Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
2?-*v :/
gv'. fewi;'
PHIL COPE
LOVE KNOWS NO SEASON
+
Even though the leaves are falling outride, it's springtime in the
hearts of this couple as they take advantage of the recent springtime
weather to ponder their thoughts about life and love.

Moonwalkers Conrad, Bean Install
Nuclear Powered Base On Moon

SPACE CENTER, Houston (DPI) The happy crewmen of Apollo
12 whistled while they worked with hammer and tongs Wednesday
and set up a functioning nudear powered scientific base on the moon.
Viewers on earth were denied a closeup view of the efforts of
Charles Pete Conrad and Alan L. Bean when their color television
camera failed, but this did nothing to dampen the spirits of the
astronauts.
Bean got out a hammer and gave the $78,883 camera a few good
whacks, and when this failed to correct the problem, he turned his
attention to other matters.
Skillful fix, ground communicator Edward G. Gibson
sarcastically observed. Yeah, good craftsmanship, agreed Bean.
Conrad's first moonwalk lasted 3 hours and 39 minutes and Bean
was out on the dusty surface 2 hours, 58 minutes. They then returned
to their lunar lander for about eight hours rest before setting out again
early Thursday for another 3% hours of exploration.
Conrad and Bean steered their landing ship, Intrepid, to an
incredibly accurate touchdown on the arid Ocean of Storms at 1:54

TRAINING CENTER FOR FUTURE POLITICIANS SET UP
No Special Qualifications Needed To Serve SG

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first in a series of
articles on UF's Student Government. One of the
largest and most complex student agencies, now
incorporated under law, SG handles hundreds of
thousands of dollars annually and provides countless
services to students. But who are the people behind
it and what do they do for you? Part 1: ITie College
of Student Government.)
By RONNIE BLOOM
Alligator Correspondent
Admission to UF's College of Student
Government is relatively simple. You don't have to
carry a specified academic average, pass an entrance
exam, or submit any personal
recommendations... all you need is a desire to
serve.
In reality, of course, there is not an established
SG college, but there is a training center for the
future politicians and leaders of this state and
nation ... a practice community for potential, civic
leaders, opinion formers and changers, lobbyists and

Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 46

3,200 FOR STUDENTS

Gator Bowl Tickets
Go On Sale Monday

By DAVE DOUCETTE
Alligator Managing Editor
The 3,200 tickets to the
Gator Bowl for UF students will
go on sale Monday and Tuesday
at gate 13 of the Stadium from
8:30 a.m. to 8 pjn., provided
tickets are available that long.
The tickets for the Dec. 27
game between UF and the
University of Tennessee will cost
$6.50 each, for students, faculty
and staff.
Any tickets not sold Monday
and Tuesday will go on sale Dec.
1-3.
On Monday, four windows
will be open for students with
one just for married students,
who will be sold 800 tickets.
Each student will be sold one
ticket on Monday and if any are
left over on Tuesday, each
student can buy two tickets. No
student can buy a ticket for his
date by having her IDs with him;

a on. EST Wednesday while a third astronaut, Richard F. Gordon kept
the command ship, Yankee Clipper, in a 65 mile high lunar orbit.
After checking out the lunar lander, having a meal, and climbing
into their lunar exploring suits, Conrad stepped out on the lunar
surface at 6:45 a.m. EST, followed by Bean 29 minutes later, at 7:14
a.m.
They were the third and fourth men to set foot in an alien world,
following by almost four months to the day the lunar landing of Neil
A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin on July 20.
In an exhuberant mood even during the dangerous moments of
touchdown, Conrad's spirits soared to new highs when he finally
climbed out of the lander to begin the exploration.
One of the first things he saw was Surveyor 3, a now-dead
spacecraft that landed on the moon April 20,1967 and beamed 6,315
pictures back to earth. Landing within walking distance of the
Surveyor was one of the prime objectives of the mission, since
scientists want the astronauts to bring back pieces of the spacecraft to
determine how it fared on the moon.

secretaries.
Classrooms and labs for the SG training center are
on the third floor of the Reitz Union. As a part of
this institution for additional learning, you will
obtain practical knowledge and experience of the
working of this university and learn to work with
people in all walks of life.
The professors of this so-called college are the
elected and appointed officials and organizational
leaders who are your equals in age and serve you in
leadership and organizational abilities.
These student-professors will teach you the basic
fundamentals of their jobs and counsel you so you
may attain your desired goals as a graduate from the
College of SG.
Your assignments in the SG school may be very
specific only requiring you to follow simple
instructions, or they may depend on your creative
ability to meet certain demands.
Possibly, you might host special guests of the
university, such as senators, representatives, and
other state leaders. Some students travel to high
schools and junior colleges as part of a speakers

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

both students must be there.
SG Secretary of Athletics Lee
Greene said this policy was being
followed to stop abuse of the
system as at previous games and
to be sure tickets go to UF
students.
Married students will be
allowed to buy two tickets, if
the husband or wife is not a
student.
All students must have their
registration fee card and picture
ID.
New fee cards can be obtained
at the Hub and picture IDs at
the rear of the Main Library.
UF received a total of 11,060
tickets for the game compared
to 18,000 for Tennessee. Since
UF signed the contract first,
they received a better deal on
tickets, Greene said.
Any tickets not sold by
Tennessee will be returned to

The

bureau for UF.
Other students are assigned tasks such as raising
money for campus improvement projects, or
assuming a cabinet position under the student body
president,, or tutoring an underprivileged Gainesville
youth,.or attracting top entertainment to campus.
The assignment you receive depends on your
talents. You become talented by experience in
working with SG.
All the tests in the SG college are take-home.
When youve followed the directions of your
teachers, attended class regularly, completed your
assignments, met all your goals and objectives, then
you take home as much personal satisfaction from
achievement as you deserve. Thats the test. You
grade yourself.
So you see, there is a College of Student
Government and somewhere there is a place for
you.
Come by our office on the third floor of the
Union or call for information at 392-1665.
(NEXT: An examination of the composition of
SG.)

Thursday, November 20, 1969

the UF.
Os the 11,060 tickets,
students get 3,200, faculty 800,
Gator Boosters 3,500, lettermen,
legislators and work priorities
1,200, alumni 860, and 1,500
complimentary seats. The
complimentary seats go to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Athletic Director Ray Graves,
the football team and other
groups outlined in the regular
ticket policies.
The best tickets the UF
receives start on the 35-yard line
of the east stands and run
around through the north end
zone.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said he has
asked University Police Chief
Audie Shuler to make sure that
orderly lines are maintained at
the windows.
u lf the lines get out of hand
as they did at the Houston game,
the windows will be closed until
the situation is dear,** Shepherd
said. M We dont want any
students injured.**
This ticket policy was
approved by the University
Ticket Committee in a five-hour
meeting Wednesday afternoon.
WEEKEND FIRE cause
still unknown, state
police inspector reported
on Wednesday page 2
Academics 4
Classifieds 8
Editorials 8
Entertainment 10
FSU News 6
Letters 9
Movies 14
Small Society 6
Sports 19



Page 2

The

Cause Os Fridays Fire Still Unknown

By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The first official word on Friday nights Agricultural Engineering
Building fire came from State Fire Inspector Tumey Burkhard in
Jacksonville on Wednesday.
Burkhard, who completed his inspection Tuesday said the cause of
the fire is still undetermined.
Wooden partitions in the northeast section of the building were a
fire hazard but I dont feel they were the direct cause of the blaze,"
Burkhard said.
He said its too early to properly estimate the damage to the
structure.
In my opinion, it lodes like around a $250,000 loss. Ill have to

Sen. Chiles Enters
US Senate Race
State Sen. Lawton Chiles Wednesday entered the race for the
U.S. Senate seat Sen. Spessard L. Holland will leave vacant at
the end of 1970.
Chiles has been traveling the state for the past several months
saying he would support Holland for re-election but that he
definitely would be a candidate should Holland decide not to
run.
Hollands announcement last week that he would not seek
re-election opened the door to Chiles candidacy.
Chiles was recently named runner-up for the St. Petersburg
Times award to the most outstanding state senator. He is
chairman of the senate ways and means committee and
appropriations subcommittee*

Court Order Stalling Oath
Races Against Deadlihe

By KEN DRIGGS
Alligator Correspondent
The American Civil Liberites Union (ACLU) is
hopeful that a restraining order against the Florida
loyalty oath will be issued by the U.S. Supreme
Court in time to beat the Thursday morning
deadline the university has set for employe
signatures.
Justice Hugo Black has asked the state of
Florida to present whatever information they wish
by Thursday morning, and were looking for an
injunction then, Leroy Lambom, a local ACLU
representative and law professor said Wednesday.
If the restraining order is not issued, UF faculty
and staff members will be required to have the
revised oath signed by Thursday.
Portions of it were struck out by a lower court
decision earlier this fall.
Lambom said attorney of record Jerome
Bomstein of Orlando who served as counsel for the
Connell and Adams cases which brought about
earlier oath revisions, had been notified by Black of
the move, as have state attorneys.
If he (Black) is going to be helpful to the

THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
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GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
QUICK-WAY COPY CENTER (QUICK-SAVE)
1620 w. university (univ. plaza) 372-7436
l I I Ml I 'l I !
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
for Correction must be given before the next insertion. -----

yrAfrWttFTNSPECTOIT REPORTS

mmmZ. y ~
ill I liv, ' w
|7
Bp
... wants Holland's seat

plaintiff he must act by Thursday. He can still be
helpful by acting on Friday or Monday, but were
afraid that a lot of faculty who dont agree with the
oath might go ahead and sign so they can be paid,"
Lambom said.
Earlier Wednesday UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said an Arts and Sciences faculty
resolution would not change the administrations
stand concerning the oath. The resolution
condemned efforts to force faculty to sign the
oath while it was being challenged in federal courts.
Local ACLU Chairman Mrs. Norma Munn said
the plaintiffs had the option to present their cases
to any Supreme Court justice they wished.
Anyone seeking a liberal decision would
naturally turn to Justice Black or Justice (William
O.) Douglas," she said.
The revised oath under contention eliminates the
portions which require personnel to swear they are
not members of the Communist party or any
organization that advocates overthrow of the
government.
Though this lesser court decision was a partial
success the ACLU appealed to the U.S. Supreme
Court for a more sweeping decision.

wait for an engineering check. f sh Agricultural
Burkhard criticized the construction of the Agnc
Engineering Building and other structures on the UF campu
in that and other buildings on shomid
be converted to concrete blocks. Theres no doubt about it,
Burkhard said, theyre fire traps. .. n camous
The fire inspector also criticized wooden p in
Calling them fire hazards he commented, I wouldn t want to sleep
recently completed a month survey of buildings on the
UF Ms findings were submitted to UF administrators rn the
report'has Submitted to Chief Deputy State Fire Marshall
Williard Knight.

When the
Lights Go Out Jyyv;
Weil
Buy your Drinks!%j)
tonight at the
aljCfi/YWIQ 1 N.W. 10 AVE.
*
Were also giving away Champagne!
Conlon do his thing!

Survey Shows Need
For Additional Buses

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Stuff Writer
During one week, 659 people
had to wait for a second bus
because of overcrowding.
If you were one of them, you
will probably be happy to know
two blue buses will now run
together during periods of
heaviest traffic as a result of a
bus survey conducted by Parking
and Traffic Coordinator Lee
Burrows.
Eight people were employed,
one assigned to each bus.
Another result of the survey
may be either charging to ride
the buses, or issuing passes next
year, according to Burrows.
During the survey week,
approximately 35,000
passengers boarded the buses.
The peak peroid of passenger
demand is from 7:30 a.m.-8 a.m.
Passenger loads also increase
about 20 minutes before each
class period, Burrows said.
It appear, the bus system
gets its overloading factor in the
morning hours from the
dormitory areas along
North-South Drive and in the
afternoon from the Plaza of the
Americas, Burrows said.
The surveyors said they felt
the drivers were competent and
their relationship with the
passengers was good.
The recommendations most
often made by the passengers
were:
Bus routes should be
changed to include Norman Hall
The buses, if possible,
should be scheduled in order not

t
L I M II W
r*4 I m /v
sane Mi just
Cant wear 'afro"
0

to create overloading during
peak periods.
The system should be
devised so all of those riding will
share in the cost of operation,
and not just those who buy
decals.
The buses are in operation
from 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
The blue buses, originating
from the bus terminal lot, run
every four minutes.
The orange A buses, also
originating at the bus terminal
lot, run every eight minutes.
The orange B buses
originate from the law school.
They run every 15 minutes until
12:30. From 12:30 5:30 p.m
they only run every 30 minutes.
Accent Essays
Still Accepted
Essays are still being accepted
for the Accent 7O essay contest,
and with SIOO in prizes waiting
to be awarded for the best
entries.
The essays should be written
on some aspect of the Accent
theme, which is Tomorrow in
Perspective. Three sub-themes
planned for Accent week are
transportation of tomorrow,
environmental control and city
planning.
The contest deadline is Nov.
25. All entries may be submitted
to the Activities Desk on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
GATOR ADS SELL



Turnout Light At Reapportionment Meeting

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
A sparse turnout of 50-75 faculty members met
in University Auditorium Wednesday afternoon to
air complaints cm the proposed reapportionment of
the University Senate.
The purpose of the general assembly meeting
was to furnish information to the entire faculty so
they will be better able to express an informed
opinion when the revisions are brought before the
senate on Nov. 25 for a vote, UF President Stephen
C. OConnell told the group.
They asked the senates constitution committee
questions about the need for student members on
the senate and administrative council (ex officio)
members, the large size of the senate, and the lade
of representation of non-resident faculty.
The proposed revisions to the UF constitution
provide for drastic changes in the senate, replacing
the faculty-representative senate with a university
wide senate.

I 1
| Why Not Try Europe j
| For Summer Jobs j
$ S
j; If the idea of that same old job in your hometown this j:
: summer doesnt excite you, how about considering Europe? :j:
& UFs local committee of AIESEC, an international
organization of business and economic students is arranging an |jj
§ exchange program between American students who want to &
g work abroad and foreign students desiring employment in the J
g United States. §
§ Tonight at 7:30 pjn. in Room 150 Cos the Reitz Union |
|j AIESEC will explain the program which offers job possibilities |
§ in 47 member countries. $
g Jim Barks, president, worked in a department store in Leeds, $
:*j England in the summer of 1968 under AIESEC auspices. He will |
i"" be available for questions. s
Before AIESEC can arrange a position overseas, a student s
must become a member of the organization and have completed |
§ at least nine hours of economics or business courses. S
ijt An American student must secure a job for the summer for a
j-: foreign student. |
$ Applicants can request either job-type or country preference. |
|
X v
coxc*xx
Holland
Lauded
By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Staff Writer
A resolution commending
U.S. Senator Spessard Holland
for his many years of
leadership was passed
unanimously by the Student
Senate Tuesday night.
Holland, a Democrat and the
senior senator from the State of
Florida, announced recently that
he would not run for re-election.
He is 77.
The Senate also approved on
the first reading the spending of
$20,000 for four handball courts
and a water fountain behind
Norman Hall and another water
fountain on Broward Field.
A swimming pool and
pump-house scheduled to be
built on Broward will not be
moved however. The Norman
Courts will take about 60 days
to complete. They will not be
lighted. Final approval of the
expenditures is expected at next
weeks meeting.
The group also appointed a
special committee to investigate
the apportionment of the senate.'
Majority Leader Sam Pooie, who
is author of the bill, said he felt
the senate was too large and
some legislators were
representing two constituencies.
Reports from the election
study and the football seating
committees were postponed
until the senators finished their
studies.

