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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
A Little 1 A Touch
Woodstock Os Chicago
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CRAIG GOLDWYN
Prayers For Peace
Mark Long March
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
WASHINGTON With a touch of Chicago and a large dose of
Woodstock, more than a half-million antiwar demonstrators shivered
through three days of protest in the nations capital this weekend.
They came to pray for peace. They came from as far away as
California, Michigan and Florida to show their numbers and their
beliefs to the president.
And in record low temperatures, often well below freezing, they
marched 40 hours the angle-filed line of long-haired, short-haired,
white-haired and bald-headed protesters.
From Arlington National Cemetery, across the wind-lashed
Memorial Bridge, around the eerily-lit Lincoln Memorial to the White
House and on down Pennsylvania Avenue to the Capitol they
marched, candles and a sign with the name of an American soldier
killed in Vietnam in hand.
And as the dawn came Saturday, bringing little Warmth with it,
they began to gather en masse on the long, grassy ellipse in front of
the Capitol.
District of Columbia police estimated then* number at more than a
quarter of a m2Hon. Coordinators of the March Against Death placed
file figure at 15 million. Most observers agreed it was more people
gathered in one place than anyone had ever seen before.
But despite the size of the gathering, there were no incidents early
Saturday to mar the peace demonstration as the endless line of
protesters, walking 17-abreast, began the solemn procession back
(SEE WASHINGTON' PAGE 2)

Anti-War Protestors March Against Death

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Avignmonti Editor
WASHINGTON The nations
japitol was an occupied city this
weekend.
On one side were a half-million
anti-war protestors who battled the
freezing weather to march against death.
On the other side were several thousand
policemen, National Guard troops and
Army and Marine regulars sent to
Washington on riot-alert.
Except for two incidents, the politics
of confrontation left town for the
weekend.
On Friday night, several splinter
groups of SDS, protestors who called
themselves Weathermen, Crazy Men and
Mad Dogs, along with Yippies, amassed
at DuPont Circle to march on the

The
Washington
March
Saigon Embassy. Washington police
denied their request for a parade permit
and told them to leave the park. The
protestors, some brandishing Viet Cong
flags, refused to leave and flying objects
began hitting police cars. Clouds of the
excruciatingly painful pepper gas were
the polices retaliation. Sirens wailing,
police squad cars surrounded the park
and officers hurled gas cannisters
which were mistaken for fireworks or
bombs by the naive at the
demonstrators.
The gaseous mist sent the students

The
Florida Alligator

V'oL 62, No. 43

$250.000 DAMAGES
Friday Eve Blaze Guts
Ag. Engineering Hall

A fire late last Friday night
caused an estimated $250,000 in
damages to the east portion of
the Agricultural Engineering
Building.
The blaze was discovered by
UF agriculture student Albert
Green, who was studying in the
building located on Radio Road,
adjacent to the site of the
Florida State Museum now
under construction.
Geeen called dm police
shortly after 9 pm. when he
entered the mate shop area on
the east side of the building and
found flames burning through
the roof.
Police called for help from
three Gainesville fire stations and
firemen fought the blaze for
over an hour before bringing it
under control.
University Police also enlisted
the assistance of Gainesville
police in crowd control and
traffic direction. No incidents
were reported.
Gainesville Fire Captain, D.C.
Smith said, we came through it
real good. We had the usual
number of scratches but no
serious injuries.
Officials of the agricultural
department report two
classrooms in the building were
damaged heavily.
University police conducted
UF STUDENTS are often
taken for rides by the campus
police, but the results are
always satisfactory .. .page 5
Campus Crier 10
Classifieds 11
Editorials ..................8
FSU News 3
Movies 11
Small Society 6
Sports ...................12
What's Happening 5

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

running to side streets for cover, where
alert people were handing out paper
towels and holding pans of water. Wet
cloths over the face were supposed to
provide some protection, but the effect
was minimal.
The last time I got gassed this bad
was in Vietnam, said an ex-G.I. turned
anti-war protestor.
The key to evading the gas was to
keep tabs on which way the wind was
blowing, but this was not always
successful. Police eventually gassed the
side streets from all directions.
You gotta remember were playing
the Washington Kangaroos on their own
tuif. said one disgruntled protestor.
The gassing was not
confined to the demonstrators. Several
observers, including a 6-foot 5-inch

interviews after the fire to
determine if any suspicious
events took (dace before the
blaze was reported. No
substantial evidence was
uncovered.
Gasses usually held in the
Agricultural Engineering
Building will have to be held
elsewhere due to damage catised

Hhj
ms
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mfM ...
WmM:,---
PETE KNOCKE
BEFORE AND AFTER SCENES OF FRIDAYS FIRE
... Below, the aftermath and above, fire truck fights blaze.
it
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-
m TEI2S %TS
PHIL COPE

Monday, Novemberl7, 1969

by the fire.
Arrangements for alternate
sites are being made through the
registrar's office Chairman E.T.
Smerdon, Agricultural
Engineering Department said.
The information will probably
be posted on the building's main
bulletin board or the classroom
door, he said.

250-pound Washington radio newsman,
were overcome by the choking fumes.
However, Roger Mudd of CBSTV,
came prepared he pulled a gas mask
out of his pocket when the trouble
began.
After nearly five hours of trouble
marked by verbal and physical abuse
directed toward the policemen as well as
the gas, the police told the 4,000
demonstrators they could stay in the
park for the night.
The other incident of violence came
Saturday afternoon following a nearly
flawless peace march and rally on the
grassy lawn at the Washington
Monument. Just as the rally was
breaking up, the Yippies and SDS
factions appeared out of the mob ready
to move on the Department of Justice
(SEE VIOLENCE' PAGE 9)



Page 2

!, TWlFloridi Alitor,

Washington March Target: Peace

PACE OWEj
down Pennsylvania Avenue, past the government triangle,
to the ellipse in front of the Washington Monument.
And as the first of their numbers reached the monument,
with chants of Peace now!** filling the air, others were pouring
down the opposite side of the street to join the march at the
Capitol.
A tiny, blond-haired boy, his eyes half-closed against tiie
bone-chilling winds, wore a sign reading: Its my birthday
today. 1 am nine-years-old. Is half my life over?*
A group of marchers started the melodic strains of Give
Peace a Chance and it was picked up and passed back through
tire crowd.
Khaki-green uniforms were seen here and there behind the
barred windows of government buildings. Sometimes a soldier
would pop his head out and wave a peace sign down to the
marchers, and it would be returned as shouts of
One ... two... three ... four Tricky Dick, Stop the war,*
grew louder from the crowd.
Hundreds of small American flags crackled in the winds, and
one protester -a flag in one hand and giving the peace sign with
the other said this march was more patriotic than any
self-proclaimed pro-American demonstration.
Only once did the threat of violence mar the peace march. A
band of about 200 Yippies, carrying Viet Cong flags, broke
from the lines and charged the Justice Department. The march
paused and grew quiet, but few others joined the charge and
within minutes the lines of protesters began moving again,
shouting for peace louder than before.
Lines of New Mobilization (New Mobe) marshals encouraged
the procession on. Its not much farther... looks
beautiful... smile, it makes it warmer, they said. And the
crowd moved on.
Folk songs drifted over the grassy mall under the spindle-like
Washington Monument as the march emptied onto the ellipse, a
mile and a half from its formation point.
Demonstrators settled in small groups on the cold earth.
Some slept for the first time in three days. Some unpacked
picnic lunches. They waited for the rest of the protesters, some
just starting out.
To the east, behind a long row of strategically placed buses,
lay the White House. The Oval Office overlooks the monument
mall.
Government helicopters circled overhead. Sen. George
McGovern told the crowd, We meet to declare peace and to
put an end to war not at some time in the future, but now.

Orbiting Apollo
Moon Explorers
Sleep Sunday

Today, Tuesday and Wednesday Specials
12 Pair Pants 98(
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I 5 Shirts 99<
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I 402 NW 13th ST. 209 NE 16th AVE
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR fe the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and a published five times weekly except during lone,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate b SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wll not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida / Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
for correction must be given before the next insertion.

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) Apollo 12s
astronauts, working the night shift while flying to
the moon, slept most of the day Sunday and their
families and thousands of others attended church to
pray for their safe return.
It was the last coasting day for the three Navy
commanders, Charles Pete Conrad, 39, Alan L.
Bean, 37, and Richard F. Gordon, 40, before they
whip into lunar orbit and begin preparations for
their dangerous moon exploration mission.
Even before retiring for the day at 6:22 ajn. EST
the space men were so silent that mission control
began worrying they might be cooking up
something.
You folks have been pretty quiet. Whats up?
ground controller wanted to know.
Nothing, Conrad replied.

