Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62, No. 42

Apollo 12 Ready To Go

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OPEN WIDE PETEKNOCKE
... Nurse Helen Phillips checks John Willey for signs of sore throat
Sniffles Season Once Again:
Watch Out For Those Colds

By STEVE BERGSMAN
Alligator Correspondent
The cold season is here.
Both clinically and
systematically were moving into
the cold season, said Dr. Ewen
Clark, chief of preventive
medicine at the UF infirmary.
In October 615 common
colds were treated at the
infirmary, compared with 188 in
'September, Clark said.
Before the season is over,
figures show that 1,200 to
1,500 people will come in for
colds alone, Clark said.
It is impractical for all these
people to see doctors also
unnecessary, he added.
We try to have the people
with these ailments seen quickly.
If things get bogged down there
is no way to remedy the speed
problem, explained Dr. Clark.
If students come to the
infirmary with colds, theyre
usually treated by nurses and
not doctors.
In the service education
program nurses are taught to


Flu Shots Available
Flu shots will again be available at the Student Health Center
(infirmary) according to Director Dr. WJ. Coggins.
Coggins recommended that students suffering from chronic diseases
such as asthma, bronchitis or diabetes, report for the flu shots. He said
students in good health need not be vaccinated.
i We havent had much flu so far and we arent expecting any great
wave of it this winter, Coggins said.
Tuesday and Thursday of this week the staff at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center received routine yearly flu vaccinations. These were not
available to the general student body.

The
Florida Alligator

Before the season is over, figures show
that 1,200 to 1,500 people will come in
for colds alone/
- Dr. Ewen Clark
- UF Infirmary

recognize and treat the common
ailments.
Nurses fill the support that
the mothers give you at home,
explained Clark.
Nurses give out decongestive
tablets and advise how to look
after the cold.
However, there is no cure and
no defense for the cold, only
relief of symptoms.
S
The cold will get better if
you leave it alone, Clark said.
If youre in a reasonably
good state of health and if you
live in a reasonably well
organized existence then youll
have a better chance against the
cold, Clark added.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

ACLU Attempts To Block
Oath Signing Requirement

By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The American Civil liberties
Union filed a request for an
emergency restraining order in
the fifth Federal Circuit Court of
Appeals in New Orleans late
Thursday to block the signing of
the loyalty oath by UF faculty
and staff.
The order, filed by Jerome
Bornstein co-operating attorney
sot the ACLU from Orlando
attempts to invalidate an earlier
court decision requiring oath
signatures.
A UF professor of psychiatry,
Paul Adams, took two clauses of
the oath before an Orlando
court last week, attempting to
have those portions removed
from the oath.
The Adams case failed to
meet court approval. However,
the Connell case, similar to the
Adams case in that it questioned
the oath, gained partial approval.
The Connell case, involving an
Orlando schoolteacher,
eliminated the first two portions
of the oath and prompted a

Workmen Fix Tank;
Blastoff At 11:22
CAPE KENNEDY (UPI) Workmen did the job that some feared
couldn't be done" Thursday and put Apollo 12 back on schedule for
its 11:22 am EST blastoff Friday on Man's second mission to the
ancient surface of the moon.
Technicians worked around the clock to replace a faulty liquid
hydrogen tank in the moonship which threatened the flight with a
month delay.
At this time, conditions are all go," mission director Chester Lee
said in an afternoon briefing.
Meanwhile, astronauts Charles Pete" Conrad, Richard F. Gordon
and Alan L. Bean did some last-minute tuning for their 10-day
$350-million expedition by zipping high over the moonport in
sharp-nosed T3B jet trainers.
With the new hydrogen tank installed and filled with frigid liquid
hydrogen fuel for the ships electric generators, everything looked
good for an on-time launch. If the three Navy commanders are unable
to get off by 3:50 p.m. EST Friday, they will be grounded until Dec.
14.
Showers and occasional flashes of lightning occurred in the
moonport area Thursday and weathermen predicted showers, low
clouds and 23-mile-an-hour winds for launch time. These conditions
were acceptable for blastoff but may ruin the view for thousands of
persons gathering in the area to watch the shot.
President Nixon will be among those on hand at the cape to see the
launch. Hell be accompanied by Mrs. Nixon, Vice President Spiro T.
Agnew and the wives of two of the astronauts, Mrs. Jane Conrad and
Mrs. Sue Bean.
Bean, the missions lunar module pilot, admitted the outlook
seemed bleak for a Friday launch to the moons Ocean of Storms
when the eager astronauts first learned of the trouble Wednesday.
It locked at first like it couldnt be done, he said.
Then it looked like a 100-1 chance. But they did it, and it must
have taken a lot of effort. Weve got some really sharp people in this
program.
The rest of Thursdays schedule was a light one, with the astronauts
going to bed early. They were to be awakened at 7:05 a.m. Friday for
breakfast and to begin suiting-up in their white space uniforms. Their
schedule calls for them to climb into their capsule atop the 36-story
Saturn 5 booster at 8:42 a.m.

revision of the present oath. The
case heard two weeks ago was
upheld by an Orlando court.
It removed the portions
requiring a faculty or staff
member to identify himself as a
member of the Communist party
and the section identifying one
as a member of an organization
advocating the overthrow of the
government of the United
States.
The Adams case was heard by
a panel of three judges in
Orlando, one of whom was
Judge Brian Simpson of the New
Orleans federal distrcit court.
Two judges ruled portions of
the oath unconstitutional, while
Simpson ruled unconstitutional
the entire oath and the required
sigantures. As a result portions
of the oath were
unconstitutional.
Local American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) President and
UF professor, J.J. Zeman
expressed support for the ACLU
move.
We have been behind the
ACLU for some time now, we
fully support this action,

Friday, November 14, 1969

Zeman said.
The case, being appealed
should reach the New Orleans
court by Wednesday.
Norma Munn, representing
the ACLU said the order was
termed an emergency order to
speed up court action.
We hope the court will make
a decision next Wednesday in
our favor, Mrs. Munn said.
Reaction on campus toward
the proposed order has been
mixed.
(SEE'ACLU'PAGE 2)
fj
SERVOMATION HAS a
heart It prepares 70,000
meals every year to feed UF
students and faculty.. .page 4
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 17
FSU News 7T... 4
Letters 9
Movies 12
Orange and Blue 10
Small Society 6
Sports 20
Whats Happening 2



Page 2

£*f IfePfdritfrMttitattfK PHd*£N<*feriibfef l4; 1969

The Student Mobilization Committee
(SMC) has filed a permit with the
Gainesville City Pd ice for the peace
march scheduled for today.
Police Chief William Joiner said
Thursday he had been contacted by
Donald Albury of SMC and everything
is in order for the march.
He said the purpose of a permit is to

FSU Senate
Tables SMC
Bus Fare Bill
Action on a bill to send 114
Student Mobilization Committee
(SMC) members from Florida
State University to the Nov. 15
Moratorium in Washington, D.
C. was tabled indefinitely by the
FSU Student Senate at its
meeting Wednesday night, Tom
Henderson, FSU Flambeau news
editor, said Thursday.
Hie bill, allocating $1,824 to
pay half the bus fare for the
students, was vetoed Monday by
FSU Student Body President
Canter Brown.
Brown said in a letter to Vice
President Wayne Rubinas earlier
this week that the size of the
group going may quickly
assume the identity of a political
action group whose main
purpose is to participate fully in
the Washington activities.
This would conflict with the
assertion of the Senate that this
was to be an educational
experience and a fact-finding
trip, Brown said.
He did say that he is
wholeheartedly in favor of
students attending the
moratorium activities, but did
not approve of using activity
funds provided by all students.
The bill originally passed in
the Senate by a 17-16 vote when
Rubinas cast the deciding vote.
Rubinas headed moratorium
activities at FSU Oct. 15.
Meanwhile, SMC Chairman
Bob Gordon charged that
Brown's veto was a case of
political opportunism and said
Brown has signed at least four
bills in the last year which
appropriated funds to groups
that use money for political
purposes.
Gordon named the American
Society of International Law,
the ft-. Martin Luther King
Memorial Scholarship Fund, the
State Moot Court Team and the
AIESEC (a group which
indoctrinates foreign students)
in his charge.

AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS!
'THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ...
LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT, ROBBERY,
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
LOBS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING. \ Wfl
ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE.
IREGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY RlNcl\
HATCHERS JEWELERS
2 EAST UNIV. AVE 376-8892
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
for correction tfllSf be gMEti beWit'Tltt Wilt TiMltfM -

PLAZA ACTIVITIES TO AT 1l :
SMC Granted Permit For March Today

arrange a safe route for the march and
to get police protection, but there is no
law preventing a march or parade
without a permit as long as safety and
traffic regulations are followed.
The SMC also arranged with the
Public Functions Office to have use of
the Plaza of the Americas and the public
address system, said Assistant to the

|g|

ACLU Requests
Restraining Order

Efbom page
UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell would not comment
on the action but promised a
statement as soon as his office
was officiaDy notified of the
order.
UF attorney Tom Biggs
echoed OConnells statement.
This is new to me, he said.
Ill need some time to study
the case.
Chancellor of the state
university system, Robert B.
Mautz said the state would
appeal the order if upheld by the
New Orleans court.
Mautz said they will not
appeal the Connell case.
Its a matter of legal
strategy, he said.
When informed of Mautzs
statement Zeman said, "In a
year proceeding an election, I
cant expect much more. Sure
theyll appeal, just to waste the
taxpayers money.

Federal circuit courts of
appeal are the courts directly
beneath the UJS. Supreme
Court.
The legal aspects of the case
prevent us from taking this
directly to the U.S. Supreme
Court; we have to go the route
of the New Orleans Circuit
Court, Zeman said.
-
£V£ttWH£R£ You look,
RE-RUN&
t

Tired of the Gville scene?
HIDEAWAY Ride-a-way I
1 MILE NORTH OF WALDO to the
ON U.S. 301
Hideaway
nightly entertainment I
Sat. & Wed. Nights I
RAY PARRISH DANCE BAND I
Mon Tues &Thurs Nights I
the folk-Rock & Country Sounds of I
Jfi£AH M WOQDWARD |

vice president for Student Affairs James
Hennessey.
Activities will begin at 11:30 a.m. on
the Plaza of the Americas with an
assembly featuring Bob Zuber,an active
Marine who opposes the war in
Vietnam.
At 11:55, 39 crosses, each
representing an Alachua County

| Its Really Great I
To Be A 'Pig }
MOBILE, Ala. (UPI) The next time youre |
called pig by hippies, yippies, and militants, take £
it as a compliment, says the Alabama Farm Bureau $
Federation. |:
The national media have reported many instances $
of hippies, yippies and militants characterizing police §
and public figures as pigs in an apparent effort to |
stigmatize the objects of their scorn, the bureau said
in an adopted resolution. §
Be it known to all such name-callers that pigs are if
one of the noblest works of creation, they are the most £
intelligent of all domestic animals, that this form of |
livestock is produced on nearly four million farms in |
every state in the nation, that pork from pigs is vital to |
the national economy. |
We therefore, suggest to such name-callers that |
they cease down-grading these honest animals, that |
they attempt to emulate pigs. |
" By BRENDA GEVERTZ
WOULD A BIT OF CHEESE LURE YOU?: There it is, right smack
in the center of campus, behind the facade of weathered bricks and
next to the number one center of indigestion and hearburn (alias: the
Main Cafeteria). So, whats a nice watering hole doing in a place like
this? Would you believe ... UFs Rathskeller, after no little planning,
is here to provide you with great entertainment, a warm, friendly
atmosphere and, of course, lots of cold flowing suds (and I dont
mean Ivory soap, either). The Rat is featuring the Ewing St. Times,
direct from Miamis Flick, to sing and amuse. Performances on Friday
and Saturday nights begin at 8:30,10:30 and 12:30.
KENTUCKY CLEAN-UP: Plain and simple, Gators: Beat
Kentucky!
RABBITS, KANGAROOS,... AND NOW, GATORS: Theres this
little piece of paper and it definitely says there will be a Gator Hop in
the Graham Area Rec Room on Saturday night from 8-12. It must be
in the gin in the marshmallows again.
HEY, YOUVE GOT TO HIDE YOUR HAY AWAY (UGH!): Hide
it on a flat surface, pile many happy people on top, and you should
have one wild time like the Catholic Student Center is planning for
tonight at 7. Farmers or anyone else interested in learning about
nature should meet at the Center for the fun.
FOR A QUICK RECOVERY: So, you made the scene for the
hayride and now youve got hang-ups? Fear not, the Catholic Student
Center has planned a good lecture to bail you out. Dr. Henry Lyons
will talk Sunday night on Psychiatrists vs. Religionists. Unwind at

resident killed in Vietnam, will be
handed out to marchers.
The march will begin at noon and will
go down University Avenue to the
Federal Building.
A program of speakers will follow
consisting of talks by university
professors, students, returned veterans
and active servicemen.



COUNCILPASSESVERDICT
Oath Labeled 'Coercive Patriotism

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The required signing of the loyalty oath at UF is an attempt at
drought control and smacks of coercive patriotism.
This was the verdict passed down by the Arts and Sciences Student
Council on Wednesday. The council asked that signing loyalty oaths
be made voluntary.
Formed last year by Dr. Harry Sisler, dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences, the council has the responsibility of representing the
views of students in the college.
Tom Blackmon, council chairman, said Thursday the council has
the right and the duty to speak out on this problem.
Loyalty oaths have no place in this university. The supreme court
has been saying for years that this type of oath is unconstitutional.
The resolution states: The Arts and Sceinces Student Council is
fearful that the proliferation of so-called loyalty oaths represents an
unhealthy regression to the days of McCarthyism and the Johns


Council Schedules Review
Os Language Requirements

The Arts and Sciences
Student Council is scheduled to
consider proposals for revision in
that colleges foreign language
requirements by the end of the
quarter, Chairman Tom
Blackmon said Thursday.
He said the story appearing in
Thursdays Alligator stating the
council had recommended the
language requirement be
discontinued was erroneous.
We have taken no action
yet, Blackmon said.
A number of us dont think
the language program is
accomplishing what it should, or
what they say it should be
accomplishing, he said.
However, he said the council

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Hearing
Set Today

214 N. W. 13th St.
376-6472
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would proceed through the
established channels which are:
the council, Dean Harry Sisler,
the college and university
curriculum committees, Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Frederick Conner and the
various language department
chairmen.
We hope to have this
resolved before Christmas,
Blackmon said. I plan to
submit my report to the council
by Thanksgiving.
Blackmon said his report,
along with recommendations
from Student Body President
Charles Shepherd that the
foreign language requirement be
abolished, will be presented to

A public hearing to decide
which pesticides will be
restricted by a new state law is
set for 9 a.m. Friday, at the
Division of Plant Industry
Building in Gainesville.
The law, which goes into
effect Jan. 1, is designed to curb
the use of pesticides judged by
the Department of Agriculture
to be hazardous to man or his
0 environment.
At the hearing the 13-member
Pesticide Technical Council,
which advises the Commissioner
of Agriculture on matters of
pesticide labeling, will hear
discussions on the 35 pesticides
they have proposed be
restricted.

Sanders
felKeittuckij frid
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|GOOD SAT. & SUN. ONLY|

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Committee.
In addition to this, the resolution said the council opposes
withholding of salaries from employes of the university who oppose
signing the oath.
Copies of the resolution are being sent to Sisler, the president of
UF, the chancellor of the state university system, chairman of the
board of regents, to the Florida Legislature, and to the office of the
governor.
Sisler on Thursday said his only reaction to the resolution is the
council has the right to prepare resolutions.
They expressed an opinion that should not be taken as an official
act of our college. Im not in favor of what they said.
What affect will the resolution have on the policy decisions of state
administrators?
Blackmon said it wont have any effect on the governor, but added,
State University System Chancellor Robert Mautz will welcome our
suggestions as being a responsible way of expressing student opinion.