FEW COMPLAINTS ABOUT OF SENATE REVISIONS

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One revision provides for 10 voting student
members. There are now five non-voting student
members and Student Government had asked the
senate that these five members be given a vote.
Several faculty members showed opposition to.
this revision, as did Leonard Powers, a law professor
and member of the committee.
I think it is wrong as a matter of principle, he
said. One vote has power, even though you may
say only 10 votes is not representative.
The committees stand cm the revision was that
the student members would be more likely to take
part seriously in the senate if they were given a
voice in decisions.
The manner in which the student representatives
are chosen will be left up to SG.
Charles Browning of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) presented a statement
from the IFAS calling the committees failure to
provide representation for non-resident instructors a
very undemocratic action.
The committee is proposing action that will

seminole
senior
pictures
6-9 p P m NOV. 17-20
GREEK MAKE-UP
NOV. 21 9-12,1-5, 6-9
Sign up in Seminole office
or call 392-1687 12 pm-spm

Thunday,Novombar 20.1969. Tho Florida Alligator.

ignore that part of the faculty not on the campus,
Browning said.
The colleges most affected by this revision are the
College of Engineering, Genesy's program, the IFAS
agriculture extension program and the College of
Medicine.
Charles F. Eno, chairman of the revision
committee, tokl the faculty members no provisions
were made for alternate senators, because the size of
the senate (200-250 members) offsets any absences.
Under the revisions, a quorum consists of 75
members.
O'Connell has the power to appoint six members
to the senate under the proposed revisions and no
stipulations were placed on what group the
members would represent.
Several faculty members expressed concern that
the president could appoint alumni or even the
governor.
The committee began work on the revisions in
January and they were first circulated to the senate
in June.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/

Gifted Children Shouldnt Be Discouraged

By SUSAN GREENBERG
Alligator Correspondent
Parents and teachers must
learn not to stifle a childs
curiosity, according to the
president of a group which
strives to improve educational
programs for giften children.
Dr. William Rogge, director of
the national Association for the
Gifted, met with local members
Sunday in the Reitz Union and
left the message, teaching is
helping a youngster explore his
physical environment
including relationships with
those around him.
Usually, when a child begins
exploring his environment, he is
stopped by too many donts
dont bother me now, dont
touch, dont do that...
The message the child has is
dont learn, Rogge said. What
motivation that the child did

ACADEMICS
1 news and views
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF Graduate Fellowship student and president of the student
branch of the Association for Childhood Education at UF, Barbara
Segal, was recently appointed a student representative to the Florida
AC.E. International for the State of Florida.
Two scientists in the UF Visual Sciences Laboratory, Dr. Nathan W.
Perry and Dr. Donald G. Childers have received a renewal of National
Institute of Health grants totaling $233,836. Both grants permit
continuation of research in brain and vision function.
Dr. Lester R. Dragstedt of the UF College of Medicine was recently
honored when his portrait was unveiled at the University of Chicagos
School of Medicine. Dragstedt attended the ceremonies recognizing
his more than 50 years of outstanding contributions to medicine.
A symposium on computer and information science is scheduled
for the Americana Hotel on Miami Beach, Dec. 18-20. UF Professor
Julius T. Tou, the symposium chairman says the theme of the
symposium will be Software Engineering.
Dr. Robert Gaither, chairman of the Department of Mechanical
Engineering announced the receipt of a grant totaling $5,000 from the
Ford Motor Company. Gaither said the purpose of the grant is to try
to encourage engineering programs which seem more in tune with the
times.
Dr. Max R. Langham has returned to the UF Department of
Agricultural Economics after spending a year at the University of
Minnesota on a faculty development leave.
The UF Department of Agricultural Economics has been awarded a
grant for $62,263 from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of
Water Resources Research. The federal funds will be matched by a
like amount from state sources.
Drop out Os
college.
(For a late study break at Capt. Wishbone's.)
Free Capt. Wishbone
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have, we kill.
Rogge, professor at the
University of Illinois, said since a
mother is the first important
influence in a childs life,
educators should start working
with mothers to expand
childrens learning motivation.
For example, Rogge said,
why not let a child have a room
to do whatever he wants, to add
to it, to expand it, or leave it a
mess if he wants? Maybe he can
have one place where he has his
own set of rules a different set
of relationships than you
(parent) have. If he wants to
haul rocks in, to dump paint in
the middle of the floor, he can.
Rogge stressed that this
would create an environment in
which a child can be curious and
explore. It would encourage and
motivate learning behavior.
Teachers must also be aware

ROGGE TELLS LOCAL GROUP

of creating a maximum learning
environment, Rogge said. He
suggested teachers leam how to
step out of their teacher roles
and become part of the class.
A teacher should develop the
ability to make a child feel
comfortable and welcome in
exploring the adult world,
Rogge said.
Rogge, who developed the
Illinois Plan for gifted children,
said the maximum learning
environment concept is
important not only for gifted
children those who have a
high potential to learn faster
but for encouraging all children
to learn.
He said the Illinois Plan
started researching learning
behavior but turned to studying
methods of teaching and teacher
behavior. The Illinois Plan
became an adult education

Placement
Service Offered
Re-Con, a no-cost
computerized job placement
service, is being introduced
currently to UF students.
The service matches
qualifications to specifications
of companies.
Its advantages include
exposure to companies and
institutions not able to recruit
on campus and allowances for
in-depth interviews.
At least 150 top universities
have been contacted for
participation in the program by
Re-Con Headquarters in New
York.
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GATOR
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program since parents an
teachers behavior is more
important in influencing
children.
Changing teachers classroom
personalities, Rogge said,
would change teachers concepts
of themselves, their emotional
feelings about certain groups
(black students and minority

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groups), and finally their
behavior in the classrooms.
Some models of adult
education Rogge suggested are
having teachers visit students
homes, cooperative nurseries
where parents help teach and
expanded PTA programs to help
parents understand their
childrens learning behavior.



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DOUG CASE
SOMETIMES YOU NEED A FRIEND
... and no one is there
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DOUG CASE
THE "BEFRIENDERS"
... a "person-to-person" organization

UF 'Befrienders Mobilize
Crackdown On Loneliness
The institution of friendship
may have suffered under
the weight of computers
and forms-in-triplicate,
but it isnt dead at UF.

DOUG

By DEE DEE HORN
Ashtint Features Editor
Alone. . 105 t... frightened.
You wander, seeking,
reaching, trying to tocommunicate.
communicate. tocommunicate.
But there's no one to listen.
And there seems to be no
escape from the bitter loneliness.
Then someone suggests the
Befrienders.
Befrienders is a student
organization created to help
lonely students. No files are
kept, no names are written
down. The Befriender must be
available whenever hes needed.
It is not a counseling service,
nor is it a crisis-prevention
society.
"It is person-to-person
caring. . 1 et-me-offer-you-my
-hand friendship, said Barbara
Eisenstadt, student co-ordinator.
Chaplains, resident assistants,
doctors, and members of the
University Counseling Service
are the Befrienders prime
sources for locating lonely
students.
If a student needs individual
attention his counselor cant
provide, he is told about
Befrienders. Barbara is then
contacted to match up a
Befriender with that student.
My job is bringing together
people getting to know each
Befriender as an individual so I
can match him up with someone
hed probably become friends
with in everyday life, Barbara
said.
The Befriender is given the
name and telephone number of
the student. He is not given any
background on the student's
personal life or problems. 1
The purpose is to provide a
relationship between two
students, Ptof. William Kline,
faculty advisor said.
They do what any two
friends do together, whether
that means bowling, drinking,
eating, going to classes together,
or just shooting the bull, Dr.
Art Larson of the Mental Health
department and one of the
Befrienders' founders, said.
"These students are not
patients, he emphasized. They
are just students who have not
been able to find a friend or
someone who cares on campus.
The organization trys to f
remain as jupstrt|ctured as j
possible because every student is
different and must be dealt with
a different way.
A Befriender is not trying to
be a therapist, Kline said. He
is just trying to be a friend.
The sad part of the lack of
structure is that we lose
continuity. It takes much of the
quarter to get started.
He added that. .funds. .to

support us must be planned in
advance. We need money.
The prime groups of students
among which loneliness is
prevalent are international
student wives, freshmen, and
those students sitting in front
of the television set on a Friday
or Saturday night, Larson said.
They are students who want to
be involved but can't, or don't
know how to push themselves
into the first true relationship
with other students.
Befrienders have been in
existence for almost three years,
Kline said, but there are always
people to help.
Sometimes Befrienders think
they have benefited more than
the students they meet.
I think the group has helped
me more than it has helped the
other people, William Slobodkin,
4EG, said. I think in the time
Ive been with the group I've
learned what goes into the
making of a friendship, and how
to maintain a good one as well as
learning to be sincere to another
human being.
"This generation is so
c 001... too cool. Maybe if they
weren't so cool, they'd find
they'd enjoy each other's
company, he said.
Another Befriender joined
because she had belonged to a
suicide prevention group at
Berkeley.
I found potential in myself
that I never knew I had the
ability to be completely honest
with another person.
Befrienders hold meetings
when they feel theyre
necessary. They discuss the

'This generation
is so c 001...
too cool.
Maybe if they
werent so cool
J tllflPPPfcw
eacb others
company.
4 *.< t'l't-'i \ < s v.' j'i C; I !'.
.-* jr.rr at v*p* ..****

Thursday, N oven .bar 20,1969, The Florida Alligator,

relationships they are building
up with their own new friend
(never mentioning any names)
and explore their own
friendships within the group.
Our meetings* are
bring-y our*own-dinner
get-togethers not meeting? in
the formalized sense of the
word. All kinds of people just
rapping about friendship and the
problems of being human* in
this automized university
environment,** Miss Easenstadt
said.
Because believe it or not
she added, There still are lots
of people concerned with the
simple, basic, beautiful act of
friendship.
The meetings sometimes turn
into a critical analysis of the
student*s own personality.
Your personal feelings come
out at the meetings, Slobodkin
said. You learn how you come
across to others and you can
modify your own personality
quirks right there because
commentary is all on a friendly
basis.
Befrienders need no
qualifications other than a
genuine desire to offer
friendship to another student.
Most of the group are veteran
Befrienders, or those who heard
of the organization by
word-of-mouth.
They all vary from
sophomores to grads, and most
of UFs colleges are represented.
Alone. . 105 t... frightened.
You wander, seeking,
reaching... but now there*s a
Befriender waiting with an
outstretched hand.

Page 5



>,Th* Florida

Page 6

Draft Bill Gets Nod

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Senate gave final congressional
approval Wednesday to President
Nixons draft lottery bill.
The measure was rushed to
the floor and passed by voice
vote after a perfunctory debate.
It had already been passed by
the House and now will go to
Nixon for his signature.
The measure will pave the

Governor Foils McQueen Offer

JACKSONVILLE (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk got the jump on actor
Steve McQueen Wednesday and personally removed two
incorrigible youths from the adult state prison reception center.
Kirk traveled to Lake Butler near here and removed Richard Copas,
15, and Donald Douglas, 14, who have lengthy records including
truancy, petty larceny and breaking and entering.
Theyll stay with me until I can get them to the youth center at
Marianna, said Kirk, who had the boys when he returned to
Jacksonville to tour an economic opportunity center.
All right, kids, stay with me, Kirk boomed at one point as the
boys strayed a few feet from his side. What did I tell you? Stay with
me.
McQueen got into the picture last week when he heard that the
boys were being detained in an adult institution. He offered to
provide a home or pick up the expenses to transfer the boys to a
California reform school.
Circuit Court Judge D.C. Smith had recommended that the youths

Distribution Points Named
For A&S Winter Directory

The new Arts and Sciences
course and teacher directory has
just arrived and is being
distributed at the following
department offices for
chemistry, Leigh Hall, biology,
Flint Hall, history and political
science, Peabody Hall,

news
CENTERS Cultural and educational centers for black and
international FSU students have been established, administrative
sources announced Wednesday.
The center for international students will be operational in about
two weeks. The black student center is expected to be operational by
the first of next year.
Stated objectives of the centers as well as their organizational
set-ups are in final planning stages and will be announced later in the
week.
VETO Canter Brown, student body president, vetoed senate bill
15 which limits house and off-campus councils to penalties of verbal
reprimand Wednesday and called for a five-member panel to examine
the council and see what changes if any are necessary.
Brown said he vetoed the bill because it would limit the judiciary to
verbal reprimand. He said, This would effectively strip the house and
off-campus councils of any authority which would not seem a
judicious move.
THE NOW SOUNDS OF
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM TIL
ALIBI
Lounge -C
NWMthST&UNIV.AVE.

way for selection of 19-year-olds
first, exposing each eligible man
to the draft for only one year.
At present, a man can be
exposed to the draft for as long
as six years.
The bill itself changes only
one line of the Selective Service
Act repealing a provision that
prevented the President from
choosing draftees by lot.

anthropology and foreign
languages, ASB, University
College office, Little Hall, and
three copies in 113 Anderson,
Arts and Sciences office.
The directory lists all courses,
sections and instructors for the
entire college for winter quarter.

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be put in a home for juvenile first offenders but correctional officials
assigned them to separate cells in the adult reception center. Their
move to the Marianna juvenile institution was to have been discussed
at a Dec. 10 Pardon and Parole meeting.
State officials had said there was little chance that McQueen s offer
would be accepted. McQueen, who spent much of his boyhood in
reform schools, had read of the boys plight in the newspapers.
A state official said he met Kirk early this morning and was told,
Were going to Lake Butler and Im going to get those kids out.
The boys, classified as incorrigible by the St. Lude County
juvenile court, face three years of confinement on the breaking and
entering charges.
The two boys, dressed in blue T-shirts, prison pants with a white
stripe and battered work boots, were very quiet and looked tired.
Reporters tried to talk to young Copas, who said he was surprised
to be out and who said yes sir when asked if he was glad to be out
of the adult prison system. The questioning was halted by Kirk.