We are not here to break a President, Sen. Gharla GoodeH
said. We are here to break a war and begin a peace.
Peace ... to all one-half million of you, the commentator
said. Teace ... thats what this is all about.
And as the singing and the march continued, and cries for
peace flowed on, the rally passed its peak. Demonstrators
drifted away to the warmth of downtown buildings.
The doors of the Smithsonian Museum of History and
Technology were open, and frozen youths drifted in to rest and
sleep in corridors, on unused escalators and under display cases.
Museum guards said more than 40,000 youths were in the
building by 3:30 p jn. when they were forced to lode the doors.
We probably wont be able to open tomorrow, a guard
said. Just look at this mess.
Police patrolled the building in quiet disbelief as a growing
demonstration of the more radical dements began to gather on
the steps of the Labor Department across the street.
Violence clouded the days activities as several thousand
Yippies, Weathermen, Crazies and Mad Dogs (extreme left SDS
groups) charged across the mall and began moving on the Justice
Department.
Police moved in, tear gas masks already in place, and the
National Guard followed.
The radicals clashed first with the more moderate New Mobe
marshals who urged them to turn back.
For Christs sake, cool it! Youre ruining everything we have
tried to do, one marshal cried out. He was soon engulfed by
the mob.
Red paint splashed against the building. The American flag
was tom down and replaced with a red Viet Cong flag. And the
police moved in.
Tear gas canisters were thrown into the mob by the hehneted
officers. Government troops, stationed in the basement of the
Treasury Department, were put on alert as the demonstrators
circled the Justice building.
And as the rioting group broke away from the clouds of tear
gas and proceeded down Washingtons E Street, breaking store
windows and hurling rocks as they went, fragments of the peace
march looked on through teary eyes.
It was hard to tell whether the tears came from the spreading
gas fumes or from frustration.
By 8 pjn. the citys streets were cleared, with only a strong
smell of lingering gas and small groups of patrolling police and
National Guardsmen remaining.
Novembers chilly March on Washington was over, but peace
march coordinators vowed they would return next month.

woiupud iuau
seminole
pictures
senior
6-p P m NOV. 17-20
GREEK MAKE-UP
NOV. 21 9-12,1-5, 6-9
Sign up in Seminole office
or call 392-1687 12 pm-spm

Were just exercising and listening to the tape
recorder... looking at the moon and looking at the
earth and reading books.
Conrad and Bean land the lunar module Intrepid
on the moons arid Ocean of Storms at 1:53 a.m.
EST Wednesday, while Gordon keeps the command
ship Yankee Clipper in moon orbit.
Mission planners purposely gave the space pilots a
topsy-turvy work schedule on their outward journey
to get them in shape for their work on the lunar
surface.
The moon explorers, during their 32 hour stay on
the lunar surface, will be doing most of their work
in what normally would be nighttime in their time
zones on earth.
Their sleep periods fall during earth daylight
periods.

Protestors
Return Capitol
To Politicians
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
- remnanfcsof an earlier army of
250,000 protestors ~ went
sightseeing among the littered
monuments of Washington
Sunday and gave the capitol
back to its politicians, who
praised the behavior of the vast,
but by no means silent, majority
of them.
As if to symbolize the citys
relaxation after three days of
tension, President Nixon took
advantage of the days brilliant
weather with a visit to Robert F.
Kennedy Stadium for the
Washington-Dallas professional
football game.
Nixon was host at a White
House prayer service where aides
cautioned newsmen not to
question him about Saturdays
mass rally, the largest in the
capitols history.
The President wants no
questions about the
moratorium, an aide said.
Hes adamant on that.
The barricades which had
sealed off the White House came
down and police permitted a
group of Jewish protestors to
conduct a Hebrew serivce for the
war dead in front of the White
House.
They carried a huge black flag
with a Star of David and a blue
fist in its center. Rabbi Bruce
Goldman, chaplain at Columbia
University, blew the shofar, the
rams horn which is sounded on
Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of
Atonement.
Another demonstration was
staged in front of the National
Archives by a group Os
out-of-uniform servicemen who
had participated in the
demonstration and several
hundred young sympathizers.
Nixons chief public
spokesman, Herbert Klein, said
in a television interview Face the
Nation CBS that the leaders
of the march had promised to
keep the peace and they carried
out their word.
Stodoot Directories
Distributed Today
New student directories may
be picked up beginning today at
the student services booth across
from the Hub. On-campus
students should receive them
through camnus mail.



Soviets Flexible
At Nuclear Arms
Limitation Talks

Palm Beach Pop Festival
Pushes Ahead, Floyd Told

The Palm Beach rock festival
is still on, Dave Rupp, the
festivals promoter told Gator
Loan Fund Chairman Eddie
Floyd Saturday.

Kappa Sigs Cap Off Drive

The Kappa Sig capping-off
campaign for the United Fund
drive will begin today at 8 a.m.
with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell contributing the first
dollar.
The drive will begin at the
Friendship Walk in the Plaza of
the Americas.
Stick em up for United
Fund" will be the fraternitys
theme for the week-long

news
LYCEUM: A black consciousness lyceum, a week of speeches,
exhibits and discussions, spotlighting black culture, kicks off today
with a concert in Moore Auditorium by black poet Gylan Kain.
- The lyceum, sponsored by the Union Program Committee, will
present former professional basketball star Bill Russell and singer
Odetta along with local blacks during the week.
OMBUDSMAN: Jack Whitley, chairman of this years Homecoming
committee, was appointed Ombudsman Friday by FSU Student Body
President Canter Brown. The appointment is subject to approval by
student senate.
The first thing well do is appoint a full time secretary,* said
Whitley, in stating the objectives of his office, and then take on
serious problems like the infirmary, athletics, and the Union Program
Council."
BIOPHYSICS: FSITs 45th PhD. degree program was instituted
recently when the Board of Regents approved a new doctoral program
in molecular biophysics.
MONDAY, NOV. 17, 9 A.M.
register for a FREE set off linens
THE MERCHANDISE MART
FACTORY OUTLET FOR TOWELS, LINENS. ETC.
2409 s.w. 13th in the village square

In a phone call, Rupp
instructed Floyd to continue
selling the S2O tickets to the
three-day concert featuring the
Rolling Stones.

campaign. Brothers, pledges and
little sisters will be collecting all
week, dressed in cowboy or
girl outfits, complete with
masks.
They will be at the Friendship
Walk and the intersection of
13th Street and University Ave.
Coins will be placed three
bricks across on the Friendship
Walk every day. Come by and
contribute.

HELSINKI (UPI) The Soviet Union appeared
ready Sunday to press for a total ban on use of
nuclear weapons in exploratory Strategic Arms
Limitations Talks (SALT), opening Monday
morning in Helsinki.
Diplomatic sources said the Soviets also would
seek:
t An end to further development of strategic
nuclear weapons.
i Reduction and ultimate destruction of nuclear
arms stockpiles.
Limitation and subsequent reduction of
strategic means of delivery of nuclear weapons.
The United States has previously rejected any
total ban on use of nudear weapons for reasons of
self defense.
Diplomatic sources indicated UJS. objectives in

He sounded pretty definite,
I think Rupp is going to hold a
pop festival even if he has to go
to jail,* Floyd said.
Rupp recently appealed a
Palm Beach County Zoning
Commission ruling against the
event to be held on Rupps Palm
Beach International Raceway,
Nov. 28-30.
The zoning commission said
the festival would not be
condudve to orderly growth of
the county and that health,
welfare, safety and morals would
be impaired.
Tickets will not be sold at the
gate, and they are all S2O Floyd
said.
THE YKM6
BARBER SHOP
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Qalnesville Shopping Cntr.
Profflerl
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5 ANNIVERSARY
KS APPRECIATION DAYS
NOV. 17, THRU THE 26TH
On behalf of all KINGS FOOD HOST employees, I would like to thank all
university staff and student body for making our past five years possible. We look
forward to serving you in the future.
Harlan Trofholz
IN APPRECIATION:
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THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
/
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
QUICK-WAY COPY CENTBt (QUICK-SAVE)
1620 w. university (univ. plaza) 372-7436

Monday, November 17,1960. The Florida AWgetor.

the talks would be:
Limitation on deployment of strategic
weapons.
f Halting further stockpiling of nuclear arms and
ending development of even more awesome nuclear
weapons and means for their delivery.
Further talks on strategic management** of
present nuclear weapons stocks.
US. disarmament chief Gerard S. Smith and
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Vladimir S.
Semenov arrived in Helsinki Saturday and held a
private meeting Saturday night.
Civilian, military and scientific advisers to Smith
and Semenov will join them Monday at the
exploratory talks, which will precede definitive
negotiations.
Definitive negotiations probably will not begin
until next year.

