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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
ACLU Appeals Loyalty Oath To Supreme Court

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The national American Civil Liberties Union has
decided to appeal the U.S. Supreme Court for a
restraining order against the Florida loyalty oath
sometime this week.
If the restraining order is not issued, UF faculty
and staff members will have to sign the revised oath
without the two portions ruled unconstitutional
in the Connell decision by Thursday.
The portions of the oath which require personnel
to swear they are not members of the Communist
party or of any organization that advocates
overthrow of the government were eliminated in the
case involving an Orange County schoolteacher,
Stella Connell.
In a case like this, it is possible for only one
iustice to issue the order, said Norma Munn,

.A8 jAintwak

Vol 62, No. 44

Gators Accept Bowl Bid

Hf Jsj
iLI ft m
AFTERNOON PRESS CONFERENCE
... with Coach Ray Graves and President Stephen C. O'Connell

AVAILABLE WITHIN A FEW DAYS
State Investigating Fire Causes

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The investigation of the extent of damage and cause of Friday
night's Frasier Rogers Hall fire has been turned over to the state
Deputy Fire Marshals office, Physical Plant Director Calvin Greene
said Monday.
Although there has been an unofficial estimate of $250,000
damage, no official estimate will be made available until the fire
marshal's investigation is complete. Greene said the information
should be available within the next few days.
The building is insured for about $407,000 under the state's fire
fund, he said.
Only the back shop portion of the agricultural engineering building
was heavily damaged. The section had been undergoing remodeling.
Two classrooms were also damaged by the fire, and a large portion
of the building was damaged by smoke.
Greene said the main part of the building will be back in use soon
and the office space which suffered no damage except a loss of
electricity is in light use already.
Chief John Dampier of the Gainesville Fire Department said

ine
Florida Alligator

UF-TENNESSEE CLASH AT GATOR BOWL

ATTEMPTS OK FOR RESTRAINING ORDER

chairman of the local ACLU chapter.
If the order is issued it will be good until either a
decision is reached on whether to appeal the
Connell decision, or, until the state requests open
hearing.
Mrs. Munn said no decision has been made on the
appeal of the Connell case. The thirty days allowed
for decisions on whether or not to appeal will not
expire until Nov. 30.
When a request like this is made for a restraining
order only the plaintiffs are present. The state wont
have a representative at the hearing.
However, if it wants to, the state can request an
open hearing.
Then the decision will be up in the air again,
Mrs. Munn said.
The Fifth Federal Circuit Court of Appeals in
New Orleans said Friday it doesnt have jurisdiction

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
Its the Gator Bowl.
The Gators Monday accepted
the bid from the Gator Bowl to
meet Tennessee in the Bowls
Silver Anniversary Classic on
Dec. 27.
We welcome the challenge,
Coach Ray Graves said in a press
conference held at President
Stephen C. OConnells office.
No bowl will have two better
teams.
Tennessee, who had been in
strong contention for the Orange
Bowl, was knocked out of
contention when it fell to Ole
Miss,* 38-0 last Saturday.
The team voted on what bowl
bid the Gators would accept
during a meeting at 11:30
Monday morning.
Knowing that Tennessee, the
probable SEC champ, would be
their opponent if they were to
choose the Gator Bowl,

Monday the conduct and cooperation of the University Police, the
maintenance division and students was just what we like to see.
He said the fire department would like to thank everyone who
helped in reporting the fire and by following orders.
No satisfactory reason for the fire has been reported so far, Greene
said. And no official cause will be listed until the fire marshal's
investigation is complete.
University Police Chief Audie Shuler said the fire marshal's report
should be available this afternoon or Wednesday.
At this point we have no information as to the cause, Shuler
said.
Only two courses had been reassigned Monday afternoon. MCA 301
has been moved to EES (Electrical Engineering South) room 230 and
MCA 306 has been moved to EES room 335.
Most of the courses held in the building are graduate work with the
emphasis on individual studies. The registrars office reported no
other instructors have put in requests ffor replacement classrooms.
Students wishing to find where the class has been moved should
contact the individual instructor, said Assistant Registrar T.A.
Graham.

to rule on the request for the restraining order
against the now revised Florida loyalty oath.
Jerry Bomstein, ACLU lawyer, had filed the
request Tuesday.
The request can be viewed either as an
enlargement on the restraining order which included
only the two portions ruled unconstitutional, or, as
a completely new restraining order on the whole
oath, Mrs. Munn said.
The court apparently based their decision on the
fact that when there is a case in a three-judge
district court, the decision can only be appealed to
the U.S. Supreme Court, Mrs. Munn said.
She said even though the case had been decided
by only one judge, George Young, technically it
could be considered to fall under this ruling.
Although their reasoning was unusual according
to several UF law professors, it was not without
precedent, Mrs. Munn said.

UF versus
Tennessee
December 27

increased their incentive to
accept the Jacksonville offer.
Other bids were offered
Florida, however, Graves would
not disclose which bowls were
involved.
When it appeared that UF
would receive bowl bids, I
authorized Coach Ray Graves to
speak for the university as to
whether or not we would accept
and if we would, which one,
OConnell said.
OConnell considered the
team as one of the most
dedicated group of young men
ever to walk on Florida Field.
It will be to our advantage to
play where so many of our fans
will be able to see us,

Tuesday, November 18, 1969

OConnell added. Im sure we
will make the people of Florida
proud of the Fighting Gators.
The meeting of the two teams
in Jacksonville will pit two
coaches who starred for the
opposing team.
Graves played center for the
Volunteers in 193940-41, and
was part of the Tennessee teams
that went to the Rose Bowl in
*4l, the Sugar Bowl in 4O and
the Orange Bowl in 39.
Tennessee coach Doug Dickey
quarterbacked the Gators to a
victory in the Gator Bowl after
the 1952 season the Gators
first bowl game. They beat
Tulsa, 14-13.
Graves welcomed the chance:
of playing his Alma Mater, but
pointed out hed like nothing
more than to beat them.
Tennessee which was ranked
third previous to their meeting
with Ole Miss has beaten
Chattanooga, 31-0; Auburn,
45-19; Memphis State, 55-16;
Georgia Tech 26-8; Alabama,
SEE 'GATORS' PAGE 5)
UF SPONSORS
OPERATION OUTREACH* a
project to aid Gainesvilles
black community .page 5
Classifieds 11
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 11
Orange and Blue 10
Sports 13

v fSBm x



!, Yhieflorida Alligator, Tuesday, November 18,1969

2

TO TALK WITH SILENT MAJORITY
GOPs Set Campus Tours

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
A Republican task force will
make a tour of state universities
around the beginning of next
year to give the silent
majority of college students a
chance to express themselves.
House Minority Leader Don
Reed, R-Boca Raton, said
Monday that at a caucus in
Tallahassee on Nov. 10, a group
of Republican state
representatives, including Reps.
Charles Davis of Vero Beach and
William James of Delray Beach,
decided to form the task force.
They suggested that we as
Republicans travel to state
campuses for the purpose of
making ourselves available to
student depositions on whatever
they want, Reed said.
This is not an attempt to
UF Zoologist
Featured In
'Look' Mag
UFs own world-famous
zoologist Archie Carr together
with his equally-famous green
turtles is in the spotlight once
again.
A story on the 60-year-old UF
professors 30-year-long study of
the migration of the giant
sea-going turtle is featured in the
Dec. 2 issue of Look Magazine,
available on the stands today.
The U.S. Navy is currently
underwriting Carrs investigation
of the flight of the turtle,
because, as Looks article says,
the green turtle may know
something it doesnt know about
navigation
The turtles live off the
Brazilian coast, but breed on
seve n and-a-half-mile-long
Ascension Island, 1,200 miles
away off the coast of Africa.
This navigational feat,
considered impossible until Carr
proved its truth, has been the
main emphasis of Carrs study.
MINI-POSTER
CAN AN aECTioN
BE ANNULLED?
O 0

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville. Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator w3l not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one

bypass the administration, but
to get our fingers on the pulse of
what young people at the
universities around the state are
thinking.
Reed said there is a severe
lack of communication between
responsible students and state
legislators.
We hear from the militants
every day through their actions,
but responsible students are
prone to remain silent, he said.
We want to give the silent
majority the chance to express
themselves rather than the
militant minority.
The task force probably will
begin its four soon after the first
of the year, because the special
session of the legislature set for
Dec. 1-10 and the students
Christmas holidays do not allow
enough time to do it sooner,
Reed said.
In February task force
- Jr m
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isl i
B'
HF > 1
ARCHIE CARR
... turtle expert
He proved it by an extensive
tagging program which also
showed the turtles almost always
return to the same nesting spot
on Ascension each year.
Another mystery Carr is
attempting to explain is the
disappearance of baby turtles
during their first year of life.
They swim into the ocean and
do not return until a year later
half-grown.
Carrs latest attempt at solving
the mystery of the turtles begins
next spring when he will attach a
20-lb. electronic float to four to
six female turtles and make
them swim the last 100 miles of
their journey to Ascension
Island under his surveillance.
And after that he plans to
turn the task of tracking the
turtles over to a Nimbus
satellite, which has tracking
abilities much greater than
normal equipment.
Look is only one of many
magazines which have featured
articles on Carrs
accomplishments over the past
30 years. Among the others are
National Geographic Magazine
and Scientific Review.

members will be tied up with
committee meetings and
preparation for the next session
of the legislature, he said.
The format of the tour has
not been decided yet, but the
suggestion has been made that
Young Republicans clubs be
used for contacts on campuses
and for setting up forums.
Reed said this method
probably would be used with
one day, including an evening
session, spent at each major
university. The tour will last
approximately one week.
The task force will operate on
members own funds, Reed said.
Reed explained the state
cannot fund the tour because it
only authorizes travel expenses
and per diem for official state
business by, committees,
determined by a house majority
and Speaker of the House.
Because Republicans are
minority party, they cannot
establish an official committee
to obtain state funds.
But, Reed said, the finances
are no problem.
The members are happy to
do at their own expense.
Between five and nine
lawmakers have shown interest
in the tour, and selection for the
task force will be determined by
who is financially able and
whose schedule will allow him to
make the trip, Reed said.
After the tour is completed,
the task force will report its
findings to a caucus with any
recommendations it might have
for legislation.
Reed emphasized the task
force is a Republican group, but
he said he would like to see
Democrats join the effort.
Population
Talk Tonight
Zero population Growth
Inc. and the Population
Control Seminar will jointly
sponsor a lecture tonight on
the population explosion in
Florida and the world.
The lecture will be held in
Walker Auditorium at 8 p.m.
There is no admission, and all
are welcome. Speakers will be
Dr. Olle Elgerd and Dr.
Seymour Block.