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' 4 **



2 More For,
1 Against In
Friday's Vote

SHOWDOWN VOTE FRIDAY
Ten Undecided On Haynsworfrh

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court nomination of
Judge Clement F. Haynsworth
Jr. picked up two more Senate
votes Wednesday, but Sen. John
J. Williams, R-Del., a stickler for
high ethical standards in
government, said he would vote
against the confirmations.
Williams decision, expected
to carry considerable weight
with those senators still
undecided, was disappointing to
the White House.
But it was offset by pledges of
support from Sen. J. Caleb
Boggs, Williams Republican
Delaware colleague, and Sen.
Ted Stevens, R-Alaska.
With the 1 pjn. EST Friday
showdown vote less than 48
hours away, there were only 10
senators still undeclared on
President Nixons nomination of
the Greenville, S.C., federal
Patrol Planning
'Total Effort 1
Tallahassee (upi)
Predicting that 37 people will
die in Florida traffic accidents
over Thanksgiving, the state
patrol announced Wednesday it
will use unmarked cars, radar,
vascar, airplanes and every
available trooper.
Only a total effort can stop
deaths during the 102-hour
holiday period, according to
Col. Reid Clifton.
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WASHINGTON (UPI) Sens.
J. Caleb Boggs, R-Del., and Ted
Stevens, R-Alaska, came out
Wednesday in favor of Clement
F. Haynsworths Supreme Court
nomination but Sen. John J.
Williams, R-Del., announced he
would vote against confirmation.
As more of the uncommitted
senators announced their
intentions two days before the
Senate vote on the controversial
nomination, a UPI survey
showed this line-up: publicly or
privately for Haynsworth, 43;
publicly or privately against, 47;

appeals court judge to succeed
former Associate Justice Abe
Fortas.
According to the UPI poll, 47
senators were against
confirmation and 42 for
confirmation.
Barring switches from the
committed lists, opponents of
the nominee have to pick up
four of the 10 senators still

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undeclared, 10.
Boggs broke with his
Delaware colleague, Williams, in
announcing support for
Haynsworth. He said the
nominees endorsement by the
American Bar Association was a
major factor in his decision.
Williams said he decided to
vote against confirmation on
ethical grounds. He said he felt
confirmation would be
tantamount to approving
off-the-bench financial dealings
by Haynsworth that he
considered questionable.

uncommitted to reject the
nomination.
Williams has become known
as the strongest Senate voice for
demanding high rectitude of
government officials. He noted
in a Senate speech that the
opposition to Haynsworth
centered on two points: his
conservative philosophy and his
off-the-bench financial activities.

U.S. Combat Casualties
Highest In 2 Months
SAIGON (UPI) American combat casualties have scored since the
Communists launched their winter campaign 17 days ago and last
week were the highest in two months, allied military sources said
Wednesday.
The sources said the weekly casualty report to be issued Thursday
will show that the number of Americans killed last week was the
highest since 135 died in action the week ended Sept. 20.
Dating the start of the winter campaign Nov. 2, the day before
President Nixons Vietnam policy speech, the sources said Communist
and South Vietnamese losses also had increased sharply during the
first two weeks of the offensive.
They said 5331 Communists and 674 South Vietnamese had been
killed during the two-week period ended last Saturday.
The exact number of American losses was not disclosed, pending
the release of the official report.
Fighting along the Cambodian border northeast and northwest of
Saigon and heavy action below the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) last
week pushed American casualties higher, the sources said.
In the previous seven weeks, the weekly number of American
combat dead exceeded 100 only once.
South Vietnamese military spokesmen said Wednesday they are
expecting a peak soon in the winter campaign, possibly centered in
Saigon and other urban areas.
They said a captured Communist document ordered Viet Cong in
Saigon to appeal to the people to overthrow the government, using
popular discontent with the governments recent moves to tighten the
economy and the antiwar demonstrations in the United States as
springboards.
Military spokesmen reported only scattered fighting throughout
South Vietnam Tuesday.

Thuriifau OH IQAQ Th* Clmmla A llinatnr
v i wifiWf ipuiifiiiuW' zu r Afo9, inm rwniii Miiifiiiiif

Page 7



!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20,1969

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

The New Me: An American
Agent Os Peace Abroad

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following article is reprinted
from the Ankara Daily News of
Monday, Nov. 10,1969.)
By JOE TORCHIA
Peace Corps Volunteer
Last week there were two
articles in the Daily News about
the Peace Corps.
The one on the front page
announced that several Peace
Corps volunteers are planning a
second protest against the
Vietnam war, against American
Foreign policy. The one on page
two told about a Turkish
magazine which labeled Peace
Corps volunteers as spies, as
members of the CIA, as trouble
which was given to us by
American imperialism.
On page one, the Peace Corps
is condemning American Foreign
policy; on page two it is
supporting it j even spying for it.
The other day someone asked
me if I was in the Peace Corps
and I said yes. Then he asked me
why and I said because I want to
be, because Im learning a lot.
Then he asked me if I was
helping anybody and 1 said I
dont know. Then he asked me if
I supported the Vietnam war
and I said no. Then he asked me
how my country could sponsor
war and peace at the same time
and I I started to say
something but I stopped. I
opened my mouth then I closed
it. I looked at him for a long
time, then I walked away.
During my four years in the
university I never partook in a
protest or public demonstration.
I often agreed with the
protestors but I never felt
committed enough to become
involved. I had to work to pay
for my education, I had to
study.
Then I left America. I came to
Turkey as a Peace Corps
volunteer because I wanted to
become involved in another
culture, learn another language,
discover another way of life. I
wanted to be an individual in
another culture, to forget
America and discover another
part of the world.

- 'd^*'
vSHV ftflrmrnin

Â¥-
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

I have never felt more like an
American than I do now.
By leaving America I became
more of an American, I became
a representative of America. I
went to a single site where I was
the only English-speaker because
I wanted to learn about the
Turks. Then 1 found out the
Turks wanted to learn about me.
Suddenly I realized the
gravity of my position and I
looked at myself as if it were the
first time. Suddenly words
became very precious and I had
to choose them very carefully. I
did my best to be myself but
that was difficult because I was
discovering a new self.
And Im still discovering a
new me it's a me-as-a-foreigner,
a me-as-a-Peace-Corps-volunteer,
and yet it's a me-as-an me-as-anindividual.
individual. me-as-anindividual.
I, Me, Joe-Torchia-The-Peace-
Corps-Volunteer thinks the
Vietnam war is the most useless,
wasted, unfortunate, pathetic,
terrifying war that has ever been
fought. Last year a high school
friend went to Vietnam to be
mortared to death. Thats what
the letter told his mother -a
mortar shell exploded and
boom! so did my friend. He had
never left home, had hardly ever
left Pennsylvania, then suddenly
he found himself in some jungle
with a St. Christopher medal
around his neck and a gun in his
hand. Who did he die for? His
country?
I tried to write his mother; I
reconstructed the letter a dozen
times; I tried to say I was sorry,
and I was sorry but I was also
furious and disgusted and my
hands were trembling and I felt
so so frustrated, so useless. I
couldnt write to her.
Now 1 realize how important
it is to be an American,
especially an American abroad.
Now I know how important it is
to be an agent of Peace -a
Peace Corps volunteer. Now I
realize more than ever how
much I need to speak out how
much I-as-an-American need to
shout, to speak, to argue, to
scream, to yell stop! stop! damn
it, stop it!
Mr. John Corev. Peace Corns

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

Director in Turkey, told the
protestors: I think I understand
your very deep feelings and your
wish to express them. Im trying
to.
He tried to set up
communication with the
Ambassador so, in the event of
another protest, there would at
least be understanding.
The Ambassador refuses to
see us. For two weeks weve
been trying. One day we tried
five times. He wont even talk to
us on the telephone.
During the last protest
Ambassador Handley closed two
of the three entrances to
embassy property and would not
admit more than 30 protestors.
Reports say this time he is
considering closing the grounds
altogether.
This to ask you: Please, Mr.
Ambassador dont close those
gates.
We want a peaceful
demonstration. Were protesting
against violence and we dont
want to be locked out on
Ataturk Boulevard where there
could be trouble with Turkish
police. We want to stand in front
of the embassy for one hour
with one sign and then go home.
We want to feel like were doing
something.

*::... Sati re
UC In The Sky
$ # §
: |:|
yAv.v:wv;w;*K*w:.w.K.;. ; x .xo>:o:. W oK.>M.K.;* R6Q C TOW ci X

It often seems that the
powers that be in University
College adopt an attitude much
like one we night expect from
the Almighty. Suppose the
Almighty took up the methods
of University College.
We find ourselves at the gates
of heaven, a doorway really. It is
a glass doorway with a sign
taped upon it saying, Take a
number and be seated.
Lo and behold, its the UFs
Dean Doggie, headed for his
Great Final Examination in the
I Sky.
The stately gentleman strides
up to one of the receptionists
and says something which is
inaudible from our position.
Why certainly, exclaims the
Secretary, tenured Florida
faculty should never have to
wait again. Step right this way.
We follow Dean Doggie past
several banks of secretaries to a
. door, marked, Tfce pjtecutive
Almighty.

EDUQRIM 1
Write Our
Own History
The late R. H. Towney told a British audience in 1949;
Each generation must write history for itself, and draw
its own deductions from that already written, not because
the conclusions of its predecessors are untrue, but for a
practical reason.
Different answers are required, because different
questions are asked. Standing at a new point on the road, it
finds that fresh ranges of the landscape come into view,
whose unfamiliar intricacies demand an amplification of
traditional charts.
Towney was not talking about the American political
process, but his rhetoric is applicable. The past two or three
years have revealed uncharted terrain in the thrust for
political and social change.
Some, like the Weatherman faction of SDS, release their
desperation by shattering shop window glass on the streets
of Chicago or Washington. Many more equally desperate
citizens might do similarly but for their scruples against
violence.
Sen. Eugene McCarthy led a movement of so-called
participatory politics, which McCarthy describes in The
Year of the People, his latest book, as new politics in
every respect: the new kind of people who were involved;
the new ways that were opened for raising a challenge; and
new in the substance of the challenge itself.
Different questions were being asked, questions that the
two major political parties failed to comprehend, much less
to answer.
The nation is ripe for the creation of another major
political party.
Promised reforms of the Democratic Party have not yet
come; and the New Democratic Coalition seems to be falling
apart.
The public support that Prof. Hubert Humphrey
bestowed on President Nixon and his Vietnam policy served
only to illuminate the silhouette of our political party
system as not two but one in reality.
Although Humphrey supported Nixon ostensibly so as
not to make Vietnam a partisan issue, his move may do
more to destroy the major political parties than to protect
them.
And the victoiy of a system that pits the personality of
one professional politician against another while studiously
avoiding discussion of the divisive issues promises merely to
promote political and social instability.

The door opens, and we see a
large mahogany desk, free of
papers and very shiny. An
elderly gentleman looks up,
breaks a wide smile (showing a
perfect set of teeth) and savs
Hi, Im Steve.
How do you do, sir.
Please be seated, be
comfortable, the Almighty
sayd. Youve made a fine
choice. Many of your
contemporaries have gone into
state government and had to
make other arrangements.
The Almighty goes on, Our
institution is in some ways like
yxiurs. You see, we have
admission requirements, too.
Dean Doggie nods.
Because of the many people
we handle, we just dont have
time to review an entire lifetime,
bo we have what we call Progs.
or you, Mr. Doggie, we have
picked at random 40 one-minute
segments from your life, which
are representative, we hope, of

your entire earthly existence.
Our computer has produced
a graph of how these
representative minutes were
used.
You spent nine minutes
sleeping.
Two minutes were devoted
to yelling at your wife.
Another minute went to
scratching and sneezing.
A final minute you devoted
to kicking a Cocker Spaniel.
To give you an idea what
this means, according to our
standard chart, that minute
kicking the Spaniel means you
I have kicked 1 (logs for
consecutive years, says the
Almighty.
The Almighty pauses
dramatically, brushing lint from
his obviously expensive smt smtThis
This smtThis means, Im afraid
Oh no, cries Doggie, You
dont mean!
Yes, says ( the Lord, You
go back to University College.



Choir Voted In Favor Os Singing

MR. EDITOR:
As a member of the
University Choir, I feel I must
take this opportunity to
straighten out Mr. Ron Argentati
(Choir Forced Into Veterans
Ceremony, November 18) on a
few points. In particular, I
would like to point out the
disservice he did to our director,
Dr. Elwood Keister.
It seems that Mr. Argentati
somehow got the impression
that Dr. Keister forced his
politically biased and dictatorial
will on certain members of the
choir in committing us to sing at
UFs annual Veterans Day
ceremony.
The fact is that the choir
followed its usual procedure in

Our System Is Democracy

MR. EDITOR:
The vociferous majority of
the University Choir wishes to
explain to Mr. Argentati how a
democracy works.
The choir is composed of a
director and sixty-three
students, the function of the
director: to provide a workshop
for the performance and study
of repertoire in the choral field.
Business operations of the
choir are conducted by its
executive committee, not the
director. Questions concerning
our performance at a
non-scheduled event are brought
before the entire choir for their
approval.
We committed ourselves by a
majority (60-3) vote to perform
at the Veterans Day ceremony.
New Oath
MR. EDITOR:
The faculty has been asked to
execute revised revised loyalty
oaths. However there are
currently court challenges to
even this form of the oath. Thus
the spectre of executing oaths
revised to the third degree has
been raised. Since the degree of
such possible revisions is
theoretically unbounded, in
order to minimize future faculty
inconvenience, the following
universal oath is hereby
proposed:
I, the above-named, aT
citizen of the State of 1
Florida and the United |
States of America, and being |
employed by or an officer I
of the University of Florida I
and a recipient of I
funds as such employee or
officer, do hereby solemnly
either swear or affirm that I
will believe whatsoever is
required, by law or
regulation, of me to believe
in order to maintain my
status as a recipient of
public funds. Furthermore, I
agree to alter my beliefs as 1
may be required to conform I
I with future changes in laws I
I or regulations or with future I
j court decisions.
A CONCERNED PROFESSOR

1111111111111 l

Mr. Argentati somehow got the impression that Dr.
Keister forced his politically biased and dictatorial will on
certain members of the choir in committing us to sing at
UFs annual Veteran s day ceremony. The fact is that the
choir followed its usual procedure . it put the issue to a
vote.

regards to singing engagements
it put the issue to a vote. On
Monday, November 10, Dr.
Keister presented us with a
choice of whether or not we
should sing the next day at the
ceremony.
After considerable discussion
by the choir of both sides of the
issue, the consensus was that our

It was our decision, Not Dr.
Keisters.
The choir, as a group,
expresses no political opinions.
We provide a program of cultural
and entertaining music for the
students at UF and the

UC Calls Them Student Advisors, But...