Page 3



Floirda Alligator, Monday, November 17,1969

Page 4

HONOR STUDENTS SERVE AS ADVISORS
UF Hebs Freshmen Feel At Home

By BRUCE BRUNT
Alligator C orrespondent
In loco parentis may be on
the way out, but the UF is doing
everything within its power to
see that freshmen are made to
feel at home on campus.
Officials in the housing office
have been working with the
registrars office to enroll
freshmen students living in co-ed
dorms in the same Logic classes.
Housing feels that if the new
student can immediately
associate with those who live
around him, he will have a better
chance of succeeding in school.
Incoming freshmen are
assigned an honor student as an
advisor. This honor student is
usually a sophomore or junior
who lives in the dorm and has
shown an interest in bettering
the dorm life.
Janie Kronmann, a
sophomore living in Yulee Hall,
is one such honor student. In
September, Miss Kronman

Devices Will Raise
Gym Seating Capacity

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
The Florida Gyms capacity,
reduced from 7,400 to 4,000 to
comply with an order from the
deputy state fire marshall may
be increased to 5,100 if the UF
can execute a few changes.
The capacity of the gym was
cut in September because it did
not meet the current life safety
code requirements concerning
exits.
The fire marshall was not
satisfied with the gym, said
Director of Athletics Ray Graves
Thursday, but he thought the
situation should be reviewed and
he sent an assistant for closer
scrutiny of the situation.
In a report received by Graves
earlier in the week, the fire
marshall said the gyms capacity
could be ; increased if an
adequate fire alarm system were
installed as well as panic devices
on doors, lighting on exit doors
and a public address system.
The UF is now in the process
of correcting the situation
Assistant Director of Athletics
Percy Beard said.
Beard also said that the gym
should be in operating
condition for the UFs first
home basketball game Dec. 20.
In a report published in a May
edition of the Alligator,
architect George Ryad Fisher
stated, When used as a place of

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assigned 20 freshmen to advise
ten men and ten women. All of
the women lived on Janeys
floor and the men lived in
adjacent Reid Hall.
Miss Kronmann has mixed
emotions as to the success of
this new program. In the past,
freshmen girls were assigned a
big sister on their floor. This was
a person that each girl could go
to when she had a problem or
just wanted to talk. Boys were
more or less left alone to fend
for themselves.
After almost two months as
an honor student I have found
that I have established a good
big sister-little sister relationship
with all of the gills, but the boys
have gone the way of the wind. I
guess the boys just found out
that they could get along fine by
themselves, she said.
As far as having the combined
Logic classes, I guess it works,
because all of the girls seem to
have done better on the
mid-terms than the average. This

assembly under existing
conditions, Florida Gymnasium
would pose a threat to the lives,
of its occupants in a fire or other
emergency requiring prompt
exit.
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might be because they know
more people in their class and
have a greater interest in
attending.
The whole purpose was to
make freshmen feel comfortable
and at home during their stay at
UF, Miss Kronmann said.
With 20,000 students,
relationships can tend to be very
impersonal and a student who
was always used to having lots of
friends at home can find himself
UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
1802 W. University
Adjacent King's Food Host
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB
X-TRA quick watch repair
Diamond Setting
Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophys plaques
BECK" BECHTOLD 373-1025

* MONTHS FROM NOW |
YOU CAN BE EARNING BIG MONEY
EVEN IN YOUR SPARE TIME
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I BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY URGENTLY NEED I
COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS WHO HAVE SOME
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WHAT IS A COMPUTER PROGRAMMER?
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"program".
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You can learn at home, at your own pace, y li/jtk §
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After your first lesson, you can write a simple \ > B
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m SHORTAGE NO TECHNICAL BACKGROUND H
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lost up here. The goal of this
program is to increase the
students success in school both
socially and intellectually.
1 think this is as
successful as it can be, Miss

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
*
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
NW 14th ST & UNI V. AVE.
:: :

muun MOf
REPAIR SHOPS
1620W.UNIV. AVE.
STMnS
AND
101 N. MAIN ST
OTM2II
SOLESAnACHEDHEELS
ISiwlwa Inh.



' TO WALKING STUDENTS DAY AND NIGHT
Campus Poce Give Needed Rides

By GROVER ROBINSON
Alligator Correspondent
Need a ride somewhere on campus? Ernie Johnson, a member of
the Student-Police Liaison Commission and the Blade Student Union,
discovered recently a campus police car going your way may be the
answer.
I was trying to thumb a ride across campus the other day and was
getting nowhere until a campus policeman stopped and asked me
where I was headed, Johnson said. I told him, and he said, Hop in.*
I was surprised when the officer told me he often gave students
rides, Johnson added.
The campus policemen have no intention of replacing Yellow Cab
or the campus bus service, but they are generally anxious to help

GatorPaks
On Sale
For 25(
Gator-Paks are on sale again
to raise money for UF*s Gator
Loan Fund.
Each Gator-Pak contains
sample sizes of various toilet
articles phis discount coupons
for such items as magazine
subscriptions and camera film.
The men*s pack, which sells
for 25 cents, includes a small can
of spray deodorant, a tube of
shampoo and a tin of aspirin
tablets. The womens pack costs
50 cents and has additional
items.
Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity is
handling the sale of Gator-Paks
as a service project. In charge of
the project is AEP service
chairman Wayne Hieber.
Hieber Tuesday said the Paks
are made up by Student Gift
Pax, Inc. of West Hempstead,
Long Island, N.Y. The firm
distributes the Paks for
promotional purposes to
charities which in turn sell
them for 100 par cent profit.
All funds raised for the Gator
Loan Fund are matched 9 to 1
by the federal government. The
UF Office of Student Financial
Aid distributes the money as
scholarships, grants and loans to
students seeking financial aid.
About 1,200 students are
receiving aid through Gator
Loan Fund this year.
Gator-Paks can be bought at
the Information Booth across
from die Hub. AEPi pledges arid
Little Sisters also will be selling
them in dorms and apartment
complexes. The Paks will be on
sale until theyre all gone.

MONDAY SPECIAL
f fHQff -
ROAST BEEF ON DRESSING
FREE IGE CREAM w/ purchase of PIE or CAKE
TUESDAY SPECAI
YOUNG TENDER 70
ROAST TURKEY /0
& MASHED POTATOES
aJf
lsAn|sEfr&aEWW
B / / |*SfrTV If Jk'- ft

WHAT-S HAPPEMNcj;
L... By BRENDA GEVERTZ 11

A LITTLE LATE FOR
HALLOWEEN: Kappa Sigs love
a good party, but when theyre
costuming around in the middle
of November, one gets a little
suspicious. So, if you get
attacked by a brother, pledge or
little sister, fear not! Instead,
reach deep down into your
pocket, just before you get to
the hole covered up by masking
tape, and pull out a few coins.
The frat promises to give the
money to the United Fund.
AS THE WORLD TURNS:
On The Edge of Night, Search
for Tomorrow. And, lurking
among the Dark Shadows of the
General Hospital, you may find
the Doctors. Ask them about the
Days of Our Lives and they may
tell you the Truth or
Consequences. Concentration is
CLARK GABLE STARS
tonite in the GREATEST
SHOW OF ALL TIME...
GONE WITH THE WIND
tonight at the Suburbia
DRIVE IN THEATRE
ADVERTISEMENT

students out when they can, according to Lt. Luther Golden of the
campus police.
As part of our preventative law enforcement we make it a point to
stop any coeds we see walking at night and offer to ride them to their
destination, Golden said.
During the day many of otir men will give students rides if they
arent on a specific mission, he added.
There is no department policy on giving students rides during the
day comparable to our night policy with coeds, but we dont
discourage the individual officer from doing it, he said.
If they arent on dispatch somewhere, most of our people are glad
to help out, Golden said. Its also good public relations because the
officer and student can get to meet each other personally.

the key to avoid jeopardy. Lets
Make a Deal Who Do You
Trust to Tell the Truth? The
Price is Right. For further
information, go to the Reitz
Union Auditorium tonight at 8.
Dr. Joseph Kitagawa, professor
of the history of religions at the
University of Chicago, is going
to speak. His topic is The
Changing Ethos of World
Religions,
QUITE A NOVELTY: Peering
from beneath the covers of his
two best sellers, author and UF
English professor Harry Crewes
will speak and give readings from
his novels. The program begins
at 4:30 in Lounge 123 of the
Union.
Harry
Crews
B
Photo by Helen Henrahan
HARRY CREWS was bom In 1935
in Bacon County, Georgia. He lives
with his wife in Gainesville, Florida,
the site of the University of
Florida, where he teaches English.
When Harry Crews first novel, The
Gospel Singer, was published early
in 1968, it received high praise
from such novelists as Richard E.
Kim and Andrew Lytle. In the
Richmond News Leader, Robert P.
Hilldrup called the book
altogether the best piece of fiction
this reviewer has seen come out of
the South since Jesse Hill Fords
The Liberation of Lord Byron
Jones.
* "' .V '** i
jgfov **'' r V & ;jj
Harry Crews will speakcm, and it,
give readings from, his three
x - x. Y -v -,4y < *,
' V.j-*;v. '.-Xy p pw
w pw v w?
S Monday, November 17,
4:30 in Lonqge 123
J Wayne Reitz Union.