seminole
senior
pictures
*6-9 pm NOV. 17-20
GREEK MAKE-UP
NOV. 21 9-12,1-5, 6-9
Sign up in Seminole office
or call 392-1687 12 pm-spm
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ROBIN HOODS?
Bandits from Kappa Sigma are loose. Chris Schauseil was cornered
in the Alligator Newsroom Monday but she gave her share to the
United Fund to escape. Left to right are Danny Kandel, Miss
Schauseil, Terry and Sandee Martin.
Student Senate Will Get
Stadium Seating Report

The Student Senate will hear
reports on two perennial trouble
spots in their meeting Tuesday
night.
The reports will come from
two special committees
appointed to investigate election
procedures and football seating.
Election Study Committee
Chairman Walt Hardenstine will
present proposals that hopefully
will lead to the elimination of
such problems as voter eligibility
which in the past has led to
voiding of elections.
Secretary of Athletics Lee
Greene will report on proposals
for a spirit section to replace
the now defunct card section.
Senate Majority leader Sam
Poole will propose another
committee to investigate the
appointment of the senate.
This is to keep
misrepresentation accusations
from being used as political
footballs, Poole said. We hope

to see fairer representation of
ideas come out of this
committee.
The legislators will convene at
7:30 in room 349 of the Reitz
Union.
Directories
In Union
Student directories will be
distributed through today on the
ground floor of the Reitz Union.
They will be available after
today at the activities desk on
the third floor of the Union.
Off-campus students can pick
up their directories between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m. Oncampus
students have received them
through housing, married
students on campus can obtain
directories through village
mayors and fraternities and
sororities have received copies
for their members.



Frosh Council
Taking Initiative

By RALPH BETANCOURT
Alligator Write*
Freshman Council, revived
to give freshmen a voice in
UF affairs, has taken the
initiative in making that voice
heard.
Vice president of the
council, Gary Nevins, said,
The council must make
itself felt by taking the
initiative and coming up with
much more action. We are
going to surprise the Student
Senate.
Regarding some of the
projects discussed at their
first meeting, Nevins said the
council is looking into fire
equipment at various
dormitories. He said the
equipment in the newer
dorms is satisfactory, but in
the older dorms, especially in
Murphree, many floors either
have no extinguishers or
unworkable ones.
The council is also
planning a bonfire before the
first home basketball game.
The purpose of it is to boost

HEW Delays
Cydamale Ban
Seven Months
WASHINGTON (UPI) A
government ban on artificially
sweetened foods containing
cydamates has been delayed
seven months.
Secretary Robert H. Finch of
Health, Education and Welfare
announced during the weekend
that the deadline had been
pushed back from Feb. 1,1970,
to Sept. 1,1970.
The deadline change does not
affect the order to remove soft
drinks containing the artificial
sweeteners from the market by
Jan. 1.
The immediate ban on using
cyclamates in the production of
food and beverages also remains
in effect.
Finch said the action was
being taken to coordinate the
U.S. phaseout of cyclamates
with Canada, which is taking
similar action.
This is particularly true in
regard to the seasonably
processed fruits and vegetables,
Finch said. Suppliers should be
on the same cycle and phaseout
on the same basis.
Teacher Appears
Before Fans
Fan-shaped classrooms at the
Dobyns-Bennett High School in
Kingsport, Tenn., focus student
attention more readily on the
teacher.
CLARK GABLE STARS
tonite in the GREATEST
'GONEWIimfStwIND
tonight at the Suburbia
DRIVE IN THEATRE
ADVERTISEMENT

student spirit, specifically of
the freshmen, and to revive
an old UF tradition in which
each freshman had to supply
the fire with his weight in
wood.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said the
council has more power than
people realize. First, it
consists of elected officials,
and second, it has the backing
of Student Government in all
of their recommendations.
Adviser Kevin Davey said the
council is backed by the
senate and Shepherd.
Shepherd has appointed
Council President Jeff Crane,
to the new bloc seating
committee, and plans to
appoint more members to
all types of groups where
freshman opinion is
advantageous.
We are now in the slow
process of organization,
Nevins said, but we want to
push for reforms and become
active. The first step, he
said, would be acquiring a

j half-truth
m the whole half-truth \
You see ads like that every day. Maybe you even think I
you're not being told the whole story. Well, maybe I
they're only telling you about the benefits. m
The Commercial Bank of Gainesville would like to clear 1
the air. You see, we have a Free Checking Account. In 1
fact, as long as you maintain a 100.00 minimum daily 1
balance; you can write as many checks as you wish. This 1
is quite a savings over a year's time. The important thing I
H is to remember that you will never have a service charge. I
So quit being confused! I
I === JTHE COMMERCIAL BANK I
flllThte OF GAINESVILLE
I LLLUP 1717 NORTHWEST 13th STRKKT I
Membar F.D.I.C.

CHARLES SHEPHERD
... council has power"
budget which, at the present
time, they do not have.
We want to be recognized
as one of the most effective
voices on campus, Nevins
said.
We want to give the
freshmen an opportunity to
participate in the activities
and decisions of the
university, Shepherd said.
Also SG Secretary of the
Interior, Davey said, Until
now the freshmen have been
left out. The council gives
them the chance to get
involved with SG and the
university.

Cutbacks In Payments
For Welfare Families
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) State Welfare Director Emmett
Roberts said Monday a recomputation of the welfare caseload may
permit a cutback of less than 10 per cent in welfare payments to
families with dependent children, but it is too early to tell for sure.
Health and Rehabilitation Secretary James Bax announced last
week the payments would be cut about 10 per cent to avoid a
projected $1.7 million deficit by the end of the fiscal year, but one of
Roberts aides said over the weekend a recomputation could hold the
reduction to five or six per cent.
It will be about two to three weeks before we could really fed we
could nail it down,*'Roberts said.
He added there was no reason to believe the deficit would be less
than the projected $1.7 million.
He said he doubted anything more than a 10 per cent cutback will
be needed and hopefully it might be somewhat less.**
But he explained the recomputation of more than SO,OOO cases
contained many variables* and he was in no position to predict
whether the impact on individual welfare mothers and their children
might be lessened.
Earlier, Assistant Programs Director Walter B. Conwell said he
believed the recomputation might result in a smaller cutback than
expected because the department had feared it was not in compliance
with a federal requirement that state standards be periodically
updated.
A later study showed the standards were brought up to date last
year, he said.
Roberts blamed the need for the cutback on a caseload which
increased far more rapidly than projected.

TuMday, Novwnbar 18,1968, The Florida AMigator,

3



4

Th ftfKidfl Alfigtfor, Tuesday/foovember 18/1969

Man In Southwest
Broward First Floor

By RON BATES
Alligator Correspondent
Theres a man living in a girls
dorm for the first time at UF.
Cary and Gail Gavant have
been living in the Southwest
Broward Hall Resident Advisors
(R.A.) apartment since they
were married Sept. 1,1969.
The very first day we came
into the apartment, we walked
around and everything was
beautiful, Cary said.
Everything was perfect until we
walked into the bedroom and
found this BUNK bed.
Gail Gavant, 4MS, now an
RA., has lived in Broward for
the past three years.
Gail had applied for the RA.
position in February. Broward
had reduced their total R.A.S
from eight to five, leaving only
one occupant per apartment.
Faced with going through the
appropriate housing channels
late in the spring quarter, after
they knew they would be getting
married, the situation didnt
pose much of a problem. Most
of the Broward area counselors
and advisors already knew Cary
and Gail, because she had been
involved in dorm activities.
The biggest obstacle was fear
that the girls wouldnt come
down in the evenings to talk to
us for fear of disturbing us,
Gafl said.
A big plus in their favor
was that Cary could offer a
mans viewpoint in helping solve
some of the girls problems.
Eventually, with the help of
Miss Phyllis Mable, director of
jTgsnl
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Resident Counseling and
Housing, the Gavants were given
an apartment on the first floor.
Although Cary and Gail lived
only about a block apart in
Atlanta, Ga., they never knew
each other until they met on the
UF campus in September of
1966.
Cary, a member of the track
team for four years, sees several
disadvantages in living among
several hundred girls.
He sometimes works out and
claims he draws attention when
returning through the lobby.
Most people dont know that
Im married and that I live here.
They just think I come to see a
girl with my dirty, sweaty track
clothes on.
A senior economics major, he
enjoys talking stocks and bonds
every once in a while and its
impossible to find anyone to
intelligently discuss them with.
One evening, Cary said, he
received a phone call from a
male who swore he was trapped
on the third floor by girls who
were tormenting him. It turned
out to be his former roommate

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1 in-

i..* 8
' mXmSmmmm:
CARY AND GAIL GAVANT
... first RA couple at UF coed dorm

who was pulling a prank,
explained Gail.
When Cary went to buy a
parking sticker he told the
officer that he lived in Broward
and, No, it wasnt co-ed yet.
I thought he was about to
pull out his gun and arrest me
before I told him I was married

to the R.A., he said.
Cary claims that no one ever
checked up to find out if they
were really married, since most
of the counselors were
well-acquainted with the couple.
But after Cary began
mentioning the idea, What if
someone*" could get away with

living together?*, I showed our
wedding pictures around,
assured Gail.
All in all, Cary is most
relieved that, Now I dont have
to walk all the way back to
Tolbert Hall after saying good
night.



-a .
Operation Outreach AUlied
At Gville Black Community

By JUDY PIVARNIK
Alligator Correspondent
Aid to the black community of Gainesville will
soOn be coming from a UF-sponsored project called
Operation Outreach.
Development of the project began November 6
when Sam Taylor, ILW, was appointed director of
Outreach by Roy Mitchell, director of the Office of
Minority Affairs.
Workers on the project will be volunteers and
students eligible for work-study. Students whose
parents make no more than $7,000 a year are
eligible for work-study, according to I. Douglas
Turner, director of student financial aid.
SAMSON Chairman Marsha Kaufman is assisting
in the planning of Outreach. She said that once the
project was out of its planning stages SAMSON
would supply volunteers.
Present plans divide Outreach into nine areas:
tutoring services
t medical referral
§ legal referral
t consumer education and protection
college and university referral
i financial aid for students
job training
job clearinghouse
recreation assistance
Taylor feels all these services will help fill a
vacuum in the black community.
A progressive approach will guide the tutoring
services, according to Taylor. There will be no
mini-classes, instead trained tutors will instruct
students on an individual basis.
Medical and legal referrals will be handled by
medical and law students. They will inform the
black people of their legal rights and medical needs.
Consumer education and protection also is a very
vital part of Outreach, Taylor said.