MR. EDITOR:
This universitys advisement
system is totally inadequate and
is administered in a blatantly
incompetent manner. Those who
have the job of advising students
and aiding them in preparing
their programs for graduation
have little knowledge of the
universitys rules and
requirements.
Prior to registering for the
Winter Quarter I noticed in my
file that I needed two additional
credits in the physical sciences
to graduate from the College of
Arts and Sciences. However,
while in UC I completed all
science requirements necessary
to be admitted to the upper
division. I had substituted the
final quarter of CBS for CPS. On
page 146 of the university
catalogue it states that such a
substitution is in keeping with
the rules.
Now I am told that I need
more credits in the physical
sciences. On page 193 of the
catalogue it states that a total of
eight hours is required in the
sciences for a degree. I have
completed six hours under the
University College system. In
addition, I have ten credits in
the biological sciences. However,
I find that I must take an
additional two credits in the
physical sciences which are
irrelevant to my major.
The point is that completion
of the UC requirements
presupposes that one will not
need any additional courses in
the sciences for graduation from
the College of Arts and Sciences.
While in the lower division I
was never informed that I would
need additional credits in the
sciences. Now I will have an
excess of science credits because
there is no course with only two
credits. My program would have
been better coordinated had I
been made aware of the
requirements by the so-called
advisors cognizant of the rules in
UC.
Clearly, all that an advisor is
worth in UC is the' ink of his
iT t .m } Ct' ** K

participation in the Veterans
Day observance was simply a
show of respect for those men
who have died fighting for our
country and not a political
gesture of any sort. In a show of
hands, the choir voted
overwhelmingly in favor or of
participating in the ceremony.
In fact, Mr. Argentati, there

state-wide public.
Mr. Argentatis criticism
should be aimed at our system
of democracy, not at one man.
ALANP. GRAHAM
President, University Choir

signature. There is no continuity
in the Universitys advisement
program nor an awareness of its
inadequacies. The villain is not
the administration per se, but
the professors and instructors
who lack any competence in
advising.

Jo/
informatoi ftp*.
r /
Sure I Can Tell You The Way Back To Your Dorm
Whats It Worth To You?

Counseling Center s Services
Are Psychological, Not Academic

MR EDITOR:
Your article on Friday 14
about the counseling center
included a picture of Dr.
Childers talking with a student.
Dr. Childers is a member of the
Comprehensive English
Department faculty of
University College.
He is not a psychologist and
has never been a member of the
Counseling Center staff. He has
frequently served as an academic
adviser an(F counselor to
numerous university students.
The functtoh of the

llllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll

awWMHti jlwwlwfcKfl.

were only two members of the
choir besides myself, who voted
against our singing the next day.
If this smacks of dictatorship in
any way, I would appreciate
having you explain it to me
sometime.
One more thing, Mr.
Argentati. Barry Goldwater did
not invent Veterans Day.
Veterans Day has been observed
in this country since 1954;
Armistice Day had previously
been celebrated on that date
since 1918. Last weeks
ceremony was neither the first
time our veterans have been
honored on this campus, nor the
first time the University Choir
has participated in that
observance.
Personally, I strongly resented
Mr. Goldwaters tactic of using a
pre-existing holiday as a vehicle
for expressing his political views.
For that reason I voted against
our singing on November 11.
However, I abided by the
majoritys decision and did sing
with the Choir on Veterans Day
because. Mr. Argentati, that is
how democracy works.
HOWARD SKILLINGTON, 2UC

This university must institute
a planned program of instruction
for professors and others so that
they can properly advise
students. They must become
aware of all rules and regulations
and degree requirements. In
short, they must also learn that

Counseling Center and of the
Counselors or advisers in
University College is frequently
confused and your picture is an
indication of this confusion.
The Counseling Center, is
essentially a psychological
services center that is available
to all students and their spouses.
It is not involved in the process

LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be witnheld only if writer shows just cause. The editor
reserves the to edit all letters for space. %
II l#>| !' ftij*) l "I .. l |, M II

There is no hope
for the complacent man

advising is a responsibility not to
be treated lightly.
In addition the university
should seriously consider
instituting an office of student
advisement to be run and
coordinated by upper division
and graduate
students who have been trained
in advising and are fully capable
of answering all questions
pertaining to the academic rules.
If we are to be a great
university, we cannot ignore
these problems. I am confident
that this university will deal
justly and decisively with the
advisement problem as with the
many others that now plague it.
Students are more than a
number or an advisement card.
They are people with needs and
hopes. Forthright action must be
taken not as a means to appease
unjust demands, but to alleviate
grave injustices.
If the university tries to solve
its problems it will be doing a
great service to society. Its
students will be more than
people sitting in classrooms;
they will become its allies in
building a better world.
BRUCE DAVID ALPER, 3AS

of helping students select
particular courses meeting the
requirements of a major, etc.
Instead, it offers the services
described in the article as well as
marital counseling and
encounter group consultation.
HARRY A. GRATER, JR.
Director

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20, 1969

The
Florida
Alligator

ON MAYAN ART
Kampen Lecture Monday

A lecture Refocusing A
Picture Os Mayan History by
Dr. Michael E. Kampen, Visiting
Assistant Professor of Art
History at UF, will be presented
at 8 pjm., Monday, November
24, in room 109 of Little Hall.
This illustrated lecture,
sponsored by the Department of
Art and the UF Center for Latin
American Studies, is the first of
three lectures on Mayan art to
be presented by Dr. Kampen.
These lectures will relate not
only to his courses in Latin
American art, but to the major
Mayan Art Exhibition scheduled
at the University Gallery in
February and March, 1970.
Dr. Kampen holds degrees in
Art History from the University
of Minnesota and Tulane
University. He received his Ph.D
Abortion Talk
Scheduled
The campus speakers series,
sponsored by the Reitz Union
will present a panel discussion
on the problem of abortion,
Nov. 24, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Union Lounge.
Entitled To Be Or Not To
Be the series is having three
speakers from different areas to
give their views on the
contemporary problem.
Rabbi Monson, director of
Hillel, Dr. Henry Blank, medical
law and Dr. Elizabeth Philp from
the infirmary staff will each
present a side of the abortion
problem.

I f Natural I
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I Natural Wonder Eye Makeup by Revlon 1
I Available at: I
I Campus Shops and Bookstore I

BIB: 'B : : BB : 'B '^HIB' ; KWK m

degree in Art History last May
from the University of
Pennsylvania where he worked
with Drs. Linton Satterthwaite,
Alfred Kidder and William Coe,
some of Americas leading
experts on Mayan culture.
Dr. Kampens particular

The Childrens Movie of the
Month, is being sponsored by
Maas Brothers in conjunction
with the Center Theatres.
Starting in December a series
of 4 motion pictures will run
until March. The films will be
shown on one Saturday each in
Dec. on the sixth, in Jan. on the
17th, in Feb. on the 21st, and in
March on the 14th.
There will be two
performances each, Saturday, at
10 a.m. and noon.
The four movies to be shown
are:
% From 20th Century Fox:
Smiley starring Ralph
Richardson, John McCallum,
Chips Rafferty and Colin
Petersen as Smiley.
From 20th Century Fox;_
The Sons Os Robin Hood
starring David Hedison, June
Laverick, David F rar and Marius
Goring.
From Warner Brothers:
Satellite in the Sky starring
Kieron Moore, Lois Maxwell and
Donald Wolfit.
From Warner Brothers:
The Boy and the Laughing
Dog starring Walter Brennan
and Phil Harris, Brandon de

Movies Here For Children

interest is die pre-Columbian art
of the Veracruz area of Mexico
and his doctoral dissertation
dealt with the sculpture on the
Great Pyramid.
This lecture is free and open
to all, and the public is cordially
invited to attend.

Wilde, Sidney Poitier, William
Hopper and Louis Beavers.
The Series will begin on Dec.
sixth with the showing of the
motion picture, Smiley.
Tickets are being sold at Maas
Brothers and may be purchased
by subscription by mail order or
Fy telephone for $2.50.

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? start saving your S&HGreen Stamps now, come c /*
V 1 "jfro gifts money can buy. (And you won't need the money!) I
... SWIFTS PREMIUM BONELESS
PRICES EFFECTIVE
THRU WEDNESDAY A
NOVEMBER 26, 1969. f
JBb\ tMw
ipLjlif si
JSa
pound plus 100 sxtra SAH J ll *""**'
e%||* ISI'SSn aValTipS I Boneless Conned Ham |
C wiin coupon! | 1. ,,,. |
' _____ XAAAABAP^ftattaftft^hatt^fifinftftftnftaaaar,

EXTRA pF*^|
>
Assorted Flavors
Pillsbury Cake Mixes
three reg. pkgs. $1
6. |hrlrM,Nn.U.l*W) J j
EXTRA PP* s *!
iWGreenStampsPy
WITH mil COUPON AMD PWRCMAtf OF HKiitfHl
Wishbone Italian
Salad Dressing
16-ex. bet. 69c
7 (IxpirM W.d Nav. M. I***) ,;
M. EXTRA P SSBB^Sf
dWGiwnStampslPJ
| Mac Leans
| Tooth Paste
| 6.75-oz. tube 79c
| 12. (Ixpira. Wad. Nn. *, 1949) £
xeeeeeeftft^aftfteeeeliiuuunni>eeeeex

EXTRA
Ell
JA J ; I
Cosmetic Puffs
260-ct. pkg. 69c ; |
|> 5. (Ixpira* Wad.. N. 19, 19*9) | |
PI
(Planter's |
Mixed Nuts j!
13V2-OX. can 89c
; wff* *. % Vj
EXTRA
py
iAsst. Flavors, Village |
Inn Seasoned Rice |
reg. pkg. 39c |
s 13 (Kxplrts Wed 4 Nav. 26, 1669) 11

EXTRA iP^
EPelident
Tablets
40-ct. pkg. 98c
8. (ix,jr*. Wad., Nav. a*. 1949)
p]
Publix Corn Oil
Margarine j
1-lb. ctn. 39c j
9. |itl|^GreenStampsPl
Wizard Asst. j
Air Fresheners j
9-oz. can 59c j
I 14. (Ixpira* Wad. Nw. a*. 1949)

PH
[Booth's Frozen |
Lobster Toils |
8-ox. pkg. $1.79 |
3. (Kxpir*. WW. Nn. 14, 1666)
ijifll^GreenStamps
1 Howard Johnson's Chicken if
or Shrimp Croquettes J|
12-oz.pkg. 69c < ,||
l> 10.' W<4.. Nv. 26. 1666) KjneeftennkAeeoeepoebooftetutn nns ftnnftnexx
p||
INestle's Choc., Buttersc. or 11
Milk Chocolate Morsels 1;
two 6-oz. pkg*. 62c ||!
1 5. (Ixlm WMI Nv. 16, 1666)
ezft>em>emuuuuu>ezbeeeeeftneeoftftftftnA

Thursday, November 20. 1969. The Florida Alligator,

W^.6WW6666I6IWWWSI^
S
Freezer Queen Gravy
A Sliced Turkey
two pound pkg. $1.39
3* (Ixplrx. W, N*v. 16. 16*6)
;
PI
Swift's Cornish I
[ Gome Hens I
\ 1 Wlb. pkg. 79c |
Uxplrxt W6..N*. 6*. 1666) <8
ninnnnn n no*
Pi
Nestle's
Chocolate Morsels
12-oz. pkg. 59c
I 16. (Ixpiras W*. Nv. 16.1666)

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20, 1969

< tHFIXIN§A-P!ENTY^
| Liverwvrst .*,.99* j 'DOOp-BdSl^d 1
j ^\w^z\&i*dhim
M or *H v -nr
A !*<>< Treat, froth Standard A a MM V HR §
/( 2 *"'494]j|| r=~~sSg~" s T ij^llirKMlS
j jj"j£jj|jj aCO n "T9* I sZZ^AcSJ
A >w ** t , a -a= | kd Daisies . *1" |
Chuck Steaks 79 | Beef Liver 69* | gpSMpSgy^,; MHm|
Be* Dams* TO | Polish Sausage ,V,' 79* j 1 ,jfe' ~^-JKI
rVV ;pKwll9T ib. m m |
Swift's Premium leader Seeeless A S # ek S S 9 A
Imperial Roast ... ,99 c J vc9* J
Beef Roast .*1" E==*!S7*--.t "
toHr M .>.. M J Roll Sausage .......* 69* 1 / V|^W l Aj
Short KIDS 1k.59 f Sausage Patties ...!£ 69* f



. .... H ' 4RS| i£at/KUBBKBBSSBA c\
ft HI K 1 \ \\ \l
r7 -' BIM OTlifcH P /
L\-'\ptinrM A3 F 9QF;3 3 00 0 R NloE jjjr *i/l \
iV
Ml "fi"
% 1 j7i i |Lii
SAVE 12c, Rmlcnwr IwomtitcM
Lemon Juice v 39* 4
SAVE 11c, Minot Jolllod
Cranberry Sauce .... 2IT 39*
SAVE 10c, Libby's
Canned Pumpkin .... 2 ,* 29*
SAVE 1 Ac, Harvard, Slicod tickled, or tickled with Onions,
Greenweed Beets e e ee e 4 'jars*
SAVE 16c, Groonwood Doliciowe
Red Cabbage 4
SAVE 9c, Orooa Oiont #303 Coos Croons Stylo or
NibletsCern 5?.:: $ 1
SAVE 10c, Orooa Uioat Kitchoa Slicod or Froach Stylo
Green Bean 4 # .*l
SAVE 29c, Liadsoy Soloct
Ripe Olives 3 21*1
SAVE 47c, Liadsoy Soloct Mpo
aUIaJ mini m O' *" $1
PlTfOii eeeeoeeee tl 1
SAVE 10c, Coiro osooty Dill Strips or
Sweet Crispios tr*9*
SAVE 4c, Hoi ax Thick, Rich
Tomato Ketchup 'ir 25*
SAVE 9c, Kraft's MsHdoy Troot
Marshmallow Cream .2 S 49*
SAVE 24c, Klaaaox
Dinner Napkins eeoo eo 41 pftg*. I |
SAVE 10c, Floia or SolfdUsias
Pillsbury Flour H 49 c
SAVE 2Sc, FA P
Fruit Cocktail S # 2 ,| l
SAVE 17c, Fillshary
Frosting Mixes oeooeoo 3 pk.
(Caramel, Daabla Datch Fidfe, Croomy Vanilla, Flatty Whits, Creamy Fodga)
Prices Are Effective
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
jr
.