Sisler at the same time.
Blackmons proposals will be
for a junior-year-abroad language
study program and a total
immersion living situation on
campus where students will only
converse in one foreign language.
These two plans, if
impelemented, would hopefully
replace the requirement for
200-level language courses, he
said.
The Student Government
proposals, to go before the
Student Senate for legislative
backing next week, are entirely
divorced from the council's
recommendations, Blackmon
said.
Shepherd has praised the
council for its work, but urged
them to take additional steps
and abolish the requirement in
lieu of other course work in the
English language.
o
Alumni Get
New Leader
Leadership of the UF Alumni
Association will change hands
Saturday during the fall
Executive Council meeting on
campus.
Doyle Rogers of Palm Beach,
president of the association
throughout 1969, will relinquish
his gavel to Jacksonville attorney
James Ade. The meeting begins
at 9:30 a.m. in the Constans
Theatre adjacent to the Reitz
Union and will be preceded by
coffee and donuts at 9 a.m.

114. N.W. 34th St.
3723646
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1 Steak n Shake
L I£l£WJ3th St __ __ _________ Gainesville
^eeHaeiHieHHiaeHeeaaeeeaeeaHHeieHHHeeeeeHsaeeeHHHeeeeeeHleeeaeeeaMeHei
THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer print-outs, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
OUICK-WAY COPY CENTER (QUICK-SAVE)
1620 w. university (univ. plaza) 372-7436
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Friday; November 14) 106 TheFlorkbi AHigetor, I

CUSTOM FRAMING
PICTURES, DIPLOMAS, etc.
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St., 376-2431

Page 3



AMM* 1< 1989

Page 4

Servomation Food Service
Really Does Have A Heart

By MARGIE CATALDO
Alligator Correspondent
Servomation is not a
monstrous robot stalking the
campus with an empty head,
blinking eyes, and mechanical
controls. UFs Food Service
Director is a real person
equipped with, and using, a
real heart for the benefit of
UF students and faculty.
Robert Overton, head of
the Mathias Division of
Servomation at UF since July
1966, is responsible for the
preparation of 70,000 meals
per year totaling over
110,000 pounds of food and
beverages. With a staff of 200
full time and approximately
50 part time college, junior
college, and high school
students, Food Services gross
sales for the past year were
$1.5 million in the eight
cafeterias and snack bars on
campus. Overton said the
Reitz Union contributed one
third of this.
Food Services caters all
manual campus food
operations. It provided food
for the Florida Blue Key
banquet for 1,700 persons
and the Homecoming
Barbecue with 3,000 guests.
Meal plans, meal coupon
books, the convenience
counter, luncheons, and
banquets are part of their
operations.
Utilizing the meal plans for
fall quarter, 703 students are
taking advantage of price
discounts and wider selection
of food.
The 7-day plan provides 21
meals per week, with costs
averaging 85 cents a meal.
Overton said the student
realizes a 32 per cent
discount 2O per cent
missed meals allowance and
12 per cent for not buying a
la carte. Total cost for fall
quarter is $241.33, with
winter and spring quarters
costing $204.20 each.
Overton said those
students seldom or never on
campus for weekends
purchase the 5-day plan. The
15 meals served average $1
per meal, and the cost is
$202.80. The plan for winter
and spring quarters costs
$171.60. He said a 15 per
cent discount lO per cent
missed meals and 5 per cent
for the plan itself, is passed
on to the student.

news
JOCK The athletic committee of FSU has recommended to
President J. Stanley Marshall that a student per capita athletic fee of
$8 be adopted beginning with the 7O-7l student activities budget.
The proposal, which would yield approximately $460,000 would
remove the intercollegiate athletic allocation out from under the
control of student government. The figure for this years
appropriation is $175,000.
J C OFFICE A student government office of junior college
affairs, headed by Phil Alvarez, has been established by SG President
Canter Brown.
The office, which will have cabinet status will handle the problems
of junior college students before they come to FSU, and after they are
enrolled.
VETO An estimated 250 to 300 FSU students will be in
Washington D.C. this weekend for the March Against Death despite
the fact that a bill which would have allowed 114 additional students
. ¥ i i
to attend was vetocd-by Brown:

Both plans are
advantageous to the student,
Overton said. They are
allowed open substitution of
food and are not forced to
eat a special entree designated
by the Food Services as part
of the plan. Breakfast meal
allowance is 90 cents, lunch
and dinner are $1.40 and
$1.45 respectively.
Overton said, A student
can come in and take his meal
allowance in bags of potatoe
chips or cartons of milk. He is
free to choose. If he exceeds
the limit, the student must
pay the difference.
Overton said
approximately 1,000 students
start the quarter on the plan.
The dropouts are the result of
sorority and fraternity
pledging and withdrawal from
UF.
He added that he does
realize how students feel
when they are cafeteria
captives.
When your friends go out
for a sandwich and you eat a
solitary dinner on campus,
its a tittle disheartening, he
said.
In the past, students have
come to Overton with checks
made out to the Food Service
and ask him to cash it and
return their money to spend
as they please. He admitted it
was impossible, but offered
to call their parents and
suggest they send a new
check made out to the
student. So far, Overton said,
Theres been no need.
Coach Ray Graves has
called Overton the twelfth
man on his team. He works
with the team trainer to
provide foods of the same
type served in the cafeterias,
but higher in protein.
Food Services also sells
sls meal coupon books with
tickets ranging in value from
one to 25 cents. They are
negotiable at all campus
cafeterias and the
convenience counter.
Grace Madden, assistant
Food Services director said,
This prepaid book, which
can be carried over to another
quarter, is good for students
who cant budget their food
money. They always have it
to rely on.
Overton explained the
Food Services role in the new
convenience counter as a

co-operative effort with
Student Government. It is a
pilot to determine the needs
of the students, set up in an
existing area, with minimal
capital and equipment
outlays. Needs are surveyed
and what is normally
purchased at commercial
convenience stores determine
what the counter is to stock.
Overton said he is in favor
of this chance for the student
to change from the cafeteria
atmosphere and enable him
to stretch his food dollar.
Inter-hall Council
committees are Overtons
sources for learning of
students complaints,
suggestions and constructive
criticism. He said many major
problems are solved and
improvements, such as menu
changes and the Ratskeller,
are fruitful outcomes.
Mrs. Madden said, Mr.
Overton has tremendous
relations with students and
staff. Plaques from Alumni
Services, Student
Government, UF students,
commendations from UF
President OConnell and
Coach Graves cover his office
wall in acknowledgement of
his help.


1 Popular items at popular prices keynote the menu:
Hamburger 25 Beachcomber (Fish) 49
Cheeseburger 35 Chili Dog .39
Feastburger 55 Tropiclub (Roast Beef) 79
Outrigger (Shrimp & Pot. Puffs) 79
PHI French Fries 25
Potato Puffs 25 I^^]
~ 1 1 Key Lime Pie 30 K; *' J
1 Lemon Pie 30 pSflf ;
| Milk Shake (Choc., Van. & Straw.) .35 Michelob on Tao -is P?
'f§f> : Fresh Orange Swizzle 25 Milk 17 I
L s*? B,rch Beer 15 rang. Juice !!!! '.
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- *<>** +
The UFs director of student financial aid, I.
Douglas Turner, said last week it may be more than
a month before needy students can reap the benefits
of a guaranteed loan amendment approved by
Congress Oct. 16.
the holdup, Turner said, is that the Department
of Health Education and Welfare (HEW) has not
begun notifying private lending institutions of the
passage of the measure.
Right now, no one has taken the responsibility of
presenting the amended law to bankers, he said.
It usually takes a month or longer for the word to
filter down from HEW.
The amended bill permits the secretary of HEW,
during periods of high interest rates, to pay banks
and other providers of student loans a bonus of up
to three percent over the seven percent ceiling
normally attached to the loans.
The purpose of the amendment was to make
government-guaranteed student loans competitive
with other higher interest loans in the private
market. The special allowances will apply
retroactively to loans made since Aug. 1, with
authority for the allowances expiring July 1, 1970.
Theres no indication that the banks have

Joint Effort Inaugurated
To Aid Mentally Retarded

By JUDY PIVARNIK
Alligator Correspondent
The UF College of Medicine
and the Florida Division of
Retardation have joined forces
in an assault on mental
retardation.
The University-Sunland
Committee was established by
Dr. Emmanuel Suter, Dean of
the College of Medicine, to
further integrate the medical
school into the Sunland Training
Center at Gainesville, Dr.
Charles F. Weiss, medical
advisor-consultant to the
Division of Retardation,
explained.
Sunland Training Centers are
state-supported institutions
scattered throughout Florida.
The Gainesville Sunland,
located on a 200-acre site on
Waldo Road, houses
approximately 2,000 mentally
retarded children and adults.
UF physician-professors and
their students work along with
division physicians and other
professionals. They conduct
individual examinations and
evaluations of retarded residents
at Sunland.
Sunland serves an educational
function for the College of
Medicine. Dr. Weiss said that all
medical students taking Physical
Diagnosis are involved in the

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fhrisiian Jtofhrisiian
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program.
Students are introduced to
the patients and problems of
mental retardation before they
become involved in mental
retardation, he said. k
The Sunland experience
remains in the back of their
minds when they study scientific
courses, added Weiss.
Weiss said that the stress was
on preventable diagnoses and the
outcome of certain types of
diseases.
Laboratory research
conducted at Sunland is under
the guidance of Dr. Owen M.
Rennert, Acting Director of
Medical Education and
Research.
Rennert said that inborn
errors of metabolism associated
with mental retardation were
currently under investigation.
The aim of such research,
Weiss explained, is to develop
better means of diagnosis and
more sophisticated identification
methods.
He said that research would
be directed at singling out new
causes of mental retardation.
Refinement in the evaluation of
certain types of retardation
would also be an aim.
Years ago, file care of the
mentally retarded was
nrimarily domiciliary, Weiss

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** T "V *, i .i. *,
Loan Holdup
Anticipated
received or had time to present the new allowance
directives to their boards of directors, Turner said.
We axe hoping that the banks will receive formal
notice of the new allowance from HEW in the very
near future.
He said that about 125 students at the university
are depending specifically on the federal insured
loans to pay tuition, room and board for the winter
quarter, which begins in January.
If they are not able to make loans with
hometown banks through the federal insured
program by that time, I feel that we can underwrite
them through the new Florida Tuition Sharing
Program, Turner said.

said. He anticipated that this will
be changed.
UF Will Host
Dog Racers
UF will entertain
representatives of the states
greyhound racing industry
Saturday with a series of special
events in conjunction with the
Florida-Kentucky football game.
The program was planned in
appreciation of the industrys
long-time support of higher
education and UF through
scholarship funds.
Since 1949, greyhound tracks
have provided scholarships for
the states universities. During
the 1968-69 academic year, UF
received $158,228 for 386
scholarships for its students
from this source.
The schedule begins with
coffee at 9:45 am. Saturday at
the home of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, followed
by a campus bus tour. A
luncheon at 11:30 am in the
Reitz Union precedes the
football game and the group will
be honored with a reception at
OConnells home immediately
following the game.

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UFj REfRESENTATIVES
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our business is people
If you work for Syntex you're really in the people
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Our products are revolutionary drugs and other
pharmacological products created and marketed
especially for the public's health and welfare.
Our scientists developed the first orally-active
progestational agent which became a basic ingre ingrey
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number of significant anti-inflammatory agents and
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Our customers are physicianshealers who look
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Ourcompany? We've been making history for the
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We continually keep our' eyes open for talent
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William Landau will be on campus November 14
Please contact the placement office to arrange for
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What worries me, though, fe the situation in
June, when about 3,000 to 4,000 students wfil be?
going to hometown banks for educational loans
under the federal insured program. We just dont
know what the reaction of the banks wffl be.**
program. This cast the burden of making
educational loans on a smaller number of banks in
Turner noted that not all of Florida's banks
participated in the original federal insured loan
the state, many of which no longer can afford to
make student loans at seven per cent. ~
*Tt remains to be seen whether or not the three
per cent incentive actually will be an incentive,'* he
said.
The Tuition Sharing Program referred to by
Turner recently went into effect. Senior universities
in toe state contribute a small portion of each
students quarterly tuition to a fund administered
by the Board of Regents. The board then returns
funds to the contributing universities for use as
student loans.
We expect to receive about $150,000 from this
program during the remainder of this academic year
(ending next August) and every cent will be put to
. use Turner said.

Page 5



Page 6

i. Thf Florida Alligstor, Ft***. Jlavember 14,1969

Philpott Grad Speaker
Dr. Harry M. Philpott, president of Auburn University, will be
commencement speaker at UFs fall quarter ceremonies Dec. 20.
Philpott was vice president of UF from 1957-65, and was here as
assistant, then associate professor of religion from 1947-52. During
the intervening years of 1952-57, Philpott was dean of religious life
and head of the Department of Religion and Philosophy at Stephens
College, Columbia, Mo.
Processional for the fall quarter commencement will begin at 9:40
a.m., with the ceremonies at 10 ajn. in Florida Gym.
A reception for graduates, their families and friends will be held at
the home of UF President and Mrs. Stephen C. OConnell from 2 to
3:30 p.m.

ISE 350
Enrollment
Increases

Miami Gl
Charged
FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
Charges that an officer murdered
a large number of civilians in
Vietnam are being reviewed by
the Army to determine whether
he should be court-martialed, a
spokesman said Thursday.
The officer, Ist Lt. William
Laws Calley Jr., 26, of Miami is
currently attached to the
student brigade here and
assigned to special duty with the
officer of the deputy post
commander.
Calley was reportedly
involved in the death of more
than 100 civilians in March
1968, at Son My, nicknamed
Pink Ville by soldiers because it
is a pink area on maps. It is
located about 340 miles
northeast of Saigon.
The Army first disclosed
Calley, who was with the
Americal Division, was being
held beyond his term of duty
Sept. 5 but has not released the
nature of the charges against him
other than that they involve
possible violation of Article 118
of the Uniform Code of Military
Justice, which deals with
murder.
Lt. Col.
RAMSEY
Speaks On
VIETNAM
TODAY
12:30 pm
Room 150 e
Union
UF
Young Demos.

By EILEEN FEINBERG
Alligator Correspondent
Looking for an easy A? Why not try ISE 350, a course in
computer programming? Many people have.
But many students claim it is not all that easy. What is this
hard crip course all about, and why has enrollment in it
increased 10 per cent each term?
Few computer experts in the country get perfect results the
first time, but practice is the key. Therefore, each student in
ISE 350 is given S4O worth of computer time to prepare
assignments.
If it is not correct the first time, the computer will designate
it as such, and students may repeat the assignments as many
times as necessary until it is correct, said Dr. F. D. Vickers,
instructor of the course. Each student has access to any
computer at any time.
The final grade for this two-hour course is determined by

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quizzes (the average grade is 97), homework assignments
(average 100), and a final exam (average grade of D). Nine
homework assignments are required, to be done on the
computer.
However, the course is designed so that no more than ten
percent get Es, and at least ten percent get As, Vickers said.
In addition to S4O of free computer time, the course provides
a student-maintained lab. Twelve people are required to run it.
The only prerequisite is to have taken ISE 350. The pay is $1.50
an hour, and students choose their own working time.
ISE 350 is required for all engineering students, and is
accepted by all other departments as an elective.
Its an involved language, Vickers said. If students fail to
learn this, they can pretty well count on an E in at least three
other engineering courses. If you spend two hours a week, read
the material and go to lectures, you can derive a fantastic
amount of knowledge.