IN OPEN DISCUSSION
SMC Asks Recognition

Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC) appeared
before the UF Committee on
Student Organizations Monday,
in a bid to receive university
recognition.
The committee announced no
decision Monday but said they
would notify SMC in the near
future of their recommendation.
Their recommendation is in
turn considered by Vice
President for Student Affairs
Lester L. Hale and the final
decision on recognition lies with
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
The meeting took the form of
informal questions and answers
between members of the
committee and officers of SMC.
The committees main
concerns seemed to be whether
the anti-war groups statement
of purpose to organize against
the war would be expanded to
include other issues besides the
war and, secondly, SMC funding.
What would happen, one
committee member asked, if all
the troops were brought home
tomorrow?
Some people in SMC, said

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John Sugg, SMCs secretary,
feel many issues like black
liberation are intrinsically
related to the war. The same
system thai perpetrates the war
oppresses black people.
Director of Student Activities
Bill Cross pointed out to SMC
that they were not allowed to
have fund-raising activities on
Previously, several
committee members had asked
where SMC obtained funds.
SMC finance committee
co-chairman Kris Loken said
most funds came from
contributions and the SMC
officers contended that no
monies had been raised for
profits but to meet expenses.
The members of the UF
committee were chairman Frank
Maturo, Cross, Secretary, Milton
Christian, Edwon Kirkland,
Thomas Scott, Scott Holloway,
Bob Merkel, Mary Tuns tall and
Cinthia Utley.
SMC began at UF this summer
and now claims to be UFs
largest student organization with
membership exceeding 500. It
organized the Oct. 15 Vietnam

The consumer division of Outreach, headed by
Jim Sykes, 6AG, will help black people make more
efficient use of their buying power. It will also help
them alter their buying habits to achieve better
diets.
Sykes said there will be an investigation to
establish if any local stores charge exorbitant rates
to black people. Credit practices of large stores will
also be examined.
My main concern is that individuals paid a
minimal wage be able to stretch their wages to the
greatest possible extent, Sykes said.
Outreach will also help black high school students
plan college careers. Information about schools
actively recruiting black students and financial aid
opportunities will be provided.
The purpose of job training will be to instruct
black people how to get a job as well as how to
learn die skill, Taylor said. The job clearinghouse
will then help bring the jobs to the people and get
knowledge of the jobs to the people, he added.
Outreachs recreation efforts will be coordinated
with the Gainesville recreation department.
Outreach workers will work in existing community
centers and later establish their own centers.
Taylor said that plans were under way to set up a
day care center at Kennedy Homes.
The one thing holding up the project is getting
matching funds, Taylor said.
Right now up to $20,000 is available to
Outreach, Turner said. However, any money
granted to Outreach must be matched 20 per cent
by a local source.
The available $20,000 comes from a federal grant
which specifies that it be used for an off-campus
project, Turner said.
There will be jobs for as many students who
come in, Taylor said. Everyone involved in the
project will benefit.

Moratorium and sent several
hundred people to the
Washington mass mobilization
last weekend.
Gators Pitted
Against Vo Is
fFROM PAGE oNe||
41-14; Georgia 17-3 and South
Carolina, 29-14.
The Gators have played in the
Gator Bowl four times for a 3-1
record, with victories over
Baylor, Penn State and Tulsa.
Their only loss came against
w Mississippi.
Florida will be the home team
and according to Graves, the
two teams will play with our
football.

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5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 18,1969

6

Defense Argues For
Mistrial Os Chicago 7
CHICAGO (UPI) The defense argued Monday a mistrial should
be declared in the riot conspiracy trial of seven men because of police
infiltration and spying into affairs of the defendants.
U.S. District Court Judge Julius J. Hoffman ruled that the defense
charges were unsubstantiated and denied the motion.
Defense attorneys continued cross-examining police undercover
agent Irwin Bock as the government reportedly neared an end to
presentation of its case.
The seven defendants are accused of conspiring to incite the rioting
that erupted in Chicago immediately before and during the 1968
Democratic National Convention.
Defense attorney Leonard Weinglass said undercover agents had
been so active in infiltrating the defense camp that lawyers are not
sure who, even among their own staff, they can trust.
He said Bock infiltrated so effectively that Weinglass confided
defense secrets to him before the trial began.
Weinglass said that since the trial started, the defense has discovered
that Chicago policemen are going through waste baskets taken from
the defense offices.
The defenses October telephone bill was delivered opened and
resealed with tape, he said.
Its impossible for us to prepare our defense not knowing who in
our office to trust or what material might reach the governments eyes
before it is presented in court, Weinglass said.
He said 23 of the first 42 government witnesses to testify were
undercover spies or paid police informants.
It is not unreasonable to assume that this type of
activity ... continues, he said.
Joe Kennedy Unconcious,
Family Gathers At Estate

HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (UPI)
- Joseph P. Kennedy, 81,
patriarch of the Kennedy family,
was reported unconscious and
near death Monday after
suffering a heart attack. Family
members gathered at his home.
Kennedy, father of a US.
President and two senators, was
not conscious, a source close
to the family said. The family
was watching and praying.
His wife Rose and Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy, the sole
surviving son, cancelled public
appearances elsewhere in the
state to be near the ailing eldest
Kennedy.
Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis, widow of President
John F. Kennedy, flew in from
Greece. R. Sargent Shriver, US.
ambassador to France, and his
wife Eunice Kennedy Shriver
also gathered with other
members of the family at the
Kennedy compound on

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The senior Kennedy,
ambassador to Great Britain in
193741, suffered a heart attack
Saturday. Doctors at first said it
was a minor setback but his
condition worsened Sunday and
he lapsed into unconsciousness
by Monday.
Concern for the ailing
Kennedy became apparent a
week ago when Mrs. Kennedy
said the family would not take
its annual trip to Palm Beach,
Fla., for the first time in many
years because her husband was
in poor health.
Priests from nearby St.
Francis Xavier Roman Catholic
Church, where Mrs. Kennedy
attends daily Mass when at the
compound, administered the last
rites of the Catholic Church to
the former ambassador two or
three times within the past
month, it was learned.

~ by Brickmon
be small society
I'M
/AY THINS THINS-11.19
-11.19 THINS-11.19 ggi.KJVoJ
RETURNS TO WHITE HOUSE
Nixon Prepares For Soto Talks

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon returned to the
White House from Camp David,
Md., Monday to prepare for
talks with Prime Minister Eisaku
Sato of Japan over conditions
for return of Okinawa to
Japanese control.
Sato, whose political future
may depend on the outcome of
the three days of discussions
starting Wednesday, arrived at
Dulles International Airport in
Virginia expressing confidence
that my present visit will prove
fruitful.
Nixon, who flew to his

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presidential retreat in the
mountains of western Maryland
late Sunday for an overnight
stay, worked alone on the fiscal
1971 federal budget he will send
Congress in January.
He was accompanied by his

wife, Pat, and elder daughter,
Tricia.
The Nixons will entertain
Sato and his wife Wednesday
night at a state dinner at the
White House.
An estimated 700,000
students and workers
demonstrated in Japan Sunday
in an effort to block Satos
departure for Washington.
Satos opponents expressed
fear Japan would be humiliated
if the United States retains use
of bases on Okinawa for military
operations in Korea and
Vietnam.



ASTRONAUTS PREPARE FOR MOON LANDING
Apollo 12 Enters Lunar Gravity Monday

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) Apollo 12s space pilots,
flying a route of no-return,
whipped behind the moon
Monday night and blasted
themselves into lunar orbit for
Americas second moon landing.
Since the spaceship could not

S.Viet Official Disputes Report
Os U.S. Executing 700 Civilians

QUANG NGAI, South
Vietnam (UPI) A South
Vietnamese official, disputing
reports that American
infantrymen executed up to 700
civilians in one village, said
Monday the deaths were caused
instead by U.S. air and artillery
strikes and the toll was perhaps
300.
The official, Col. Ton That
Khien, military chief of Quan
Ngai Province, said in an
interview that the air and
artillery barrages leveled the
village of Son My in March,
1968.
He said he believed the attack
was ordered in the Viet
Cong-controlled area to avenge
the death of U.S. troops who
had been killed there by snipers.
The incident happened during
a search and destroy mission by
troops of the U.S. Armys
Americal Division.
Khiens comments
contradicted reports from some
of Son Mys 1,500 residents that
a 100-man U.S. Army patrol
stormed into the village, emptied
huts and opened fire on men,
women and children with their
automatic rifles. They said there
were 70 to 80 survivors.
The Army is holding Lt.
William Calley Jr., 26, of Miami,
Fla., at Fort Benning, Ga., on
murder charges in connection
Qmwp a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida
- .. ~ sjo,

communicate with earth from
behind the moon, 32 tense
minutes elapsed while the world
waited for word from Navy
commanders, Charles Pete
Conrad, 39, Alan L. Bean, 37,
and Richard F. Gordon,4o.
It was the first time

with the case.
A squad leader who served in
Calleys platoon, Sgt. David
Mitchell, 29, of Frandsville, La.,
is being investigated at Fort
Hood, Tex., for allegedly
committing assault with intent
to murder in the incident.
I dont believe the
Americans shot the civilians like
the villagers say, the
40-year-old Khien told UPI
Monday. I have worked with
the Americal Division many
times.
I know this is not how they

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astronauts had rocketed into
moon orbit from anything other
than a free-return-trajectory.
Had anything happened to the
main command ship engine, the
space pilots would have had to
scramble to get home.
A free return trajectory allows

operate. Many times I have seen
them try to save the lives of
people in Viet Cong areas at a
risk to themselves.
But yes, people told me
there was much bombing and
artillery near the village during
the operation and that many
people died.
I think perhaps 300 were
killed, probably by the artillery
and bombing. I talked to the
villagers four months after the
incident and they said they did
not see the Americans shoot
anyone.

astronauts to loop around the
moon and head for earth even if
their rocket fails to fire, but
mission planners had Apollo 12
deviate from this route so they
could carry out a pinpoint
landing on the moon, and
still get the sun lighting
conditions that are required.
The astronauts lowered
themselves into the lunar orbit
by firing a 5 minute, 55.4
second braking blast that slowed
them from 8,146 miles an hour
to 5,470 mph.
Their egg-shaped orbit,
ranging from about 71 to 194
miles above the lunar surface
will be trimmed Tuesday to a
more circular route about 62 to
74 miles high.
From that point, Conrad and
Bean will fly the lunar lander
Intrepid to the surface of the
moon, landing at 1:53 a.m.
Wednesday.
They will spend 32 hours on
the lunar surface during the
$350 million mission, gathering
about 100 pounds of moon
rocks and setting up a nuclear
powered scientific base during

Tuesday

two separate moon walks
totaling up to eight hours.
Before slipping behind the
moon for the first time, ground
controllers gave the astronauts
some fresh instructions for
emergency procedures to follow
if anything happened to the
main engine.
In the event of such a failure,
the astronauts still could have
fallen back on their descent
engines to get back on a
homeward bound track.
But spacecraft communicator
Ed Gibson explained since the
spacecrafts trajectory to the
moon was slightly different than
first planned, it would be
necessary to take a different aim
in the event anything went
wrong.