V
PUBLIX

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street

2 FontOuit Duka.
I iorden's Tarty Cioscant
a Dinner Rolls 39* |
I Masola Com Oil
J Margarine 39* |
A Pillsbury Delkious Crescent
f Dinner Rolls 39*
A Pillsbury Assorted
I Refrigerator Cookies ... 2s^ $ l ?
Philadulphia Brand A
| Cream Cheese ;£ 33* |
y Kraft's Cracker Banal A
A Sharp Cheddar . (tick 9 C |
1 Armour'* Mist Wisconsin
Medium Cheddar A
A Wisconsin Chaatu Bar V
" Treasure Cave Blue .... 39 c A
A Oairi-Frath Delkious
f Cottage Cheese V£ 59 c
Arv v Ila
HKVI
* BP
juj2
2 Fum. Out Faya IW ftjt |
| Pktswnat Florida Cane. Froznn i
A Orange Juice ....... 2~73 |
I Aunt Jnmima Tasty
Frozen Waffles 43* I
A Birds Eya Nan-Dairy
f Cool Whip *27 59 e A
i For Thanksgiving, Pst Bits Pumpkin or
| Mince Pies.. 3Ji£ $ l
* Pktswnat Tatty Froton I
I Cooked Squash 2 "**39*
1 Groan Giant Tasty Whois Ksrasi A
k NibletsCom 312l V
I With Brown Sugar, Bird* Eya A
a Sweet Potatoes £45 c I
I Birds Eys Now International
Vegetables 'i£49 c |
A (Spanish Styls, Bavarian Style, Danish Style, Japanese Style or
I Mexican Style)
Booth s FomWy Pack I
| Fish Sticks iis9* |
f Singleton's Tasty 14... $l O9 k
A Breaded Oysters 1 f
A Btwn Owl 6wm Dept. V
f taashlaa Crisp Fresh A
I Sugar Wsrfors ...."* 49* V
I KeeMer Crisp Tasty i
a Honey Grahams... W, 1 41* I
I Bag. 4tr, Little Brewaie
Fig Bars ii 39* A
A Beg. 49 Little Brownie Vanilla, C bee elate or T
" Duplex Cremes . .X 39* |
f Tomato Juice ~ V 39*
A Sooth Share Holiday Treat,
I Stuffed 01ive5..... *.* 49*
Ocean Spray Cranberry- I
A Orange Relish 'V? 39*
T Del Meat. Inrly Garden A
A Sweet Peas f
Pepperidge Farms A
I Regular Stuffing
a S3* I
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Pepperidge Farms I
f Stuffing
a li I

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat

Thursday, November 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator.

4c-off label# Reynold*
Aluminum Foil 29*
For Holiday Treats, Dromedary
Pitted Dates ** 35 e
55- ~ 7s- IPOBLIXI
Whole Onions # £ 29* m% m mriti fM
Thank-You Spkad Rad or Groan
Kieffer Pears T 39'
Thank-You
Apple Rings '* 39*
OreenGiant Dalkiout Non-Such
Sweet Potatoes 3\i~ $ l Mince Meat
7c-off labal, Pillsbury * 33c
Pie Crust X 22* l
Pillsbury Borden's Nona-Such
Pie Crust Sticks ..... iT 49* Mince Meat
HeaWl & Beeuku Aika. Spook 49
B 1 With Brandy, Berdan's Nona-Such
Hair Spray is co
Arrid Extra Dry ir O rr
Deodorant 99*
I Ml MB I \ \ \ a
\ r'jvfi'
. .T\ *
lyjpigSv
l?i
if' ; ., f ...
U. S. No. 1. All Purpose
Potatoes '. b 89 c
Crisp Rad Delicious
Apples ..*^B9*
North Carolina Kiln Driad
Sweet Potatoes <-12*
Delicious California
Pitted Dates .*"39*
Kraft's Delicious
Fruit Salad 69*
Ocean Spray Broad fresh
Cranberries ... leoeeeeeee bet 39*

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

mm

Where shopping
is a pleasure

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

cm>v*v%%vavaw:w:o:o:o>x>:>:*>>::oxcb*
1 FOR SALE |
AKC silver beige male poodle 41/2
mos. old unusual color have stud
service reasonable prices on
grooming. Call after 5:30 3 78-6342.
(A-3t44*p)
You bur * we'll cry 1968 Enduro
Yamaha 250 scrambler 1-yr old 2700
miles PERFECT condition two new
helmets S6OO. Call Brad or Gary
376-8524. (A-st-44-p)
67 MGB Convertible; Wire wheels
S4OO cash and pick up payments.
Firm. Bank appraisal. Call 376-6671.
(A-st-44-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
Amplifier Fender twin reverb.
Older blackface model. Great
condition S3BO. Call 372-2173. Rock
& Roll will never die! (A-st-42-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak matching
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewriter
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
(A-7t-42-p)
Heath model DA-281 Stereo
amplifier, 35 watts/channel, all new
tubes, SBS. Heath model AJ-63 Mono
FM tuner, $25. Both SIOO. Will
demonstrate. Call 378-7671.
(A-st-42-p)
1966 Harly Davidson 175 cc.
Excellent Condition $225. See Rich
at apt. 29 LaMancha. (A-st-43-p)
68 Suzuki 500 cc. 6000 mi. left on
warrnt. Immaculate condt. Bags,
hlmt., and more incld. Very fast. Call
collect 904-496-3017 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-43-p)
2 Falls 1 dk. brown, real hair, barely
worn, $25. 1 Platinum, real European
hair, worn once $35. Call
3 78-467 I.(A-st-4 5-p)
Honda 150 cc, 1965 fair condition,
dependable transportation, also
Canon Pellix camera 1.2 lens Cycle,
$l5O, Camera, $175. Call Jeff
378-6819. (A-st-45-p)
CAMERAS Canon 1.8 50mm
serenar-lOOOth to 1 sec & optima
compur auto 35. light
meter-tripod-access, carry cases for
all.-Sawyer rotodisc slide projector
SIOO for all. 376-9538 before 9p.m.
Bob. (A-3t-45-p)
CAMPERS Must sell this week.
Step van camper S2OO. Colliers
Encyclopedia yearbooks Childs set
book case SIOO. Before 9 p.m.
376-9538. Bob. (A-3t-45-p)
12x44 mobile home 1968 Air one
bedroom 400 down assume payments
Art Deane 3101 SW 34th St. no. 66
or 378-9402. (A-st-42-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer, SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-46-p)
ROYAL Office Electric TW w/ Cb.
and Cloth Ribbons elite free
stand and Cb. Ribbons sl6O.
378-0384. (A-3t-46-p)
AUCTION New Used Antique
Merchandise. Saturday night 7:30
p.m. November 22nd. C&J Auction
House, Archer, Fla. (A-2t-46-p)
Furnished mobile home 68'. 2
Bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central air
& heat & other extras. Call Liz after
6:30 373-2210 take over payments.
67 Triumph 650 TRG-C. Best offer.
Phone 378-7191. (A-st-46-p)
Kawasaki 250 SS Scrambler. Perfect
condition. Sacrifice S4OO. Call
378-1713 after 5:00 p.m. (A-3t-46-p)
Cy :-:-:-:-x*x-x-x-:-x-Mww K
FOR RENT
w?;?x*x*x*x-x*x-:*v,%rx x*x x x*x x*:§.
One bedroom Gatortown Apt.
sublease Jan-June, large furnished,
carpeted, with pool. Call 378-6188.
(B-3 t-44-p)
Two Bedroom AC Close to campus
sllO mo. Available December 1. Call
376-6671. (B-st-44-p)
1
Turned off by dorm fife? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op- 1002. W. Univ. Ave.
I nsta I Invent plan rm-meals
4220/quarter. Some financial aid
available. 378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
llvingroom completely furnished, ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo., cable TV.
Colonial Manor Apts. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c)
Must sublet.'Jan June. 2 bdrm. apt.
AC, 3 blocks behind Norman. Call
373-1230 after 5 p.m. (B-3t-46-p)

XWWWWAV%V.VAV.V.%V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.
FOR RENT
Furnished mobile home 68' 2
bedroom, 2 bath & Study. Central
Air & Meat & other extras. Call Liz
after 6:30. 373-2210. Married
Students Only. (B-4t-46-p)
Perfect apt. for married couple. One
bedroom, pool, air cond., carpet,
curtains, near shopping. Occupy right
after finals. slOl a mo. Call to see at
376-8958 after 4:00 p.m. (B-3t-45-p)
Beautifully sum. 1 BR duplex,
available win qtr, 2 blks from
campus, all elect., central A/C, fully
carpeted. $l2O/mo., 319 NW 14th
St., 373-1220. (B-st-45-p)
1 bedroom apt. 328 S.W. 34th St. in
village 34 fully furnished air
conditioned, quiet, close to school
slls per month call 372-2103.
(B-4t-45-p)
Must Sublease. College Terr. Apt. 1
blk. from campus. $120.00/mo. Utl.
Included. Call 378-4190. (B-st-46-p)
WANTED |
{.X>WS'iWX < : < >KX*V BWW
Quaint house with fireplace and
garden is lonely. Looking for female
roommate. SBS monthly includes
everything. Call 378-6366.
(C-3t-45-p)
Female roommate beginning winter
qtr private room La Mancha Apts.
Phone 378-9611 or come see us in
apt. 54. (C-2t-45-p)
Male roommate wanted to share 4
BR plush La Mancha apt. with 3
grad, students. $ 70/mo. incl. utilities.
Ready now or Jan. Call 376-1337.
(C-st-45-p)
Wanted one coed roommate to sublet
College Terr. Apartment. Rent is $65
a mo. utl. inc. '/? blk from campus.
Call 3 78-8345 after 5 p.m. Rent Paid
until Dec. 10 (C-st-45-p)
Female roommate needed winter &
spring terms (Getting married need
replacement). Share large 2-bedroom
apt. with 3 girls. Quiet, comfortable,
convenient. 2 blocks from Norman
Hall. sllO/quarter. 373-2832.
(C-st-42-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
French Quarter apt. $45.00 per
month Poolside. Call after 5 p.m.
373-2209. (C-st-43-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE one male
roommate wanted for winter quarter.
Rent 43.50 + util. Central air and
heat, pool. Call Herb 376-6361.
(C-st-41-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters.
Available Dec. Ist. $45.00/month.
Call Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5
p.m. (C-3t-46-p)

FSSSL^(xfA
JJJI
~flj| SECRETLY FILMEpr|
I SHOW7:3O %% IjttMj I
/ BUM I
13 THE SCENES FROM I
I THIS MONTHS PLAYBOY I
vXfIEMQQKfr:-:
jf dEbORAk ,f

Page 14

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20,1969

I WANTED I
Grad Student to share unbelievable 2
br townhouse w/ senior law student.
Unique not in Sin City! A steal at
SBO beginning January. 373-1612.
(C-3t-46-p)
HELP WANTED j
jfcw M<*c*x<*x-x-:-:-v*?w*x-x-x-x-x*:*vi*i<
Need extra sales help for Christmas
selling. Apply in person at
Silverman's, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-44-c)
Experienced mother will care for
infants and toddlers by hour, $.35 or
week $15.00. Phone 378-6681.
(E-3t-43-p)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 Wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua." (E-llt-42-p)
CLERK-TYPIST II position open in
Student Publications. Full-time
employment with all university fringe
benefits. This jobs requires no filing
and is much more interesting than
just straight typing. Youll be using
IBM's new MT/SC typesetting
equipment, composing type for the
Florida Quarterly, Seminole and the
Florida Alligator. An IBM
representative will train you at full
pay. 40 words per minute, 80 per
cent accuracy required. Call Mr.
French, 392-1681 after 5 p.m. for
appointment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer. (E-tf-45-nc)
AUTOS
VW 1966 Black with red
interior, one-owner, 53,000 miles.
$950. Call Mike at 373-2349.
(G-st-45-p)
1956 MG A good mechanically. S2OO.
Martin 0018 C guitar with case, $175.
Four 15 wire wheels, S6O. Two
PESS Prof, mikes 150 one Roberts &
1 Norelco mike with stand SSO.
3 72-7024 afteT 5. (G-st-45-p)
1969 Kamann-Ghia, 3 Months Old
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., $1950. (G-st-35-p)
1964 VW; New engine, brakes, tires,
mechanically excellent visually
catastrophic; must sell before Friday.
$475. Will bargain; Call 378-7693
after 6 p.m. (G-2t-46-p)
67 GTO Super clean, light blue, black
vinyl top, stereo tape, AM-Fm, rally
wheels, tach, custom interior, call
Pesek 378-9779 asking SI9OO.
(G-st-41-p)

>>:OyFCrM.M.M,MAVJWWVWW> mm -
v;-;':-;-x-:*:-;-;-v-V"V. Xv.x*x-%v-Sv>;
AUTOS
iw*x-x.wwxY:*x*x*x-x*x*x.ssvxv*x*x*x : :*
1962 Comet 6 cylinder 4 speed trans
radio and heater, $l5O or best offer.
Call 392-7463 or come by 1247 NW
12 Avenue. (G-3t-44-p)
Porsche 1961 Silver recent engine
overhaul radial tires new fuel pump
windshield and coll. Koni shocks,
Bursch exhaust SI7OO call 378-8342.
(G-3 t-44-p)
1965 Mustang 2+2, V 289, radio,
wsw, st. shift, console, good gas
mileage, call Jim Carter 392-0834,
372-5703. (G-3t-44-p)
VW 1966 BUG GOOD
CONDITION 26,000 MILES, DARK
GREEN, RADIO. $925. 372-5796.
(G-st-44-p)
196 5 JAGUAR XKE Roadster.
Excellent condition. 378-7620.
(G-st-42-p)
GOING NORTH?
Ineedaride N0v.21 to
Maineor intermediate
points. Share expense.
Call Bill at 378-8462

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadline >3too pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

'4
s
s
' **3
*' ; V
'?
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN I',AAAE l ,AAAE DATE i
fot.l. (consecutive) STUDENT PHONE
for rent 1 day
wnfd 2days ADDRESS :
help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
Q autos CD 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE ZIE
personal Q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
D "' c WORDING I
1 1 11 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 11 1 11 11 iii 11 m i) i r
2l I I I I I II I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i
3fl I I I I I I I I I I I 111 I I I I I I I I ITTTT
* L L II M I 1 I I I II I I I I I I I I I 1 II I I l-H II I I [
' ' .1 ! m - A

Us# our handy
mall In order
forme

PERSONAL |
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be In
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-st-42-p)
- Win*. A I
VIVIEN LKIGII
i OLIVIAdeiIAVIUANI) i
"GONE WITH
THE WIND"
8:00 ONLY