OWE WAY OF MEASURING SUCCESS
Students Refer Friends To Counseling Center

By FRED KRATKA
Alligator Correspondent
A significant number of
students that go to the
University Counseling Center fer
help are sent there by students
who have been there themselves,
Mrs. Maybeth Phillips, secretary
to the director of the counseling
center, said.
One of the ways we feel we
can tell that the center is helping
people is by looking at the
number sent by students who
have used our services
themselves.
If students who have visited
the center recommend it, the
center must have done some
good for that student, Mrs.
Phillips said.
Dr. Robert Hilarides, one of
seven psychologists woiking at
die center, said there is no
positive way the center can tell
if it is doing die students any
good.
They dont usually come
right out and say their problem
is solved, Hilarides said.
The counseling center is
located at 311 Little Hall.
When a student goes to the
center for help he is asked to fill
out a personal data sheet. The
form asks for general
information (Name, address,
who sent you, major, other

colleges attended.)
The form is two pages long
now, but a year ago it was
several pages longer.
The extra pages asked for
more personal information.
(What are your occupational
plans? What are your leisure
time activities?) One section asks
you to circle those adjectives
that best describe you: Good,
Attractive, Unclean, Happy,
Sinful, Crabby, etc.
We found that long form
made many people unhappy.
They come here looking for
help, not to fill in some long
paper, Mrs. Phillips said.
Students coming to the center
for help are about evenly divided
between those who are seeking
vocational help What should I
major in? and those who have
personal problems.
For vocational help the center
has a standard procedure.
The student comes in, fills out
a data form and is interviewed
by one of the centers
psychologists. On the basis of
this interview the psychologist
recommends that the student
take certain tests. These tests
show the aptitude of the student
for certain subject areas as well
as his personal preference for
one area or the other.
After the student takes his
tests and they are graded, he is

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COUNSELING CENTER LENDS VOCATIONAL, PERSONAL GUIDANCE
... Kristine Kauffman confers with Dr. William Childers

asked to return for another
interview. Test results are
discussed.
This is usually the last visit he
makes to the center.
Personal problems are handled
differently.
Each person has his own
individual problem. We have no

set procedure for dealing with
personal problems. We deal with
each student as his problem
merits, Hilarides said.
An indication that the
counseling center is working is
the fact that the number of
attending students is growing
each year.

mam S/ictkm
GAINESVILLE MALL

Friday, Novambar 14,1069, ThaVtorida Alligator, I

Last year 2,500 students who
had never been to the center
went for help.
The increase in students
looking for help has caused the
center to add two new
psychologists to its staff last
year.

Page 7



Page 8

I, n Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14, 1960

Tile Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
?WEmr) au am itez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
1?M
A M Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
y Executive Editor News Editor
JK itiCuCftH
|WhoTHappmiing^^^^^^|
| Golden Time
!$ Jf
>& *:
11
£ I
1 i
By Brenda GevertzaS
I guess I always have liked Novembers. Not any specific day, you
know, but just the month.
It's not an all-of-the-sudden type feeling. 1 dont wake from a big
night around the block collecting candy, stuffing myself and sorting
our the unwrapped pieces only to say, Gee, it's November now and I
feel good."
No, it's more of the feeling that eases up and creeps down. By the
time the last plastic bag-full of one-half priced candy com in
individually wrapped celephene packets for Trick or Treat has been
sold, yes, about that time, you just know it's November.
November is a warm month. It sits well on the tongue and comforts
the heart. Wearing a sweater in the sun feels just golden. And the earth
beneath your now-white toes feels cool enough to make you run quite
fast in the Sunday afternoon touch football game.
By the time white areas, where bathing suit straps once rested,
match the rest of shoulders perfectly, frost greets the morning paper.
On those early winter mornings there would be hot chocolate and
warm buttered toast in the kitchen. Or sometimes, if I hurried to get
dressed, cinnamon toast.
But that was many years ago, in the Novembers of my childhood.
Now I love November for all of those feelings and new ones, too.
November isn't tarnished by aluminum Christmas trees. People have
the holiday spirit, but they don't push and shove just yet; they know
that there are still oh, so many shopping days left.
In November we play the last home football game. There is
something about a November day making it the perfect frame for the
final crowd singing of the Alma Mater. The guys wear their wool coats
throughout the games and girls' cheeks turn naturally rosy in the
wind.
But more than anything, November reminds me of home. The smell
of moth balls still lingers in the wool blankets, and there is probably a
bowl of nuts sitting on the kitchen table. Mom will bake a pumpkin
pie and pack cold turkey sandwiches for me to bring bade to
Gainesville.
Yes, 1 guess I always have liked Novembers. Novembers are so full
of life.
"He Was Real Big In TV Cigaret Commercials
tibe t1T .eeueo mij nuotlf H ytoo hJorirtJUt/v ad Hiw wmcH
riba a* Jrfyrt j

EDITORIAL
Vole For National Policy?

South Vietnam is a miserably poor,
disorganized nation, slightly smaller in area
than Missouri with a population a few
thousand more than California.
It is a country badly damaged by civil
war, North Vietnamese aggression and
American firepower.
But history may record that damage as
relatively minor besides the deep and bitter
divisions the war has inflicted upon the
United States.
For two weeks now, Americans have been
choosing up sides about this war with
frightening intensity.
We must take a long and hard look at how
this buildup of passion began, and how it
can be stopped.
The polls clearly show the depth of this
division. Some 80 per cent of persons
questioned are fed up with the war, yet 57
per cent say they oppose immediate
withdrawal of U.S. troops.
This fundamental dilemma has been
brought to a boil in recent weeks by the
massive turnout for the Oct. 15 moratorium,
by the long buildup given President Nixons
Nov. 3 address and its disappointing
contents, by Vice President Agnews
intemperate language, and by a general
outpouring of false accusations on Veterans
Day.
The side-choosing was painfully apparent
on Veterans Day.
Rep. L. Mendel Rivers of South Carolina

A Test Os Law And Order

Frank Manktawicz-
Tom Bradon
IWLI w V
WASHINGTON Respect for law and order
would begin, so Richard Nixon told his audience
during the campaign, at approximately the time the
nation elected him President. The test of that thesis
will come this weekend during the November
demonstrations against the war in Vietnam.
The Nixon attitude toward law and order will be
judged on two counts. The first is whether or not he
will permit violence. The second is whether or not
he will permit dissent.
So far, the Nixon Justice Department has stressed
its fear of violence. The result is that the leaders of
the demonstration from whom violence was feared
have promised that they intend an orderly march.
But in emphasizing its fears the Justice
Department may bring about a result altogether
different from what Mr. Nixon would like to see. It
may turn the event into a powerful instrument of
American dissatisfaction.
The first indication of this outcome was the
switch of moderate moratorium leaders from a
position of hands-off the Mobe to full co-operation.
Rep. Allard Lowenstein (D-N.Y.) led the pack
Withing moments after the Presidents speech on
Vietnam, Lowenstein decided that, risk of violence
or not, he had to protest against what he
characterized as the Presidents inching posture
McGovern long ago decided that he could not
apeak before a crowd of war protesters, many of
whom did not share his belief in this country and its
capacity to right its own wrongs. But after th.
Justice Department, in the peW, f i> e JZ
Richard Klemdienst, broke off negotiations with
lerie* of the Mobe, McGovern, to!, tooTcoS

put it in words at a Washington rally:
There are more of us patriotic Americans
than those pro-Hanoi-crats. Keep up the
fight. The other accusations are familiar:
Communist, dupe, misinformed, misled,
masquerading in the name of peace, etc.
etc., etc.
It is time for more people to begin
showing that good old American
characteristic of differing, but with respect.
Honest differences of opinion are the
source of our agony.
Most of the supporters of the Presidents
policies are patriotic, sincere, well-informed
people who believe the most honorable way
out is a gradual, face-saving transfer of
responsibility to the South Vietnamese.
Most of the opponents of present policies
are patriotic, sincere, well-informed people
who believe the most honorable way out of
this miserable, mistaken war is the quickest.
The solution to this dilemma is not
through name-calling, or questioning the
patriotism of others. It is through removing
the cause of the division.
We urge President Nixon to speak and act
to cool the passions that have been raised.
We urge him to make good his promise of
May 6,1968:
We will forge a unity of goals, recognized
by men who also recognize and value then thenown
own thenown diversity.
St. Petersburg Times

of what he conceived as his duty rather than his
fears.
Goodells decision to speak at the final rally was
based on similar reasoning. Other senators and
congressmen will also be present who might not
have been had the Administration challenge not
been so direct.
There are rules for handling antiwar
demonstrations.
Rule One is not to talk about intelligence,
one former high Justice official put it. The first
thing I learned about intelligence on violence is
that theres plenty of it.
We could have called off the march on the
Pentagon put the blame on intelligence and face
the consequences, which might have been worse.
Rule Two is to keep talking, don't teD them
what you wont permit such as a mass march past
the White House. The Secret Service won't permit
that and for good reason. But you have to keep
negotiating, keep feeling, until they suggest
something you can agree to.
Rule Three is to prevent negotiations from
breaking down. If you permit this, you are faced
with the Chicago consequence; you have forbidden
something the other side feels is a constitutional
right. The result may be another Chicago.
Kleindienst has broken all three rules. He has
talked about intelligence on violence; he insisted
from the start that he would never yield on a march
down Pennsylvania Avenue, and he broke off
negotiation.
The result, even if a mutually satisfactory route
can be agreed to, is a lurking belief by many
otherwise well-disposed toward the Administration
that the Justice Department may look upon a
confrontation as not entirely unwelcome.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of tha writer of the article end not
those of the University of Florida.*



South Vietnamese Dont Want
To Take Over The Fighting

iBR jt\ &m

Veterans Day Service:
A Political Harangue

MR. EDITOR:
Tuesday I went to the Veterans Day ceremony at
the Plaza of the Americas. I understood that the
service was to be a non-political program
cemmemorating the sacrifices made by the many
American servicemen who have been called to serve
their country in the armed forces.
I went with the idea of joining in quiet respect
for those Americans who fought and died in wars
both just and unjust when their country asked it.
Instead I was deluged by a highly political harangue

Frustration
Unleashed
MR. EDITOR:
I wish to apologize for those
individuals in the aisle 47 area of
the Gator Bowl Saturday, who
during the third quarter of the
Georgia-Florida game unleashed
their pent up frustrations and
demonstrated the comportment
of inebriated beasts.
The sound of these cattle and
the loathsome cry of then thencontagious
contagious thencontagious reaction to mob
violence and hate continue to
remind me that sub-humans are
found even among our academic
confines.
MRS. A. R. GROVER
Ban Umbrellas
In Stadium
MR. EDITOR:
There is nothing in the world
more frustrating than to go to
watch a football game and get,
instead, umbrellas blocking your
view, poking you in the eye, and
dripping water in your lap. I
propose that umbrellas be
banned in the stadium and that
people be a little more
thoughtful and purchase
raincoats and rainhats. It would
make the game much more
enjoyable! Thank you.

MR. EDITOR:
Here is one member of the silent majority** who
does not subscribe to the doctrine that to love this
country one must love our present foreign and
domestic policies. Precisely because I love this
country, I am opposed to the continuation of our
war in Vietnam.
Nearly everyone (except a few military
professionals) now agrees that we should never have.
Nearly everyone (except a few military
professionals) now agrees that we should
never have put troops in Vietnam in the first
place .... Americans who love their country
and its ideals (not simply "my country right
or wrong) will continue to protest. Louder,
and louder and louder. Whether Mr. Nixon
and Mr. Agnew like it or not. \;
put troops in Vietnam in the first place. We did so
partly because we mis-read history (Munich**, the
domino theory**), and partly because our
administration deceived us into thinking that we
were only responding to aggression** from the
north: that China or North Vietnam had invaded**
the South, or that our destroyers in Tonkin Gulf
were attacked while innocently cruising in
international waters.
Now we know the truth, and know that our


No General IDont Peel \
That Genocide Is Basically \
Inconsistent With j
\ Judao Christian "Theology/

by an extremist ex-Coiigressman, who repeated tired
half-truths, inuendoes and outright lies in an
attempt to justify American presence in Vietnam.
Mr. Mathews is surely entitled to his point of
view; however a Veterans Day service is not the
place it should be expressed. His blatantt attempt
to make political mileage out of the deaths of
American men is an insult to our country and an
insult to all the Veterans, living and dead, hwo have
served when their country asked.
K.R. SHULTZ, 7EG

policy was wrong. But the Administration has not
acted on this knowledge. Instead, it is said, we are
there and it doesn't matter how we happened to
get there. We can't just leave; we must find an
honorable settlement; we must Vietnamize the
war.
Our real hang-up seems to be as Mr. Nixon said
the other night that we tike to think that we have
never before "lost" a war. We are more interested in
saving face ours than in doing what we now
know is right.
The problem with Mr. Nixon's proposal is that
despite periodic claims by the generals that the
South Vietnamese troops are almost'' ready to
take over the fighting the S. Vietnamese people
do not have the same enthusiasm for this war that
the Pentagon and our Administration have. Mr.
Thieu and Senator Stennis were quick to endorse
Mr. Nixon's proposal, because they know that we
will never withdraw our troops if we wait until the
S. Vietnamese want to take over the fighting."
In the meantime, Mr. Thieu's dictatorship and
Mr. Stennis' political-military-industrial
establishment will continue to profit from the
slaughter. And Americans who love their country
and its ideals (not simply my country right or
wrong") will continue to protest. Louder, and
louder and louder. Whether Mr. Nixon and Mr.
Agnew like it or not.
RICHARD H. HIERS
ASSOC. PROFESSOR OF RELIGION

s* : View From The Crowd ws 8aa Ma##,a |
| Football Game
I y Ma . J
Gator football, ahhh yes, IH remember it well. And there is so
much to remember.
First, one must acquire tickets. This nifty little trick can be
accomplished in several ways, all hazardous. By braving the elements
and standing in line there is the hope of at least an end zone seat.
Block seating gets you a seat, but somehow you're always either on
the ten yard line, fifth row or fifty yard line, row ninety. As a last
resort you can either get one from a friend" for twenty bucks or
resign yourself to the radio.
Finally, the day" arrives. It is either cold and rainy or so hot that
you can fry an egg on a spirit hat. If you are a guy, you go to pick up
your date and she is twenty minutes late. If you're a gal your date is
always twenty minutes too early.
The stadium is in sight. Gamely you surge forward, loaded down
with a seat cushion, umbrella, program, binoculars and of course a
cooler filled with lemonade. Lemonade?
Now the confrontation. I think youre in our seats. See, we have
seats one and two, row twenty. You have seats and
twenty-nine, row sixty-five. Once this is settled you scrunch in and
wait for the game to start.
Let it begin. Well, into the first quarter you may have already had a
drink poured down your back by an exuberant fan. Abo the guy in
front has probably got you in the eye a couple of times with his
shaker. The males impress their dates by showing how well they
understand the plays. That was a double reverse triple option play to
the weak side which was changed to a quarterback sneak and resulted
in an interception." She is definitely impressed.
At the half, the Gators are leading Nashville Theology 48-3 and
everybodys happy. After passing three guys to the top and
conducting a futile search for peanuts, you are now ready for the
second half.
Somebody next to you keeps yelling, Spade those Bulldogs," and
you dont have the heart to tell her that were playing the Rodents.
Into the fourth quarter you hear a couple of, Go for a hundred
Gators," and Coach Graves, to be kind, is using his seventh string
quarterback.
Suddenly, you have acquired double vision as a result of having
been bombed by a roll of tiolet paper trhown from the eightieth
row. A boy in the row behind you has turned green while clutching an
empty fifth of Zorro Rum.
It takes ten minutes to count up the Gator score and the rout is
finally over. As you stagger for the exit, you see John Reaves
massacred by three hundred twelve year olds after one chin strap.
Back to whatever you call home. A hot shower and three hours
recuperation later, you are now ready to engage in that hallowed
tradition, the post-game party, dance, drunk marathon." Sweet
dreams Gator fans.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of wri|ers.
Names will be withheld orify if writer sfiows just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters for space.

V' > 'Ff j* fr w i Wit
, Friday, November 14,1968. The Florida AWlgejer,!

