
ill photography
Ph. 372-2512
1915 N. W. 13th Street
Directly across from
I Gainesville High School

Crime and Safe Streets Act.
The theory was that persons
who commit crimes ought to
have to pay to train policemen.
Manatee County Court of
Record Judge Robert Schultz
ruled recently that the
assessment, in addition to the
normal fine paid by a violator,
amounts to a tax" and not a
cost of the court.
He said the court's police
poWers do not embrace the
authority to tax and therefore
the law is an encroachment by

liked children so much that she
took three boys into her home
as foster sons.

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the legislative upon the judiciary
branch.
He refused to require a man
convicted of speeding to pay the
sl. The county appealed the
decision to Manatee Grcuit
Judge Lynn Silvertooth.-
William Reed, director of the
Department of Law
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Enforcement, said about
$160,000 has been collected and
. deposited in the state treasury.
He is counting on part of it to
begin field training for agents at
the academy Jan. 1.
Im sure the ruling will be
appealed to the Supreme Court
and if there is a constitutional

PQPI FISH
fi*&9* cks CHIPS
i Special Sale Fri, Sat, Sun
| first order second order
i fish & chips 79< ONLY I Rsg. $1.58 valu

Friday, November 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

problem that it can be remedied
by the next legislature,** Reed
said.
It will impede but not stop
start of curriculum and training
at the academy, however. He
said if necessary, department
training funds will be used.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1969

The
Florida :
Alligator i

READING SCHEDULED
Fire Cant Stop Dickens

By CRAIG HEYL
Alligator Staff Writer
Despite the fire that
destroyed the Sigma Nu
Fraternitys chapter house last
year, the traditional Dickens
Christmas Carol, reading will
again be presented.
The presentation is planned
for Dec. 5.
The reading of A Christmas
Carol will be given in the
University Auditorium. A
reception will be held in the
home of UF President Sand Mrs.
Stephen C. OConnell after the
performance.
Initially, the reading was held
in the chapter house, followed
by a reception.
This tradition prevailed for 30
years until last year when
attendance of the Dickens
reading exceeded the house
capacity of 2,000. The Reading
was then moved to the
University Auditorium.
Vice President Lester Hale
will read Dickens Christmas
work for Sigma Nu.
After the fire that destroyed
the chapter house on University

jj
DYNAMIC BLACK POET
Gylan Kain, a poet from Harlem, spoke to UF students Sunday in
the Reitz Union. Described as a resurrection of a prophet, Kain
combined fiery oration with jazz and stormed through an electric
poetry reading. His performance was not a scholarly chat, but a revival
for his audience.
AISHIHJ. aoivo A-LSHIHJL UOJ.V9 AISUIHI HOIVD AISHIHJL
1 The l
l T.G. I
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s resumes the s
Underground j
l Film \
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1 633 N.W. 13th ST. V
| Remember W.C. Fields every Tues. <
tHIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR -r THIRSTY GATOR.-7 THIRSTY t

ENTERTAINMENT

Avenue, OConnell made an
offer to assist the fraternity, and
this year, the reception, which is
by invitation only, will be
hosted by the OConnells at
their home.
According to Jay R.
Gebhardt, co-advisor to the
fraternity, the honored guest
this year is to be Coach Ray
Graves, a Sigma Nu alumnus.
Gov. Maddox
Reads Also
ATLANTA (UPI) Gov.
Lester Maddox said Wednesday
hed be glad to try to help with
an 85-hour nonstop Scripture
reading starting on New Years
Eve.
Maddox has been invited to
take part in a marathon
Bible-reading session by the
Voice of Prophecy,
international radio broadcast
group of the Seventh Day
Adventist Church.
The group asked 75
government, civic and religious
leaders to take part.

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PB Folk Festival On

' Special to the Alligator
WEST PALM BEACH The
Palm Beach Art and Music
Festival is go.
Circuit Court Judge James R.
Stuart ruled late Thursday night
that the P&lm Beach County
Zoning Commission exceeded its
authority when it denied a
special permit for the Festival at
the Palm Beach International
Speedway.
Stuart also indicated zoning
commission attorneys did not
prove during an eight-hour
hearing here Thursday that the

'Rider Comments
Easy Rider, now playing at the Plaza II Theatre, is the most
controversial movie to hit Gainesville since Midnight Cowboy.
Since the Cowboy review received so much criticism from
Alligator readers, students are invited to see the movie and send in
their comments.
Selected short reviews will be presented in Wednesdays Alligator. If
response is big enough, more will be printed after the Thanksgiving
holidays.
Send reviews and comments to: Ted Remley, Entertainment
Editor,Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Room 365 or drop them by the
Alligator office.
Only comments with signed names will be printed.