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
FRIED CHICKEN
All You Caro To Eat ff V
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Cranberry Sauce

iTn' - -
fin 1 MHIWMIiKM
NOW! "HAUNTINGLY FEAUYIFUI! jfjMwS£&' ' >
t James Garner i
\Gayle Hunnicutl/ /Cannes film festival win I
\mSm/ Best Film Bv a New Director LJ -|
H*s=rjs9s=r> A Walk with LoveHKjJF I
g and PeathmoM |
Albert Claus says: I

ALLIGATOR I
/ / |I WA/V /
II mr ym W
jgamm Or. -'

J. l ?y. r^?y.'N?v T ber 2o 1969 > The Florida Alligator

Page 15

| PERSONAL 1
Need writers for off campus mag.
Open positions for. comics, cartoon,
satire, humor column or story. Call
Stan Ratoff eve. 378-4824.
(J-st-41-p)
Graduate Students Locating Teaching
Jobs Revolutionary approach.
Directories of Positions to Candidate.
Candidate to schools. Inexpensive
Deadline December 1, 1969.
Applications write: Intercept, Box
317, Harvard Sq., P. 0., Cambridge,
Massachusetts 02138. (J-3t-45-p)
Tired of motel-like apt.-living?
Charming two bdrm house with
fireplace, garden and dog pen needs
female roommate. Pamper yourself.
No. 378-6366. (J-3t-45-p)
Fun on Fridays! All singles over 21
come to The Lamplighter from 5:30
to 7:30 this and every Friday.
Doubles 65 cents; alt other drinks 50
cents. 25 cents cover (to pay for ads,
etc.). Spread the word and come
relax- after a week's work!!
(J-3t-46-p)
Looking for something to do Sat.
night? Why dont you come over to
the Murphree'Area Courtyard and see
the Celebration perform. It will be
a Gator Hop show put on by Tolbert,
Murphree and Broward from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. on Sat. Nov. 22. (J-2t-46-p)
This is dedicated to the one I love
Happy Birthday, Baby, and happiness
always. ILY A strayed kitten who has
found her way. (J-lt-46-p)
UNDERGROUND DYLAN ALBUM
WHITE WONDER, now available
exclusively in Gainesville at the
Subterranean Circus, 10 S.W. 7th St.
while they last. (J-bt-46-p)

I LOST & FOUND |
Lost: One wallet. Brown. Lost on
East-West Drive. Reward offered.
Contact Carl. Phone 2-7131 after 6
p.m. (L-3t-46-p)
LOST: Green suede coat. Sat. DU
House. Call 376-2530. (L-3t-46-p)
LOST medium size reddish-brown
female dog, in vicinity of Newberry
Road and 1-75. Looks .'ike cocker
spaniel with long tail. If found call
376-1077 or 392-0792. Her name Is
Taffy. (L-3t-46-p)
Lost, large female Siamese cat
wearing a flea collar, answers to name
Taffy. Lost in vicinity of N.E. sth
Ave. Reward. 376-0529. (L-3t-45-p)
Lost: Black-and-white female Basset
puppy. Lost Sunday near Catholic
Church. Reward. Call 378-5409.
(L-5-i-4 5-p)
LOST Pair of gold rimmed glasses
. in black case. Contact Tom Kennell,
392-9965. Reward. (L-3t-45-p)

JJ TAMV I WILLIAM SHAKESPEARES
Siam | j TODAY immortal play
*** Ainu "JULIUS
FEATURES ONIY CAESAR
1:15 3:20 MARLON BRANDoVjJI i
5:25 7:35 9:40 deborah kerr
JAMES MASON WAt
vv 1
They Lived A Thundering Adventure That Rocked Two Nations!
ifwr
I mi Tony Aguilar
Um Minneii VVfendell Burton TimMclntine
, **
curwr broadway s smash musical
@%ywtjjFc)i NOW THE MOST EXCITING
T (jjHmgflgy " E
y f
TECHNICOLORVPANAVISION*
V# /<- <4 ~ aV c ) .* 4

~
| SERVICES
WN^.-.-.s-x-x'-^x-r-x-r-NSsv^^^sx-r^r.Nssv;-:-
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 S.E. 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-46-c)
Tennis Racket Restringing. Free
pickup and delivery. M&R Tennis
Services 378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
Health foods, natural vitimins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing' in
thesis and dissertation copies and
cohating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service.
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-45-ts-C)



Page 16

i, ThR FlcFridO'Alligator, Thursday,. NtmembAr 20) 1969

"" OU, K '* OI,N SUB.M 8.i511.l ...NO SUMO
Turkeys A" Bacon
£e/f-£aJtiy
10to 14 Lbs. JM HA "T "W^wl
1 W-D BRAND TURKEY PARTS KafiKgpfe j PK
brlast..79 c M 39* 1 ;2 |
' THIGHS.. 49* BACKS... 19* ffiWT-ti.!...,.M'
f;f- id n. oormn-s
Quantity Right! Reserved Prices Good All Wook Thursday Thru Wednesday, Nov. 20-26 CREAM CHEESE ............ 39*
WMN MXIf STORES. INC. COPVRIGHT 1949 *Vi. itOtDI Js John
GRADE A QUICK FROZEN LARGE BAKING umMsunnavun .. .one c. FRESH BOSTON BUTT PORK ill CANNED BISCUITS 22*
M W-0 BRAND GROUND...PIus 100 Free Stamps w/Couapn A 4BBRI MR IHi
HENS -49* BEEF 5 1 2 89 ROAST... -59* #
OYSTERS 79= COOKED HAM *1 CHOPS ... -7 I C4..L R
3-02. Jar SINGLETON SHRIMP GOVT. INSPECTED QUICK FROZEN lEG-O- FRESH SHANK HALF OR WHOLE
COCKTAIL. .3/89' LAMB.... 79 PORK HAM 69' ZVrr^ |
1-lb. Bag SUNNYLAND FRESH PORK HOT OR MILD SUPERBRAND COTTAGE 216-Lbs. W-0 BRAND QUICK FROZEN 20 PATTIES §ll BUN
SAUSAGE.. 69 CHEESE .. 2 ~ 69' HAMBURGER .*1 Os I
3 PIMENTO CHEESE 69*
IIP tastc asiA pi hch
W-D BRAND E-Z CARVE OVEN READY $ f| |
M 1 UMK 5AU5AGE......... 89*
o'
4* mmopie 3/'t. fciattiM..79< JlSfrl POTATOES! 69<
legLrgaW nthtch Tlr ouims $ -.
. ASPARAGUS 39* 88T.... 4/>l. a aMM CAUUnOWER .. Z 49*
__ "AU ?/W FLbWER .. 3/89 c SPftOUTS.. 3/M. §OLD APPLES 13,*T
y| Ql ASTOR ORANGE *JRMB V jSHk 5.*..K1197 1
Juicejw^gg
LLiiiF j fciiiij jiitiiywvss'jsftii do con
S-18. PKG. IWOPOIYBACS TWOYKGS 1 3 PACK PKG I 3 IBS Off MORE l2i OUf ~
W-D BBANOLEAN |i AAeMUUfM WHITI MANSCOM S Ftf NCM W-D BEEP USOA CHOICE BONELESS MEAT LOAF, VEAL PARM
iwr- H>.~rr mM~*~
130 N.W. 6TH ST. ~ 1401 N. MAIN ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.' HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS II



I W D B#AND YOUN BROAD BREASTED GRADE "A"
|^
Las6ooum- HO*. £s(
I IAHD O'SUNSHINI A^_
Oamf
I 9 < \\ W'kpS OtMm I I
Milk i
- -~ I b.DIXIEDAAIINGSTUFFINO No. 303 Cor THRIFTY MAID GREEN LIMA ~ No. 303 Con THRIFTY MAID BARTLETT
I m lB I BREAD.... 2/41 c BEANS Sl*}. PEARS 4/*l.
I K I S DARLING PRESTIGE No. 216C0n THRIFTY MAID CUT SWEET No. 300 Can THRIFTY MAID CRANBERRY
I / NO ;JJ. 1 I BREAD 29' POTATOES 4/*l. SAUCE.... 2/39'
I .1 PINEAPPLE 4/*l. ASPARAGUS. 49' FRUIT CAKE *1
Lai iikv .. ill GLENN FARMS STEM A PIECES . 12-oz. NISLETS No. 303 Can LESUEUR
rjJSS M 1 9 "" I M ROOMS 4/l. CORN 5/*l. PEAS 4/*l.
I 1 HELLMANNS
I WTO> \M Mayonnaise
LB B
iW I Shortening _, §a
CHEIC LOW CALORIE SOFT I w/$5.000r more purchaw If
yH MAXWELL HOUSE ALL GRINDS
lipplEs .. 3/*i.|gf| gw ## SO
lookieS ... 3/*i. t£ A RB L.OT 00 MHR i
n |
Rk.DIXIE DARLING FLAKY BROWN & SERVE _,. N 1-LB. R
KdU5.....-*/1. 'sMg> ss rOEEEE " 9fl< -".Mil
lECANBUNS3/*l. |Sp tUrPEE if
BE~ SALAD DRESSINpfI^ Prices iifthis Ad good rT
pa.. tn. mm- SALfiNES \r& thru closina- W& Nov *26th
fer" ,oc \olc 130 NW 6THST 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. TnrU C,Q5m 9 VT ea INOV ZOTn
| ,CWe 39* ORANGE RELISH 39 e 130 N.w. om ai.. uiway iii uiaui cddiki^c
K CHNO 3/*l 1401 N. MAIN ST. OPEN ON SUNDAY niWAT 441, HIGH SPRINGS
* w IpjllL* l ** * f bab f I ff'W wt- --

LOAF

Thursday, NovunMr 20, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



*.v *+.*> ft .* n t *.'*# r. 'v # *Sa Rk-r4V -.
I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nowmbw 20,1969

Page 18

COOKED HAMS 55
RIB R 0 it9^
FEATURE
SVan" PINEAPPLE 3sr SI.OO 1 tB rIP f.
y Q Heavy Wrap Special
AWtPMB|K\ VjM M 7 Jane Parker Delicious Special!
TB^^mWvBSFTTf|P ump k'nPies £49*
Bread 4 99<
PEAS 5 £ SI.OO COFFEE " 99< (|UBfifSw
SOUP =- 10{ BAB-0 10< jjjjjt
Si S ? NGESS iIS'
||s;vg :
mi sw2nd Ave. 1 if.uJJlpMiol IESEOXEESdI faH JV^
1130 NW 16th Ave *rm,,,. couro* a*. *. of| STAMPS wm m covfONAHtrv.cnA..of ] STAMPS win. tm* coupon *n pukkah or | STAMPS STA MPS
1 REGULAR ALUMINUM ffffffW FLOOR WAX AIR FRESHNER MAZOLA |^ rTfrT^,
offers Good Alcoa Wrap i%z 33c | Klear 0x... 98c JAX i Glade 59c JAX i Corn Oil -is; 63c mmm \
November 19-26 .... PP.od through nov. za y ft<*P?



The
Florida
Alligator

SEC Games This Week Mismatches

ATLANTA (UPI) They
should proclaim Saturday as
be-kind-to-an-underdog day in
the Southeastern Conference.
There are only three football
games involving SEC teams that
day and all three shape up as
mismatches.
Take a look:
Eighth-ranked Louisiana
State (8-1), smoldering over
being snubbed by the major
bowls, hosts Tulane (3-6)
Saturday night in Tiger Stadium,
where, in a more kindly mood,
the Bengals beat Mississippi
State 61-6 last week;
Tenth-ranked Tennessee
(7-1), anxious to prove that last
weeks 38-point loss to Ole Miss
was really an illusion, visits
Kentucky (2-7) and you can
figure that the Vols will really
test the confidence of Wildcat
Coach John Ray;
And Vanderbilt (3-5),
which beat Kentucky 46-6 in its
last outing, is host to Southern
Conference champion Davidson

UT Decides Against
Post-Season Game
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI) The University of Tampa reversed its field
Tuesday and ruled out a post-season football game after earlier in the
day having asked Texas A&l to consider such a game here Dec. 6.
In a terse one-sentence statement released through the sports
information office athletic director Sam Bailey said:
The University of Tampa has decided not to pursue the possibility
of a post-season football game.
There was no elaboration, but earlier it had been reported the
members of the team would be asked to vote on whether or not they
wanted the extra game.
Texas A&I is eighth in the United Press International small college
ratings with an 8-1 record. Tampa, at 7-1, is rated ninth in the UPI
poll.
Rattlers To Face Grambling
In Orange Blossom Classic

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida A&M University athletic
officials announced Wednesday
the Rattlers will take on
twice-beaten Grambling College
of Grambling, La., in the Dec. 6
Orange Blossopi Classic at
Miamis Orange Bowl.
The classic will pit college
footballs two most victorious
coaches against each other.
A&Ms Jake Gaither, with 200
victories in his career, leads the
nation, and Gramblings Eddie
Robinson is second with 186.
The Tigers are 6-2 for the
season with one game remaining
against Southern University this
week. Florida A&M, beaten once


Bar-B-Q
**Taka out service"
ASSORTED
BOX LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
BY THE POUND
Call ahead it'll bo
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1202 NE Bth AVE.
(NEXT TO TRIANGLE
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378-3206

GATOR SPORTS

VEIfIHHHHBi 'wn wmmm
W jLi &
APB jllHMk A
Jr m
..... ___ PETE KNOCKE
GATORSWI LDCATS
... last Saturday's mismatch

(7-2) which normally doesnt
challenge teams at the SEC level.
Action starts Friday night in
the Orange Bowl Stadium where
the Miami Hurricanes (3-5) hosts
Wake Forests Deacons (3-6)
and you wont find too many
people breaking down the gate
for that one either. Also Friday

in seven outings, faces
Bethune-Cookman this week and
the University of Tampa next
week.
A&M is the traditional host of
the classic pitting two of the top
Negro teams in the nation.
Grambling has appeared in
three previous Orange Blossom
Classics, defeating A&M 28-25 in
1967 and 28-21 in 1955, and
losing 42-15 in 1964. The two
teams have never met in regular
season play.
Southern University, the
Tigers last opponent of the
regular season this week, was
edged 10-7 by the Rattlers.