7



8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 18,1989

A Certain Charm, An Inner Beauty ...

Speaking Out
Sewage, Alice Pollution
By Charles Harper

It has been evident to many
of us in the universtiy
community for some time that
our sewage treatment plant is
inadequate. I, for one, was
pleased to see Mr. Allens article
(Nov. 10) which confirmed this
fact.
It does not take much of a
technician to conclude merely
by glancing at the polluted water
being released by the plant or
sniffing the air nearby that the
teatment has been incomplete. It
should be obvious to all that the
plant must be upgraded as soon
as possible.
I wish to point out several
factors, however, which were
lightly stressed or not mentioned
at all in the article. First, the
unpurified water leaving the
plant is not piped away, but is
dumped into the on-campus
wildlife preserve and recreational
area, Lake Alice. In other words,
Lake Alice is polluted. Or in still
different words, the lake is an
open sewer.
Granted, the amount of
suspended materials in the
sewage plant outflow is
relatively small, and any normal
body of water the size of Lake

Alligator Staff
Naat Sanders Mery Toomey Janie Gould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley Anne Freedman
Assistant News Editor Feature Editor
Published' by students of the; University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
4
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices in Rtxmi 330. Reit/
Union. Phone 392-1681 or 392 1683.
Opinions expressed in the l-lorida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of l lorida.

Alice would purify the water
very effeciently. However, the
lake is a long way from being
normal, which brings me to my
second point.
The addition of nutrients to
Lake Alice, which result from
the normal breakdown of sewage
in the plant, has allowed the
insidious water hyacinth to
proliferate and blanket the
surface of the water. The result
of this occurrence has been the
almost complete extinction of
the normal plants and animals in
the water which would allow the
lake to complete the task which
the treatment plant has failed to
do.
The cycle is seemingly
inescapable. The nutrients
fertilize the hyacinths; the
hyacinths cover the lake and
block out the light to organisms
below; they die out and the lake
can no longer cleanse itself of
the untreated sewage which
passes through the plant during
peak hours.
The third point I wish to
stress is that Lake Alice has a
pumping station at its west end
which controls the level of the
lake by pumping the overflow

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor
y.

into the ground water. The city
of Gainesville currently gets its
drinking water from the ground
water. A few years ago a marker
dye was released along with the
treatment plant outflow into the
ground water; the dye showed
up in the tap water a few days
later. Is this any way to run a
sewage plant? You bet it isnt!
Recent events on campus have
focused attention to Lake Alice.
Two basic factions have
polarized from the discussions,
one in favor of retaining the lake
as a wildlife sanctuary (a
function which it is performing
poorly at present) and the other
visualizes the lake as a boating
pond surrounded by picnic
areas.
Regardless of which groups
wishes are fulfilled, the
treatment plant outflow must be
diverted from the lake (and
hopefully from our source of
drinking water) before there can
be the faintest hope of
effectively controlling the
hyacinths and renovating it. I
think it is imperative that this
course of action be included in
any proposal to upgrade the
sewage treatment plant.

%vy ~=^ > jfnff'inirn, V'r i I
*

editorial
Come Together
It was cold in Washington Saturday.
But the cold came from the lashing winds, not the
emotions and actions of the more than one half million
anti-war protesters.
The cold came from the barred wmdows of government
buildings, from the patches of green uniforms seen behind
them, from the cordoned-off White House, whose Oval
Office over-looked the masses of Americans gathered
together for a cause and whose windows remained empty,
and from behind the machine gun lodged on the northwest
comer of its lawn.
It did not come from the endless lines of shivering
protesters massed against the cruel winter winds at the foot
of the Washington Monument.
For, despite the freezing temperatures and piercing gales
whipping through these legions, there was a warmth and
communion among people. It was a feeling seldom known
in a society grown too sophisticated for that.
There was a warmth brought by conviction, by
dedication to a belief, which reached the inner being long
before the icy winds.
Peace... peace now. .. please!
Stop the war!
These were the cries of Saturdays March Against Death.
And under these banners, pleading for the President of
the United States to call a halt to the killing of American
soldiers in Vietnam, were the faces of America.
Faces of the young from every state in the union, half
hidden behind their long hair and wool scarves that caused
millions to set them apart and label them Communists.
Faces of the stereotyped American businessman, who
carried an American flag instead of his briefcase and echoed
Establishment.
Faces of the average American housewife and mQther,
thinking of her son who died and not wanting another
mother somewhere to know the same pain.
Faces of the old, even more wrinkled against the cold
winds, who had seen three other wars and did not want to
see another rip through the nation.
These were the faces, the emotions, banded together to
begin a peace and reunite a divided country.
But there were other faces, lost in the crowd and far
outnumbered by those truly desiring the peace they called
for.
They were the faces of hate, of irrationality, of sickness.
Charging the Departments of Justice and Labor with flags
of the Viet Cong in hand, these faces claimed the headlines
and tarnished the feeling of the demonstration.
They handed the administration the violence they so
vocally feared.
They gave Vice President Spiro Agnew an issue to
clamor about for months to come.
And they gave coordinators of the March Against Death a
sense of frustration and despair equaling that from the
policy-makers of this country.
In a day showing the good of American anti-war
protesters, they revealed the bad and the ugly.
Their actions were deplored by the New Mobilization
leaders.
They were deplored by the marchers who cursed them
beneath their breaths as they ran from the tear gas.
They did not belong in Washington that day.
And they were rejected as the hypocritical peddlers of
violence they proved themselves to be.
For the vast majority of the marchers were there for
peace in peace.



whimsical Fancy No Solution To Vietnam

MR. EDITOR:
The editions of the Alligator
received here are read with great
interest. Like most Americans I
have remained silent in my
response, but on reading several
letters to the editor in the 27
October edition, I was amazed at
what little knowledge of the true
situation several students had. A
political dissertation is not
planned here, only remarks on
statements made by Mr. Bill
Joyner and Mr. Steve Lerman.
Mr. Joyner, like many
Americans, feels that the troops

w jOIM V jap
/ Yf m R ''me I-
SIRn^NEa?

Choir Forced Into Veterans Ceremony

MR. EDITOR:
I am very much concerned
with certain aspects of the
November 11th Veterans Day
ceremony held on the Plaza of
the Americas.
In an effort to make the
ceremony appear as non-political

Stand Up, Subversives

MR. EDITOR:
The loyalty oath question is a
stimulating and controversial
subject. Too much has been said
against the loyalty oath while
very little intelligent
argumentation has evolved in
defense of it. This letter is
written with the intent of
bringing out a few of the often
overlooked benefits of the
loyalty oath.
One of the fundamental
tenets of the pro-oath sweares
was stated by Walt Kelly several
years ago. The important thing
is not who is guilty but who can
be suspected of guilt. If
subversives would only stand up
and be counted there would be
no room for the creation of such
great men as Joe McCarthy and
Tom Slade. Instead of revealing
themselves, however, the tricky
devils are apt to lurk in the
darkness behind your garage or
stand up in front of a crowd and
spout a bunch of long words.
(Long words in themselves are
grounds for suspicion.)
By enforcing the oath taking
we are assured that anyone who
signs is either a fine upstanding
American or a communist AND
a liar. In this manner we are able
to open two distinct areas for

could just be packed up and
brought home in a few days. It
seems not much thought has
been given to the logistics of
moving 500,000 plus men and
equipment. If the administration
began the withdrawal today it
would take well over a year to
reduce the American presence to
Pre-Johnson strength.
It must also be taken into
consideration that the NVA and
the VC are not willing to allow
American units to leave quietly
as was proven by the Marines
attempt to withdraw this year. It

as possible, all publicity for it
carefully omitted reference to
the fact that it was originally
proposed by Barry Goldwater as
a sign of support for the
American troops in Viet Nam.
This fact was reported in your
paper some time prior to
November 11th, but all further

suspicion: (1) the Non-signers
who are suspect from the word
go and (2) the communist
signers who, of course, are the
real hard core suspects. In
order to ferret out a communist
signer you need the investigative
ability of at least a state senator.
The original oath was the best
one. The logic-chopping of the
ACLU has little place in such
matters. When it conies to
signing an oath youve got to
think in terms of emotion, love
of country, desire to crush the
enemy within, votes, etc. NOT
reason.
If oaths or the signing of
oaths were related to reason we
would be required to swear that
we have read the Florida State
constitution. Thats a little too
much to ask. I gladly signed the
oath without reading word one
of the constitution and Im
damn proud of it, too. And Im
proud of everybody else that
signed the oath with no specific
knowledge of the constitution.
Theres been some plain and
fancy oath taking around the UF
campus in the last few weeks.
There are an awful lot of fine
folks here who have showed the
boys in Tallahassee a thing or
two about oath swearing. GO
GATORS!
HENRY BAKER, 7AS

was only possible by the 101st
Airborne Division covering the
rear of the Marines and keeping
the enemy from inflicting heavy
casualties on the vulnerable units
trying to leave Vietnam:
Mr. Joyner, you can be well
assured the VC would not only
kill those who had made a profit
from the war but everyone eke
in any government position
down to the local school
teachers. This has been his
policy in the past why should
he change now? It must be kept

reference to and advertising for
the ceremony stressed the in
memoriam aspect rather than
the original political bias.
The affair was further
worsened by the editorial which
appeared in your Veterans Day
issue. It is at least disturbing, if
not actually frightening, to see
phrases in an American
newspaper such as "... the war*
may not be honorable morally,
the soldiers individual fight
certainly is not without
honor... a job done in the
interest of our country,
regardless of the morality of
those interests ... those men did
their job without argument.
They are highly reminiscent

= WL. iBB
;M X m %
r?VHKjX^^^^^ft^3lK\|tJjfilKl
MUKTSS, m I *j| Jgj
jT\\ % I^4

of the arguments for the defense
at the Military Tribunals at
Numburg JM1946 and at the
Eichmann trial in 1961. It would
be interesting to me personally
to know whether this was
merely an unfortunate choice of
words on your part or whether it
is your personal credo.
Finally, I must strongly
protest the breach of trust
perpetrated by Dr. Elwood P,