UNION Fri. & Sat.: The
Dirty Dozen with Lee Marvin &
Jim Brown at 5:30, 8 & 10:30.
Sun.: Breathless by Godard at
7 & 9:30.
PLAZA I Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Marlowe with James Gamer &
Gayle Hunnicutt at 1:53, 3:50,
5:49,7:50 & 9:50.
PLAZA 11-Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Easy Rider with Peter Fonda
at 2:15 4:04, 5:53, 7:47 &
9:45.
FLORIDA Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: Sweet Charity with
Shirley MacLaine.
CENTER I Fir., Sat. &
Sun.: The Undefeated with
John Wayne & Rock Hudson.
CENTER H Fri., Sat. &
Sun.: The Sterile Cuckoo with
Liza Minnelli & Wendell Burton.
SUBURBIA DRIVE IN Fri.
& Sat.: The War Wagon,
McLintock, 1116 Alamo &
Hellfighters all with John
Wayne. Sun.: Therese and
Isabelle & Circle of Love.
GAINESVILLE DRIVE-IN
Fir., Sat. & Sun.: Midnight
Cowboy with Dustin Hoffman
and Jon Voight at 7:07 & 11:16
& The Sweet Body of
Deborah with Caroll Baker &

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festival was likely to a
public nuisance if permitted to
continue.
The Circuit Court decision
gives the green light to the Nov.
28 through 30 rock music
festival following an all-day
hearing marked by ramlbing,
sometimes emotional testimony
from more than 20 witnesses.
The hassle Stuart unravelled
was a complex legal question
about the nature of the rock
music festival.
The controversy which
sparked the legal battle over the
festivals future became even
more clouded when the

flicks

Jean Sorel at 9:26.
DRAGON DRIVE-IN Fri.,
Sat. & Sun.:To Be A Woman
at 7:30, Charlie Bubbles with
Albert Finney & Ill Never
Forget Whats His Name.
THIRSTY GATOR Sat.:
Underground Film Series at 9.
CUSTOM FRAMING
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defendants named in the suit
filed by promoted David Rupp
submitted a counter-suit asking
for a restraining order on the
Festival.
Rupp asked that the County
Commission and the zoning
commission be ordered not to
interfere with the festivals
promotion or operation.

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The film
BREATHLESS
will not be shown
in the Union this Sunday,
as previously scheduled.

Friday, Naaawdrtr 21, 9M, Tlw Florida AMifar,

Page 19



Page 20

The F torida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1969

AT DEC 10 TALK
Project Concern Founder
Schedules Presentation

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Project Concern is interested in relating to the
world a sense of family, peace and love.
The international project has set up medical
facilities in South Vietnam, Hong Kong, Mexico
and the state of Tennessee in an effort to achieve
its goals.
The hospitals in these areas are set up as
medical relief facilities and serve the
communities in which they are located.
Dr. James Turpin, president an founder of
Project Concern, will be in Gainesville December
10 to explain his foundation.