" II II
If
There is no hope
for the complacent man

Page 9



1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14, 1969

Page 10

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative
Notices

GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION (GRE) will be
given Dec. 13. The last date for
receipt of registration form in
Princeton, N.J. without paying
the $3 penalty fee is Nov. 18.
Application booklets and
information are available in
Room 235 Tigert Hall.
FOREIGN STUDENTS
(Couples and families also):
Thanksgiving (Nov. 27 and/or
Christmas hospitality will be
offered by Gainesville families at
their homes, if students will
indicate their acceptance at the
International Center. Names are
requested by Nov. 19.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: The
Presbyterian Church in Florida
and other states runs
CH RISTMAS
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE this
year for students who would like
to spend a few days away from
Gainesville at Christmas-time in
private homes at no cost except
transportation. Inquire at the
International Center.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF
THE FLORIDA BANKERS
EDUCATIONAL
FOUNDATION will meet on
Dec. 10 to review
scholarship/loan applications for
the coming quarter. All
applications and supporting
papers must be in the Dept, of
Finance & Insurance office 204
Matherly Hall by Nov. 21.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two week* in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
NOV. 19: RALSTON
PRUINA CO.: ARTHUR'
YOUNG & CO.; OWENS OWENSILLINOIS,

ROTATING TOPICS COURSES
FOR WINTER QUARTER
DEPT COURSE SECTION CREDIT DAY/S PERIOD BLDG ROOM EX GP Course TITLE
ATG 490 0862 C 1 F 7 MAT 16 208 RECONCILING BASIC PRINCIPLES OF
* ACCOUNTING WITH DEMANDS OF USERS
APV BM 6523 C 3 tfH 6 STA 46b I**C PRINCIPLES 6f AftVfratiSlNfl RESEA^ST
APY 630 1158 V VAR TH 6-9 ASB 3C 18C CULTURES OF MELANESIA
APY 630 1162 V VAR MT THF 4 ASB 3C 16A AYMARA
SPY 630 1163 V VAR W 2jZ_S ASB 3C 17A URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
GYP 621 3602 C 3 M W F 5 BRY 203 18A NUMERICAL APPROACH TO INDUSTRIAL
LOCATION
_JM 599 4037 C 3 T TU 1 222 _J§B URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING __
GYP 695 3606 V VAR M ?~ 2 203 17 8 GEOGRAPHY OF RURAL SETTLEMENT
TH 7-9 BRY 203
* -jj- L ( ?mm| ANGE . " ni n NFE MANAGEMENT RESEARCH METHOPULU^
PCL 630 DEP-C S MTWTHF 5 PEA 301 18A BLACK POLITICS
_FY 4M DgP£ i 407 188 PRECISION BEHAVIORAL MANAGEMENT^,
ZY 664 DEP-V VAR to arrange NFE ECOLOGICAL GENETICS
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I ~
. f a filin <*.9
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Boss, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, & V ft
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ILLINOIS, OWENSILLINOIS, INC.; GULF POWER
CO. EE, ME. IBM CORP.;
PROCTER & GAMBLE
DISTRIBUTING CO.
NOV. 20: COLUMBIA
TH EOLOGICAL SEMINARY;
ABRAHAM BALDWIN
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE;
HARTFORD HOSPITAL;
HAZELTINE CORP.;
STANDARD FRUIT 8e
STEAMSHIP CO.: EASTERN
ENGINEERING CO.;
RAYTHEON CO.;
INGERSOLL-RAND CO.;
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY,
INC.; USDA-OFFICE OF THE
INSPECTOR GENERAL;
NORTHROP CORP.
NOV. 20 8i 21: UNION
CARBIDE CORP. PH.D.
DIVISION; E. I. DU PONT DE
NEMOURS & CO.; MISENER
MARINE CON STRUCTION,
INC.
NOV. 21: AETNA LIFE &
CASUALTY CO.; GIRL
SCOUTS OF U.S.A., REGION
III; STATE OF FLORIDA
PERSONNEL BOARD; THE
HARTFORD INSURANCE
GROUP; CONTAINER CORP.
OF AMERICA; UNITED
TELEPHONE CO. OF
FLORIDA EE, Acctg. BA,
DS-Industrial Management.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AT ORLANDO Bus. Ad.,
Encon. Fin. US NORFOLK
NAVAL SHIPYARD Nuc.
Eng., EE, ChE, CE. Arch. E.,
Met.E., General Engr., IE, ME.
*; BELLA, HERMIDA, OLIVER
& GILLMAN Acctg.; DEPT.
OF THE ARMY HARRY
DIAMOND LABORATORIES-
Phys., ME, EE, ChE.
- CANCELLATIONS: NOV.
20: U.S. DEPT. OF
COMMERCE
* Indicates U.S. Citizenship
Required.

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

GENERAL NOTICES
LECTURE: The Changing
Ethos of World Religions lecture
will be given by Dr. Joseph M.
Kitagawa, professor of Far
Eastern Languages and
Civilizations, University of
Chicago, in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on Monday, Nov.
17, at 8:00 p.m.
LECTURE: Dr. William
Rogge, University of Illinois
professor speaks on Advanced
Learning for Potentially High
Achievers" from 1- 5 p.m.
Sunday (11/16) in Room 347,
Reitz Union. Dr. Rogge is
sponsored by the University's
Dept, of Special Education, the
National Council for
Exceptional Children and the
Florida Association for the
Gifted |>tudent (FLAG).
Friday, November 14
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Univ. of Fla. Young Democrats,
"Discussion on Vietnam", Lt.
Col. Ramsey, 150 F & G
Union, 12:30 pTm.
Union Movie, 'The Great Race",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 150 A & B Union,
7:00 p.m.
Catholic Student Center
Hay ride. Meet at Center, 7:00
p.m.
Hillel Foundation Service, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "RIFF", Union
Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, 'The Ewing St.
Times", 8:30,10:30 & 12:30
p.m.

address all administrative notices and general
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Saturday, November 15
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
Football: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Kentucky, Florida Field,
2:00 p.m.
Union Movie/The Whispers",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Graham Area Gator Hop,
Graham Area Rec. Room,
8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller: 'The Ewing St.
Times", 8:30, 10:30 & 12:30
p.m.
MENSA Social 2903 S.W. 2nd
Court, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 16
Hillel Foundation, Bagel & Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Catholic Student Center Social
Committee Meeting, 12:00
noon
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 6:30 p.m.
University Film Series,
"Burlesque of Carmen",
Chaplin, Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Catholic Student Center
Lecture, Student Center
Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
Accent 70: Gylan Kain, "Kain
Out Tongues of Fire",
Poetry, Song & Dance, Union
Ballroom, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, November 17
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.

Reitz Union, Prof. Harry Crews,
"Young Writer Discusses His
Craft", 122 Union, 4:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
College of Physical Education
Dance Demonstration,
Women's Gym, 8:00 p.m.
College of Arts & Sciences:
Joseph M. Kitagawa, 'The
Changing Ethos of World
Religions'', Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Dames Assoc.
Meeting, "Cooking Capers",
Gainesville Gas Co., 8:00
p.m.
Tuesday, November 18
Seminole Student Portraits, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Table Setting
Contest, Air Force ROTC
Library, 7:30 p.m.
College of Physical Education
Dance Demonstration,
Women's Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Home of Mrs. Uhrig, 3432 N.
W. 11th Avenue, 8:00 p.m.,
Sarah Coventry Jewelry
Party.
Music Dept: Florida Woodwind
Quintet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
German Dept: "Cat and Mouse",
Union Aud., 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
"Jefferson Airplane", $3.00 &
$1.25; Accent 70: "Kain Out
Tongues of Fire", SI.OO.



Friday, November 14, 1960, Tha Florida AMltor.

NIXON THANKS CONGRESS FOR POLICY SUPPORT
Thousands Flood Nations Capital

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Thousands of demonstrators
converged on a security-tight*
capital Thursday for a three-day
mass protest against U.S.
involvement in Vietnam. Even
before it officially began, about

Force Os 40,000
On O.C. Alert
WASHINGTON (UPI) A security force of almost 40,000 was
alert in and around Washington for possible trouble during the three
days of antiwar demonstrations.
Almost all will be hidden from public view, and many come from
the ranks of the demonstrators themselves.
Informed sources believe there may be small, sporadic outbursts
but none that cannot be easily contained, probably by the District of
Columbia Police. Its 3,000 men will be the main visible evidence of
the security precautions.
The D.C. police can call on a federal force of thousands, including
9,000 Army and Marine troops, specially trained in civil disturbance
operations, who are being kept out of sight on federal property until
or if needed. Some will be stationed inride die Justice
Department, the security headquarters.
About 25,000 other military personnel are in the area. The
National Guard has 2,700 men on stand-by, the UJS. Park Police 400
and 125 U.S. marshals will be on duty.
Networks Attack V.P.

NEW YORK (UPI) The
presidents of two major
networks accused Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew Thursday night
of trying to influence coverage
of government news.
Referring to Agnews sharp
attack on all three networks'
coverage of the President's
Vietnam speech, Julian
Goodman, president of NBC
said:
Evidently he would prefer a
different kind of television
reporting one that would be
subservient to whatever political
group is in authority."
CBS President Frank Stanton
said Agnews speech in Des
Moines Thursday night was an
unprecedented attempt to
intimidate a news medium.
ABC President Leonard H.
Goldenson, in his reply to
Agnews attack, said, We will
continue to report the news
accurately and fully, confident
Hijacker, 14
To Get Tests
CINCINNATI (UPI) A
14-year-old boy accused of
attempting to hijack a Delta
jetliner at greater Cincinnati
airport while holding a young
dancer hostage Thursday was
referred to a psychiatric clinic
for testing.
Juvenile Court Judge
Benjamin Schwartz ordered the
tests for David L. Booth of
Norwood, who allegedly held a
knife at the back of Barbara
Jean House, 18, of Milford, and
forced her to board a Delta DC9
with him.
The youth demanded to be
flown to Sweden but airport
officials and police persuaded
him to surrender before the
aircraft left the ground.
PAINT All types & Uses
Color Guild Quality
See the New Deep Tones!
Easy Park Right in front
THE BRUSH ft BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431

Page 11

150 protesters were arrested at
the Pentagon.
Five hours in advance of a
march against death from
Arlington National Cemetery to
the Capitol, President Nixon
made a hurried surprise visit to

in the ultimate judgement of the
American public."
AS three networks, in an
unprecedented move, carried
Agnew's speech live on television
and radio. UsuaSy networks
carry only the President live.

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the House and Senate chambers
to thank congressional
supporters of his Vietnam
policy.
Addressing Congress for the
first time since he took office,
Nixon won cheers and a standing
ovation when he declared:
I know that when the
national security is involved,
when the peace of the world is
involved, when the lives of our
young men are involved, we are
not Democrats or Republicans.
We are all Americans."
The White House shrugged off
questions whether Nixon was
trying to blunt the impact of the
demonstrations. His press
secretary, Ronald Ziegler, said
Nixon simply wated to show his
thanks for expressions of
support for his peace plan for
Vietnam.
Nixon, who claimed the
support of the majority of the
American public in a 12-minute,
off-the-cuff speech to the House,
entered the Capitol through a
ride door. As he left, a man in
the crowd of several hundred
shouted, stop the war." Others
held up signs reading: Peace,
now.
Rallies, marches, teach-ins,
vigils, debates and readings of
the names of Vietnam War dead

jl£ Don't Miss Saturday's Game
I Teddy Bear Nursery
ANdeySet.7n-lpm $2.00
( -W1 Alm eN n%lit Fri. ft Sat
SW TRAINED AND EXPERIENCED BABYSITTERS
Children can be left enrf
1 picked up anytime convenient to you.
1214 N.W. 4th Street
Ph. 376-0917 for further information

were planned in dozens of cities
across the country. But the
focus was on Wariiington and
the 40-hour planned march of
45,000 demonstrators past the
White House in single file, each
carrying a placard with the name
of an American killed in combat
The climax will come
Saturday with a mass march
from the Capitol down
Pennsylvania Avenue, to within
a block of the White House and
then on to the Washington
Monument for a rally of
speeches and folk music.
A security force of about
40,000 men, including 9,000
riot-trained Marines and Army
paratroopers from North
Carolina, were on hand for
possible trouble.
Before the Thursday night
march began, an antiwar
religious ceremony was broken
up peaceably in the main
concourse of the Pentagon by
building guards.
Os the 150 arrested on a
charge of obstructing
corridors," about 40 were
Roman Catholic or Episcopalian
clergymen. Two, C. Edward
Crowther of Washington, D.C.,
and Daniel Corrigan of
Rochester, N.Y., were identified
as former Episcopalian bishops.

-**' /;"' - *r
Harry
Crews
*' r v
Photo by Helen Hanrahan
HARRY CREWS was born in 1935
in Bacon County, Georgia. He lives
with his wife in Gainesville, Florida,
the site of the University of
Florida, where he teaches English.
When Harry Crews* first novel, The
Gospel Singer, was published early
in 1968, it received high praise
from such novelists as Richard E.
Kim and Andrew Lytle. In the
Richmond News Leader, Robert P.
Hilldrup called the book
altogether the best piece of fiction
this reviewer has seen come out of
the South since Jesse Hill Fords
The Liberation of Lord Byron
Jones.
Harry Crews will speak on, and
give readings from, his three
novels
Monday, November 17,
4:30 in Lounge 123
J Wayne Reitz Union.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ll
AMPEX 750 4 track 3 speed tape
deck stereo play-record, echo effect
sound on sound etc. Includes walnut
base & cover tapes $l5O firm
378-6129. (A-St-40-p)
Martin 0018 c Classical guitar with
hardshell case, Roberts 770 x
tape recorder with AKG and Roberts
mikes stand earphones assesories
372- 1956 MG good engine tires top side
curtains wirewheets some materials
for restoration 372-7024 after 5.
(A-4t-40-p)
Heavy duty VW trailer hitch. sls.
Call 376-0710 between 8 and 5.
(A-3t-40-p)
8* x 42* 2 bedroom mobile home, air
conditioned, redecorated; with utility
shed. Call 372-3112 or 372-8032.
$1750. (A-st-40-p)
ANTIQUE AUCTION Sunday
afternoon, 2 p.m. November 16th C
& J Auction house, Archer, Florida
(A-2t-41-p)
68 Lamplighter mobile home 12X45
fully furn, bar and stools, 2 bdrm, ac,
park has pool. ssl month, $650
equity payments possible
378-5174. (A-st-41-p)
Vespa 12 5 perfect mechanical
condition, low mileage, very reliable,
new paint, new brakes, SSO. Call
376-9226 ask for Jim Retzke.
(A-3t-41-p)
Sale full contents North-South
Museum. Route 16-16 A Kingsley
Lake near Starke, Fla. 9000 Rare
Books, Authentic Early American
furniture, 2,000 pc Silver (coin,
sterling) fine china, linens, art glass,
oil paintings, rare antique prints
mirrors chests, lamps, hundreds
Civil and Rev. war items, all
authenticated, beautiful jewelry
telephone 533-2381 Address Rte
no. 1 Box 361 Starke Florida.
(A-2t-41-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Basset Puppies AKC reg., wormed
shots, 6 wks old, $75 Also Army
Officers Dress Blues & Greens, 1 & 2
Lt. insg. & hats. Call 372-7890.
(A-lt-4 2-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera
with FI 8 lens, manual 200M lens,
and pistol grip. $75 firm. 376-4905
after 6:00 P.M. (A-3t-40-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-l 4t-34-p)
Ladies drinks $.35 at the Friday
Afternoon Club. A weekly cocktail
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd at the
Lamplighter Lounge this and every
Friday. Two private rooms are
reserved for us. This is where it's at.
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (A-4t-39-p)
Kawasaki 120 Scrambler a sacrifice
for $265 1968 model Call Bob at
373- (A-st-38-p)
Amplifier Fender twin reverb.
Older blackface model. Great
condition S3BO. Call 372-2173. Rock
& Roll will never die! (A-st-42-p)
Royal Electric Typewriter Standard
with cloth and carbon ribbon
$152.00, Typewriter table $5.00
378-0384. (A-lt-42-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk must sell
S3OO 1966 good condition 372-5015.
(A-3t-42-p)
1969 Honda Superhawk 305 CC.
Excellent mechanical condition
4,000 miles, some dents & scratches
$450. Call 376-4736 after 5. (A-3t
42-p)
12x44 mobile home 1968 Air one
bedroom 400 down assume payments
Art Deane 3101 SW 34th St. no. 66
or 378-9402. (A-st-42-p)
TIMEX WATCH, very good
condition. Excellent for Nurse or
Nursing student. $5.00. Call Judy
392-0731 before 5:00 p.m.
(A-lt-41-p)
GERMAN SHEPHERD, 3 mos. old,
AKC, great pedigree, well trained,
had all shots. FORCED TO PART
WITH HER, REASONABLY
PRICED. CALL 378-3486.
(A-2t-42-p)
KAWASAKI 250 SS Good Condition
$450.00 Including Helment Call
462-2792 after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-42-p)
New Healthways two stage, double
hose, scuba regulator $45.00 or best
offer. Call 376-1523 after 5:00
p.m.A-2t-42-p)
2 Complete trains, 5 oak matching
chairs. Camphor Storage chest,
portable Underwood typewriter,
tables, antiques & oddities. 6110
S.W. 13th St. Closed Sundays.
(A-7t-42-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14,1969