% OPEN FORUM:-

in mind the enemy is a good
communist and the ends justifies
the means.
It is hard to see Mr. Joyners
point that American troops
destroy the countryside; they
spend most of their time
building villages, roads and
bridges which the enemy
destroys whether there are
civilians in them or not.
Mr. Lermans analogy on
flame-throwers and napalm is
quite interesting. It seems he has
never talked to anyone who has
been on the receiving end of

Winning Spirits
There, Mr. Allen

MR. EDITOR:
The letter concerning the
Gators, printed November 13th
from All-American Armchair
Quarterback, Mr. Allen, has
finally prompted me to answer
all of our great fair weather fans.
A question of what happened
to the winning spirit was asked

Keister in forcing some members
of the University Choir to
partake in a program which was
so obviously politically
motivated. He not only forced
his politically biased and
dictorial will on these members
of the choir, but employed the
most primitive form of
subterfuge in obligating the
entire group; namely waiting
until twenty-four hours before
the ceremony to announce to
the choir that he had committed
them to participation.
The University choir is funded
by money taken from each and
every fee-paying student at UF. I
strongly recommend that it is
time for the vociferous

minority of students who chose
not to participate in Veterans
Day ceremony to question
whether Dr. Keister has the right
to expect 100% cf our student
body to an organization he
so pompously commits to
supporting political
demonstrations which attract
less than 3% of our students
RON, ARGENT ATI, 4AS
* V t l

Tuesday, Noasmbar 18,1988, Tha Florida Alligator,

enemy fire. It must be brought
to his attention that napalm is a
highly effective weapon for
destroying an enemy who is
about to take your life. Napalm
is not dropped on crowds of
civilians encircled by American
troops, it is dropped on soldiers
actively engaged in cutting off
your life.
The Vietnam war is very real
and cannot be solved by un-real
flights of whimsical fancy.
STEPHEN THOMAS
Ist AIR CAVDIV

in the above mentioned letter.
Since when is a 6-1-1 record
with a good chance for a bowl
game not a winning spirit? Logic
like that fits in perfect with the
brilliant sports writers from
Tampa and Jacksonville who are
Go Gators as long as were
winning.
I realize our fair weather fans
are not willing to give a great
sophomore a break. Its easy to
sit in the stands and expect 10
great games with no pressure
getting to these first year varsity
players who were tabbed to go
anywhere from 2-8 to 4-6.
As for the comments about
Hunter Bowen and John
Schnebly, I would like to suggest
that Mr. Allen go to Coach
Graves office on the second
floor on the west side of the
stadium and tell him of his
talents. There are plenty of pads
in the Florida Gym locker
Rooms that have been waiting
years to go on such talented
shoulders.
By the way, Mr. Allen should
watch the films to see that first,
the fake field goal play had been
blown dead before the ball was
snapped and second John
Schnebly had to run for his life
just to get the pass off. In
reference to Bowens punting,
granted he had two bad punts
early, but no damage was done
due to a great defense. After
that he had seven good punts
when we needed them.
I realize you fair-weather fans
don't like to lose but neither
do the fans who support the
Gators win or lose. Most
important, neither do the
players who not only spend
three hours going all out on
Saturday but also many hours
Sunday through Friday working
to win.
For those who think this is an
easy routine and think they are
better than our present players,
Coach Graves would be glad to
see you., Go see him you
armchair jocks.
GEORGE TROLLER, 4BA
RICHARD LA TINA, 3AS
ED KNOPF, 2UC
FRED DeWINKLER, 3EG
JIM SLA TTER Y, 3AS
DAVID WHITE, 3EG
JOHN MORTON, 3AS
DON BAGGETT, 3AS

9



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 18,1969

10

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

FOREIGN STUDENTS
(Couples and families also):
Thanksgiving (Nov. 27 and/or
Christmas hospitality will be
offered by Gainesville families at
their homes, if students will
indicate their acceptance at the
International Center. Names are
requested by Nov. 19.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: The
Presbyterian Church in Florida
and other states runs
C HRISTMAS
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE this
year for students who would like
to spend a few days away from
Gainesville at Christmas-time in
private homes at no cost except
transportation. Inquire at the
International Center.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF
THE FLORIDA BANKERS
EDUCATIONAL
FOUNDATION will meet on
Dec. 10 to review
scholarship/loan applications for
the coming quarter. All
applications and supporting
papers must be in the Dept, of
Finance & Insurance office 204
Matherly Hall by Nov. 21.
FULBRIGHT GRANT
APPLICATIONS for study or
research abroad should be
submitted to G.A. Farris,
International Center by
December 2.
THANKSGIVING EVE
RECEPTION will be given by
the Foreign Student Adviser for
international students and
faculty at the Catholic Student
Center, 1738 W. University Ave.,
on. Wednesday, Nov. 26 from 5
to 7 p.m.
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
meeting has been called for 3:30
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19 in
University Auditorium. The
Constitution Committee has
submitted a number of
recommendations to the

ROTATING TOPICS COURSES
FOR WINTER QUARTER
DEPT COURSE SECTION CBfill BAY/S PjRI.QB SLBS BSQM §XGP Course TITLE
ATG 490 0862 C 1 F 7 MAT 16 208 RECONCILING BASIC PRINCIPLES OF
ACCOUNTING WITH DEMANDS OF USERS
TBV 659 SSSC TTB 5 STS 356 _frftlf|ClfrLEs 6E ADVERTISING RESEARCH
APV 635 ~ TIS6V Var TK 6- 9 asb isc cultures of Melanesia
APV 630 1162 V VAR MT THF 4 ASB 3C 16A AYMARA
SPY 630 1163 V VAR Jfif ASB 3C 17A URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
GYP 621 3602 C 3 M W F 5 BRY 203 18A NUMERICAL APPROACH TO INDUSTRIAL
JM 599 4037 C 2 Uh -1 SIA 223 188 URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING
GYP 695 3606 V VAR M 9-10 BRY 203 178 GEOGRAPHY OF RURAL SETTLEMENT
TH 79 BRY 203
MCaT 690 4186 C 3 TO ARRANGE NFE MANAGEMENT RESEARCH METHObOLtoV
PCL 630 DEP-C 5 MTWTHF 5 PEA 301 18A BLACK POLITICS
PSY 422 PEP-C-* 3 M SL=J LIS 407 18D PRECISION BEHAVIORAL MANAGEMENT
ZY 664 DEP-V VAR to arrange NFE ECOLOGICAL GENETICS
_.,' \

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION __ I
# -h in* 'v.
.f a sis* 110 \ y.R
Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... V ~^
** Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, /
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your c 9-Cr\ /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole/% jo JP ^

Administrative Notices

University Senate, which if
adopted, have the effect of
substantially reducing the size of
the Senate, making it
predominantly an elective body,
and altering the apportionment
among the various administrative
units.

Tuesday, November 18
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 8:00 8i 4:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Table
Setting Contest, Air Force
ROTC Library, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Home of Mrs. Uhrig, 3432
N.W. 11th Ave., 8:00 p.m.
German Dept. Movie, Cat and
Mouse", Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
College of Physical Education,
Dance Demonstration,
Women's Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Florida Woodwind
Quintet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, November 19
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Befrienders Meeting, In front of
Infirmary, 5:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Latin American Colloquium, Dr.
David Monsees, "Machismo;
A Look at Behavior", Latin
American Colloquium Room,
College Library, 8:00 p.m.
University Dames Fashion Show,
"Heayenly Bodies", Union
Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.

BLUB BULLETIN

GENERAL NOTICES
PRE-VET CLUB MEETING
has been scheduled for
Thursday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m.
at the Veterinary Science Dept,
on Archer Road. Guest speaker

Campus Calendar

Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.
German Dept: "Cat and Mouse",
Union Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 20
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Reitz Union "Deli-Nite", Union
Cafeteria, 4:30 7:00 p.m.
Beta Alpha Psi Meeting, 362
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christain Science Organization

We help build
better business 4 ways

Like bringing the product or service to
the student. We help thousands of
students find what they want through
advertising.
Like uniting the academic and business
communities. The two worlds most
students live in come together on our
pages.
Like letting the student compare before
he chooses. We help students plan their
time and expenses. We help them save
money.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AI)JD GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Dr. William R. Dudley, Jr.,
D.V.M. will speak on "Expense
of Setting Up Practice." For
more information call Leland
Simmons at 378-3548 or Dr.
James Himes at 392-1841.
CAN GOODS AND
ARTICLES OF OLD

Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
AIESEC Meeting, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.. Anyone
interested in Working in
another Country or with
Foreign Students.
Football Films, Union Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom
Meeting, 150 F & G Union,
8:00 p.m.
Student Contractors and
Builders Assoc. Meeting, 349
Union, 8:00 p.m.

And like making business more responsive
to the needs of their customers. We help
them to find out what the student wants.
Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
If you've got something to offer...so do we.
The
Florida
Alligator
An ACP-rated All-American College Daily

CLOTHING are being collected
in the Plaza of the Americas on
Sunday, Nov. 23, from 12 noon
to 2 p.m. These will be
distributed to the needy in the
Gainesville area for
Thanksgiving. Sponsored by the
Catholic Student Parish.