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Monday, NewwOar 17,15 M. The Plorfcle AMgetor, I

ywSj/


Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 17,1900

Page 6

ITS GOT CHARACTER OWNER SAYS
WelLEquipped Hearse
Makes Life More Fun
By PHYLLIS GALUB
Aligator Staff Writer
Its got character.** 5
A strange way to describe a hearse, but that's the reason Erich
Strong likes his.
He said he wanted an original car (?) and he certainly got one.
Strong, a new employe in the coast engineering department, bought
his used hearse in a Boston warehouse and drove it down to Miami.
Teople had some really wierd comments on the way down here.
Some guy was really smashed. He took one look at the car and started
to sing, They're coming to take me away, ha ha.* '*
He said he*s had a lot of fun in the car.
He also said he*s had a lot of fun with the things he keeps in the
back of the hearse.
He has a bed back there for special occasions* only with a
casket pillow and throw, which is a casket cover.
He also has a cow skull, to add to the atmosphere the hearse
creates.
The original velvet curtains are stiD on the window and he says he
plana to install a stereo.
He said he was stopped by the police in Massachusetts several times.
'They stopped me because the Devil's Disciples, a group which is
similar to the Hells Angels, carry guns in hearses. But I don't carry
anything but people."
He said a lot of people like to ride in the car. Sometimes, he takes
at least 10 people to a drive-in.
Tt really freaks people out to see us all pile out of the car, he
said.
Strong said one time he saw two people walking along and decided
to offer them a ride.
I had on the tall black hat I wear sometimes. I rolled up next to
them and said, speaking very slowly, 'come right in.' Boy, did they
run."

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the small society by Brickman
v-A Swamp
== /A/7
vyiVMA|iefi pgr eieenew

Riker Denies
Fee Increase
There has been no increase in
housing fees for Murphree Area,
Director of Housing Harold C.
Riker said last week after the
Freshman Council said they
might protest a supposed
increase from slls to $l3B.
Riker said one possibility for
the misunderstanding is that
beginning students are assessed a
general fee of $l3B for housing
before entering the UF. After
arriving they are given a refund
or charged an additional fee
depending on which dorm is
chosen.
There is a possibility the $23
refund for Murphree residents
has not been sent yet, he said.

VtizA, lan
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favorite plaza, Pizza Inn yfirt-s
Pizza prepared from a *ecrete /ni \
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perfection served fresh, hot and
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"Our color TV is back"



A C > ..
Buy Your 1970
fl
|a^^jpHlL.a|l^^K|HpppgH
11 I
I. I I u m
R 1^- ''
- w'.*!* >* IPf ./ #2? ,2>'te '^y^-
..*' 1 * <
It looks like Jo-Arm is sitting down on the job!
l*o ' ;
' '' : 1
Join Concerned Students to put Jo-Ann Back
to Work by simply purchasing a Seminole.
; -' ... '-V y '. v ' -. " .. '. - ... .' -. *'. - j_ "'.
You can join (by ordering your Seminole
at one of these three convenient locations..
v. ; 1 - ; ..*-
_ /
Days little Hall
Service booth across from
the Hub
Nights Research Library
The sisters and pledges of ae* will take your order
.' .*. .y 4 \<* *'* "* .-;' '- *. f . .. Ti- .s / / *
at any time between 9 AM and 4 PM weekdays
through November 21.

November 17,1969. The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 17,1969

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
. The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
I A PP Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
Executive Editor News Editor
A wnimH
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,|| '.Jf ff
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The only object in the small room
was a wood-burning stove.
There were mgs and kilims on the
floor and a few pillows along the walls.
Some clothes hung from large nails and
a radio rested on a small pile of books in
one comer.
I had been invited to Alis house for
dinner.
His mother cooked on a fireplace
outside. There was no kitchen. There
were no bedrooms. There was only one
room: the room with the wood-burning
stove.
I was welcomed with the Turkish
courtesies I had learned to expect. 1
responded accordingly 1 kissed Alis
mothers hand then pressed it to my
forehead. I said Hos bulduk. When I
sat down I said merhaba to everyone
in the room and asked them how there
were. They all thanked me and asked
about my health.
We sat on the floor Tuikish-style with
our legs crossed in front of us. There
was Alis mother (his father was dead),
his older brother and younger sister, and
Ali.
Ali was about IS years old. He was in
his second year at the Orta Okul (junior
high school) where I taught him English.
He wasnt a good student, but he was
quiet and industrious. He attended
school in the afternoons only since the
small, five-classroom schoolhouse ran on
double-sessions. He worked at odd jobs
after school and, like most students in
the school, he took little time to study
English.
We talked for a while about how cold
the weather had become, about my
impressions of Turkey and the town,
about teaching, about the students,
about other small things of great
importance. Alis older brother had
become engaged a few weeks earlier,
and we talked about that.
1 thanked them for inviting me to the
ceremony and they thanked me for
coming. I remember it was held outside
(in the garden of the girls home) just
before the weather had turned cold.
Tables and chairs had been borrowed
from the neighborhood and an orange
punch and pastries had been served. The-

Dinner Guest In A Turkish Home

| The Adventures Os |

couple stood beneath the grape vines,
their faces expressionless and their
hands quivering slightly as they signed
their names in the book and exchanged
rings. Then they walked around, shook
hands with all the men and kissed the
hands of the older women, pressing
them to their foreheads.
Then an old man began chanting and
everyone bowed their heads and
extended their arms in front of them,
palms uplifted. They called on an
all-powerful Allah to give the young
couple long life and many children. I
was moved by the simplicity and the
solemnity of the occasion.
As we sat in the small room Alis
mother smiled pensively and seemed to
be saddened at the thought of losing a
son. Then she suddenly rose, went
outside and soon brought in a tray of
food and placed it on the floor. She
passed out spoons and hunks of bread.
She gave me a cloth napkin. She sat
down and joined the rest of us around
the tray and asked me to begin.
There were three bowls of food, one
had a little meat in it but it was mostly
vegetables. The food was excellent and I
was again amazed at what Turkish
women could do with so little.
His mother was an elderly woman
with a wrinkled face and young, very
alive eyes. She was very nimble, moved
and ate quickly, and found it much
easier to sit with her legs crossed than I
did. She wore a plaid veil (it was a faded
pink and white) over her greying hair
which hung in loose strands near her
eyes. She .smiled often and kept insisting

EDITORIAL
Una Buena Idea

Student Body President Charles
Shepherds proposal that the foreign
language requirement as it is now in effect in
the College of Arts and Sciences be
eliminated is a sound one.
Shepherd has encouraged the Arts and
Sciences Advisory Council and the Student
Senate to support his Executive
Departments recommendation, which also
urges:
t the institution of a new language
requirement which would allow students to
substitute certain English courses for the
present foreign language requirement, and,
that further efforts be made to upgrade
language departments and the quality of
instruction they offer.
Shepherds reasoning is simple: While a
reasonable skill in foreign languages may be
desirable or even essential in certain fields,
its intrinsic value in many other areas would
be marginal at best.

Vote For National Policy?

MR. EDITOR:
Since the Physical Science buffoon has seen fit to
regail Alligator readers with his inane, antebellum,
platitudinous interpretations of current events twice
within recent days, I consider it necessary to
attempt to curtail further homilies from this
technical Polonius.

that her guest eat more.
There wasnt very much food and I
did my best to make it look like I was
eating a lot.
I had been invited to many homes for
dinner during the year I spent in the
town. Some people were poorer than
Alis family, but most were slightly
richer. But the hospitality was always
the same. A guest is God in a Turkish
home. His every wish is honored, no
matter how much of an inconvenience it
is to anyone else.
When it comes to hospitality, Alis
family was typical. When it comes to
school (especially English), Ali was
typical.
, Since the town was eight kilometers
off the main road, tourists seldom (if
ever) ventured off the beaten path to
discover it. The students (and villagers)
seldom met a foreigner and saw no
reason for learning a foreign language. It
wasnt real to them; it wasnt alive. I
couldnt blame them.
The school was cold in winter (I
could see my breath in the classroom)
and hot in the spring. My smallest class
had over 40 students in it three
students in a seat. Many students were
over 17-years-old (some even 20) and
had no desire to sit in a classroom, let
alone learn English. Most of them would
never go to high school. Most would
never leave the town, never have a need
for a foreign language. Probably none of
them will ever leave Turkey.
The children were the most beautiful
people in the town.
... Outside the classroom, they taught

By allowing a choice, students in fields
where skiT in a foreign language would serve
little purpose could better utilize their
course work and time to better prepare
in English through courses such as semantics
or linguistics.
Depending upon the individual plans and
expectations of a particular student,
Shepherd said in his proposal, a great deal
more may be accomplished by the student
through course work in aspects of the
English language.
And we agree.
Thus we urge the Student Senate and the
Arts and Sciences Advisory Council to
support Shepherds proposal. An early
elimination of the blanket foreign language
requirement is not only desirable but
necessary if the College of Arts and Sciences
is to continue on its road to meaningful
academic reform:
Y por ello aplaudimos la sugerencia del
Presidente Shepherd.

The flaw in his tedious argument espousing the
necessity of determining national policy at the polls
rather than through public demonstrations, is that
the last election presented persons desirous of
expressing opposition to the Vietnam policy the
choice of casting a ballot for Hubert Humphrey or
Richard Nixon. Some choice.
ROYDUBOURG

me Turkish and soccer. They did chores
for me around my house. They took me
donkey and camel-riding, swimming and
fishing, and they came to my house to
talk and look at American magazines.
Like Ali, they invited me to dinner.