Page 12

I j
Heath model DA-281 Stereo
amplifier, 35 watts/channel, all new
tubes, SBS. Heath model AJ-63 mono
fm tuner, $25. Both SIOO.
(A-St-42-p)
!** nn ^ n rnnn,in |
Tired of your old drab apartment
sub-lease a poolside Village Park apt.
available winter quarter. Call
373-2442 after 4 p.m. For sale or rent one bedroom trailer
and Cabana gas heat & air
conditioner $975 or $65 mo.
392-0939 or 376-3322. (B-st-39-p)
1 br efficiency. New, clean, quiet,
can move right in. Must sublease SBS
per mont. Furnished. Call late any
night or morning. 376-6854.
(B-4t-41-p)
Several 1 br. apts., 1 bath, kitchen,
iivingroom completely furnished, ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo., cable TV.
Colonial Manor Apts. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. 372-7111. (B-6t-41-c)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
3 rms upstairs FURNISHED
481-2775 HAWTHORNE $65.00.
(B-st-41-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Univ. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals
$220/quarter. Some financial aid
available. 378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
Sublet Jan-June furnished AC quiet
carpeted apartment with 2 balconies
IV2 blks from campus $125 month or
coed roommate 373-1921.
(B-3t-42-p)
I WANTED J
Wanted 2 tickets MIAMI game. Call
378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359.
(C-2t-41-p)
Heres your chance to live well. Need
two coeds to sublet in Landmark.
TV, stereo, pool, ail electric. Nice
roomies. Call 378-6422. (C-st-41-p)
One male roommate for La Mancha
apartment. Private bedroom. Cali
373-2642. (C-3t-40-p)
One Female Roommate needed for
2-Bedroom Landmark Available
Dec. 15 Dec. rent free $46.25/mo.
No Deposits Call 378-3518.
(C-3 t-40-p)
Male roommate La Mancha S7O per
mon including utilities Furnished
Prefer grad student. Available Now
Call 378-9441 Apt. 53. (C-st-40-p)
The university crowd who enjoy
action and reasonably priced drinks.
The Friday Afternoon Club is going
again. Sponsored by graduate
students at the Lamplighter Lounge
this and every Friday. Two private
rooms reserved for us. Ladies drinks
$.35. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m, (C-4t-39-p)
Female roommate 2 bdr apt. 3 blocks
behind Norman $lO9 per qtr. Call
373-2513 after 3 p.m. (C-st-35-p)
Female roommate needed winter &
spring terms (Getting married need
replacement). Share large 2-bedroom
apt. with 3 girls. Quiet, comfortable,.
convenient. 2 blocks from Norman
Hall. sllO/quarter. 373-2832.
(C-st-42-p)
Male roommate for winter qtr to
look for 2bdrm apt in $l4O range.
Call 373-1514 after 10 grad student
preferred. (C-3t-42-p)
Female roommate for Frederick
Gardens apt. Immediate occupancy
or 2nd & 3rd quarters. Call Dana
372-3909. (C-3t-42-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters
available Dec. Ist $45,00/month. Call
Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-38-p)
.yXWWfIOC'XC-WAy.w.wwvXvlvXwXv
|[ HELP WANTED §
Reoseoxccox-r-x-x-i-x-v-v; vi-x-x-x-v-viC
400 per month. Part time evenings.
Must be neat & have own trans.
Report 206 SE Ist St. til 9 PM.
(E-st-40-p)
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
*3 |P a Per game
3 games SI.OO
Sat. 9am 6pm
Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

fIHEtP WANTH) Jj
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing-
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
WANTED: Two or three accounting
majors for work in the business office
of one of the largest student
organizations at the University
Student Publications. Sophomores or
Juniors only. Call 392-1689 or come
by Room 330 In the Union any
afternoon. (E-3t-nc)
Male help, part time... not a
temporary position. Ex per. in credit
and collections necessary. Prev.
banking, small loan, Insur. or depart,
store. Inside outside duties, auto
furnished. Maybe full time during
school break. For appoint, phone Mr.
Ellis 376-5333. (E-2t-41-p)
Are you bored? Would you like to
earn an excellent salary doing a
challenging job? Your responsibilities
will be varied, however, you must
type 60-80 wpm and take dictation
at 80-100 wpm. Apply now lO day
oaid training period begins December
10. Call Mrs. Mendoza 462-2499 at
Alachua. (E-llt-42-p)
"Burlesque of Carmen"
with
Chaplin
Sunday at 7 & 9:30
Union Auditorium
50<

SUBURBIA]
Hr THFATRt_|
r %*, Omm AMah' 11

, .v. <*s&& mi
!*-- '* ..- - *-\ mm
THE I
CiNCiNNAB I
KID I
rnfirs I
y?rT7> t ,i7?i7

fw w AWItP I
Need two (2) capable students woh<
gardens, weekends an fJ % J d % so o*e
Gainesville. Some painting. Also one
experienced typist and extra g£l for
house clcleaning. Nice estate.
Hunting. flsh '"| 2 381 fifto. 1
prevailing wages, 533-2381, Kie no.
Box 361 Stark, Fla.
Oriental girls and boys .'JJjJJfjJJ
and busboy work in new Po'*"* 1 *"
room. University nn. Apply in
person to Mr. Sasser. (E-3t-40-p)
Part time work, early morning hours.
Need not interfere withP re ent ,! a
college schedule. Deliver Tampa
Tribune for supplementary Income.
Call Ed Wyatt or Dale Wesley for
JUJnStlon* 372-4902. (E-st-3-p)

hURRY^\
/ OVER! \
/ LAST 5 DAYS! \
/ FIRST TIME AT REGULAR PRICES! \
winner! 3 ACADamr awards 4 \
. WCLUD)NG BEST ACTRESS KATHARINE HEPBURN I
JOSEPH . LEVINE iwou AN AVCO EMBASSY HIM Jb I
(f PGT6ROTOOL6 KATHARINE HEPBURN /
THE UON IN WINTER |
FEATURE 2:00 4:30
.. 7:00 9:30
/ Todouf 5 4 9 y 42 \
I JOHN HUSTON CREATES 'aA \
I A LOVE STORY FOR TODAY! J
\ ft WB with Ijom fall/
\ and Death 'llsy
A John Huston-Carter De Haven Production v/
\ AMELICA HUSTON j§| I op/
ASSAF DAYAN

1964 Triumph TR4, roi bar, radio
wire whls, good top, tonneau^luggaod
rack, new Insp. sticker, very good
contltlon phone 372-7980 after 6
(G-lt-42-p)
1969 Kamann-Ghla, 3 Months Old
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1470
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., 61950. (G-st-35-p)
1963 Rambler American 220, std
trans, good gas mileaga, great reliable
transportation $225 Call 376-0579
after 5:30 p.m. (G-3t-42-p)
1967 Austin Cooper 1275 cc
Westlake engine 100 bhp 7000 r pm
Goodyears abarth All new Interior
New Paint excel, cond. can
392-7504. (G-lt-42-p)



r T"...... .'^3,^jj^^OXCj-lXlL^X^jC^3^So!flCm33C

Q p 0 n .. .^.>-.w.vv.;av < 'in n non ni wiftrewwi
i AUTOS 1
l L ..... -- r --.
1965 JAGUAR XKE Roadster.
Excellent condition. 378-7620.
(G-St-42-p)
1965 Chevy 11. manual, good tires,
student going overseas, must Sell,
S4BO. Phone 378-9161 after 5
weekdays. See car during weekend.
(G-2t-41-p)
67 GTO Super clean, light blue, black
vinyl top, stereo tape, AM-Fm, rally
wheels, tach, custom interior, call
Pesek 378-9779 asking SI9OO.
(G-st-41-p) _____
1968 Sprite, excellent condition,
serviced + tuned every 3000 mi.,
radio excellent heater, front sway-bar
Stebro exhaust, BRG, other extras.
Asking $1650. 378-2235. fG-st-39-p)
65 MGB. Own a real sportscar. Very
well cared for. Mechanically perfect.
Radio, heater, new top, tonneau,
boot, lucas light, etc. Call Harvey at
373-2713 or come by La Bonne Vie
no. 339. (G-Bt-35-p)
67 XKE convertible. Excellent,
yellow, blk top, chrome wire wheels
$4195. Serious offers call 392-1881 8
to 5, ask for Louise Hardin.
(G-st-40-p)
1966 MUSTANG like new 36,000
miles automatic transmission, radio
heater, 6 cylinders, call 378-8752
after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
1965 MG Midget Needs net top and
brake job. Has new inspection tag,
battery, starter, generator, exhaust
system. Best offer. Call 373-2345.
(G-st-40-p)
x-x-x-x-x*w.-.-.vx-:**x-x-:-x-x*x-x-v.v.-.v.;.
PERSONAL
>: ¥
VX.^NV.V*v.\vM ;vWv! X'!v'.y'V.'.'.v.v; v
BABY FLYING SQUIRRELS, tiny,
cute, loveable, great for Christmas $5
apiece. Call 376-0968 after 6 PM.
(J-2t-41-p)
STA 320 tutor needed must start
from beginning. Pay to be arranged.
Call 378-6431 or 392-8396 anytime.
(J-2t-41-p)
NEED YOUR TERM PAPER
TYPED? Will type anything. Only
$.50 a page. Broward Hall on
campus. Call 392-9760. (J-2t-41-p)
Action this and every Friday at the
Friday Afternoon Club. A cocktail
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd. Two private
rooms reserved. Ladies drinks $.35
5:30-7:30 p.m. (J-4t-39-p)
Men! Visit all of west or east Europe
next summer for S3OO private and
coop organized trip write box 2657
Gains. U. Sta. for info. (J-st-39-p)
BOYS!!! Your Playboy coed maid
service is here! Hire your bunnies
now. Rates to be arranged. Call
Nancy or Lisa. 373-2760. (J-st-40-p)
Two Cool guys want Two Cool chics
to go to Wash. D.C. Nov. 13 for
Peace March. Call 3 78-0707.
(J-lt-42-p)
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be in
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-st-42-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE

[ sSoTleGreatacelg£ j
llllliltt KlliN Dtl ARIHLIR OCONNELI VIVIAN Vffi MW IM SIOMHOSS I.IMIH
i\ hear rue new song hit n*w**TMtAT niee | |yj|
TEruuirm no PAMZ.VISION FROM WARNER EROS.I

FRIDAY NOV. 14 5:30, 8:00,10:30 P.M.

Friday, Nowmbar 14,1968, The Florida Alligator,

f personal "1
Selfish Susie Happy 18th birthday.
Good things are happening for you
tonight. All our love, Linda and
Bobby. (J-lt-42-p)
WILD SLUT AND SWEAT HOG: the
time is drawing nigh, make ye ready
for the Saturday night orgy.
GWRBPW (J-lt-42-p)

GAA This is the Rise of the fall.
Fulfilling our trust, renewing our
faith that this has always been that
this will be again ... lyve, vca.
(J-lt-42-p)
Dear Chickie: Four years of heaven
and hell have been worth it. You will
always be Number One to me. I love
you. Dartin'. (J-lt-42-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING 16
NW 7th Ave. (J-st-28-p)
| LOST A FOUND
":'XX-X-X-X*X-X-X.:.X-VWV.%SN-X-X*X-X-XCJ:
FOUND boy's size 16 blue cardigan
sweater at Gator Bowl Saturday.
376-2771 evenings. (L-41-nc-3t)
Reward for return of UF camera lost
at Ga. Fla. game Sat. 392-7665.
Haines. (L-3t-40-p)
Lost: keychain and keys on Friday
on or near the drill field or socer
field. Keychain has sentimental value.
378-0847. (L-3t-40-p)

I OPEN 6:30
show
I p^^^YOURE THROUGH,

Page 13

| SERVICES j
, i?WW*J?
Health foods, natural vltimlns,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight Instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair for ever
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist (over
20 yrs experience) 372-8039. By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)
Tennis racket restringing free pick up
and delivery. M 6 R Tennis Services
378-2489. (M-22t-l-p>
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS 1126% N.
W. Bth St. 376-85C6 prices not given
over phone, depends on garment.
(M-st-39-p)
NOW Two new services available at
the Student Activities Desk 1) list
of typists term papers, master's
theses, and doctoral dissertations
(financial arrangements the
responsibility of the typist and
client) 2) Xerox service ($.lO per
copy.)

Admission 50<

fli
THE
WHISPERERS
who
are pP||H|||
they? fjj|&
BRYAN FORBES'
Production of
THE
WHISPERERS
s#*#
EDITH EVANS
ERIC PORTMAN
A SfifdPwMPr'rfwli-i
umat nctvmkK o^pormt/mv

SATURDAY NOV. 15
5:30, 8:00,10:30 P.M.

I*SERVICES 1
Cocktail party sponsored by graduate
students for the university crowd at
the Lamplighter Lounge this and
every Friday. Two private rooms
reserved for us. This is where it's at.
Ladies drinks $.35. 5:30-7;30 p.m.
(M-4t-39-p)
GREEKS!! This if the week-end to
get a PARTY PHOTO by St*n. Get
one taken. It will be potted at your
house. Order If you like It No
obligation. (M-lt-42-p)

I What ever Z |
I happened to Colc I
I Aunt Alice? I
1 when the honor starts to grow! I
WELD
Wt w Me9m9QM& 9:08 v
ragjffl
1011 M. W.
2 HTuTnlHg
|U
nvrfM
Times
Ever
Together
,
WjliSpOi o I
lor Smmd The MIRISCH
Brains 0 VANDYKE
to RutsvMte |ym| pBMDK^J
OF THE MONTH!
| PI W. tfafverslfy 4ve~ |
A gift WILLIAM HOLDEN
I r~M YIRNfI LISI
OFJOY SW BOtIFYIL
OF HOPE, I ..v. TERENCE YOUNG
of coura ,y CHRISTM/1^

{" ""seKS-I'
Litnwwwiny: iiwwl
Let PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE xerox your thesis,
dissertation or manuscript work. We
type them so we know how to handle
them. (S.OB per copy collated) Call
376-7170. (M-6t-38-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)



Page 14

* TOM

UF Students Now
Pay For Pranks
By BARBARA DURANT
Alligator Correspondent
Murphree Area, notorious for its fire crackers, water fights and
dumpster fires; may be seeing calmer days when the student vandals
discover that they will have to pay for the damage.
Students will now share the costs of repairs needed for damages
caused by student pranks.
Housing will keep a record of all such repair costs per section. If the
costs exceed $64, then it wil be divided among the approximately 32
students in the section. The $64 minimum is set per section because it
would cost Housing that much to bin the students of one section.
VJ. Huriong, maintenance supervisor at Murphree, estimates that
10 to 12 per cent of the entire maintenance budget goes to repairs due
to vandalism.
If a person commits vandalism or destroys something, then we feel
he should have to pay for it,** said the 26 year veteran Maintenance
Supervisor.
Very seldom do we have a Monday that we don*t have one or two
sections flooded. Before, we couldn't do anything about it. Now we
go ahead and charge the students right then."
Every time a section is flooded it costs the maintenance department
SBO.
The students at UF are supposed to be on the honor system but if
the pranksters cannot be pinpointed, the entire section must suffer.
Theres much more vandalism now than there was when I first
started working here back ip *43," Huriong said. The only trouble we
had then was at the end of school."
Os course the morale of the students is a little low because of the
paiking tickets and I think sometimes they take it out on the
buildings."
The morale just may be la little lower when Housing starts mailing
bills. All students not paying will have their grades held by the
Registrar.
Prof Says ZPG
Booms On Campus

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Interest on campus in the
work of Zero Population
Growth Inc. (ZPG) is booming,
Seymour S. Block, UF professor
of chemical engineering said
Tuesday.
At our last meeting we had
standing room only. Close to
200 people were present to hear
the illustrated lecture by Dr.
Hugh Popenoe on Food,
Famine, and Overpopulation'."
Block said people have been
calling him to get more
information on the world
population explosion.
I*ve even had a request from
Experimental College asking me
to teach a course on the
population explosion.**
To help handle the requests
for more information, Block and
members of ZPG will hold a
population growth seminar
tonight at 8:30 pjn. in the
second floor conference room of
the NASA Building.
Also, ZPG will have a business
meeting at 7:30 pm at the same
location to elect officers and
discuss dub business.
The seminar is designed to
help students learn about the
population explosion problem

VIENNA ATHENS ..c-sl*
LONDON ~ Uf/ V/Cf I
W** o** 0 **
interested? v/ *7
contact room 310 Reitz Union
392-1655
jpjflUU
n!mi ass

by taking course work at UF.
The sodology department
has specialists in population, the
biological sciences study man
and his relationship to the land
he lives on, and in nursing
students in nursing study
procedures for handling
indigents."
Block said in the College of
Medicine birth control is studies,
in engineering there are
problems of waste removal and
in physical education they study
methods of teaching birth
control.
This subject cuts across a lot
of academic areas on campus."
Block said it is important for
the student to know what
courses on campus offer studies
in population problem.
(UN Secretary General) U
Thant has said this is the number
one problem in the world today.
We are going to need trained
people in this field."
The Department of Health
Education and Welfare (HEW)
according to Block, has started a
bureau for family planning
which will work with the
poverty program.
This is a chance for students
to be of service to their country
and the world.