>l/t
i&mvw: iimMjmf
* Bullit
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Reviewer
There are bad cops and there are good cops and then theres
Bullit (from the films promotional advertisements). And there are
bad movies and good movies and theres Bullit, resting
somewhere between.
From a quick look at what Hollywoods offering us these days, it
would seem that the era of action-adventure and entertainment films
has all but left us, giving way to a seemingly significant variety that
justifies its existance with symbols and messages. This is all right, and
probably is a step in the right direction, but somehow it feels as if
something is being lost.
For many people still like to visit the movies simply to be
entertained. Its quite an achievement for the motion picture people
to discover that they can enlighten thqir audiences, but they shouldnt
forget that films have also functioned well as a medium for release and
enjoyment.
In the minority, the makers of Bullit were apparently shooting
with this near-forgotten function in mind, and they come pretty close
to their target. Bullits sole purpose seems to be achieving a total
release of thoughts and cares by the audience in exchange for an
immersion in the action.
This is accomplished with enough finesse (via the apt talents of
director Peter Yates and cinematographer William Fraker) that the
film abounds with almost aching suspense and a cinematic control
guaranteed to carry the audience over every bump and around each
turn of the films extremely hanowing chase scene.
Its all well and good, and if thats all youre seeking youll be well
satisfied. However, if you include an interest in the characters as part
of your enjoyment, Bullit just might miss with you. The actors
especially the starrmg McQueen move through their exploits with
no more motivation than avoiding puppet-like deaths and finishing the
movie.
Steve McQueen plays Frank Bullit exactly as he did Thomas Crown,
and his other roles in The Great Escape and The Sand Pebbles
simply mirror this one.
Everyone exudes that understated Supercoolese that McQueen
cant seem to get away from, with the whole film rolling under the
auspices of a successful format and not bothering any more than its
star to try something new.
All things considered, youll like Bullit.
THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
NW T4th ST ft UNI V. AVE.

Governor Claude Kirk has declared the week
starting Dec. 7 as Project Concern Week. In
conjunction with this state-wide event, the
Gainesville Junior Womans Club and the
Gainesville Jaycees are bringing Turpin to
speak.
Turpin, who has been called A Second Tom
Dooley, purports, We, as Americans, have lost
some of our capacity to believe, because we have
lost much of our contact with the dirty reality of
life as it really is.
His project and speech are intended to relate
to his fellow citizens the reality of the world.
Turpins speech will be held at the. Gainesville
Womans Club. Admission is free.

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The
Florida i
Alligator |

- a
vi^KSMBBFytWK!
''atgPrS-L. it jap? v
t - lla'
. ?| rTyHHI I]
DOUG CASE
GATOR FLANKER CARLOS ALVAREZ
... a solid favorite at hb position

DURRANCE, STEEN AND ALVAREZ
Three Gators Make All-SEC Team

By JACK WILKINSON
UPI Sports Writer
Hie UFs Mac Steen, Tommy Durrance and
Carlos Alvarez made the 1969 Southeastern
Conference All-Star football team announced
Thursday by United Press International.
John Reaves came in second to Mississippis
Archie Manning, for the quarterback position.
In the backfiekl with Manning, a junior, were
sophomores Durrance, a running back; flanker
Alvarez; and running back Curt Watson from
Tennessee.
At tackles in the offensive line were Steen, a
senior; Bob Asher of Vanderbilt; guards Alvin
Samples of Alabama and Chip Kell of Tennessee and
LSU*s Godfrey Zaunbiecher at center.
The voters sportswriters and broadcasters
went heavily for Manning as the All-Conference
quarterback, generally ignoring Reaves, the Gators
record buster and no. 2 passer in the nation. Reaves
also ranks third nationally in total offense and holds
a healthy statistical margin over Manning.
Manning, piloting the Rebels into the Sugar Bowl
with hb thrilling play, ranks 10th in the nation in
total offense with 1,946 yards. He has scored 12
touchdowns, and thrown for seven others. He ranks
11th in passing with 1,553 yards.
Reaves* battery-mate made the team in a breeze,
however. Alvarez, a 5-11 Cuban refugee and
acrobatic pass catcher, was a shoe-in at flanker. Os

*
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W^w^aHt->msSsm ,; JHHHpr -,
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jnSk jHHy|i
aHHIiL '%
: * _- -' "> f| ||? f §fe --V-V ; : ~* SRlfe ?'- "# M r ;;'
..:... ' : flB -§*f
victorious in close race for potiiion