Most of them had dark hair with
large, dark eyes; they were very curious,
inquisitive, respectful, friendly and
happy. They talked freely (in their own
tongue) and were anxious to show off
their town and country. I wanted to
teach them English, but I couldnt. So I
tried to learn about them.
Ali was typical. He took care to eat
little and see that I was full. He offered
to work for me the next day. He talked
little and listened a lot. His mother
talked proudly of him and he blushed.
She asked how he was doing in English
class. I said he was trying. That was
true.
After the meal we talked for a half
hour before I thanked them and
excused myself. They apologized for
not having more and I thanked them for
giving so much.
When I walked home, there was a full
moon. It was cold and the wind blew
my hair. I put my hands in my pocket,
looked around, saw no one, then
skipped down the street.
My stomach wasn't full, but the rest
of me was.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Janie Gould Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices in Room 33Q, Reitz Union.
Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida
Alligator are those of the editors or of the
writer of the article and not those of the
University of Florida.



\
gr Jm ~y%ttJi -/> Jm P I H^^
In other parts of the city activities resembled those
of Armies of the night. As a prelude to the march
Saturday to the Washington Monument, protestors
Friday night led by the radical SDS and yippies, bent
on making trouble by their own admission, clashed
with police and tear gas bombs.
Photos By Craig Goldwyn

m.

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Violence Mars Otherwise Peaceful Day

Goddamnit, youd think theyd be
add by this time. Why dont they just
go home? said a highly annoyed peace
marcher. He was not alone in his
sentiments. There go the freaks, said
someone else.
Huge, crudely deafened paper-mache
images resembling Vice President Spfro
Agnew, former President Lyndon B.
Johnson and someone else nobody
was quite sure who were hoisted by
the SDS-Yippie leaders and others
carrying red flags followed in strict
march formation. The ultia-leftigt cadre
made its way to the Justice Department
where they were surprised to be
confronted not by the police but by the
mote moderate New Mobilization
marshalls. The New Mobes locked arms
placing themselves between the police
and the SDSYippies.
Animal-like sounds, Indian war
whoops and low groans from the
SDS-Yippies as they marched around
the Justice Department thoroughly

confounded the mob that was waiting
to see what would happen. They sound
like theyre possessed by demons, said
an observer. Ive never seen anything
like that before, I think theyre crazed.
The militants marched around the
massive building twice, but unlike
Jericho, the walls did not 1 come
tumbling down. The police finally
sealed off a block of Connecticut
Avenue facing the Justice Department
and fired gas both at the marchers
and at the crowd that was now
numbering 100,000. Whereupon the
cadre became a mob, the mob began
running, police began gassing a
four-block area at 15-minute intervals
and the mob left a string of broken
store windows in its wake.
Included in the four-block area was
the Harrington Hotel, whde Floridas
Student Mobilization Committee was
headquartered. Gas seeped into the
hotel, and the occupants began crying,
choking and having the dry heaves.
This place sounds like a TJB. ward,
said someone in the hotel cafeteria.
Dont rub your eyes, that only


The Masses
Chant
'Give Peace
A Chance
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makes it worse, cautioned another, as
onlookers peered out the lobby
windows to watch the National Guard
troops pass by.
For those involved in the March
Against Death, however, this weekend
meant a time to work for peace.
Miserable weather marked by rain and
sleet on Friday and freezing
temperatures and chilling winds all day
Saturday, did nothing to quell the spirit
of the march. Thousands upon
thousands marched past the White
House in single file Friday, each
carrying a candle ensconced in a Dixie
cup and wearing a placard bearing the
name of of GJ. killed in Vietnam.
One girl looked like death itself. She
wore a grey mantle and hood covering
her from head to toe. Her face was
painted with grey flourescent make-up
and a white peace symbol was painted
down her nose.
As did all the others, she paraded
before a White House lawn that was lit
up as bright as daylight. A particular
bright spotlight in front of the White
House concealed a machine gun nest

Monday

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installed for the inarch.
A happy, almost festival-lice
atmosphere marked Saturday, the day
of the mass march. Hawkers on street
comers sold everything from peace
buttons to pins announcing that *1 am a
effete, impudent, intellectual snob,** to
underground newspapers. And a hawker
pleaded, Be a conspirator! Buy a flag
(a Stop die Trial** flag). Only 25 cents.
Cheap.**
An atmosphere of friendship and
communion permeated the weekend.
The students helped each other. When a
girl fell down on a city street, six
people, all part of the New Mobe,
helped her. People shared their food,
their money, their rides home.
The violence was secondary, and it
failed to dampen the spirit of the New
Mobilization to End the War. At a
meeting of the Florida contingent
Friday, Steve Fahrer said:
Weve heard there might be trouble
at DuPont Circle tonight. If you want to
go there, go in groups of three or four,
and if there is violence, try to stop it.
We dont want it.**

Page 9



i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 17, 1969

Page 10

|\4 Campus Crier jj
* 1 L W SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT ff
Sm*********4^^

1m Annual fain Jteafib
INTERNATIONAL MUSIC & ARTS
10 *\, FESTIVAL
THANKSGIVING DAY WEEKEND
\\\\ V v FRIDAY, SATURDAY, & SUNDAY fA JT
NOVEMBER 28-29-30
THE ROLLING STONES, JEFFERSON AIRPLANE, IRON BUTTERFLY, SLY & THE^sf^ ~~~~Jr'
f/ FAMILYSTONES, JANIS JOPLIN, CHAMBERS BROTHERS, STEPPENWOLF, SPIRIT, X E2fc II
J GRAND FUNK RAILROAD, PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC, JOHNNY WINTER, THE
BYRDS, SWEETWATER, COUNTRY JOE & THE FISH, ROTARY V TT""
CONNECTION ... plus 15 other major groups. m
Profits from ticket sales will be given to Gator Loan fund as they have obtained 2,000
tickets for UF students and community. Get your tickets at Donigan's or the Sub Subterranean
terranean Subterranean Circus.
For information, call Eddie Floyd, chairman of Gator Loan fund, at 378-5549, 376-9226,
392-1665 or come by the Gator Loan fund office, Room 326 of the Reitz Union.
ALL TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED IN ADVANCE $20.00 per body
JEFFERSON AIRPLANES TO FLY HERE
The Jefferson Airplanes, sponsored by Student Government Productions and the Interfraternity Council, will appear in
the Florida Gym, December 2, at 7:00 and 9:00. Tickets can be purchased for $1.25 at the Reitz Union Box Office or the
Record Bar.
CONTEMPLATING SUICIDE?
Come join the people with whom you have something in common. Perhaps it's grades ... dates ... or financial burdens that have gotten you
down. No matter why you're thinking of calling it endsville, meet the Befrienders at 5:30, Wednesday, November 19 in front of the Infirmary.
SPIRIT CHAIRMAN NEEDED
A new chairman of the S.G. Spirit Committee will be named this quarter by Student Body President Charles Shepherd. The Spirit Chairman
serves as a member of Shepherd's staff, is a member of the Pep Rally Responsibility Committee and is in charge of the annual Banner Contest.
Applications can be picked up in room 305 of the Union.

PROGRAM OFFICE REQUESTS
MOVIE SUGGESTIONS
We want to know what films you want to see!
The Graduate Planet of the Apes
Elvira Madigan Barbarella
Fistful of Dollars Valley of the Dolls
Bom Free Blue Max
Quiller Memorandum President's Analyst
your suggestions:
PROGRAM OFFICE SCHEDULE
Monday,l7th Harry Crews, author of 2 best sellers, and a UF colorful
instructor of English, will speak on his novels and give readings from them at 4:30
in Lounge 123 of the Union as part of the Campus Speakers Series. There is no
admission.
Friday, 18th & Sat.. 19th The Union movie will be the "Dirty Dozen" in the
Union Auditorium. Showings at 5:30, 8:00, and 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, 20th University Film Series presents "Breathless" in the Umo".
Auditorium. Showings at 7:00 and 9:30.

ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET, STAFF, AND AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS DESIRING PUBLICITY IN THE CAMPUS
CRIER, MUST TAKE THEIR INFORMATION TO THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY 5:00 WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON OF
EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
THANKS,
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT

DELI-NITE AT THE UNION
4:30 to 7:00 pm In the Union Cafeteria, Thursday, November 20. The finest in
delicatessen food sponsored by Union Program Office.
25 cents Caesar Salad with Toasted Croutons
70 cents Corned Beef
25 cents ...; Fleishig (vegetable soup)
20 cents Knishes (potato cakes)
20 cents Sweet and Sour Green Beans
15 cents Kosher Pickles
20 cents '. Bagels
20 cents Whipped Cream Cheese
35 cents Cheesecake with Pineapple topping
10 cents ... Coffee



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
AMPEX 750 track 3 speed tape
deck stereo play-record, echo effect
sound on sound etc. Includes walnut
base A cover tapes $l5O firm
378-6129. (A-st-40-p)
Martin 0018 c Classical guitar with
hardshell case, Roberts 770 x
taperecorder with AKG and Roberts
mikes stand earphones assesories
372- (A-4t-40-p)
1956 MG good engine tires top side
curtains wirewheeis some materials
for restoration 372-7024 after 5.
( A-4t-40-p)
8 x 42' 2 bedroom mobile home, air
conditioned, redecorated; with utility
shed. Call 372-3112 or 372-8032.
$1750. (A-st-40-p)
68 Lamplighter mobile home 12X45
fully furn, bar and stools, 2 bdrm, ac,
park has pool. ssl month, $650
equity payments possible
378-5174. (A-st-41-p)
Vespa 12 5 perfect mechanical
condition, low mileage, very reliable,
new paint, new brakes, SSO. Call
376-9226 ask for Jim Retzke.
(A-3t-41-p)
GunsGunsGunsInventory over
460. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom;
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera
with FIB lens, manual 200M lens,
and pistol grip. $75 firm. 376-4905
after 6:00 P.M. (A-3t-40-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
Amplifier Fender twin reverb.
Older blackface model. Great
condition S3BO. Call 372-2173. Rock
& Roll will never die! (A-st-42-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk must sell
S3OO 1966 good condition 372-5015.
(A-3t-42-p)
1969 Honda Superhawk 305 CC.
Excellent mechanical condition
4,000 miles, some dents & scratches
$450. Call 376-4736 after 5. (A-3t
42-p)
12x44 mobile home 1968 Air one
bedroom 400 down assume payments
Art Deane 3101 SW 34th St. no. 66
or 378-9402. (A-st-42-p)
GERMAN SHEPHERD, 3 mos. old,
AKC, great pedigree, well trained,
had all shots. FORCED TO PART
WITH HER, REASONABLY
PRICED. CALL 378-3486.
(A-2t-42-p)
KAWASAKI 250 SS Good Condition
$450.00 Including Heiment Call
462-27g2 after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-42-p)
New Healthways two stage, double
hose, scuba regulator $45.00 or best
offer. Call 376-1523 after 5:00
p.m.A-2t-42-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak matching
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewrltter,
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
(A-7t-42-p)
Heath model DA-281 Stereo
amplifier, 35 watts/channel, ail new
tubes, SBS. Heath model AJ-63 Mono
FM tuner, $25. Both SIOO. WMI
demonstrate. Call 378-7671.
(A-st-42-p)
DONT merely brighten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them ... eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-43<)
Super-8 automatic movie camera
with FlB lens, manual Zoom lens,
and pistol grip. $75 firm. 376-4905
after 6:00 p.m. (A-3t-40-p)
AVON cosmetics, colognes, toys at
fantastic SAVINGS for brother,
sister, parents, or lover. Order now to
receive for Christmas. Call/see Tla
392-9345, Jennings 453. (A-3t-43-p)
1966 Harly Davidson I7scc.
Excellent Condition $225. See Rich
at apt. 29 La Mancha. (A-st-43-p)
68 Suzuki 500 cc. 6000 ml. left on
warrnL Immaculate condt. Bags,
hlmt., and more Incld. Very fast. Call
collect 904-496-3017 after 7 p.m.
(A-st-43-p)
v
j| FOR RENT I
Tired of your old drab apartment
sub-lease a poolside Village Park apt.
available winter quarter. Call
373- after 4 p.m. (B-st-39-p)
Sublet Jan-June furnished AC quiet
carpeted apartment with 2 balconies
IV2 blks from campus $125 month or
coed roommate 373-1921.
(B-3t-42-p)

1 FOR RENT
t M nifi rrMprr r r-m-rflti oo po ooci!
For sale or rent one bedroom trailer
and Cabana gas heat & air
conditioner $975 or $65 mo.
392-0939 or 376-3322. (B-st-39-p)
1 br efficiency. New, clean, quiet,
can move right in. Must sublease SBS
per mont. Furnished. Call late any
night or morning. 376-6854.
(B-4t-41-p)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
livlngroom completely furnished, ww
carpet, a/c $l2O O mo., cable TV.-
Colonial Manor Apts. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
3 rms upstairs FURNISHED
481-2775 HAWTHORNE $65.00.
(B-st-41-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Unlv. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals
$220/quarter. Some financial aid
available. 378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
Here's your chance to live well. Need
two coeds to sublet In Landmark.
TV, stereo, pool, all electric. Nice
roomies. Call 378-6422. (C-st-41-p)
Male roommate La Mancha S7O per
mon including utilities Furnished
Prefer grad student. Available Now
Call 378-9441 Apt. 53. (C-st-40-p)
Female roommate needed winter &
spring terms (Getting married need
replacement). Share large 2-bedroom
apt. with 3 girls. Quiet, comfortable,
convenient. 2 blocks from Norman
Hall. sllO/quarter. 373-2832.
(C-st-42-p)
Male roommate for winter qtr to
look for 2bdrm apt In $l4O range.
Call 373-1514 after 10 grad student
preferred. (C-3t-42-p)
Female roommate for Frederick
Gardens apt. Immediate occupancy
or 2nd & 3rd quarters. Call Dana
372- (C-3t-42-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
French Quarter apt. $45.00 per
month Poolside. Call after 5 p.m.
373- (C-st-43-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE one male
roommate wanted for winter quarter.
Rent 43.50 + util. Central air and
heat, pool. Call Herb 376-6361.
(C-st-41-p)
| HELP WANTED j!
400 per month. Part time evenings.
Must be neat & have own trans.
Report 206 SE Ist St. til 9 PM.
( E-st-40-p)
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
WANTED: Two or three accounting
majors for work In the business office
of one of the largest student
organizations at the University
Student Publications. Sophomores or
Juniors only. Call 392-1689 or come
by Room 330 In the Union any
afternoon. (E-3t-nc)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
paid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua. (E-llt-42-p)
Experienced mother will care for
Infants and toddlers by hour, $35 or
week $15.00. Phone 378-6681.
(E-3t-43-p)
riT||||TijijTre
WmMM I H
I
TONE WITHI
THE WIND
8:00 ONLY

Monday, November 17,1969. The Florida Alligator,

I AUTOS |
1969 Kamann-Ghla, 3 Months Old
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., $1950. (G-st-35-p)
1963 Rambler American 220, std
trans, good gas mileage, great reliable
transportation $225 Call 376-0579
after 5:30 p.m. (G-3t-42-p)
1965 JAGUAR XKE Roadster.
Excellent condition. 378-7620.
(G-st-42-p)
67 GTO Super clean, light blue, black
vinyl top, stereo tape, AM-Fm, rally
wheels, tach, custom Interior, call
Pesek 378-9779 asking SI9OO.
(G-st-41-p)
1968 Sprite, excellent condition,
serviced + tuned every 3000 ml.,
radio excellent heater, front sway-bar
Stebro exhaust, BRG, other extras.
Asking $1650. 378-2235. (G-st-39-p)
67 XKE convertible. Excellent,
yellow, bik top, chrome wire wheels
$4195. Serious offers call 392-1881 8
to 5, ask for Louise Hardin.
(G-st*4o-p)
1966 MUSTANG like new 36,000
miles automatic transmission, radio
heater, 6 cylinders, call 378-8752
after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
1965 MG Midget Needs net top and
brake job. Has new inspection tag,
battery, starter, generator, exhaust
system. Best offer. Call 373-2345.
(G-st-40-p)
PERSONAL |
Menl Visit all of west or east Europe
next summer for S3OO private and
coop organized trip write box 2657
Gains. U. Sta. for info. (J-st-39-p)
BOYS!!! Your Playboy coed maid
service is here! Hire your bunnies
now. Rates to be arranged. Call
Nancy or Lisa. 373-2760. (J-st-40-p)
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be in
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-5t*42-p)
J |
FOUND boys size 16 blue cardigan
sweater at Gator Bowl Saturday.
376-2771 evenings. (L-41-nc-3t)
LOST: Paperback, Poetry A Prose of
Pope Reward Please Call
392-7593. (L-2t-43-p)
C SERVICES 11
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight Instruction Instrument flight
Instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you can't beat the deal at
the nicest little airport In the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. ( M-20t-30-p)
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair for ever
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst (over
20 yrs experience) 372-8039. By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)
Tennis racket restringing free pick up
and delivery. M & R Tennis Services
378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
/ A
I W 1
l LAST 2 DAYS U W J
\ 2:00 4:30 7 & 9:30 \
/pere KAJHARIN6 I
f OTOOL6 H6PBURN J
I .MARTIN POtL /
/ \
I TH LION IN WINT6R j
NOW^
A LOVE STORY
§FOR TODAYI
A Walk with
H Love and
COLOR by na9J|
he luxe.
AT.. 2:06 3:57
5:48 7:42 9:36 /

Page 11

1 SERVICES |
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS 1126 W N.
W. Bth St. 376-8506 prices not given
over phone, depends on garment.
(M-St-39-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Let PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE xerox your thesis,
dissertation or manuscript work. We
type them so we know how to handle
them. (S.OB per copy collated) Call
376-7160. (M-6t-38-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
Tennis Racket Restringing free pick
up and delivery. MAR Tennis
Services 378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
j Looking j
|forJjA |
\
{ Used Car? j
| FIND IT UNDER j!
autos
IN GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
L