This is the dictionary
that has more
definitions of words
than any other
colleges i dictionary
Isnt that what you
buy a dictionary for?
It's The Random House College Dictionary. And it has lots of new words old desk
dictionaries just don't have. Words like quark. Nitty-gritty. Ho Chi Minh. Why use an old
dictionary when for only $6.95 ($7.95 thumb index), you can get The
Random House College Dictionary? It has more definitions of words than any other
college dictionary, old or new. It's the last word.
PljjjglSlSUU'-- ~~ || f |T\
? I j |||l If
' IBB; I''-'-
I m §1
I 1 w \ :
WSmlmmmit m / k m \ \ v r I ft ftillll: jaasa.
V y i i \ i\\
x \ ftlfe-f ft ft I
/\ \ \ \ V Bill BB
If I ; /

Tweve Years
of Christmas
These are Rod McKuens special words of
Christmas: holidays spent not only near the
holly and the ivy, but on Forty-Second
Street, in the fields and on the beach, in
love, waiting for love. Watching twelve
go by Mr. McKuen has -put them downior
all of us to know and remember
Other Titles

LISTEN TO THE WARM... $3.95, LISTEN TO THE WARM (Pocket Edition) S 3 95
STANYAN STREET & OTHER SORROWS.. .$3.95, LONESOME CITIES $3 95
THE WORLD OF ROD McKUEN... $4.95.
These books on display
November 14,15,617
Campus Shop&Bookstore
1

In Someones
Shadow
is quite simply one of the most direct,
touching and beautiful collection of love
poems by an American poet. Using the
seasons of the year as a platform to speak
eloquently of mans need, the words in this
book underscore the reason why Rod
McKuen has become the most influential
? el, n S P et of our lifetime. $3.95
SIO.OO signed slipcased limited edition



North Viets Refuse To Accept 62 Prisoners

.v.;.v. i '***

Nixon Thanks Congress

WASHINGTON (UPI) With
thousands of war protesters
gathering for a weekend of
demonstrations, President Nixon
paid a surprise visit to Capitol
Hill Thursday and thanked
supporters in both houses of
Congress for backing his
Vietnam policy.
I believe we will achieve a
just peace in Vietnam, Nixon
told the House. I cannot tell you
the time or date. I do know this:
When the peace comes it will
CAA DC4
Hijacked
By United Pres International
A DC4 of the Colombian
Avianca Airlines with 56 persons
aboard was hijacked Thursday
on a domestic flight between
Cucuta and Bogota and ordered
to Cuba.
Six persons were involved,
police said.
The hijack, third in South
America in two days, coincided
with the arrival in Havana of the
second of two airliners hijacked
Wednesday. The pirates of the
first were foiled in flight and
arrested in Chile.
Both planes were on domestic
flights.
THe'SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky.. .young and old...some just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
USt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road
Florida Quarterly:
The thrill of a lifetime
$1.25

'HUMANITARIAN ACT REJECTED FOR POLITICAL REASONS:

The Hanoi delegation
has refused to take back
the prisoners of war freed
by us.
Pham Dang Lam
Chief Saigon Negotiator

come because of the support we
have received not just from
Republicans and Democrats in
this body or the Senate, but
from the people of the United
States.
Nixons appearance at the
Capitol, the first since he
became President Jan. 20, was

mam ffiwf/ieu I
GAINESVILLE MALL H

H riPIHPfHKMPTVI |fit
vagm I f B J 1
H T) T H with MONETS ex ex-131\.
131\. ex-131\. I H JPI quisitely crafted
bracelets, 3.00*15.00
and charms, 2.50-7.50
H with jewelers finish
H monogram your mug*** Ugr in gold or silver.
I All glass mug with removable O Charm feature ,ety
. ~ i vcA till catch add or sub submahogany
mahogany submahogany leather cover and ...
FREE monogrammed m.tials JCSJ 3 Mas, Costume Jew Jew
Jew yours, your steady s or your elry, all stores except
Greek letters! Great holiday H fru Gandy Blvd. Store for
gift, 6.00 from Maas Handbags H Homes
SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY. 10 A. M, Til* ft : 3 0 P ? M. v

PARIS (UPI) South
Vietnam offered Thursday to
release 62 North Vietnamese
prisoners of war on
humanitarian grounds.
Communist North Vietnam
rejected the offer and said it
would never deal directly with
the Saigon government.
Chief Saigon negotiator Pham
Dang Lam, who made the POW
offer in todays peace meeting,
said afterwards, The Hanoi

obvioulsy calculated to take
some of the edge off the
weekend of peace demands here.
But White House Press
Secretary Ronald Ziegler said
that Nixon only wanted to
express his appreciation to
lawmakers supporting his war
policy.

delegation has refused to take
back the prisoners of war freed
by us.
The Saigon negotiator had
announced that the 62 wounded
prisoners were being released as
a humanitarian gesture on the
part of his government. But the
move was generally seen as a lure
to draw Hanoi into direct talks.
Both North Vietnam and the
Viet Cong have steadfastly
refused to deal directly with the

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Saigon delegation at the peace
talks.
In announcing his
governments readiness to free
the prisoners, Lam has said
Saigon was prepared for all
contacts with the Hanoi
administration through the two
delegations of the Republic of
South Vietnam and of North
Vietnam in these meetings or
through other means to arrange
for their return to North
Vietnam.

Page 15



i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14,196&

Page 16

REHABILITATION OF YOUNG OFFENDERS EMPHASIZED
Nixon Asks For Immediate Prison Reforms

WASHINGTON (UPI) President
Nixon Thursday advocated immediate
and dramatic reform of the nations
prison system to help protect the public
from the criminal who comes out more
dangerous than when first arrested.
Nixon directed Attorney General
John N. Mitchell to coordinate a
13-point program with emphasis on

Prison Release Set
For Klans 9 Wizard
TEXARKANA, Tex. (UPI) Robert M. Shelton, imperial wizard
of the United Klans of America, will be released Monday from federal
prison, it was announced Thursday.
Shelton has served nine months of a one-year sentence on a
contempt of Congress conviction.
Warden L. M. Connett said Shelton, 40, of Tuscaloosa, Ala., will be
released early due to good time earned and credited to his sentence
for good conduct in his total activities while at the institution.
The contempt of Congress citation was filed when Shelton refused
to produce a membership list in the Ku Klux Klan for a congressional
committee.
Shelton will technically be under the sentence until Feb. 13,1970,
Connett said, but will not be subject to any kind of probationary
restriction.

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rehabilitation, particularly of the young
offender.
The President also urged the
concerned citizen to support prison
reform as one of the most effective
ways of fighting crime.
One of the areas where citizen
cooperation is most needed is in the
rehabilitation of the convicted
criminal, he said. Men and women

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Nixon Forms
Rural Council
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon signed an
executive order Thursday
establishing a new cabinet-level
council for rural affairs.
At the same time Nixon
gathered the new council for its
first organizational meeting in
the cabinet room.
The council was told to advise
the President on ways to
improve the quality of life and
economic opportunities in small
towns and rural areas.
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who are released from prison must be
given a fair opportunity to prove
themselves as they return to society.
We will not insure our domestic
tranquility by keeping them at arms
lengths, the President said. If we turn
our back on the ex-convict, then we
should not be surprised if he again turns
his back on us.

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The President's program was outlined
in a directive to Mitchell. It included no
immediate requests for action by
Congress although several studies were
proposed which could lead to future
legislation.
Nixon asked Mitchell to develop a
10-year plan for correctional reform to
end the crisis-oriented, stop-gap nature
of most reform efforts.



The
Florida
Alligator

UY CEH DEPARTMENT
Course Offered

By NANCY COLVIN
Alligator Correspondent
Several weeks ago, there was
some doubt that a film course
would be a success with
students, but now it is evident
that students are vitally
interested in the film.
Dr. William Childers, associate
professor of English, has proof
of this interest in his CEH-194
class.
This course, entitled An
Introduction to the Film is a
historical account of films from
D. W. Griffiths Orphans of the
Storm to the contemporary
Hiroshima, Mon Amour.
The first class of 39 students
was an experimental venture to
see if a need and interest in a
cinema program existed. The
students serve as feedback to the
department, Childers said.
The response has come from
students in all colleges and at
both upper and lower division
levels, Childers said. In fact,
sometimes people show up at
the films on Tuesday who arent
even on my roll, he said.
This course is not a cheap
thrill course, but it is a course
that is not academic in the
strictest sense. Movies are more
than an escape, and the movies
made today have a significance
especially for students. That is
why the course is based on
looking at all the details on the
movie, he said.
We study direction,
movement, musical scores and
composition along with the
more technical things like
photography and editing, and
students develop a new insight
into the film, he said.
CEH-194 is one of many
seminars that may eventually be
used to fill the freshman English
requirements, Childers said.
The thing about the seminar is
that it is flexible, he explained.
The class meets for two hours on

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Tuesday and Thursday for four
hours credit. On Tuesday they
see the film for the week, and on
Thursday discuss it in relation to
some specific aspect like editing
or photography, he said.
Also, students write reaction
papers. These are not academic
term papers or research papers,
they are just the students ideas
about the film and its social and
philosophical significance, he
said.
Also included is a discussion
of other films the students have
seen. After all, students dont
sit around on weekends and read
a novel, they go to the movies.
Why shouldnt this be related to
their education? he said.
Now that interest has been
generated, the department hopes
to make the program
interdisciplinary, drawing from
journalism, photography,
cinema, and other related fields.
This is all in the future since it
will take much more than the
S3OO-a-quarter which is paid by
University College for the film
rentals.

'Quarterly 1 Is First

UFs Florida Quarterly
Wednesday received a first class
rating by the Associated
Collegiate Press (ACP), a
national scholastic press
association.
This is the first year the
Florida Quarterly has been
eligible for an ACP rating,
because it never before has had
enough publications. This year it
was published the three required
times.
Citing excellence in fiction,
Judge Ann H. Andersen praised
the magazines development as
exceptional for a college
magazine. All other areas judged
also received a rating of

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Co Id Fun In Hot Sun

By CATHY O'DONNELL
Alligator Correspondent
Blue Springs used to be
just a swimming hole for the
rural folk of Alachua County,
but now its a place in the sun
for adventurous UF students and
other tourists.
Located five miles outside the
city limits of High Springs, Blue
Springs is one of the many
natural sink holes in the area. Its
icy water springs from 50-foot
depths and flows down a quarter
mile run until it joins the ageless
Suwanee.
Blue Springs used to be public
property but came under private
ownership about five years ago.
Fences went up, and the old
springboard came down.
Bathhouses were constructed
out of concrete Mode, and a
charge of 50 cents was placed on
all admissions.
Rubber tires hanging over the
water from old oak limbs had to
come down because the new
owner said they were dangerous.

excellence, which is superceded
only by a superior rating.
The Florida Quarterly has
often been criticized in the past,
as being too scholarly for college
students to understand.
However, this ACP rating proves
that this isnt so, said Jessica
Everingham, editor of the
Quarterly.
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
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This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time you owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

Friday, November 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Blue Springs is 26 miles from
UF. The springs used to be
hidden in the Alachua
wilderness, but now the path is
well makred by blue lettered
signs and red arrows.

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For work in:
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Sign up for interviews through your Place Placement
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Aw equal opportunity employer

~ TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor

Not many country people go
there any more. Blue Springs is
too croweded; too many
strangers and too much
infiltration into the traditions of
the South.

Page 17



t. The Florida Alligator, Frida* Novambar 14,1968

Page 18

EVERYONE MISERABLE
Need For UF Coliseum
Evident At la Traviata

By TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
The La Traviata performance clinched it, UF
must have a coliseum soon.
Florida Gym is not even adequate for a basketball
game, and hardly the place for the opera
presentation given there Tuesday evening.
Under the circumstances, the performers did a
good job. A curtain is essential to an opera but
the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater Company had
to perform without one.
Lighting blocked the stage and detracted from
intricate sets and the acoustics were horrible as
usual.
Those in the audience lucky enough to be sitting
in chairs with backs couldn't see the because of the
flat nature of the floor and those sitting in the
bleachers couldnt see because of the pain in their
backs.
So, during the entire performance, the audience
in the chairs bobbed from side-to-side trying to see
around the people in front of them. And the poor
patrons mi the bleachers restlessly shifted positions
every few minutes resulting in several plastic cups
being noisily kicked to the floor at quiet and
inopportune moments in the opera.
Everyone was miserable the performers and the
audience.
Giuseppe Verdis La Traviata was a.
controversial opera at the time it was first
presented. The operas theme appealed to Verdi
because it paralleled his personal life.
The plot was too realistic in the 1850s and is too
far removed from todays trends in society for
acceptance.
The story of a loose woman living for only wine,
song and love shocked audiences in the Romantic
Era. The opera was even closed on moral grounds by
Queen in England.
Violettas living for life probably appeals to a
great deal to today's generation but her reasoning
was entirely unacceptable.
When Giorgis Germont (her lovers father) came
to demand that she release his son from her
influence, Violetta became an instant martyr. She
gave up her true love so that the family would not
be disgraced by her presence in the family circle.
Giorgio compliments her on her noble sacrifice
and says, May Heaven calm your grief and may
your dreams be rewarded. Here he was, asking her
to'destroy her love life, but hoping for die
realization of any future dreams she might have. His
attitude seems rather hypocritical.
Later, as Violetta is on her death bed, Giorgio

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him at this point, because she has agreed with his
point of view from the beginning.
There are few Violettas today who would give up
personal goals for societys conventions and be
complimented for it.
Despite an unpolished first act and the conditions
in the Florida Gym, Goldovsky's company gave a
fine presentation.
Nancy Stokes (Violetta) and Hervey Hicks
(Giorgio Germont) gave professional performances
with beautiful operatic voices. The remaine of the
company was somewhat weak.
The opera would have been twice as enjoyable in
an adequate theatre.

| TO SPEAK MONDAY
English Instructor
Authors Two Novels
Hany Crews, nationally acclaimed novelist and a UF instructor, will
speak Monday in the Reitz Union as part of the Campus Speakers
Series.
The program will be at 4:30 pjn. in the Union lounge.
Crews is a UF graduate, and has penned two novels: The Gospel
Singer and Naked in Garden Hills.
The Gospel Singer is Crews first novel. It is the story of a healer
with the voice of an angel. The Gospel Singer has been featured on the:
cover of Live and brought thousands to their knees in Carnegie
Hall.
The cover of the book describes the story: But for all his fame,
the singer is a man in mortal torment. And it is torment that drives
him back to his obscure and wretched hometown of Enigma, Georgia,
and to Maryell Carter, his first convert. But Maryell is dead by the
time his fabulous Cadillac pulls into Enigma and an old friend of the
Gospel Singer is being held at tenuous bay from a lynch mob, accused
of the rape and icepick murder of Maryell, cherished for her purity
and coveted by every man in Enigma.
As the novel unfolds the Gospel Singer is forced to give way to his
torment and in so doing he reveals to the believers who have gathered
at his feet just how little he is Gods man and how much he has
contributed to the corruption of each of them. In a climactic scene of
total destruction and devastating irony, his followers take revenge on
him for the truth he has finally found the tongue to tell.
Crews was bom in 1935 in Bacon County, Georgia. After a term in
the Marines he entered the UF to learn a skill by which he could
support himself while writing.
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UNION Fn.: lhe Great Race (**) with Jack
Lemmon, Tony Curtis & Natalie Wood at 5:30,8 &
10:30. Sat.: The Whispers (++) with Dame Edith
Evans & Eric Portman at 5:30, 8 & 10:30. Sun.:
Burlesque of Carmen (***) with Charlie Chaplin
at 7 & 9:30.
GAINESVILLE DRIVE-IN Fri., Sat. & Sun.:
Whatever Happened to Aunt Alice? (**) at 7:07
& 10:32 & Pretty Poison (+) with Tuesday Weld
at 9:08.
SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN Fri. & Sat.: The
Blob (+) at 7. The Thomas Crown Affair f****)
with Steve McOueen & Fave Dunaway at 8:45.
PLAZA II Walk With Love and Death (++)
with Ann Houston at 2:02, 3:57, 5:48, 7:42 &
9:36.