GATOR SPORTS

ftttwtfswss*
(, 0h man, this is fantastic. I never |
js would have believed it. All the (Haynes') §
| Hornets should have made it." |
MAC STEEN |
H Offensive Tackle §£
\\
"I'm happy whenever I win anything. I g
s wouldn't have been surprised if someone $!
& else had gotten it. There are a lo t of fine §:
receivers in the conference." $
I CARLOS ALVAREZ %
Offensive Flanker |i
I "This surprised me of course, but I %
jiS guess everybody likes the guy who scores, s
§ I'm excited about it." g
| TOMMY DURRANCE g
:: Running Back S,
Reaves 22 touchdown passes tins fall, Alvarez has
caught 10 of them.
In all, hes caught 73 tosses for 1,092 yards with
two games to be played the Gators* last regular
season game against Miami Nov. 29 and their game
with Tennessee in the Gator Bowl in December.
Durrance, who has scored 15 touchdowns and a
two-pointer, b eighth nationally in scoring with 92
points. Thats the highest total in the SEC since
1962 and he needs only three points to top aD

r nb fln J§> as iP^jp
1 BbfiSL. ~ jjbiijk-. S|
RUNNING BACK TOMMY DURRANCE PETE KNOCKE

'
SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Friday, Novmbar 21,1960, Tha Florida Alligator,

scorers since Jackie Parker set the league record
with 120 in 1952.
Sammy Milner of Mississippi State, who made the
team as flanker last year, returns this time as the
split end. Also returning is tight end Ken Delong of
Tennessee. Only three others repeat on the 22-man
team linebackers Steve Kiner of Tennessee and
Mike Kolen of Auburn and defensive tackle David
Campbell of Auburn.
Bulwarking the defensive line are Hap Father of
Mississippi and David Roller at ends, 260-pound
Frank Yanossy and Campbell at the tackles and
Steve Greer of Georgia at middle guard. Joining
Kiner and Kolen at linebackers is George Bevan of
LSU.
Buddy McClinton of Auburn and sophomore
Tommy Casanova of LSU are the defensive
halfbacks and Glenn Cannon of Mississippi is the
safety.
Every team in the conference landed at least one
man on the squad, with Tennessee leading the way
with five. The closest races saw Yanossy beat Buz
Morros of Ole Miss, Durrance edge Doug Mathews
of Vanderbilt and Steen nip Worthy McClure \of Ole
Miss.
Manning, dominating play in the big games,
outpolled Reaves almost 6-to-l and no other SEC
quarterback even got a vote.
Reaves simply picked the wrong year to make his
debut so far as the all-star balloting went.
The Lineup

ATLANTA (UPI) The 1969 United Press International
All-Southeastern Conference football team:
OFFENSE
POS. NAME SCHOOL YR.
SE Sammy Milner Miss. St. JR
TE Ken Delong Tenn. SR
LT Bob Asher Vand. SR
RT Mac Steen Fla. SR
LG Alvin Samples Ala. SR
RG Chip Kell Tenn. JR
C G. Zaunbrecher LSU SR
QB Archie Manning Miss. JR
RB Tommy Durrance Fla. SOPH
RB Curt Watson Tenn. SOPH
FL Carlos Alvarez Fla. SOPH
DEFENSE
POS. NAME SCHOOL YR.
LE Hap Farber Miss. SR
RE David Roller Ky. JR
LT Frank Yanossy Tenn. SR
RT David Campbell Aub. SR
MG Steve Greer Ga. SR
LB Steve Kiner Tenn. SR
LB Mike Kolen Aub. SR
LB George Bevan LSU SR
HB Buddy McClinton Aub. SR s
HB Tommy Casanove LSU SOPH
S Glenn Cannon Miss. SR