ELROD'S 2T2T
" v. vV
iAO/ Discount
Iv/O To Students
All Makes And Models Cowair Specialist
Get a Fair Shake.... See ELROD
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 SO. MAIN n= 376-7771
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA 1
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
Mushroom Gravy 70 A
Hash Brown Potatoes / / y
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
'A BROILED CHICKEN
r -~ $1.09
m jfTZi VjXt GAINESVILLE MALL >m::M
C
I

I SERVICES §
g'SOgdafrMftOj.f a M OOffNICr
Health foods, natural vltlmlns,
complete line Hoffman products. For
Information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
* rtus
V'BONNIE /
aYDi-g
rsm. i m #.
.-ifl m\
UiHiiil
jAnLLMM HOLDEN
} mm lisi \
$ BOURYIL J
.AITORIfyXTOaNG J
THE CHRISTMAS*
\ TREE
COLOR IT RNEUI w^TtSl



The
' Florida
Alligator

PETE KNOCKE

s= PRESS BOX
/
Bowl Fever
* SAM PEPPER=
Which Bowl?
Id like to go to the Gator Bowl, said Coach Ray Graves.
The Orange Bowl but Til settle for the Sun Bowl, Steve Tannen
said.
Who cares, John Reaves said, I just want to phy football.
Scouts from the Liberty, Gator and Sun Bowls turned out in force
Saturday to view the Gators, and all were impressed.
The Gators are a colorful team, Liberty Bowl scout Jim Aiken
said. They deserve to play in a bowl.
Florida was listed as one of 11 prospects for the Liberty Bowl.
Aiken considers Carlos Alvarez and Andy Cheney as the best
one-two receiver combination he has ever seen.
Gator Bowl scout John Piombo reported that they were still
viewing Florida as one of the strong favorites for a Gator Bowl clash.
He hinted, however, that it would be unlikely that two SEC teams
would meet in the Jacksonville stadium. Piombo dted a poor national
television viewership as the reason.
If the decision is between the Sun Bowl and the Gator Bowl it will
be the Sun Bowl. That is if the seniors have anything to do with it.
If theres a choice, we definately would vote against the Gator
Bowl. Weve been there too many times, Tannen said.
Should more than one bid be offered the Gators, the decision
would be left entirely to the team. However, the seniors still have the
greater voice on the issue.
V
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. :*', *'/*' ' .
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GATOR FULLBACK MIKE RICH FH,L COPE
.. long runs set up Gator TDs

vO^BiX^ l vi^w XvAl'/ Vi M .11 Wk M mb'o
i^WKesK.^K^w^l^Ky^wiPV'yw^Ki^i^M^

Harvin Clark takes the opening kickoff and then races 96 yards for the touchdown

PETE KNOCKE

f
Mr Aj? y
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PHIL BANNISTER*
CARLOS ALVAREZ EVADES WILDCAT DEFENDERS
... broke Richard Trapp's record in receptions
Linemen Label Kentucky
Dirtiest Team Ever Played

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
Donny Williams didnt leave Florida Field
Saturday afternoon with toothmarks on his aim.
But, according to some UF offensive linemen, it
wasnt because Kentucky players werent trying.
Theyre the dirtiest football team weve ever
played against, said center Kim Helton. Theyd
even hit you when you were walking back to the
huddle.
The Gators crushed the Wildcats, 31-6, but the
Williams, a guard, had particular reason to be
annoysdvSomecme, it seems, nipped his arm during
a pileup. They were pretty dirty, he said.
The Gators, said Mac Steen, were impressed with
' Kentucky defensive tackle David RoHer for two
ieasoris.
One Hes a very good football player, Steen,
the offensive captain-tackle said.
Two He played dirty, guard Skip Amehing
said.
Somebody on that team even closelined me
. ... .. . * -* *_ *. .1. ..

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 17,1909

Page 12

eth
PETE KNOCKE

when I was walking back to the huddle, he said.
But I guess when your record is 2-7 like
Kentucky's is, you can't help playing dirty.''
If you cant win, you might as well be dirty. Id
probably be the same way.
The UF, however, is now 7-1-1, and there is no
need for Amehing to have a similar disposition. But
the Gators did retaliate.
With the Gators ahead 14-0 in the first quarter,
Roller, apparently thinking a UF lineman had
moved before the start of the play, ran through the
offensive line and gave quarterback John Reaves a
shove. Annoyed, Helton pushed Roller offsetting
penalties.
Helton and I double-teamed him on the first
pretty far bade. And tailback Tommy Durrance
gained six yards to the Wildcats' 13. >
On the next play, Amehing Hooked Roller alone
and i^rtancexcore&
I*m not complaining, said Helton. But Ive
been a starter for three years now and I never saw
anything like I saw today.
% Im not saying the whole team played dirty, he
said. v Just a few individuals.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor



' .\
Crowds Cheers inspired Clark

By TOM SHERMAN
Alligator Correspondent
If there was a turning point in
the UF-Kentucky game Saturday
afternoon, it was the opening
kickoff return by Harvin Clark.
The 96-yard return by the
5-foot-11, 189-pound
sophomore from New Smyrna
Beach was just that. Richard
Francos conversion proved to
be all the points the Gators

WstJprf' A
- 'm
r / '.. "
TOM KENNEDY
FROSH TAILBACK DUANE DOEL
... receives outstanding player award
Baby Gators Doel
Outstanding In Loss

Hard running freshman
tailback Duane Doel was named
the outstanding Florida
freshman in the Miapii Kiwanis
Charity Football game held in
the Orange Bowl Friday night.
A crowd of 20,837 watched
the Florida freshman jump out
to a quick 7-0 lead in the first
period only to have costly
mistakes kill hopes of their
second victory.
The Baby Hurricanes
capitalized on two fumbles and
seven interceptions winning the
THESWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
/jjBBS Wa,do Road
THE
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
AT
BOOK
STORES

would need for the remainder of
the contest.
Clark took the kickoff on his
four yard line and ran straight to
the center of the field, picked up
blockers and then broke to the
outside. He eluded several
would-be tacklers and began his
race for file end zone.
It was the biggest thrill of
my football career, said Gark.
After I got into the open and

game, 39-7.
Doel, a 5-10, 190-pounder
carried the ball 11 times for 57
yards and the only score before
he injured his ankle in the third
quarter. He also caught three
passes for 13 yards.
The Plantation standout ran
back one kickoff for 25 yards.
Duane is a real workhorse,
said Freshman Coach Jack
Westbrook. He has great
balance and desire and certainly
has had a fine freshman year.
For the season, the freshman
tailback gained 247 yards on 67
tries and two touchdowns. As a
receiver he caught 15 passes for
a 214 yard total.
The Baby Gators finished the
season with a 1-3 record, beating
FSU 28-26 and losing to
Auburn, Geoigia and Miami.

HAREM MIGHT
AT
Well pay $25 to the guy bringing in
the most stag girls between 9 and. 12..30.
To be paid at 12..30
< "' * s> v "**** )
Dont forget, every Thursday we have the
mini-skirt contest, and Free Beer on Mondays
Dancing every night to the sound of
The Hammer
(formerly Th# Tangerine)

heard the fans beginning to yell,
it inspired me to run harder.
The run was the first time
Clark has touched the ball
offensively this fall, and the first
time he has run back a kick at
theUF.
1 saw four guys coming at
me up the middle, he said. So
I broke to the outside and saw
daylight. I heard the man behind
me aB the way and when I got to
the 20-yard line I could just feel
that TD.
The runback was the longest
in history against Kentucky, the
third longest in Gator history
and the first since 1947.
Gark runs the 100-yard dash
in 9.9 and favors defense over
offense.
I like defense real well. We
have a great bunch of guys and
the coaches are real inspiring.
Coach Ray Graves said Gatks
return was just brilliant and
couldnt have happened to a
nicer guy.
Thats a good way to start a
game, he said. Harvin was the
right guy for it.
Quarterback John Reaves said
'' 1 -- *


\ v .. v .jj|ri||iiij|M|mMM|^p^ag\
HARVIN CLARK
... thrill of a lifetime
he had a feeling Clark was going
all the way.
I just had that certain feeling
and I told coach (Fred)
Pancoast, Reaves said. Harvin
surprised me even more when he
did it.
ITSOH
RANCHO |
£ Mexican a
Ig Rods §
* OLE/ ft
SUsfli
HHs
MSBra
Imp
STB!
y>w^.svx'Assi:;

Monday, Nowmbw 17,1969. Tha Florida AMpator,

JjkJ3NSHINe
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ASSORTED
BOX LUNCHES
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)>