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w n LOR i ~ The Christmas Tree (++) with
William Holden & Virna Lisa at
7:30 & 9:30. *
The Cincinnati Kid (+) with Steve McQueen at
10:30 & Baby the Rain Must Fall (+) with Steve
McQueen at 12:15. Sun.: Gone With the Wind
(*****) with Clark Gable.
CENTER I Bullit (***) with Paul Newman
at 1:30, 5:37 & 9:39 & Bonnie & Clyde (****)
with Warren Beaty & Faye Dunaway at 3:30 &
7:37.
CENTER II Fri., Sat. & Sun.: Some Kind of
A Nut (++) with Dick Van Dyke and Angie Dickins
at 1:30,3:32,5:34,7:36&9:38.
PLAZA I The Lion in Winter (****) w jth
Peter OToole & Katharine Hepburn at 2, 4:30 7 &
9:30.

*****. academy award nomination
**** a fanfggfk m o yj c
*** good, but not great
** will do in a pinch
* 2 I A hours of boredom
++ not reviewed.

IIIH if I) nyw HI
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1 m m i* 1H I K=B I

HERE SUNDAY
.£* >. --v,, v &
Harlems Gylan Kain
Sponsored By Accent
Gylan Kain, a well known Harlem poet will be on UFs campus
Sunday as part of Accent 7O.
Mr. Kain, who spent his early years in a fundamentalist church,
now sees Christianity, as do many young black intellectuals, as a
concept that held Negroes in a love bondage long after the
emancipation. Christianity, according to Kain, took away the Negros
strength.
Kain also thinks the poet must destroy old images and values that
worked against Negroes and establish new ones.
His view of Poetry, Music and Song will be presented Sunday at
7:30 p.m. He will lecture in the Reitz Union Ballroom.
Kain is recognized for his literary contributions and as the founder
of a cultural workshop in Harlem. Admission to his lecture is sl.
Tickets may be purchased at the Union Box Office.

iay t rpOVtWTIDOr nRRff VllO r iuilp
. >. ']£&& :

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

SENIORS IN FINAL HOME GAME
Gators Out To Tame Rays Wildcats

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
The Gators return home to
friendly Florida Field Saturday
to play Kentucky Coach John
Rays Wildcats, who lead the
series 12 games to six.
But for this years game, the
Wildcats are 16 point underdogs
and enter with a 2-6 mark. One
of their victories being a mighty
10-9 upset of Mississippi.
The Gators, who have been
unbeatable at Florida Field this
year, go into this season finale at
home with an overall 6-1-1
record and a 4-0 home record.
This game also marks the last
home game for Floridas 28
seniors. Over 50,000 fans are

Gator Frosh-Miami
In Kiwanis Classic
Ten Baby Gator football players are looking forward to returning
to freindly surroundings on Friday night when the Gator freshman
meet Miami in the Orange Bowl.
Its the 12th meeting between the two freshman teams as they
compete for needy children in the annual Kiwanis Charity Freshman
Football Classic.
The list of South Florida players who are returning to their home
grounds include John Clifford from Coral Gables, Terry Myers from
Miami Norland, Duane Doel from Plantation, Davis Arthur from
Miami Norland, John Tucker from Miami Palmetto. Robin Rhodes
from Homestead, Glenn Deibert from Fort Lauderdale Nova, Tom
Vann from Coral Gables and Mark Hewitt from Miami Norland.
Floridas freshman coach Jack Westbrook aslo hails from Miami and
played prep football at Miami High School.

Proudly Announces
The Return Os
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-Jazz As
Blues
Its
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8:30, 10:30, 12:30

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expected to cheer them on in
respect of their fine
performances as Gators. Im
sure all the seniors want to end
their careers at Florida Field
with a victory, Coach Ray
Graves said. The seniors have
really helped in getting the team
up for Kentucky.
Although this is a
Southeastern Conference game
for the Gators, the UFs chances
of winning their first SEC
championship in 35 years are
non-existant as Tennessee has
the SEC wrapped uj>, even if
they should lose to Mississippi
Saturday in Jackson, Miss.
But the incentive for a
post-season bowl bid is reason

rathskeller

enough for the Gators to tame
the Wildcats Saturday.
Although unofficial, it is
rumored among sports editors
that the Gators might receive
bids from one of the major
bowls excluding the Orange
Bowl.
Tennessee and Penn State are
expected to get Orange Bowls
bids.
The Gators will start three
new faces in offensive left tackle
Jim Kiley, offensive tight end
Jim Yancy and defensive right
tackle Gunnar Paulson.
Graves said in the cases of
Yancy and Kiley that both have
graded out higher for the last
two games than previous starters
Bill Dowdy and Wayne Griffith
respectively. He said both
Dowdy and Griffith will see
action too. Gunnars one of
those five-year boys who never
gives up, Graves said in
reference to why Paulsons
starting. Hes come a long
way.
Paulson has been a five-year
player because he was
red-shirted one year. He has
worked up from the fifth team
last year to gain the starting nod,
in this his final home game as
Gator.
Some of the more outstanding
seniors who will start their last
home game at Florida Field are
Steve Tannen, Mac Steen, Skip

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SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

; Th9 Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14,1969

Page 20

Albury, Mark Ely, Skip
Amelung, Tom Abdelnour, Kim
Helton, David Ghesquiere, Bob
Coleman, and Paulson.
Seniors who are injured and
will not play their final home
game include Paul Maliska and

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OOUO CABE
GATOR QB JOHN REAVES
... out for SEC pasting record

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Robbie Rebol.
Other outstanding seniors
who will see action are Guy
McTheny, Wayne Griffith, Britt
Skrivanek, Alan Cole, Nick
Sinardi, Mike Palahack and
Jackie Eckdahl



Gators Go Grad Hunting

The Gators number one
record slasher John Reaves will
set his sights for another SEC
mark Saturday Babe Parillis
23 TD passes.
Reaves picked up his last SEC
record against Georgia when he
broke Frank Sinkwichs total
offensive record of 2,187 yards.
Sinkwich is a graduate of the
University of Georgia.
When the Gator sophomore
attempts to break the 23 TD
mark it will be against Parillis
alma mater, Kentucky.
Reaves now has 22
touchdown passes.
* *
Carlos Alvarez* closest
competition in the 1969 SEC
pass receiving race gained a little
on him last week as the Bulldogs
held him to three catches for 28
yards.
Runnerup Sammy Milner of
Mississippi State caught six for
94 yards at Auburn and
third-place Floyd Franks of Ole
Miss handled seven for 101
yards.
The Cuban comet is still far
ahead, however, on 63 catches
for 987 yards and 10
touchdowns. Milner has 50 for
584 yards and five TDs.
Alvarez is only one
touchdown reception short of
breaking A1 Brunos record of 10
set in 1950.
Bruno is also a graduate of
Kentucky.
A touchdown famine hit the
SEC scoring leaders last week

Harriers Lose Bir
With Knee Injuries

Floridas cross country
chances for a Southeastern
Conference title suffered a real
jolt when freshman sensation
Mark Bir developed a knee
injury and will miss several
weeks of competition.
Bir, a 5-9, 145-pounder from
Lafayette, Ind., was the leading
Gator runner this fall and was
expected to finish near the top
in the Southeastern Conference
meet on Nov. 17.
Marks injury has been a real
blow to our team, said cross
country coach Jimmy Carnes.
We still feel we have a chance
to win the title but it will take a
supreme effort on our part.
Bir had led the Gators to an
undefeated season dropping
Mississippi State, Baptist

r Climb aboard V
The S.S. Windjammer* A
i Meals served from 11:00 AM to £Aj
Midnight J
V Bernie Sher ((
| at the Organ on Thursday. Friday & Saturday U
) Oysters & clams on the half shell w
Michelob on draft v
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty J
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager V
_ 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. 1 1
Reservations Accepted l\\

F=PRESS BOX=
SAM PEPPER
L ~ SPORTS EDITORS

and of the first twelve only Ole
Miss quarterback Archie
Manning made one.
The six-pointer moved
Manning into the runnerup spot
next to the Gators* season-long
leader Tommy Durrance, who
has 80 points.
Alvarez is in fourth place with
64 points.
* *
In a recent issue of Sports
Illustrated, Reaves has been
listed as a possible contender for
the Heisman Trophy. The
magazine states that If John
Reaves were a senior or even a
junior the Gators quarterback
might weU be the favorite but he
is a sophomore and no
sophomore has ever won.
Reaves has taken a team that
was regarded as a swamp and
Joe Auers Run
MIAMI, Fla. In the first
American Football League game
played by the Miami Dolphins,
Joe Auer ran the opening
kickoff back 95 yards for a
touchdown against the Oakland
Raiders. The Raiders recovered,
however, and spoiled the
Dolphins debut with a 2314
win to start the 1966 season.

College, Georgia Tech, South
Florida and Florida State in dual
meets and winning top honors at
the Daytona Beach Run, Atlanta
Run, Callawya Gardens Inv., and
the NCAA Regional.
Carnes will take a seven man
squad to the SEC meet that will
be held next Monday in
Birmingham, Ala. The runners
include John Parker from
Orlando, A.W. Smith from
Tenillis, Ga., Benny Vaughn
from Columbus, Ga., Jack Nason
from Orlando, Don Laene
from Fort Lauderdale, Ronnie
Nabors from Gainesville and
Steve Atkinson from Columbus,
Ga.
F ollowing the SEC meet
Florida will host the Florida
Intercollegiate meet in
Gainesville on Nov. 22.

turned it into a mountain,
Sports Illustrated Writer Dan
Perkins continued.
Although it is unlikely he will
win the trophy, he is almost
certain to place high in the
voting.
Auto Rally
Set For Sunday
The Hart Rallye* Team will
sponsor a Jeopardy Auto Fun
Rally Sunday, for the beginning
rally enthusiast.
There will be three legs to the
120 mile three hour fun rally.
The rally clues are take-offs
from the television show
Jeopardy, where answers are
given and you have to supply the
right question.
A spokesman from the team
said the course is a very simple
one, so no one will get lost. The
rally gets started at 1 p.m., with
registration at 12 p.m. at the
Commercial Bank of Ganiesville
on 1717 NW 13th Street.
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... leads SEC in points scored
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Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 14,1969

HUMOR
All-Cuban
For Chico?
BY ALBERT
Once again, the Florida Alligator takes you into the depths of the
stadium, where we have managed to tap the phone of Gridiron U
coach Croca Ray Grieves.
This week, ace sports publicity director Norm Crazy Legs Carlsin
has a new brainstorm an All Cuban award for Chico Alvarays.
Riiinnnnggggg!
Croca Ray Grieves here, the only man in the world who could
take one look at Chico Alvarays and see he was a natural All-American.
Yes?*
Knock it off Grieves. This is Carlsin, your ace PR man who youre
gonna give a fat salary increase to after you hear my latest idea.
Yeah, Crazy. Hit me with it. You gonna retire ace sophomore
superstar John Raves jersey again? Huh? Last game, you wanted him
to walk out in his training towel, and that wasnt nice.
Naw, Ray, nothing like that this week.
OK, then, Crazy, sock it to me.
Right, Croca. Chicos going to make All-American, right?
Hed better, or hell be living on black beans and rice for the rest
of his stay at Gridiron U.
OK. Hell get All-American. But... get this ... hes also going to
get All-Cuban.
Hes going to get all what?
All-Cuban. You see, Chicos the only Cuban player in top college
ball today, right?
I got that much.
OK. That means Alvarays can get not only end, but quarterback,
halfback, center, tackle, and all the defensive positions too.
You hitting the bottle or something?
Naw, Ray. All you gotta do is vote for him in all positions. Theres
no competition.
And whos going to organize this?
Me. I got the forms all ready. Chico will win in a landslide. This
oughta get him the Hiesman next year with no sweat.
But I thought Raves was already getting that.
You leave it to me, Grieves. 1 got this all worked out.
All-American, All-Cuban. Heisman.
What about Raves?
Well work that out later. First you go and get a trophy case with
Chicos name on it...
But last week you had me get one with Raves name on it.
Well get another one. This is really going to be great. Hoo boy.
All-Cuban. Only I could think of that.
Hey Norm?
Yeah Ray?
Just for once, forget the whole thing.
I guess you dont like the idea.
You guessed it.
Gee, Coach, then how about starting a rumor that the whole gator
team was killed in a plane crash two weeks ago. We can start all kinds
of things, like having the team put their helmets on backwards, and
walking out of step ...
ACCENT 70
GYLAN KAIN
And Evening Os Black
Poetry, Music and Song
Reitz Union Ballroom
Nov. 16th . 7:30 P.M.
Adm. SI.OO

r ~* M t '% , l > H < 'v > - > ? -< c -- H

| Faculty-Alumnus Handball I
ROHAN

FACULTY HANDBALL
All faculty are invited to grab
themselves an alumnus to
compete in the Faculty-Alumni
Handball Doubles Tournament.
Matches will be played to the
best two out of three 21 point
games in single elimination.
Plaques are to be awarded to the
first place winner and medals to
the second and third place
teams.
All entries should send their
names and phone numbers to
Bill Benz c/o Room 134 Fla.
Gym or call 392-0581.
Entries must be in by Nov.
17. Officials will notify
participants of who their
opponents are and games must
be arranged between the
opponents or both teams will
forfeit.
ORANGE FOOTBALL
SAE won its second straight
game Wednesday coming from
behind to edge AEPi 20-21. Tau
Epsilon Phi mustered up three
first half TDs in a winning
effort as Larry Newman made
several fine catches in a 25-19
win over Sigma Nu.
Billy Parker led the Lambda
Chis to another win, 24-13 over
Delta Tau Delta, and opened the
door to a possible bracket title if

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the Lambda Chis can edge the Pi
Lams. Should the Pi Lams win
that game, the bracket would be
forced into a three way tie.
Pi Lam in the meantime lost
to the Betas 20-18 as two extra
points made the crucial
difference. It was an offensive
battle all the way as the teams
combined to set a record 20 first
downs.
Delta Chi and FIJI continued
to feel the sting of playing top
notch competition as both teams
lost to traditional Orange league
powers. Delta Chi fell 20-6 to
SPE as Mike Hawley paced the

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Mascaps
One of the newest attractions
to hit major U.S. college
campuses has been Continental
Plastics invention of the
mascap (a mascot cap).
The Florida Gator mascap
features the Gator mascot and
colors. The caps are waterproof
and made of vinyl plastic.
The Gator cap was the first
design in the Sarasota firms
collection of caps.