Chicks!
| 1515SW13THST
|Th URS.SPEciALiI
S 3 pieces dark meat 5
} chicken dinner, with |
5 french fries, coleslaw, A garlic bread
(Reg. $1.15) oday -79
LSU-TULANE JUST ONE

night, Chattanooga (3-6) is at
the Citadel (7-2).
Saturday afternoon, Florida
State (5-2-1), paced by hot pro
prospect Bill Cappleman who
passed for 508 yards last week,
will host North Carolina State
(34-1); Memphis State (7-2)
figured to win the Missouri
Valley title, hosts Louisville
(4-3-1); and Southern Mississippi
(3-5) is at East Carolina (2-6).
Saturday night, Tampa (7-1)
goes after its eighth straight
victory as host to California
State.
Dont be surprised if LSU,
which is averaging about 36
points per game, pours it on
against Tulane like it did back in
1961 and again in 1965 when
the Bengals beat the Green Wave
62-0 (both times).
The Bengals, who lost only to
Sugar Bowl-bound Ole Miss
(26-23) and who beat
bowl-bound Auburn and
Alabama, would like nothing
more than showing the bowl
folks just what they missed. LSU
could have had one of the
secondary bowls but turned
Turkey Shoot
This Saturday
Come try for a turkey at the
Broward Archery Range this
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. (bow
and arrow).
This is an all campus shoot for
students, faculty and employes.
The UFs Archery Club will
give a turkey for first and second
place for men and for women.
Equipment will be provided
by the Archery Club if you need
it. There is no entry fee.

SAM PEPPER
' Sports Editor

Thursday, November 20,1969, The Florida Alligator,

them down.
Tennessees pretty sore too
but at itself. The Vols, ranked
seven places lower than they
were before that 38-0 loss to Ole
Miss, had expected to go to the
Orange Bovyl and had to settle
for a Gator Bowl date with
Florida. Kentucky upset Ole
Miss 10-9 early in the season and
the Vols might get some
satisfaction out of running up
the score against the Wildcats.
Vanderbilt plays five bowl
teams this season and was good

GOLF
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Wp CLUBHOUSE
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OPEN 7 DAYS
Ist NINE $1.25
lf (ft $2.25 FOR 18
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vi Ml. WESTOM-75 0N
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

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be worth something? \K) k
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lower prices eTrained technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
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ASK ANY OLD TIMER ABOUT US
AND OUR FAMOUS
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CHOPPED SALAD FRENCH FRIES ROUS A RUTTER
$1.15
AND THE KST HUB! M TOWN
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BREAKFAST SERVED AU DAY
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A/ifl/UtA OPEN FROM 4:30 AM TIL 300 AM
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Th. CENTER OF MAN I
presents an Evening of
music, poetry, and
sensory awakening
and RICHARD MCGEE
"On Responding To Self Destruction j
Tonight 8:00pm j
The Presbyterian Student Cent* |
$1.50 general admission
75< students
Bring your own mat for sitting on the
floor. Some chairs are available.
...... \

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

enough to upset Alabama
(14-10) so it figures that
Davidson passing star Gordon
Slade will have to have one of
his finest days. Slade has
completed 176 of 270 passes
(65.2 per cent) for 20
touchdowns and 1,973 yards.
Ole Miss closes its season
Thanksgiving Day against
Mississippi State (that should be
another mismatch) and the
remainder of the southeast
pre-bowl play wraps up two days
later.

MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
IR2OW. UNIV. AVE.
37*0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST
375*211
SOLESATTACHEDHEELS
1 m

Page 19



l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20,1969

Page 20

f SSna sMofata/fPou/buj
: § SAVE 104 IB.QUICK FROZEN MEATY TURKEY DRUMSTICKS OK
Turkeys i turkey leg quarters 29*
W -mwji w FARMER OKAY READY-to-COOK
J N 'low, A ilov?h 4 -M 2 ARMOUR STAR LIGHT A DARK MEAT
17 TO 24 LBS&& A TURKEY ROAST >*2.59
JB f CUnSUCED TURKEY *1.19
i fl|3 lb young DUCKS -59*
i iSPSPBPSrIu.s.p.A quick frozen orade a large .
* 4W >QjOrY>>BAKINC HENS .45*

'|jj|f EVfgypl" sows sur? jB 3t=// 1
(iiiiJ? chuck i SoP
aj p SS gjp 7Sf. M


EVERYDAY LOW PRICES GOOD SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. BONUS BUYS GOOD THRU WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26th. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. ALL STORES CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY.

f SIRLOIN (Hi)
STEAKS
a sio9 /
m 40^

| fVERYDAT PRICE! ]
f SLICED 1
I BACON j
[ 59< J

fCANNED 1
HAMS agars
I mmiuss.au miat.no wash I
5 c. SA I 9 /
caw y
... ... J,..

PWUL 7SX9O" WOVIN AND
THERMAL
BLANKETS
ami eoiMMiKPaimnL
U% UYOAUiCOnON
@*2.99

E BONUS 3UY
HORMEL &
69
59 c
V' 59 c

|4 BANANAS
[%-10
O'AY LOW PRICE!]
DER SLICED Wl
IEEF I
IVER I
9< j

I BONUS BUY'
I lr3
I ITALIAN
I SAUSAGE
[ 59

JUITM TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS AHEAD!
Blue Enamel
ROASTERS
I^oo^
HCTAMGWUUU OMK (iff fI//] RjgR^^REACH

f|§) GROUND 1
BEEF
4 Jr 9 j

[ 30NUS BUY!
i CHEESE I
| SLICES 1
[ 69- J

f iSSj U.S. NO. 1 WHITE
j POTATOES
y 10 pound bal; 87y

( FRESH SSK,
FRYERS
I flmuf) I
I [iiinicHj I
( WHOLE BAGGED I
v savekxlb lb /

| BONUS BUY!
F t3IPURE PORK l
I FRESH |
I SAUSAGE I
ou A9cj

BONUS SUY!
I O
V FISH
[ FILLETS
LUL

ETriowPicnj
:~::r &!
LLOW i
HONS |
2fJ

BIY low PRICE!
INLESS
ANKS
39<

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JSN HOSE I
\99*|

EjjEfffiQ LOWEST
PRICES!
927 North Main at Corner 10th St.
1349 N. W. 23rd Avenue in
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f -ROUND )
I OR*BONELESS CTB Alf S I
SHOULDER QV BiMIliP I

I bows stm
p AZALEA BRAND J
I All Beef I
I FRANKS I
49 < I

COMPARE! TSFS-?
Skri leaf Uw - 49c 4 104
Fryer Combination tkss? 59c ,*
Turkey Drumsticks 29c ,*
Leg-O-Lamb 79c 994 304
Sliced Ham coaSr* > 4UHu!?. 59c ** 104
Skinless Franks 'jrssr 39c 494 104
Clipped Sliced Meats *r.S" 33< j* *4

SAY LOW PRICE!
CEDI/4
RK LOIN
!OPS
m

; BONUS BUY!
T LUSCIOUSSK^^I
EMPEROR I
I GRAPES I
18 J

/sweet
POTATOES
/GEORGIA
/ SBI3 Ibs.^fr^yC/

| BOWS BUY! 1
I LAMB
I CHOPS I
fppM NtV Mm UJBC
jr lb J

iOW PRICE!
v; t a
LiCED
HAM
99 c

| sows eur/
** fS(SH CRISP 0|
I PASCAL |
[ CELERY I
[ as 24< I

IfVtgVW LOW WCf
|p r riti rpoii-^j
I P,E 1
I SHELLS I
U c 79<|

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE >1
I apples I
[ 39 : 1




'
\

[ BONUS BUY! W
I ORBIT "M
BEER 1
I l2or THROW AWAY BOTTLES
[ / 79 I

COMPARE! WST
Pop-Ups or Pop-Tarts 39c ** **
Pantry Pride Hour 37 c * *
Pillsbury Floor ** 59c at
Pantry Pride Shortening 69c 79* 10*
Crisco Shortening ** 79c * i
Pantry Pride Cooking Oil = 69c * a*
Town Talk Syrup * 49 * <*

hm/D/U LOW PRICE
|r~
sate RIPE. PITTED OR REGULAR I
I Lindsay 1
I OLIVES I
[ 3/ s 1 J

COMPARE! sSFfs
Long Grain Rice .sssz, 39c 4U *<
Pure Black Pepper 10 c < w
Colgate Instant Shave 39c m 4w
Pantry Pride Salt 9c m <<
Wilkinson Blades 49c 7* m*
Royal Gelatin Desserts9c io< u
Cake (fixes -aswr 4/slsut i

| EVERtDAY LOW PRICF
I All Green
| LIMAS
,s, 6/11
I fVrRVDAV
amlmmmm
I Mincemeat
PIES
I 49'

COMPARE! str'i'"
Waffle Syrup fsas 39c *
Aspirin > ID 6 ** **l
Kelloggs Com Flakes 39 *
Kellogg Variety Pack 2/8* **
Ketex Tampons 40s % 74<
Kotex Sanitary Napkins ---65c * **
Paper Towels war 4|slsm

E~VFf?yP4y tow PRICE! |
I
i SPICED I
I PEACHES |
I I
H baggi: y J|
9 Cioverleaf 1
I ROLLS I
P*G *%G< I
OFI2 A7

iWljMi H Cl TENDER, HUMP BROAD
£TVP TURKEYS
TURKEYS 41<.

B'iowp/arl
N GIANT Bj
ieur I
l EAS I
79 J

[fUEf?yD4y LOW PRICE f^j
I JELL-0 |
I LEMON PIE I
I FILLING I
I 2^Es2f < |

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
| LIBBY'S
I CUT OR DICED I
I BEETS I
17z Jpfe v m
can W WSF 3
TvTTTdTTTchvprTcT^j
I HOLIDAY I
I FRUIT CAKEI
1299 J

AY LOW PRICE! 1
I
MEET I
TATOES I
4/ s 1 J

SAVE 4LItox.KINO COU FANCY
CUT GREEN BEANS 25*
SAVE 174.01 ANT ROLLS. PRINTS OR ASST COLORS
GALA TOWELS 3/M
SAVE t*L FOOT ROLLS.FYNI WRAP
ALUMINUM FOIL 4/M
SAVE 44.100 X JAR.VICTORY RED MARASCHINO
CHERRIES 29*
SAVE 20i.10.50z BOX.CHERRYLAND dork or milk cfcoceloto
CORDIAL CHERRIES 39*
SAVE 14i.90z JAR.HYORADE DRY
ROASTED PEANUTS- 45*

SAVE 544.K1NR SIZE DRIVE OR COLD ROWER
DETERGENTS ...99*
NESTLE 0V1K...79*
SAVE 174.200* SOTTLES
HUNT'S CATSUP 3/1
SAVE 904.U8RT FROZEN ASST.IN MITTER SAUCE.I6** WCOS
VEGETABLES....... 3/M
SAVE 164. FROZEN PINT CARTONS.RICHS
COFFEE RICH 4/M
SAVE 104. FROZEN ASSTLARdE 460* FAMILY SIZE
MRS. SMITH PIES 89<

| [VFRYDAY'LOW PRICE
I RICE-
I A-RON! i
I Sift CHiCKfN OB SPAN SM
3. M §
s PKCi Sggg
[ EVERYDAY LOW PPICf I^
I
I ANTISEPTIC 1
I MOUTH WASH M
3- $124 m
F RU 8

Mr. Businessman.
Solve your holiday
. Rf I/Wm M I
ToTsdditiorw! information or to place your order dial 384-2812 (out
x of town firm* please call collect-area code 904). Or, write Holiday
\ Gift Certificates, P.O. Box 2605, Jacksonville, Fla., 32203.


[ EVERYDAY 10W PRICE
I fyne taste w l
I WHOLE GRAIN 1
RICE
&vo29< I

[ f Vf/?yD4T LOW
| KLEENEX
I BOUTIQUE'' I
I NAPKINS I
I * 3/si 1
I rOUHT _ /
hvEyp/y tow ppicnl
|Descrf
S Flowerl
| LOTION I
I In 88 J

Thursday, November 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!]
t m
WH OU PLUMS I
IN HtAVY SYRUP J
I Purple I
| PLUMS I
[ 4>l j

SUBLETS by 1
CORN m
(WHOLE KERNEL. I
J VACUUM PACKED I
I 120 Z r,mml |C /(I /
I CANS J/ J

fERYDAY LOW PRICE
et Ritz frozen I
Pumpkin or |
Wince DIEC I
Ooz PKGS
3/89]

ERICH'S -ss. )
|WCjeLJ
I flrniu] kK
I luiwtti] QT. w, I
V PLASTIC JBr

I f VFRypAy LOW PRICE
W NESCAFE wl
I INSTANT I
I COFFEE I
[ 79 [ EVERYD AY LOW mC E!J
IviTAllS l
I HAIR TONIC I
I 4oi BOTTLES f|
[ 3/ s l J

Ypumpkin ]
I PIES El /
i I
I f/tea ft, 6akeet A I
I [mifiifl 8 I
I [WHICHj I

04 y LOW PRICE r]
fRY PRIDE "B|
/EGETABLE j
OKING I
69 J

[fERYDAY LOW PRICEII

FROZEN SLICED I
STRAW- |
BERRIES J
4^s $ l I

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE H
irzzr
I XREAM
COFFEE CREAMER f.
[ 77j
| EVERYDAY LOW PRICEH
| JOHNSON S*
I COTTON
I BUDS
[ s>l

tow price
As Ciovcrlcof I
9k instant I
if DRY MILK I
I I 49 t J
right c 'i
GUARD I

I r " 99 c 3

Page 21



Page 22

2, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20,1969

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Staff Writer
Australian Phi Wyatt called a bloody good sport.
And bloody it is.
In a recent Rugby match against Georgia, the UFs newest
intercollegiate sport tallied a fractured hip, a dislocated shoulder, a
broken nose, a cracked finger, and innumerable minor abrasions and
lacerations.
Rugby is 90 minutes of pure animal brute, bone-crunching,
road-runner quick, hom4ocking contact, and it makes its descendant
football look as tame as house kittens and as slow as turtles.
But Wyatt and Tony Barker (pronounced Boker), co-founders of
the UF team, insist its a gentlemans game.
Rugby is the most elemental game of all. Each side simply
bludgeons the ball across their opponents goal line. Their opponents
try to stop them. No pussyfooting around, no elaborate strategy, no
acrobatics.
Fifteen masochistic gladiators make up each team. Their battlefield
is 110 yds. deep'and 75 yds. wide, 10 yds. longer and 25 yds. fatter
than a football held.
The ball is always in play, until someone scores or a penalty is
called. There are no substitutes during a period, and no padding is
worn.
When a ballcarrier is tackled the ball is still alive. If he forgets to
let go when he hits the ground, chances are the two will be kicked
apart. This rule insures about 30 fumbles in an average game.
The ball is watermelon shaped, larger than an American football,
and has a smooth surface with no laces.
Play commences with a kick-off, much like in football. The ball is
up for grabs after it travels 10 yds.
Jolly good! What now?
Well, almost anything. The ball carrier is strictly on his own. No
one is allowed to block for him. When he notices that he is about to
get crushed, hell do one of five things. He can hold on for dear life
and try to run through the tacklers, he can lateral it backwards to a
teammate, or kick it downfield so theyll leave him alone, he can
fumble it, or he can hand it to an opponent and tackle him.
There arent too many penalties, but when a rule is broken, theres
no rule that says that the referee has to tell what it was, and he
usually wont.
Some penalties give the violated team a free kick. When the ball
goes out of bounds a line-out puts it in play. Others are rectified in
the scrum.
A line-out is similar to basketballs out of bounds play. The scrum
is the elemental position. Eight of the men form a pyramid by locking
arms and legs and square off against a similarly constructed pyramid.
The ball is rolled into the midst of the grunting, growling, groaning,
snorting, sweating, swearing, kicking flesh, and the center men, the
hookers, try to kick it back to their mates.
And theyre off to the races. A goal is worth three points and an
attempt at an extra two.
Two weeks ago Wyatt and Barkers henchmen made catnip of the
Georgia Bulldogs, 15-3. Winger John Gieger scored twice on
electrifying 60 yd. runs. The Aussies Wyatt and Barker put Georgia
against the wall with several long kicks, and Ira Schwartz shined on
defense.
Normal rules dont allow substitutions, but the Gators played all of
their 30-man squad. Some even donned red and black jerseys when
injuries depleted the Bulldog ranks.
But the coaches say theres room for more gentlemen on the
squad.