***********
CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 21,1968

GRAVES NUMBER TWO

Dickey Top SEC Coach

ATLANTA (UPI) 4 When
Doug Dickey installed the new
triple option at Tennessee this
season he was a long way from
the Vols' beloved single wing.
But, just as he brought about
great results when hescrapped
the legendary Tennessee Wing
for the more explosive
T-formation, Dickey brought off
the switch to the tricky triple
option with just as much
effectiveness and, though
graduation had wiped out his
entire starting backfield, he got
the Vols off and winging in no
time.
It was as awesome as it was
new and the Vob looked
unbeatable until Ok Miss upset
them a week ago. For his work
against what seemed to be
tremendous odds, Dickey was
saluted as the 1969 United Press
International Southeastern
Coach of the Year.
Dickey beat out Floridas Ray
Graves in a dose race to win the
honor for the third time. Also
getting votes in a poll conducted
among sportswriters and
broadcasters throughout SEC
country were Charles
McClendon of LSU, John
Vaught of Mississippi, Shug
Jordan of Auburn and Bill Pace
of Vanderbilt.
Dickey, when informed of his
selection, in turn paid tribute to
his team.
We tried to build a balanced
football team and make full use
of our ability, he said. That's
one of my strongest beliefs to
try and make full use of the
players* ability. Any time a
coach gets such an honor it's a
credit to the players, to the
leadership they have had and
have given throughout most of
the year.
This team has done a lot of
things well throughout the year.
They have thrown, run and
defended well. I hope we can
put them an together again three
more times this year.
The Vols go* into Saturdays
game with Kentucky with a 7-1
record and a 10th ranking in the
national ratings. They wind up
their season Nov. 29 against
Vanderbilt and then in their
fifth consecutive post-season
appearance, meet Florida Dec.
27 in the Gator Bowl.
I hesitate to say were
especially good in any one
department, Dickey said. If
youre going to be a
championship football team
youve got to have balance
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gESP BE Hkl
DOUG DICKEY
.. .bast in SEC
and it took balance in most of
our games this year.
Dickey tabbed the Alabama
and Georgia games as the best
his Vols have looked this season.
Tennessee beat Alabama 41-14
and Georgia 17-3.
Naturally, the Mississippi
game, in which the Rebels
shocked Tennessee 38-0, was the
worst.
Id have to say I didnt do a
very good job in that one, he


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RAY GRAVES
... runnerup in voting
said. I didnt do a very smart
job.
Dickey, who played
quarterback for Bob Woodruff
at Florida and later made a name
for him as an aide to Frank
Broyles at Arkansas, moved to
Tennessee as head coach on Dec.
2,1963.
Going into Saturdays game,
Dickey owns a 44-144 record.
He previously was named SEC
Coach of the Year in 1965 and
1967.

*

TTT T.rTrf.V.V%V.V
j Voted As MVP
NEW YORK (UPI) Slugger Willie McCovey of the San Francisco
Giants, who for years played in the shadow of Willie Mays and
Orlando Cepeda, achieved the highest honor of his career Thursday
when he was named the National League's Most Valuable Player in the
1969 season.
Winning the award puts the finishing touches to my greatest
year," said the 31-year-old McCovey, who batted 320 and led the NL
with 45 home runs and 126 runs batted in. If 1 had any regrets this
year, it was that we didn't win the pennant but winning the MVP
award has to be the highest one you can win individually and
naturally I'm happy."
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INTRAMURALS

Kruer Paces 8-6 Law League Win

LAW REVIEW Wayne Kruer eluded a strong
Mike Mann rush and then flipped a game winning
scoring pass to Hank Wilson to give the favored Ball
Busters an 8-6 win over Browns Bandits.
The Bandits scored first as Bob Slick Grossman
dropped back to pass, saw an opening and ran the
ball in for the score. The ball proved to be too slick
for Bob, however, as he later dropped a high snap in
the endzone cutting the Bandit lead to 6-2. The
Busters then came on to take the lead with the
Wilson score.
With only minutes remaining, Slick brought his
team back for what appeared to be the winning
touchdown. It was only to be thwarted, however, as
Shelly Finman allowed a pass from Grossman to slip

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through his hands in the endzone and the game was
lost.
Both teams were evenly matched and both moved
the ball well between the goal lines but had a hard
time scoring.
The Law League Ping Pong championships have
concluded as Art Villwock captured the singles title
and Jack Klausner and Scott Gabrielson captured
the doubles title.
Villwock performed deftly against Klausner,
beating the ex-Golden Paddle in three straight
games. Klausner, however, was undaunted and
overcame a favored Jeff Tobin-La Rue Williams
team in the best of five doubles games.
The Tobin team was favored to capture the

1,-. % i-* t *-* /. S?****- 1
Friday, November 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

doubles championship and took a 2-1 lead in the
match. Klausner managed to lead his team back to
tie it up and then forced the generally very offensive
Jeff Tobin into a defensive game and slammed by
him for the championship.
ORANGE FOOTBALL League leading Beta
Theta Pi revenged an earlier loss to' Lambda Chi
Alpha by defeating the Lambda Chis 24-7.
The game was even more lopsided than the secure
showed. The Betas doubled the Lambda Chis in first
downs as they propped for a head-on clash with the
Pi Lams. The winner of that game will play the
Pikes in the semi-finals.