Friday, November 21
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Union Movie, Dirty Dozen",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
"Jefferson Airplane", $3.00 &
$1.25; Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 FOR SALE
m
B*VK*K*tt* : : : : : *^
BaKC silver beige male poodle 41/2
mos. old unusual color have stud
service reasonable prices on
grooming. Call after 5:30 378-6342.
H(A-3t-44-p)
You buy well cry 1968 Enduro
Yamaha 250 scrambler 1-yr old 2700
miles PERFECT condition two new
helmets S6OO. Call Brad or Gary
376-8524. (A-st-44-p)
67 MGB Convertible; Wire wheels
S4OO cash and pick up payments.
Firm. Bank appraisal. Call 376-6671.
( A-st-44-p)
I AMPEX 750 4 track 3 speed tape
I deck stereo play-record, echo effect
I sound on sound etc includes walnut
1 base & cover tapes $l5O firm
I 378-6129. ( A-st-40-p)
I 8 x 42' 2 bedroom mobile home, air
I conditioned, redecorated; with utility
I shed. Call 372-3112 or 372-8032.
I $1750. ( A-st-40-p)
I 68 Lamplighter mobile home 12X45
I fully furn, bar and stools, 2 bdrm, ac,
I park has pool. ssl month, $650
equity payments possible
I 378-5174. (A-st-41-p)
I G unsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
I reload Wig. Harry Beckwith, gun
I dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
Amplifier Fender twin reverb.
Older blackface model. Great
condition S3BO. Call 372-2173. Rock
& Roll will never die! (A-st-42-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk must sell
S3OO 1966 good condition 372-5015.
(A-3t-42-p)
1969 Honda Superhawk 305 CC.
Excellent mechanical condition
4,000 miles, some dents & scratches
$450. Call 376-4736 after 5. (A-3t
42-p)
12x44 mobile home 1968 Air one
bedroom 400 down assume payments
Art Deane 3101 SW 34th St. no. 66
or 378-9402. (A-st-42-p)
KAWASAKI 250 SS Good Condition
$450.00 Including Helmet Call
462-2792 after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-42-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak matching
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewriter
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
(A-7t-42-p)
Heath model DA-281 Stereo
amplifier, 35 watts/channel, all new
tubes, SBS. Heath model AJ-63 Mono
FM tuner, $25. Both SIOO. Will
demonstrate. Call 378-7671.
(A-st-42-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera
with FIB lens, manual Zoom lens,
and pistol grip. $75 firm. 376-4905
after 6:00 p.m. (A-3t-40-p)
AVON cosmetics, colognes, toys at
fantastic SAVINGS for brother,
sister, parents, or lover. Order now to
receive for Christmas. Catl/see Tia
392-9345, Jennings 453. (A-3t-43-p)
1966 Harly Davidson 175cq.
Excellent Condition $225. See Rich
at apt. 29 La Mancha. (A-st-43-p)
68 Suzuki SOOcc. 6000 mi. left on
warrnt. Immaculate condt. Bags,
hlmt., and more incld. Very fast. Call
collect 904-496-3017 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-43-p)
FOR RENT 1
Sublet Jan-June furnished AC quiet
carpeted apartment with 2 balconies
IV2 blks from campus $125 month or
coed roommate 373-1921.
(B-3t-42-p)
tTMawe Winner A
I CLARK GABLE -£_l
I VIVIEN LEIGH ST*
I OLIVIA tie HA\II,I AND I
GONE WITH
THE WIND"
8:00 ONLY
.> ..... v fcr

Tuesday, November 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT |
One bedroom Gatortown Apt.
sublease Jan-June, large furnished,
carpeted, with pool. Call 378-6188
(B-3 t-44-p)
Two Bedroom AC Close to campus
sllO mo. Available December 1. Call
376-6671. (B-st-44-p)
3 rms upstairs FURNISHED
481-2775 HAWTHORNE $65.00
(B-st-41-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Univ. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals
$220/quarter. Some financial aid
available. 378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
1 br efficiency. New, clean, quiet,
can move right in. Must sublease SBS
per mont. Furnished. Call late any
night or morning. 376-6854.
(B-4t-41-p)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
livingroom completely furnished, ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo., cable TV.
Colonial Manor Apts. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
I WANTED I
Female roommate for Frederick
Gardens apt. Immediate occupancy
or 2nd & 3rd quarters. Call Dana
372- Female roommate wanted to share
French Quarter apt. $45.00 per
month Poolside. Call after 5 p.m.
373- (C-st-43-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE one male
roommate wanted for winter quarter.
Rent 43.50 + util. Central air and
heat, pool. Call Herb 376-6361.
(C-st-41-p)
Looking for some REAL people.
392-8577 or 392-8580. (C-lt-44-p)
Male roommate for winter qtr to
look for 2bdrm apt in $l4O range.
Call 373-1514 after 10 grad student
preferred. (C-3t-42-p)
Female roommate needed winter &
spring terms (Getting married need
replacement). Share large'2-bedroom
apt. with 3 girls. Quiet, comfortable,
convenient. 2 blocks from Norman
Hall. sllO/quarter. 373-2832.
(C-st-42-p)
Male roommate La Mancha S7O per
mon including utilities Furnished
Prefer grad student. Available Now
Call 378-9441 Apt. 53. Heres your chance to live well. Need
two coeds to sublet in Landmark.
TV, stereo, pool, all electric. Nice
roomies. Call 378-6422. (C-st-41-p)
| HELP WANTED f
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
'k BROILED CHICKEN
$1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
**-
* GAINESVILLE MALL f

11

C* -:--rr(Tftnoooeooeoeeaea
HELP WANTD I
>v.y.vwvxxc: o 8 Mooaeeeeeeeeall
Need extra sales help for Christmas
selling. Apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-44-c)
Desk Clerk Over 21 2 nights Per
Week Midnight 7AM Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn 4029 S.W. 13th Street.
Neat Appearance. (E-4t-39-p)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua. (E-llt-42-p)
Experienced mother will care for
infants and toddlers by hour, $.35 or
week $15.00. Phone 378-6681.
(E-3t-43-p)
WANTED: Two or three accounting
majors for work in the business office
of one of the largest student
organizations at the University
Student Publications. Sophomores or
Juniors only. Call 392-1689 or come
by Roon 330 in the Union any
afternoon. (E-3t-nc)
40C per month. Part time evenings.
Must be neat & have own trans.
Report 206 SE Ist St. til 9 PM.
(E-st-40-p)
n n noon iina>TQiTO-gffiio^
| AUTOS f
1969 Kamann-Ghia, 3 Months Old
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., $1950. (G-st-35-p)
1963 Rambler American 220, std
trans, good gas mileage, great reliable
transportation $225 Call 376-0579
after 5:30 p.m. (G-3t-42-p)
1966 MUSTANG like new 36,000
miles automatic transmission, radio
heater, 6 cylinders, call 378-8752
after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
1965 MG Midget Needs net top and
brake job. Has new inspection tag,
battery, starter, generator, exhaust
system. Best offer. Call 3 73-2345.
(G-st-40-p)
196 5 JAGUAR XKE Roadster.
Excellent condition. 378-7620.
(G-st-42-p)
-
67 GTO Super clean, light blue, black
vinyl top, stereo tape, AM-Fm, rally
wheels, tach, custom interior, call
Pesek 378-9779 asking SI9OO.
(G-st-41-p)
6 7 XKE convertible. Excellent,
yellow, blk top, chrome wire wheels
$4195. Serious offers call 392-1881 8
to 5, ask for Louise Hardin.
(G-st-40-p)
1962 Comet 6 cylinder 4 speed trans
radio and heater, $l5O or best offer.
Call 392-7463 or come by 1247 NW
12 Avenue. (G-3t-44-p)
Porsche 1961 Silver recent engine I
overhaul radial tires new fuel pump
windshield and coil. Koni shocks, 1
Bursch exhaust SI7OO call 378-8342. |
(G-3t-44-p)

CAUToi 1
ssssm wmqq#
VW 1966 BUG GOOD
CONDITION 26,000 MILES, DARK
GREEN, RADIO. $925. 372-5796.
(G-st-44-p)
1965 Mustang 2+2, V 289, radio,
wsw, st. shift, console, good gas
mileage, call Jim Carter 392-0834,
372-5703. (G-3t-44-p)
,'.;.v.\y.y.v.v.vv\ ;v; i ;v\vXw>XvV'V"V.v.;.
PERSONAL I
a ¥
Need writers for off Campus mag.
Open positions for comics, cartoon,
satire, humor column or story. Call
Stan Ratoff eve. 378-4824.
(J-st-41-p)
Will split 50 to 5000 dollars for coins
in Shell Oil President*? coin game.
Call 378-1764. (J-lt-44-p)
JTS you're a wonderful person. I
wish you were mine. Thank you for
all the fun last year. Love ACT
(J-lt-44-p)
Congradulations big brother! John
and Lynn Forever! (J-lt-44-p)
BOYS!!! Your Playboy coed maid
service is here! Hire your bunnies
now. Rates to be arranged. Call
Nancy or Lisa. 373-2760. (J-st-40-p)
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be in
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga, 30309. (J-st-42-p)
I LOST A FOUND f
LOST: Paperback, Poetry & Prose of
Pope Reward Please Call
392-7593. (L-2t-43-p)
I SERVICES |
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1126 W N.
W. Bth St. 376-8506 prices not given
over phone, depends on garment.
(M-st-39-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair for ever
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist (over
20 yrs experience) 372-8039. By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)
I RED PIN qX I
NIGHT (V
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12

!. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 18.1969

PLANT ENGINEER KEEPS SCORE IN 1! SECTIONS
Electrical Maze Lines UFs Underground

By RON BATES
Alligator Corraspondant
In case you havent noticed as yet, UF's campus
has no overhanging power lines or telephone lines to
mar its beauty.
Theyre all underground.
The job of knowing where they are falls upon the
Physical Plant Division and engineer John Opdyke.
Whenever any buildings or parking lots are to be
erected on any of the 11 UF sections, he must be
consulted.
If not, a contractor risks unearthing electrical and
street light lines, sanitary and storm sewer mains,
telephone and TV cables, steam and chilled water
lines, irrigation channels or gas lines.
While constructing the Reitz Union parking lot,
the builder first exposed an electrical line and then
broke it shutting off all the Unions and several
other buildings electricity.
Currently, Opdyke is investigating interference
from proposed parking lots behind Norman Hall, by
Reid and Yulee Halls, and future museum parking

SG Redecorating For $15,500

A $15,500 three-phase
program to renovate and.
refurnish the Student Senate
offices is now in operation.
The office director of Student
Government said the program
provides better use of space on
the third floor of Reitz Union to
facilitate SGs needs.
The funds were allocated by
the senate in March of last year,
said Mayer Becker, former lUC
senator and present SG office
director.
The first phase, completed
last year, established a filing
cabinet room. The room, 305, is

I Thanks For Your Patience I
I The Florida Alligator has completed Hs student traffic survey. The I
I circulation of your Alligator should now be in such a manner that I
I everyone will pass a distribution box on his way to class. I

now being used by the 12
secretaries of SGs cabinet. The
new work areas were supplied
with filing cabinets, new bulletin
boards and new formica desk
tops.
The second phase calls for the
changing of student
organizations work area. This
part of the program will
renovate the old student
organizations area into SG
finance division, which includes
the office of the treasurer,
bookkeeper, secretary of
finance, budget director, clerk of
the traffic court and the chief

on the location of the present cite of the University
Police Station.
Basically our lines are underground for
protection and beauty. Nothing insulates like the
earth, especially below the frostline, Opdyke said.
Ralph Dupree, a telephone company engineer,
laid out the Centrex (central exchange) route and
coordinated it with UF plans. All other lines had
been underground since the early 50s.
We find in this area, it provides adequate
protection from hurricane damage and cleans up the
so called unsightliness, said Dupree.
He cited reduced maintenance, extra life of lines
and safety as benefits of underground lines.
Although we try to keep a fairly accurate map
of all lines, on rare occasions we *lose an old Cable,
meaning that we dont know exactly where the
cable lies in a general area, said Curtis Townsend,
telephone coordinator.
Townsend assured that Southern Bell has a
radio-type signal pick-up detector to locate cables
after the point of orientation (like a demolished
building or wall) had been removed.

justice of the traffic court.
A storage and mimeograph
duplication room will also be
provided. There will also be
office space to be assigned to
any SG agency that needs the
working area.
Phase three is broken into two
parts. The first part is the
expansion of the reception area.
This will also allow room for the
administrative assistant and the
cabinet director.
The second part will be the
expansion of the SG presidents
office. Room for the SG archives
will also be expanded.