w m U
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Pi-'A v i .. ,>:.... .-' '" : :: vaay..
iHf/ ;aiiife IM I
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... the scrum is used to put the ball in play

Rugby- A Game For Gentlemen

|1
PLAYERS BATTLE FOR BALL IN RUGBY LINE-OUT DOUG CASE
... line-out is used when the ball is knocked out of bounds

I
"fit
il. J* _.. v s |a.
* v%

GATOR'S JOHN GEIGER
... score twice for Florida

CRAIG GOLDWYN

£ H f:
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iff a
K&-, Mfc|j££^ r :
II
is v3*-^' -5m m ys f^ *r^fe ,i %^f^ s '', j;
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... Georgia teem hit the hardest

9sHHIHrI id(HBB
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M|g|MMmM||MI|MMMMWM|M|^MMHWMB||^M^Pi

BLOODY GOOD GAME

DOUG CASE



MTRAMURALS

SAE Rallies Over Nus

ORANGE FOOTBALL
SAE, trailing 18-13 and facing a
third and 20 situation struck on
a long touchdown pass that set
the pace for a 25-18 bracket
winning effort over Sigma Nu.
PL Lam forced a bracket tie by
defeating Lambda Chi 13-6.
Coupled with the 31-0
shellacking the Betas gave the
the Delts, the Betas, Lambda
Chis and Pi Lams will have to
play it off to determine the
bracket winner.
Pikes won their bracket
defeating ATO 13-6 and SPE
captured its powder-puff bracket
with a 24-13 win over FIJI.
ALL STAR FOOTBALL
David Kaplan, student assistant
at the athletic department, has
expressed interest in another
all-star football game. Something
along the same lines as last years
TEP-Gator game played for the
benefit of SCAT and the
planned new Activities Center.
This year Kaplan would like
to see an All-Star fraternity team
play the Gators. I think there
would be a more universal
appeal to the students in seeing
representatives from more
fraternities, he said.

UF Basketball Game
To Help Loan Fund

r M
>,,.: ff|'
M il
. .. V ._
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene*
fits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
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Hying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road
Wntlimr ' ..1 /!' 1 I I i>r, a

Kaplan also offered two more
ideas that might give the
fraternity team a better chance.
No basketball players for the
Gators and bring in Rick Perillo

> v /- i'hi 'fk r
pjP k
I M ml
i 'V, MBfr
FRAT FOOTBALL TOM KENNEDY
... bracket titles at stake

The Annual Gator Loan Fund
varsity-freshman basketball game
will be this Friday at Florida
Gym starting at 7:45 p jn.
There will be a small
admission charge of $.50, which
will go to the Gator Loan Fund.
The annual basketball match
will feature a special mini-skirt
contest at half-time that
promises to be a mind-bender.
Cricket Club
To Host UM
Cricket, a game traditionally
associated with the Birtish and
Commonwealth Territories
comes to the UF campus this
weekend.
The UF Cricket Club will host
the University of Miami Cricket
Club this Saturday and Sunday
on the Gators practice field
adjacent to the tennis courts at 1
p.m. each day.
The UF team includes three
Americans and one Canadian
and will be guided by the
experience and skill of
teammates from Australia,
Scotland, Pakistan, Jamaica and
India.

ENGLISH PEWTER MUGS
with FREE monograming!
see-through glass bottom ...
S' SILLISCULPTS'
y
lovable little critters
McGuire Trophy & Engraving lyoew.umv.
MvV. V

BY STEVE ROHAN ROHANfrom
from ROHANfrom Miami for the students.

Intramural officials at the
gym displayed enthusiasm over
the idea and said it would look
into the possibilities.

UFs Alvarez
Catching Up
NEW YORK (UPI) Steve
Owens, Oklahomas workhorse
fullback, has overtaken Mack
Herron of Kansas State in the
race for college footballs
individual scoring title and now
is within sight of two
long-standing career records.
Weekly statistics released
Wednesday by the National
Collegiate Sports Services show
Owens three touchdowns last
Saturday against Kansas boosted
his season total to 21
touchdowns and 126 points.
Herron, the leader the past three
weeks, has 20 TDs and 120
points.
The Oklahoma senior needs
four touchdowns to break the
major college season mark of 24
set by Art Luppino of Arizona
in 1954 and six touchdowns to
surpass the four-year career
mark of 59 by Armys Glenn
Davis in 194346.
Jerry Hendren of Idaho also
remained the pass receiving
leader with 87 receptions for
1,273 yards and 11 touchdowns.
Runnerup Carlos Alvarez of
Florida has 73 catches for 1,092
yards and 10 touchdowns.

Vaught Honored
A Second Time

OXFORD, Miss. (UPI)
Superstars more often than not
mean super headaches for
football coaches, and a coach
with a knack for handling the
talented players invariably turns
up a winner.
John Howard Vaught has
been winning with record-setting
regularity since a windy autumn
in 1947 when his first passing
sensation, Charles Conerly,
tossed the University of
Mississippi to its first
Southeastern Conference
championship in Vaught's
maiden season.
Wednesday Vaught was
named the nation's college
football Coach of the Week by
United Press International for
die second time this season,
largely on the performance of
his latest super gridiron hero,
quarterback Archie Manning.
The 60-year-old Vaught was
recognized for the Rebels' 38-0
upset win over previously
unbeaten Tennessee. The win
knocked the Volunteers out of a
possible Orange Bowl berth into
a Gator Bowl spot and boosted
the Rebels into the Sugar Bowl
against the Texas-Arkansas loser.
It was Manning's brilliant (day
against* Louisiana State in a
26-23 upset earlier this month
that won Vaught the first
national Coach of the Week
honor.
Vaught's plan against
Tennessee was to run right at the
beefy Volunteers, and the Rebs
caught them prime to stop a
Manning aerial attack instead of
a ground game. The junior
passing sensation from Drew,
Miss., worked his mastery at the
helm with just enough passes to
keep Tennessee off balance and
bring the Rebel record to 6-3.
Despite the praise heaped on
Manning and other Rebel stars in
the past, Vaught never seems to
have the disciplinary problems
his coaching counterparts have
experienced in keeping their
stars in line, or in getting
another stellar performance out
of them. Whats his secret?
He treats them all alike, a
member of the Rebel staff said.
And thats the way they like it.
Archie is just one of the boys.
There can be no arguing that
it hasn't worked for Vaught, the
nation's third winningest coach
after 23 seasons at Ole Miss. Past
performances from the likes of
Conerly, Jake Gibbs, Glynn
Griffing and now Manning have

NEDY

.-irf? i. .f
m
| Know All Men By These Presents That
I Poiltvct SUjwjy I
| having Met and Satisfied the Requirements of the THIRSTY f
I GATOR as to her Fitness and Qualifications for the Title. J
I IS HEREBY ACCLAIMED A Itflfjht
f and is Entitled to all the Rights, Honors and Privileges
1 Thereto Appertaining, including the Right to Bullyrag 1
1 THOSE OF THE SAME SEX NOT AWARDED THIS CERTIFICATE. f
I WITNESS THE SEAL OF THE ESTABLISHMENT AND THE SIONA-
I TURE OF ITS DULY AUTHORIZED OFFICER HEREUNTO AFFIXED. 1
I Virgins Clip this out and swap for a permanent card I
I and a free drink of your choice. P.S. We use the honor I
I system. I

Thursday, November 20, 1909, The Florida AMfator, I

JOHNNY VAUGHT
...weak 'stop coach
given Vaught a career record of
176 wins, 54 losses and 12 ties
for a .755 percentage.
And although the superstar
performances arent overlooked,
Vaught credits senior
leadership with enabling the
Rebels to pull off this year's
upsets over Tennessee, LSU and
Georgia. This is an unusual ball
club. It has fine leadership from
the seniors and is a group of
boys with a lot of character and
pride they want to win, he
said.
Vaught, who played at Texas
Christian, still has a
Thanksgiving Day game against
intrastate rival Mississippi State
before taking the Rebels to their
13th consecutive post-season
appearance, a national record.
IBs team is one of six SEC
squads in the bowls.
In the Southeastern
Conference, nobody can predict
from one week to the next who
will win, said Vaught. But the
nod has to go to Vaught's Rebels
and Manning when they're at
their best.

KS
STICK EM
UR!
Have You
Bought You r
1970
Seminole
Yet?
A f-

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 20,1969

Jack Nicklaus Designs Course

< By STEVE SNIDER
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK A call to Jack
Nicklaus at home in Palm Beach
to check on a new golf course he
helped design on Hilton Head
Island, S.C.:
(The Harbour Town Golf
links will be the site of the
SIOO,OOO Heritage Classic Nov.
27-30 with Nicklaus in the field.
Its the understatement of the
century to concede he knows
every blade of grass. He knows
the roots, too.)
Im really excited about it,
said Jack. The course is
something different, on an
unusual piece of property. There
was a heavy growth of trees and
we marked every one, cutting
down only those that absolutely
had to go. And we have the
ocean, too.
Im getting involved more
and more with this sort of thing.
I cant play tournament golf
forever, this is what I want to
do when I retire as a full-time
competitor.
How long have you been
associated with Pete Dye?
About three years. Hes from
Indianapolis and when I was still
in Columbus we played a lot of
amateur tournaments together.
We talked for years about the
good or bad design of various
holes we played. He later went
into the business and as I got
more involved I joined him. Hes
head and shoulders above
everyone else.
So far, we have built a
course for the Playboy Club at
Lake Geneva, Wis., and one at
Vero beach. Fla., Johns Island.
There are several others on the
drawing board but theyre just
waiting. We have been leading
hard on Hilton Head to get it
done right for the Heritage
Classic.
How long did it take to build
on Hilton Head?
Itll be only 13 months from
the time the first bulldozer went

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id -in. i/U Cp&i-
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* r

I'
in until the first tee shot in the
tournament. I dont think any
course has been ready for a
championship in that short a
time. And its really ready.
Commissioner Joe Dey was
down there right after an eight
inch rain and found only two
small areas that might have been
troublesome during a
tournament.
The trees were no problem
but part of the original grounds"
was a trash heap. We must have
buried 30 junked cars under the
fifth fairway. Also theres a lot
of water around the place and
we had only an 18-inch elevation
to work with from the high
point to sea level but we
managed to provide fairways
with a gentle roll.
Are any of the holes on the
course (6,655 yards par 71)
similar to famous holes youve
played elsewhere?
I hope not. We tried to
create 18 different ones and not
copy anything. Theres nothing
really new in design but we tried
to bring about abrupt changes
like playing through trees, water
on the par 3s and along the
seaside. The greens are relatively

KNOWS EVERY INCH

small, some with really deep
bunkers.
When you design a hole, do
you have a big hitter like
yourself in mind?
No. The first thing you have
to think of is the kind of people
wholl be playing there 365 days
a year. At Hilton Head theyll be
residents and guests of a fairly
high average age. We have small
back tees hidden among the
trees to make it tougher for
tournament players but several
members with handicaps from
12 to 18 played recently and
they all beat their handicaps. I
had a 73 or 74 from the back
tees. That proves we achieved
our aim. It was a challenge for
me but comfortable for them.
That really pleases me.
How about your new
waistline?
I feel great. I took off 15 or

(And Info) WHW YOU
I TOBUY ANHGUR:
IPJpf 1 No, not the car. The dealer. If you cant trust the dealer, dont buy f
| || J| B ANY car he might be selling. Why? Because if you run into trouble its v
the dealer youll be coming bade to not the manufacturer. If you do i
go to the manufacturer, it will be a slow, time consuming process. When 2
youve got car trouble, you want action NOW. 1
f #1 No, not the car yet. The Service. The dealer you buy from is the logical f
jGCOIKK one to service y our car* ft s pretty easy to find out whether a dealer x
gives good service. Just ask some of the people waiting for their cars. J
And, ask others you see driving that car. The reason we stress service is i
that if the dealer is not interested in good service, you may, 1
(1) have to wait to get essential repairs done; 1
(2) be charged for things that were not done;
(3) have to go back and back to get the same thing taken care of. f
Vi" Yes, the car. A good dealer can make you happy with less than the best #
1111* (I a car. But take some extra time to see what the magazines say that rate )
cars. There are big differences in the way cars are made. Some, for 1
instance, are constructed so theyre much safer than others. You would 1
think that in this day and age every car maker would use precautions to
I keep gasoline out of the passenger compartment in case of accident, f
This is not so! #
How good do YOU feel in the car? Does it perform as you expect a 1
modem car? Test drive it on smooth and rough roads. Does it hold the i
road at high speed? Does it accelerate fast enough to pass safely at high f
speed? r
Test drive every car you find with a high rating. )
rAllrfh Dont buy from a car salesman whos using tricks or pressure to get you I
ruill Ilia to say yes. This suggests dishonesty. Buying a car is too important. Find ?
someone honest and deal with them. %
WERE NOT PERFECT AT GODDING & CLARK, BUT WE DO TAKE I
AN INTEREST IN YOU AND YOUR PROBLEMS BEFORE AND I
AFTER YOU BUY A CAR HERE. {
AND ANOTHER THING: WE SELL THE HIGHEST RATED SMALL i
CAR. 1
(This you can find out easy enough at the beautiful new library.) 1
GODDING & CLARK
115 SE 2ND ST., GAINESVILLE 7 WUVDnIsaT I
1 t 2-5 SUNDAY j
3 No Professional Salesmen .... You Talk, We Listen! V

20 pounds on a three-week diet.
Ive been off that now for about
five weeks and holding steady
around 190. In fact, since Billy
Casper put a little back on, hes
heavier than I am now.

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