STEVE ROHAN

Page 23



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Ndvambar 21,1969

Page 24

TWO WEEKEND TOURNEYS
'.l -

Harriers Ready For Meet

Floridas cross country track
team is set for a busy weekend
as they host the Florida
Intercollegiate Championships
on Friday and travel to New
York City to take part in the
NCAA Championships on
Monday.
The Gator runners will meet
Florida State and South Florida
on the University of Florida
course to determine the
outstanding team in the State of
Florida.
The Gators led by John
Parker of Orlando are favored to
capture the State title. The
Florida runners have met Florida
State and South Florida during
the season and have been
victorious.
Last week Florida finished
second in the Southeastern
Conference cross country meet
after an injury to freshman
sensation, Mark Bir, kept the
Gators from a possible league
championship.
Coach Jimmy Carnes will take
a seven-man squad to the NCAA
Championships being hosted by
Manhattan College.

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The team includes: Jack
Nason from Orlando, John
Brown from West Palm Beach,
Roy Benjamin from Brandon,
Don Laene from Miami, Ron
Nabors from Gainesville, A.W.
Smith from Tenills, Ga., and

GATOR CROSS COUNTRY TEAM
... hosts Florida Intercollegiate Championship

Jade Stewart from Mt. Lakes,
NJ.
Parker, who finished fourth in
the recent Southeastern
Conference meet is ineligible for
NCAA competition because he is
considered a graduate student.

The Harmon Football Forecast
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 1,384 Right, 451 Wrong, 41 Ties 754)

1 OHIO STATE
2 TEXAS
3 L.S.U.
4 MISSOURI
5 MICHIGAN

Saturday, Nov. 22Major Colleges

Arizona State 34
Bowling Green 28
Brown 17
Citadel 27
Colgate 15
Cornell 21
Dartmouth 26
Florida State 31
Houston 27
lowa 28
Kansas State 23
L.S.U. 34
Maryland 21
Massachusetts 26
Memphis State 35
Miami. Fla. 22
Miami (Ohio) 27
Michigan State 21
Minnesota 30
Missouri 33
Nebraska 21
New Mexico State 24
North Carolina 24
Notre Dame 30
Ohio State 26
Ohio U 31
Oklahoma State 28
Oregon State 35
Pacific 26
Penn State 35
Purdue 28
Richmond 20
San Diego State 35
South Carolina 21
S. 25
So. Mississippi 21
Stanford 31
Tennessee 35
T. 14
Toledo 31
Tulsa 24
U. 20
Utah 22
Utah State 23
Vanderbilt 27
Villanova 24
Washington 14
West Virginia 22
Yale 21

Thanksgiving DayThursday, Nov. 27

Alabama State 27
Alcorn A & M 27
Arkansas 28
C W Post 21
Mississippi 34
Morris Brown 20
Presbyterian 28
So. Carolina State 25-
Tennessee Tech 21
Tennessee State 27
Texas 42
Texas Southern 35
Tulsa 22
V.P.I. 45
Wofford 35

6 AUBURN
7 NOTRE DAME
8 PENN STATE
9 ARKANSAS
10 MISSISSIPPI

Colorado State 14
Northern Illinois 13
Columbia 12
Chattanooga 15
Rutgers 14
Pennsylvania 13
Princeton 17
No. Carolina State 23
Wyoming 13
Illinois 7
Colorado 17
Tulane 7
Virginia 20
Boston College 22
Louisville 0
Wake Forest 7
Cincinnati 6
Northwestern 14
Wisconsin 20
Kansas
Oklahoma 16
New Mexico 23
Duke 13
Air Force 15
Michigan 17
Marshall 14
lowa State 20
Oregon 20
San Jose State 7
Pittsburgh 7
Indiana 14
William & Mary 7
North Texas 21
Clemson 15
Baylor 7
East Carolina 6
California 12
Kentucky 6
Rice 10
Xavier 0
Wichita 14
Southern Cal 17
Brigham Young 14
Idano 7
Davidson 17
Buffalo 21
Washington State 7
Syracuse 21
Harvard 10