F TtoP* (uVife
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... wires present hazards for contractors
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be worth something? \J)J
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Lower prices eTrained technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
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Santa Fe Boulevard High Springs, Florida



The
Florida
Alligator ;

f SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS
Alvarez The Runner
JEFF KUNKENBERG

By JEFF KUNKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
When he was a running back
at North Miami High School two
years ago, Carlos Alvarez was a
power runner. Hed put a fancy
move on an opponent once in a
while but not often. Id try to
run around people, Carlos said.
But if that didnt work, Id go
over them.
It may be a bit laughable
because Alvarez, the UF
sophomore flanker, weighs 171
pounds now and probably
weighed at least 10 pounds less
two years ago. High school
defenders were light that year, it
seemed.
But yet, as Carlos weight has
ballooned, so have his running
techniques similarly changed.
Alvarez is definitely
razzle-dazzle now, when he
needs to be. It hasnt been often
this fall.
Two of his touchdowns have
come on bombs of 76 and 70
yards from quarterback John
Reaves and on other occasions,
Carlos has simply caught the ball

TRIBUTE
TOA
BABMAN.
ji I
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GATOR SPORIS

in the end zone.
Alvarez didnt score a
touchdown Saturday he did
have a 33-yarder called back
but for the second time this
season he displayed to a Florida
Field crowd his maneuverability.
Against Florida State last
month he caught a pass, stopped
(on a dime, the people like to
say) and reversed field as
Seminole defenders continued
moving in Carlos original
direction. Alvarez turned a short
pass into a substantial gain.
He did the same Saturday, in
the Gators 31-6 victory over
Kentucky. He and Reaves
worked a short pattern to
considerable success the entire
afternoon.
Alvarez would take a step or
two over the line of scrimmage,
as if he were going to run a deep
pattern, but stop and turn
around. Reaves would drop back
two yards and throw to Alvarez.
It was up to Carlos to make
what yardage he could.
In the second quarter, Florida
executed the play to blackboard

success. Alvarez caught the pass,
faked out the player defending
him, and snaked through what
appeared to be the entire
Kentucky defense.
Alvarez ended up going from
sideline to sideline and had he
been able to elude one more
man, might have scored. As it
was, he gained 20 yards but it
certainly had to be the finest
broken Held run seen at Florida
Field this fall.
Carlos said it was easy. His
philosophy of running has
changed. His power days are
over. When big guys start
running at me, he laughed, I
get scared and do my best to get
out of their way. Its as simple as
that.
Alvarez was hampered by
knee injuries during his high
school career.

r
Fink out on
college food.
/
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..ix/.x-xvx*x'x-xx-x%v'*"y*'vx'x:^':x*x-x-x-x*x*x*x-xv>xvx.
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Try us for a groat Lunch w
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. 2445 SW.I3 ST. TAKE OUT 378-0946
__J

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Tuesday, November 18,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Hem
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... has changed to a razzte-dazzlerunner

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

13



14

, Tin Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Noven&er ifc/TUtey

Monday A Day Os Bowls and Bids

Liberty Bowl
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI) The University of
Alabama, which helped inaugurate the Liberty Bowl
in Philadelphia, was selected Monday to open the
post season game's second decade here Dec. 13 in
the 11th annual game.
Paul Bear Bryant, head coach and athletic
director at Alabama, will be taking his dub to its
11th consecutive bowl game under his direction, a
string which began with the Tides 1959 appearance
in Philadelphia.
The selection committee voted unanimously to
invite the University of Alabama, said committee
chairman Tim Treadwell 111, and we are proud to
announce that the university has accepted.
It was Alabama against Penn State when A.F.
(Bud) Dudley began the post season game in
Philadelphia in 1959 with Ptennsylvania winning 7-0.
After one abortive attempt to play the game indoors
at Atlantic City, Dudley brought the game here in
1965.
Treadwell said the committee hoped to announce
selection of Alabama's opponent later this week.
Sun Bowl
ATHENS, Ga. (UPI) The University of
Georgia Monday accepted a bid to play in the
Sun Bowl at El Paso, Tex., on Dec. 20.
. A bowl official told the Bulldogs that their
opponent will be either Kansas State, Colorado,
Nebraska or Arizona State.
Georgia has a 5-3-1 record.
Boardwalk Bowl
NEWARK, Del. (UPI) The University of
Delaware accepted a bid Monday to play in the
Boardwalk Bowl indoors at Convention Hall,
Atlantic City, on Dec. 13. The opponent was not
designated.
The Bluejiens, 7-2, will be defending the NCAA
Eastern Regional Championship for college divisions
which they won last year with a 31-24 victory over
Indiana (ft.) University.
The bid, offered by Gene Duffy, director of
championship defense for the NCAA, was accepted
immediately by Delaware, already the university
division of the Middle Atlantic Conference
champions.
Members of the Blue Hens squad voted Sunday
night to accept the bid if it were offered.

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Sugar Bowl

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) The
Sugar Bowl has invited Archie
Manning and his Ole Miss Rebels
to face the Southwest
Conference runnerup team,
Texas or Arkansas, in the 1970
New Year's Day football classic
here, the Afternoon States-Item
said Monday.
The Rebels got the bid on the

Cotton Bowl
DALLAS (UPI) Notre Dame broke with 45 years of tradition
Monday to accept an invitation to meet either Texas or Arkansas in
the 34th Annual Cotton Bowl Classic New Year's Day.
Appearance of the once-beaten, once-tied Irish will be the first time
the Catholic Institution at South Bend, Ind., has gone to a post-season
game since Knute Rockne took his famed four horsemen to Pasadena
to beat Stanford 27-10 in the 1925 Rose Bowl.
That was the only time in the school's football history, dating back
to a one-game season in 1887, that Notre Dame has played in a bowl
game although on numerous occasions in recent years rumors have
been rife that the school was ready to relent on the ban.
The host team for the game cannot be decided until December 6.

Batlislirllrr
I Invites yon to
I fol-low the ft l lu re
I adveniu res of the
I OHKiINAL FLASH (iOHDON
st;i rri n<_r I iusK'r ('rahiir
I Tomorrow, and every

strength of their 38-0 shellacking
of previously unbeaten and third
ranked Tennessee last Saturday,
the newspaper said.
The upset left Mississippi with
a 6-3 record so far this season
and apparently knocked
Louisiana State University, now
8-1, out of contention for a
major bowl bid.

, ( ' '* *
Orange Bowl
MIAMI (UPQ Penn State, undefeated in its last
27 games, was selected Monday to defend its Orange
Bowl championship against Big Eight powerhouse
Missouri.
The Tigers, 8-1, will be seeking to avenge the
Nittany Lions* 15-14 victory over Big Eight
Conference champion Kansas last Jan. 1.
L. Allen Morris, Orange Bowl committee
president, announced the picks at a noon luncheon
Monday.
Orange Bowl General Manager Ernie Seiler earlier
called Penn State every bowls top choice.**
.Missouri assumed the posture of a giant-killer
earlier this season with a 40-17 victory over Rose
Bowl-bound Michigan.
The Tiers only loss came at the hands of
Colorado in a hard-fought 31-24 skirmish.
Penn States awesome defense has limited
opponents to a meager nine points per game average
while its offense has relied heavily on a running
attack.
Missouri has generated an exciting offense based
on the passing of quarteiback Terry McMillan and
the rushing of Joe Moore, the nations fourth
leading ground gainer.
The selections had been anticipated for several
days. Tennessees crushing 38-0 loss to Mississippi
Saturday virtually eliminated the Volunteers as a
candidate.

ROSE BOWL: Michigan or Purdue vs. UCLA
or Southern California, Jan. 1.
ORANGE BOWL: Penn State vs. Missouri,
Jan. 1.
COTTON BOWL: Notre Dame vs. Texas or
Arkansas, Jan. 1.
SUGAR BOWL: Mississippi vs. Arkansas or
Texas, Jan. 1.
LIBERTY BOWL: Alabama vs. unnamed
opponent, Dec. 13.
SUN BOWL: Georgia vs. unnamed opponent,
Dec. 20.
GATOR BOWL: Tennessee vs. Florida, Dec.
27.
PEACH BOWL teams unnamed, Dec. 30.
ASTRO-BLUEBONNET BOWL: Houston vs.
Auburn, Dec. 31.
. fti : .1- a. jt.J .4 >



IN SEC MEET
UF Hamers Fait To Vo Is

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Despite a strong performance
by Floridas cross country team
the Tennessee Volunteers
upset the favored Gators
3448 (low score wins ) Monday
to win the Southeastern
Conference cross country
championship.
Kentuckys Vic Nelson won
individual honors running a
18:42 over the four and
half-mile Montgomery, Ala.,
course.
Florida captain John Parkers
fourth place finish was the best
Gator performance. Parker ran a
close 18:55 to finish just behind
Nelson and two Tennessee
runners.
The SEC championship meet
jj'
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Sc
TOM KENNEDY
JOHN PARKER
... fourth place best
Top T wenty
UPI Teams
NEW YORK The United
Press International top major
college football teams with first
place votes and won-lost-tied
records in parenthesis, (ninth
week).
TEAM POINTS
1. Ohio State (33) (8-0) 348
2. Texas (2) (80) 305
3. Penn State (8-0) 228
4. Arkansas (8-0) 213
5. Southern Cal (8-0-1) 183
6. Missouri (8-1) 174
7. UCLA (8-0-1) 163
8. Louisiana State (8-1) 92
9. Notre Dame (7-1-1) 71
10. Tennessee (7-1) 49
11. Auburn (7-2) 33
12. Michigan (7-2) 22
13. Mississippi (6-3) 18
14. Stanford (6-2-1) 17
15. Houston (6-2) 6
16. (tie) Florida (7-1) 4
(tie) Purdue (7-2) 4
18. Georgia (5-3-1) 3
19. Nebraska (7-2) 2

turned out to be a re-match
between the Gators and the Vds
when these two powerful track
squads met Oct. 25 in the NCAA
Regional meet. The Gators won
that one easily 56-102.
But things were different
Monday as Tennessee
completely changed the picture
around on the second-place
Gators. Mississippi was third
with a 125 score, Auburn fourth
at 140 and Georgia fifth at 141.
Florida was expected to run
away from Tennessee again but
the previously undefeated
Gators were weakened
considerably with the loss of
freshman Mark Bir.
Bir had been the Gators
number one runner until a leg
injury sidelined him for the SEC
meet.
In the NCAA Regional meet
Bir finished sixth behind
Parkers fifth to pace the Gators
to victory over William and Mary
and third place Tennessee.
Following Parkers fourth
place finish was Don La Renes
seventh, Jack Nason-10, Ron
Nabers-13, Steve Atkinson-14,
Benny Vaughn-18, and A.W.
Smith in 24 position out of the
70 man starting field.