Page 13



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 17,1969

Page 14

... x.
Meet Disguised Cheerleader On Bench

ByCHUCKPARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
The football Gators have a
new cheerleader, but hes
different from the other
cheerleaders because you cant
tell hes a cheerleader.
He's Paul Maliska from Winter
Park, Fla. and a two-year
letterman.
Doesn't help you tell why he's
different from the other
cheerleaders does it?
Maybe this will he wears a
big number 30 on the back of
his all-white Gator uniform and
has been the starting split end
for Florida up and until
incurring a serious head injury in
the Auburn game.
Maliska was knocked cold in a
freak play by one of his own
teammates while trying to throw
a block on a Gator sweep.
Maliska then collapsed to the
Cliff Hare Stadium turf after the
play and was quickly rushed to
the Columbus Medical Center in
serious condition.
After being unconscious for
20 hours Maiska came to and
began to recover quickly under a
neurosurgeon's care and
direction.
Maliska dressed out for the
Gators' game Saturday with
Kentucky but with the
understanding he would not see
any type of action. Dressing up
was the first acitivity for Maliska
since the play that sidelined him
in the Auburn game three weeks
ago.
But as usual, the 6-foot-l,
183-pounder couldn't just sit
there on the bench and watch

Reaves Finds Decal,
Gets Police Citation
Gator quarterback John Reaves has been issued a University Police
Department citation for displaying an illegal parking decal on his
automobile.
The sticker found on Reaves' 1969 Dodge Charger had been issued
toGator linebacker Mike PalahachSept. 26 and subsequently reported
as lost. He was issued a new permit Sept. 30.
Reaves told the Alligator he had found the decal and placed it on
his car's bumper.
"Sure I had the decal on," Reaves said. "I found it and put it on
my car. Fm lazy.
The decal was a Campus Resident A permit, which authorizes
parking in the Murphree lot across from Yon Hall, where both Reaves
and Palahach live.
Two UPD officers noticed the decal on Reaves' vehicle Nov. 9.
M 1 drove up with another guy and two policemen were taking the
decal off," Reaves said. They took off part of it and said they would
be back for the rest."
Three nights later, the ticket was issued.
Under the new parking and transportation regulations, sophomores
ate not allowed to register a car on campus. Reaves is a sophomore.
Although the illegal decal has been removed from Reaves* car, the
vehicle was spotted Friday morning parked under Yon Hall.
Climb aboard >
yThe S.S. Winnjaromer* /{
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to Ik
Los Midnight w)
'J Bernie Sher //
| at the Organ on Thursday. Friday & Saturday II
) Oysters 8t clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft \(\
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager AS
Reservations Accepted 520 s w 2nd Ave
Closed Sundays iy

PAUL MALISKA
... new cheerleader
his teammates romp all over the
Wildcats 31-6.
And so as usual the
hard-nosed senior cheerleader
disguised in his white uniform
was out on the edge of the
sidelines cheering, slapping
hands and congratulating his
fellow Gator buddies after every
successful play especially
touchdowns, interceptions and
fumble recoveries.
One of the first things
Malidca said after recovering
from his period of
unconsciousness was he would
be back to help the Gators go
9-1.
Although Georgia ruined the
idea of being 9-1 for Maliska and
the Gators, Maliska has come
back to cheer the Gators on to
their 7-1-1 record.
I'm feeling a heck of lot

better now," he said, i couldn't
eat at first but now I'm starting
to really chow down."
When asked about the Gators'
chances on receiving a bowl bid
Maliska's face lit up and he
turned for a moment to
congratulate several players for
their performances in the
Gators victory.
"We haven't been to a bowl
since my freshman year here,"
he quickly answered, "and we'ie
really locking forward to it.
"And more than tikely 111 be
able to {day in a bowl game since
theyre five to six weeks away."
Saturday was the last home
game for Florida's seniors, and
since Maliska is a senior he
wanted to just get in the game
for a couple of plays.
His doctor had told him and
the coaches he shouldn't play
until he (the doctor) was
absolutely sure Maliska would
not suffer any repercussions.
But despite the warning
Maliska got into the game for
the last play.
"I nagged them (the coaches)
unitl they finally let me run a
play in," Maliska said, "that's all
I did."

Girls,
tall good looking
Canadian boys
eat regularly
at Bonanza.
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really Jr
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Steak dinners 79t to 2.99
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BONANZA
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When asked if he would be able
to play in the Miami game Nov.

Gator PAWN SHOP
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Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

29 Maliska said the
neurosurgeon says__ jio^



BUT LIONS ARENT TALKING
O range Bowl Eyes Penn State

MIAMI (UPI) Sleepy-eyed
Orange Bowl officials left little
doubt Sunday they hope Penn
States Nittany lions resolve
their mixed feelings and
decide to return To Miami New
Years Day.
Penn State is every bowls
top choice now* said Eamie
Seiler, executive vice president
and general manager of the
Orange Bowl Committee. And
we think we have as good a
chance as any to land them.
But Penn State coach Joe
Patemo was tight-lipped about
whether his team would accept
an invitation to return to South
Florida.
Scouts from the Sugar,
Cotton and Orange Bowls

Vrtf f to* rs 'tAfrlfft
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£W3s*!zsmKfa r
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fsff ;
PHIL BANNISTER
MELNYK HONORED
During a special halftime ceremony Saturday afternoon. President
Stephen C. O'Connell presented a plaque to UF golfer Steve Melnyk,
in recognition of his victory in the U.S. amateur golf championship.
Melnyk won it last summer at Oakmont Country Club in
Pennsylvania.
MONDAY FEAST
$199
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FEA TURING
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watched the Nittany lions
Saturday, but afterwards
Patemo said, I am not in a
position to say anything about a
bowl game.
The kids have mixed feelings
and they asked if they could

sleep on it, Patemo said.
Seiler seemed optimistic.
They enjoyed their visit' here
a year ego when they defeated
Kansas 15-14 and I believe
theyd welcome a chance to
come back, he said.
::. Under NCAA rules the bowl
pairings cannot-be announced
until Monday at noon.
Orange Bowl officials went
into an all-night huddle Saturday
after Ole Miss smashed
Tennessee 38-0, perhaps spoiling
the Volunteers as a major bowl
attraction.
Giant-killer Missouri, which
pounded lowa State 40-13
Saturday for its eighth victory of
the season, is probably second
choice of the Orange Bowl
committee. It carries some
weight that Missouri humiliated
Michigan 40-17 and Michigan
seems headed for the Rose Bowl.
Notre Dame; sporting a 7-1-1
record and possibly bound for a
bowl for the first time in years,
also looks attractive to the OBC.
But Ed Moose Krause, athletic
director for the Irish, is as
evasive as Patemo.
If you ask me if were going
to get a bowl bid Monday Id say
yes, Krause said. Well
probably get three bids, but Im
GOLF
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NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

- ~ .. - ...
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fl Sg£
"I know the way home
with my eyes dosed.
Then you know the way too well.
Because driving an old familiar route can make you
drowsy, even if you've had plenty of sleep.
If that happens on your way home
for Thanksgiving, pull over, take a break
and take two NoDoz. Itll help you drive home
with your eyes open.
NoDoz. No car should be without it. %<*tsw
1969 Bristol- Myers Co.

not saying which ones.'*
The Notie Dame athletic
board this year decided to allow
the Irish to go to a bowl after a
long ban on post-season play for
scholastic reasons.
c . ..

f Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl Phi Tarver
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Wtri % leumewvi --
Monday, November 17,1969. The Florida Alligator,

Have You
1 O J
! /j 0 fYI f| O I 6
Yp f <

Page 15



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday# November 17,1*69

Page 16

.. M BOHSHZA
m K. SIHLOIH PIT
PLAYER of the WEEK I P | ayer of the Week
Andy Cheney
CwWDUHiH rti|1 mCI i
1405 S.W. 13th Street open 11 am 9pm
Just South ol the Underpass fIHPRFVI Take Out 378-0946
i/Owclc Our lilt WISHBONE
t For Your Needs
Textbooks-Newand Used KcLcIVtO
Architectural Equipment BID TO
and Supplies
Art Supplies Mike Rich CHICKEN
Study lamps q/suii
. The ninth Player Os The Week goes to outstanding KII yy I
College Seal Florida sophomores Andy Cheney and Mike Rich for m*
their performances in the Gators 31-6 rout of
Mascot Stationary I Kentucky. I
Cheney caught five passes for 85 yards including a
Film and Develooina dazzling circus catch of 40-yards that kept the Gators
** third touchdown march going in the opening quarter.
Service Rich, who has performed well all season for the m )
Gators, ran the ball seven times for 43 yards including w
kirikin A Y PDin AY A ft an explosive 16 yard burst in the first quarter.
NWmsf* I rlvIL/M I o-o Rich's run around Kentucky's right end started the
SATURDAY 9-12 Gators on their way to their second touchdown. I |W|
Campus Shop
J IT WAS ANNOUNCED TODAY THAT CHICKEN COACHES
--THROUGHOUT THE U.S. HAVE UNANIMOUSLY VOTED
Ci t nn 5=55 55^5a WISHBONE FRIED CHICKEN TO PLAY IN THE NATIONAL
IT/ a=a::ss CHICKEN BOWL. THE PROBLEM, HOWEVER, IS THAT THEY
V HAVE FA,LED T 0 F,ND A SUITABLE OPPONENT.
BRANCH STORES-MEDICAL CENTER# BROWARD, 704s.w.2ndAve./i6thAve.&s.Mam WidihiW
TRI SHOP, TOWERS, AND THE UNION [___ a d ,vision o,^^ *,*.,*,