Tuskegee 20
Jackson State 0
Texas Tech 13
Hofstra 20
Mississippi State 7
Clark 13
Newberry 6
J. C. Smith 19
Middle Tennessee 16
Parsons 7
Texas A & M 6
Prairie View 14
Louisville 17
V.M.1.. 0
Furman -7

(Friday Games)

| More Injuries |
|. Strike Cagers §

Gator basketball coach
Tommy Bartlett is scratching his
head these days trying to figure
out who will be healthy when
Florida opens its season in
Jacksonvilles Civitan Sunshine
Classic in two weeks.
Floridas injury situation
received another blow over the
weekend when sophomore Hal
Kelley suffered a knee injure and
will undergo surgery. Kelley, a
6-foot-2, 186-pounder from
Pensacola was slated for heavy
action at left wing for the Gators
this season.
Already Rorida has lost the
services of point guard Tony
Duva for the season. Nick
Fotiou and Gary Waddell have
also been sidelined for several
weeks with injuries.
Bartlett had counted on the
6-10 Waddell to open the season
at low post for the Gators. The
sophomore from Lexington,Ky.,
is suffering from a ruptured disc
and may miss several more
weeks of practice.
Gary has been out for two
weeks and he may be out for a
few more, said Bartlett, who
enters his fourth year at the

11 TENNESSEE
12 U.C.L.A.
13 SOUTHERN CAL
14 GEORGIA
15 FLORIDA

Highlights
There'll be a lot of ink spilled in newspapers all over
the country about THE confrontation the annual title
scrap between Southern California and U.C.L.A. So we
won't linger over it too long. Both teams have been
slipping in our jratings each week ... U.C.L A. is ranked
12th, Southern Cal, 13th. However, it will still be one of
the top games of the year. Trojan fans won't agree, but
we think it's the Bruins' turn to take over the host duties
in the Rose 80w1... U.C.L .A. to win the big one by 3
points.
With the curtain dropping on the Big Ten season
(drooping would be a more appropriate term for most of
the league this year!), there's one outstanding game left
for the finale. Everybody's Number One Boy, Ohio State,
travels to Ann Arbor to do battle with sth-ranked
Michigan. The Buckeyes should win it by nine, but this
little war, being fought in Michigan country, just might go
either way.
Two of the Southeast's biggest powers, LJS.U. and a
very deflated Tennessee, 3rd and 11th respectively, don't
run into too much trouble Saturday. The Volunteers are
29-point favorites over Kentucky, and the Tigers should
dispose of Tulane by 27.
4th-ranked Missouri and 17th-ranked Nebraska are still
battling head to head for the championship of the Big
Eight. Mizzou has a much easier task in its final game of
the season than do the Cornhuskers. Missouri will pour it
to the Jayhawks of Kansas, winning by 26, while
Nebraska will have its hands full with the Sooners of
Oklahoma. The Huskers are favored by only five points.
Notre Dame, number 7, will close out its season by
tipping the Air Force by fifteen points. The other strong
independent, Penn State, still rated only Bth in spite of an
undefeated season, should administer a whipping to
Pittsburgh ... the spread is 28 points.
And lest ye forget that there are other teams in the
East that play football in addition to Penn State, two very
fine Ivy League teams, Dartmouth and Princeton, square
off Saturday to decide the championship of the
conference. Undefeated Dartmouth is favored by nine.
Wound-licker, Purdue, rated 19th, is favored to retain
the Old Oaken Bucket, beating Indiana by 14 points.
Houston, ranked 20th, will add to Wyoming's troubles,
clipping the Cowboys by fourteen. And Stanford, in 16th,
will belt California by 19 points.

eKi-y
/j
HAL KELLEY
... wHI undergo surgery
helm of Gator basketball.
Tom Purvis, a 6-5 junior from
Ocala and Dan Boe, a 6-8
sophomore from Rice Lake,
Wise., have been sharing die low
post spot.
Senior Andy Owens has been
having an outstanding pre-season
practice at the high post. The
senior captain from Tampa hit
12 of 14 field goal attempts in a
recent scrimmage and has been
providing excellent leadership
for the young Gator squad.

16 STANFORD
17 NEBRASKA
18 ALABAMA
19 PURDUE
20 HOUSTON