Lion Students Upset
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (UPI) Penn State students took the
announcement of their football teams bid to play in the Orange Bowl
in stride Monday, but some expressed disappointment at the selection
of Missouri as an opponent.
A university spokesman said the students expected the Nittany
Lions would be invited to a major bowl if they were unbeaten through
Saturdays Maryland game, and it was a matter of learning which
bowl.
He said once the team voted Sunday to return to the Orange Bowl
if invited,the only question was who the bowl committee would select
to oppose Penn State.
One student said many football fans expressed the belief that if
Penn State had to play a team ranked below them in the polls, they
would have preferred a team with the magic the Notre Dame name
carries. Notre Dame has agreed to plaWn the Cotton Bowl.
UF Films Thursday
Filmed highlights of Floridas seventh football victory of the season
-a 31-6 trouncing of Kentucky will be shown in the Reitz Union
at 7:30 pan. Thursday.
The win gave the Gators a 7-1-1 chart (3-1-1 in Southeastern
Conference action) and was their fifth in a row at home during
1969. rr
The screening is open to students, faculty and staff, alumni and
local citizens without charge.
One more film in the continuing series sponsored by the
Universitys Alachua County Alumni Club and the Athletic
Department is planned this fall on Dec. 4 when key plays from the
Nov. 29 Florida-Miami game will be shown.

HAREM NIGHT
AT
Tonight, well pay $25 to the guy bringing in
the most stag girls between 9 and 12:30.
To be paid at 12:30
Dont forget; every Thursday we have the
mini-skirt contest, and Free Beer on Mondays
Dancing every night to the sound of
The Hammer
(fornwHv TK Tangerine)
r ii 1. 7 \ ,JL .;_ ...

> TOM KENNEDY
DON LA RENE
... finishes seventh

I UF NOSE BOWL |
set for sundayD
The traditional Nose Bowl football contest between the pledge
rings** of K Lambda Phi and Tau Epsilon Phi is scheduled for kickoff
Sunday at 2 p jn.
The game will mark the 14th year it has been officially played. It
will be fought on either Florida Field or Citizens Field at the UF.
Pi Lam, victorious for the past three years boasts seven wins while
the TEPs have six.
The winner of this years battle earns the right to keep the transient
trophy.
TEP chancellor, Howard Carr, expressed confidence in the TEP
pledges. Its a rebuilding year for TEP in athletics, he said. But our
pledges will be very strong in the Nose Bowl*. I feel confident well
beat Pi Lam.
Pi Lam coach Alien Levi asserted this years Pi Lam pledge class is
the best the fraternity has ever had.
Were going to make it four straight this week, said Levi.
' ' |.* W.K.OHACt CO.
Spread the fashion
word in John
f Meyer's camel
j J fleece tunic dress.
The talk will turn
J [ T' V Jrj to the mock button
/ J W ta k' t ie c ever P OIO 1
/ / \ pockets, the new
/ / /l tj) band hem, and the
/ / W leather loop belt.
J I I ]. Wear it with or
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i onls
P' /. I I' I johnmeyer
'' / J / speaks your language
/ U
... > '*
i /

Tumd*. Wowmtxr 18,1080, The Florida AUltor, I

15



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. November 18,1969

16

THIRD TIME FOR ARCHIE
Manning Back Os The Week Repeat

NEW YORK (UPI)
All-America football memo:
Archie Manning, a junior
quarterback, was the man at
the controls as Mississippi
stunned previously unbeaten,
no. 3 Tennessee, 38-0.
For his slick performance
against greater odds than any
other winning quarterback faced
last week, Manning has been
selected in the United Press
International Backfield Os The
Week for the third time this
season.
Selected with Manning were
running backs Steve Owens of
Oklahoma, Bill Burnett of
Arkansas and Charlie Pittman of
Penn State. It was the fourth
time this year for Owens.
Terry McMillan of Missouri
and lex Kern of Ohio State
personally accounted for more
touchdowns than Manning and
San Diego States Dennis Shaw
out-bombed them all with nine
scoring passes against New
Mexico State. But Manning gets
the quarterback slot among the
weeks big four on the sheer
magnitude of the upsets he and
his teammates engineered.
Manning not only was good
but lucky as Mississippi rolled up
three touchdowns in the first

Buckeyes Still Number One
Gator Bowl UF Ranked 16

By JOE CARNICELLI
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK While the
others get the bowl bids, mighty
Ohio State simply gets all the
votes.
The powerful Buckeyes, who
put on an awesome performance
in demolishing Purdue 42-14
Saturday, were named the
nations no. 1 college football
team for the ninth consecutive
week Monday.
Ohio State, unable to accept a
bowl bid because of Big Ten
policies, received 33 first place
and two second place votes from
the 35-member United Press
International Board Os Coaches.
The total was good for 348
points, easily outdistancing
second place Texas.
Texas earned two first place
votes and 305 points. The
Longhorns will meet Arkansas,
which finished fourth this week,

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OH
period.
Archie scored the first one
and passed for the third, which
was good. He fumbled while
plunging for the middle
touchdown but a teammate fell
on it in the end zone for the
score and that was lucky.
Owens rambled for three
touchdowns on 201 yards in 44
carries against lowa State,

oi^lptS..
UIL
M
on Dec. 6 for a Cotton Bowl
berth against Notre Dame.
Penn State, the nations no. 3
team, will go to the Orange Bowl
to play Missouri which moved up
to sixth this week.
Southern California, the no. 5
team this week, will meet
seventh-ranked UCLA in their
traditional .'ivalry Saturday to
decide the western
representative in the Rose Bowl.
Louisiana State, which

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
NW 34th ST ft UNIV. AVE.

boosting his career touchdown
total to a record 43 for three
varsity seasons.
Pittman scored three
touchdowns in the first period
against Maryland and Burnett
scored three, two on runs and
one on. a pass, against Southern
Methodist.
Shaws nine touchdown passes
for San Diego State set a record,
eclipsing a mark of seven he
shared with Jerry Rhome of
Tulsa. Thats mass production.
But up in a higher class,
McMillan accounted for five
Missouri touchdowns against
lowa State running two and
three passing while Ohio
States Kern was a commanding
figure in leading the Buckeyes
over ninth-ranked Purdue with
two touchdowns arid a 38-yard
scoring pass.
Frank Harris of Boston
College accounted for five
touchdowns against VMI and
Steve Ramsey of North Texas
State passed for four against
Tulsa.
Ten other quarterbacks
accounted for three touchdowns
running or passing including Joe
Theisman of Notre Dame, Mike
Hillman of Louisiana State and

finished eighth in the balloting,
decided not to accept a bowl
bid. Notre Dame, ranked ninth,
broke a 45-year tradition by
accepting a bid to the Cotton
Bowl.
Tennessee, the nations no. 10
team, will play in the Gator
Bowl.
Auburn, no. 11, will face
Houston, no. 15, in the
Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl, while
12th-ranked Michigan and no.
16 Purdue, ninth last week, are
in the running for Rose Bowl
honors.
Mississippi, ranked 13th, will
play in the Sugar Bowl against
the loser of the Texas-Arkansas
game and Stanford, no. 14, has
been eliminated from the Pacific
Eight race for the Roses.
Florida, ranked 16th with
Purdue, is in the Gator Bowl
while Georgia, no. 18, has
accepted a Sun Bowl bid to face
possibly 19th-ranked Nebraska.

Tommy Suggs of South
Carolina.
Theismann ran for two and
passed for one against Georgia
Tech, Hillman did the same
thing against Mississippi State
while Suggs passed for three
against Wake Forest.
High-scoring running backs
included Hillary Shockly of
Stanford, who scored three
against the Air Force, and Ken
Edwards of Virginia Tech, who
scored three against Duke.
Don McCauley of North

Eighth Ranked LSU
Not Going Bowl(ing)
BATON ROUGE, La. (UP?) Louisiana State, which has won six
bowl games and lost only erne since 1961, Monday was passed over by
all the major bowls despite the prospect of an excellent 9-1 record and
the players disgustedly voted not to accept any lesser invitations.
The decision came in a 7 a.m. unanimous vote of the Tigers squad
when it became apparent that the Cotton, Sugar and Orange bowls
were by-passing the Tigers this year.
Were all sick over not getting to play in one of the bigger bowl
games, but it is all behind us now, said George Bevan, the Tigers
defensive stalwart.
Any way you look at it, one good team had to be left out of the
three major bowls and it just happened to be LSU. But, thats the
breaks of the game.
If we couldnt play a team that had a high ranking, we just felt
that the club wouldnt have anything to gain by playing a club with a
record not as good as ours.
LSU was definitely in line for a Cotton Bowl berth until Notre
Dame broke its long-standing embargo on post-season play and was
invited to the Dallas classic.
Mississippi, the only team to beat LSU (26-23), was picked to play
in the New Orleans Sugar Bowl despite its 6-3 record.
Louisiana Gov. John McKeithen, an ardent LSU fan, said he was
disappointed that LSU was not invited to any major bowls, but that he
supported the players decision to skip the other bowls.

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Carolina, Tommy Durrance of
Florida, Johnny Musso of
Alabama and Bruce Taylor of
Boston U. were among the
runners scoring twice.
Washingtons fullback Bo
Cornell wins,a mention though he
didnt score at all. Cornell
bashed, bulled and bucked for
149 yards in a 16-7 loser against
Southern California more
rushing yardage than any team
had compiled the Trojans
defense this year.