SPE attack. Phi Tau ran over
FIJI 19-7.
Pi Kappa Alpha held Sigma
Chi on the Pike 4 yard line as
time ran out in the game and
they nudged the Sigma Chis
12- The Pikes, a preseason
favorite to make good in
football may well be on their
way to a bracket championship
in one of the strongest brackets.
ATO meanwhile turned the
tables on Phi Delt winning a
13- tie by recording eight first
downs to the Phi Delts two. The
ATOs lost their first game to the
Pikes on first downs.



MEETS OHIO STATE
Purdue Looking For Upset

COLUMBUS, OHIO (UPI)
It figures to be quite an
offensive Donnybrook Saturday
when no. 1 ranked Ohio State
and once -beaten Purdue collide
before 86,000-plus at Ohio
Stadium and a national viewing
audience of 13-million.
The Buckeyes, riding the
nations longest unbroken
winning streak at 21, and
Purdue, riding the passing arm of
Mike Phipps, have combined for
more than 7,000 total yards and
625 points.
Ohio State, a solid
two-touchdown favorite, has
amassed 2,224 yards rushing and
1,406 more through the air for
3,630 total yards.
Purdues offensive has been
just as productive.
The Boilermakers have piled
up 3,638 yards 2,216 passing
and 1,422 more rushing.
Phipps, the Boilermakers*
senior quarterback, leads the
nation in total offense with
2,086 yards passing on 139
completions in 247 attempts and
18 touchdowns, and 238 more
yards rushing.
Purdues Stan Brown has been
a multiple threat, catching 30
passes for 641 yards and four
touchdowns, gaining 156 more
yards rushing, scoring 15
touchdowns and averaging 27.2
yards on 18 kickoff returns.
Ohio State junior quarterback
Rex Kem has combined his
passing and scrambling talents
for 1,283 yards and 14
touchdowns.
Kem has completed S 6 of 105
attempts for 810 yards and
seven TDs, and added 473 yards
rushing and seven tallies on 77
"We know that the Gators have
what it takes to win tomorrow
a great team and a great bunch
of students behind them.'
BAR-B-Q
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FORESTS CANT
FIGHT FIRES

,TTviiil%
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m
V
attempts.
Jim Otis, the Buckeyes* senior
fullback, has averaged 25 carries,
116 yards and almost two
touchdowns a game. That adds
up to 814 yards in 176 thrusts.
Ohio State is the nations top
point-producer, averaging 47.7
points in seven games with
decisions over Texas Christian
(62-0), Washington (41-14),
Michigan State (54-21),
Minnesota (34-7), Illinois (41-0),
Northwestern (35-6) and
Wisconsin (62-7).
Once-beaten Purdue has

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SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A. M. TIL 9:30 P. M

accounted for 296 points, with
only a 31-20 loss, Michigan
marring an otherwise perfect
season.
The Boilermakers bypassed
Texas Christian (42-25), Notre
Dame (23-14), Stanford (36-35),
lowa (35-31), Northwestern
(45-20), Illinois (49-22) and
Michigan State (41-13).
Ohio State has been installed
a 17-point favorite on the basis
of its defense which has allowed
just 56 points in 420 minutes of
combat.
Purdues defense, on the other
hand, is yielding 25 points a
game. However, the offense is
picking up the slack.
Last year, Purdue was ranked
a two-touchdown pick when the
teams met here in the third game
of the season. However, Ohio
stunned the then no. 1
Boilermakers, 13-0, and used the
upset as a springboard to the
national title.
Now the roles are reversed.

[WHEEISPIN :;MWWww<;iii!!:s8io8o:
Fuelers Return
HN SIEBENTHALER*** i
Gainesville Dragway has switched back to Saturday night racing, so
those who have never seen a AA fueler exhaling four foot flames will
have another chance.
Tomorrow night, eliminations begin at 8 pjn. Gates open at 4:30
for time trials, which run until 7:30. Both Satan's Shaker** cars wfll
be running.
* *
Results are in from the Baja Run*, which took place Nov. 1 and ran
from Ensenada to La Paz, Mexico, a distance 0f833 miles.
The big bucks** Ford team finally won, after several years of
trying, as Larry Minor and Rod Hall highballed their
Holman-Moody-Stroppe prepped Bronco the distance in 20.48:10.
The victory was a hoDow one, however, as two other Ford team
drivers died when their Bronco crashed.
The first bike in was the new 500 Husqvama TC twin, ridden by
Gene Nilson and J. N. Roberts. They finished fifth overall, 47 minutes
behing the winning Bronco.
v !; ; **
In the first motocross of this years InterAm series, held at
Peppeiell, Mass., Arne Kring won on a 405 Husqvama, establishing the
Swedish bike as the one to beat.
in the third and fourth rounds, held at Copetown, Ontario, and
Elkhom, Wise., the Huskys again came out on top.
In interAm competition, top European riders are factory sponsored
in order to compete in a series of 13 races which starts at Pepperell
and winds up in Saddleback Park, Calif.
Motocross racing is perhaps the most exciting type of competition
involving man and machine. ABC has filmed the Pepperell race for it*s
Wide World of Sports, so watch for it.

Friday, November 14,1*09, Tha Florida ANifator, I

Gator
Tote-a-Seat
3.99
Follow the Gators in
comfort! Sturdy stadium
seat features 2* foam
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See all the action
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Page 23



Page 24

f. The Florida Alligator, FrtfTaV.lVovWmber 14, T 989

Rosters For Gator Wildcat Clash

5 Jack Eckdahl QB
6 Terry Ash KS
7 John Reaves < QB
8 Richard Franco KS
9 John Schneble QB
16TomKennell QB
20 Guy McTheny TE
21 Bruce Gunter FL
22 Steve Tannen DCB
23 Larry Williamson KS
24 Jerry Vinesett TB
26 Skip Albury SAF
28 Doug Sorensen SAF
39 Paul Maliska SE
31 Andy Cheney FL
32 Charles Hood TB
33 Tommy Durrance TB
35 Bill Langley KS
36 Jack Bums SAF
37 Hunter Bowen KS
38 Harvia Clark DCB
40 Mkie Rich FB
42 Garry Walker FB
43 Gary Kadric FB
44 Ted Hager DCB
45 Carlos Alvarez FL
46 Jimmy Barr SAF
47 Mike Palahach LB
48 Gary Petersen LB
49 Jim Kelly LB
50 Mike Kelley LB

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51 Brad Powell LB
52 Len Fuller LB
53 Kim Helton C
54 Eric Taggart LB
55 Richard Kensler C
56 Nick Sinardi C
57 Tom Abdelnour LB
59 Bruce Cutright LB
60 Donny Williams OG
61 Gene Conrad OG
62 Mac Steen OT
64 Gunnar Paulson DT
65 Robbie Rebol DT
66 Randy Warbritton OT
67 Rocky Robinson OT
69 Dale Hutcherson OT
70 Danny Williams DT
71 David Peek OT
72 Fred Abbott OT
73 Mike Field DT
74 Jack Youngblood DT
75 Tom Condon OT
76 Jim Kiley OT
77 Robert Harrell DE
78 Skip Amelung OG
79 Wayne Griffith OT
81 Britt Skrivanek DE
82 David Ghesquiere LB
84 Bill Dowdy TE
85 Bob Coleman DE
88 Rich Buchanan DT

f jjK 1
Ijkf .w *# *4v
\.}f '^H;
'PP

The Harmon Football Forecast

TOP 20 TEAMS

1 OHIO STATE 7AUBURN
2 TEXAS 6L.S.U.
3 TENNESSEE BMISSOURI
4 ARKANSAS 9-U.C.L.A.
5 NOTRE DAME 10 PENN STATE
Saturday, Nov. 15Major Colleges

Alabama 22
Arizona State 33
Arkansas 24
Army 17
Auburn 26
Boston College 30
Brigham Youhg 17
California 35
Citadel 28
Clemson 23
Colgate 27
Colorado 26
Colorado State 31
Dartmouth 31
Davidson 30
Florida 30
Harvard 22
Houston 28
Indiana 23
Kansas State 17
L.S.U. 24
Louisville 21
Marshall 20
Memphis State 25
Miami (Ohio) 26
Michigan 34
Michigan State 21
Missouri 34
North Texas 24
Notre Dame 30
Ohio State 31
Ohio U 24
Oklahoma 21
Oregon State 28
Pennsylvania 20
Penn State 38
Princeton 28
Quantico Marines 22
San Diego State 40
South Carolina 28
Southern California 34
Stanford 24
Syracuse 37
Tennessee 28
Texas 38
Texas A & M 22
Texas Tech 20
Toieao 30
Tulane 21
U. 37
Utah 31
Villanova 30
V. 29
West Texas 22
West Virginia 25
Western Michigan 22
Wisconsin 27
Wvoming 31

Other Games South and Southwest

Abilene Christian 21
Appalachian 28
Arkansas State 24
Carson-Newman 27
Catawba 19
Delta State 20
East Tennessee 21
East Texas 24
Eastern Kentucky 28
Fairmont 29
Glenville 23
Harding 20
Henderson 14
Lenoir-Rhyne 27
Livingston 20
Louisiana Tech 24
Martin 22
Maryville 20
Mississippi College 22
Morehead 27
Northwood, Mich. 26
Ouachita 21
S F Austin 23
Salem 20
SE Louisiana 17
Sul Ross 21
Tampa 28
Tennessee Tech 26
Texas A & I 24
Texas Lutheran 35
Texas Southern 34
Troy State 27
Western Carolina 34

4 Steve Tingle QB
5 Stan Forston QB
7 Hugh Bland QB
8 Bernie Scruggs QB
9 A1 Borne S
11 Paul Karem S
12 Tom Domhoff HB
15 Bob Jones PK
17 Paul Martin DB
18 Joe Stephan DB
19 Dave Van Meter DB
20 David Hunter DB
22 AI Goodwin DB
24 Tom Duffy DB
27 Steve Scott LH
28 Steve Parrish SE
29 Jack Mathews DB
30 Bill Duke FB
31 Phil Foijan DB
35 Raynard Makin FB
36 Cary Shahid LB
38 Bob Wixson ROB
39 Frank Rucks LIB
40 Joe Jacobs RH
41 Wilbur Hackett ROB
42 Houston Hogg LH 1
44 Dick Beard LH 1
45 David Sullivan RIB
47 Roger Gann LH 1
49 Gayle Goins LB
52 Dan Neal DT
53 Winston Gaffron C S

(Forecasting Average: 1238 right, 407 wrong, 40 ties 753)

Miami,* Fla. 17
El Paso 7
S.M.U. 6
Pittsburgh' 14
Georgia 17
V.M.I. 7
Utah State 7
San Jose State 12
Furman 0
North Carolina 21
Lafayette 19
Oklahoma State 24
Idaho 7
Cornell 7
Wofford 20
Kentucky 6
Brown 7
No. Carolina State 22
Northwestern 14
Nebraska 15
Mississippi State 0
Wichita 17
East Carolina 17
Florida State 22
Kent State 10
lowa 14
Minnesota 20
lowa State 10
Tulsa 7
Georgia Tech 7
Purdue 17
Cincinnati 10
Kansas 12
Washington State 7
Columbia 16
Maryland 6
Yale 24
Xavier 13
New Mexico State 14
Wake Forest 12
Washington 7
Air Force 14
Navy 14
Mississippi 14
T.C.U. 13
Rice 14
Baylor 7
Dayton 15
Virginia 10
Oregon 7
Arizona 15
William & Mary 14
Duke 20
Bowling Green 21
Richmond 7
Northern Illinois 7
Illinois 21
New Mexico 6

Trinity 6
Samford 16
Arlington 17
Presbyterian 15
Guilford 7
NE Louisiana' 17
Middle Tennessee 6
Southwest Texas 13
Indiana State 20
Eastern Illinois 6
Shepherd 6
Arkansas Tech 14
Arkansas State 7
Eton 14
Jacksonville 10
Lamar Tech 0
Florence 21
Southwestern, Tenn. 7
Arkansas A & M 10
Kentucky State 0
Concord 7
Southern State 14
McMurry 7
West Va. State 6
McNeese 16
Howard Payne 17
Northern Michigan 7
Austin Peay 22
Sam Houston 14
Northwood. Texas 6
Arkansas AM & N 13
Chattanooga 7
Newberry 0

KENTUCKY

11 SOUTHERN CAL
12 MICHIGAN
13 GEORGIA
14 FLORIDA
15 STANFORD

A second straight undefeated season and
another Big Ten championship are just two games
away for Ohio State, back in the nation's top slot
this week. However, the opposition will be its two
strongest challengers, Purdue and Michigan. The
16th-ranked Boilermakers fact the Buckeyes this
week in what is also a door-die game for Purdue as
far as the Rose Bowl is concerned. Having already
lost to Michigan, the Riveters must win. The
difference in power quotients, however, gives Ohio
State the edge by 14 points.
3rd-rated Tennessee runs into what should be its
last major hurdle between an undefeated season
and the championship of the Southeastern
Conference. Their big test is ol' upsetter itself,
19th-ranked Mississippi. The Rebels have surprised
Georgia and L.S.U. (they've been surprised three
times themselves!), and would like to add the
Volunteers to their list. Again, though, it should
be Tennessee... the spread is 14 points.
That two-some at the top of the Big 8
Conference may shrink to one this Saturday as
17th-ranked Kansas State hosts 18th-ranked
Nebraska. It looks as though the K-Staters will
knock the Comhuskers out of the tie with
Missouri... Kansas State by just two.
9th-ranked U.C.L.A. and 11th-ranked Southern
Cal have just one warm-up game remaining before
their major confrontation on November 22nd. The
Udans will shell Oregon Saturday by thrity points,
and the Trojans will blast Washington by 27.
Two other powers that are propping for a major
battle at a late date (December 6th) are Texas, no.
2, and Arkansas, no. 4. Both are undefeated and
tied for the top spot in the Southwestern
Conference... both will continue to win. The
Razorbacks will beat S.M.U. by 18 points, and the
Longhorns will bounce T.C.U. by Twenty-five.
Another outstanding scrap involving two
members of our top 20 is the clash between
7th-reted Auburn and 13th-ranked Georgia. Each
of these powers has lost two games, but they
retain national ranking. Georgia will absorb loss
no. 3 as Auburn wins it by nine.
10th-ranked Penn State, with a certain bowl bid
in its vest pocket, will defeat Maryland by 32.
Notre Dame, no. 5, goes South for a visit and will
up-end Georgia Tech by 23.
Back in the Big 8, the Missouri Tigers, Bth in the
country and tied for Ist in the conference, will be
too tough for lowa State, winning by 24.
6th-ranked L.S.U. will barge by Mississippi State
by 24, while Michigan, no. 12, will try to forget
about Ohio State next week and concentrate on
lowa. The Wolverinesjwill win by 20 points.

54 Pat Eckenrod C
55 Tom Morris OT
56 Don Holland LIB
57 Marty Yerdon OG
58 Dave Hanson OG
59 Joe Federspiel RIB
60 Roddy Wolfe C
62 Rick Muench LOB
63 Steve Koon LB
64 Jerry Bentley OG
65 Rick Deason LOB
67 Fred Conger OG
69 Bill Bushong DT
70 Al Fish OG
71 Jack Brown DT
72 Dave Pursell QT
73 Bruce Sauerbry OT
74 David Roller DE
75 David Markem DT
76 Dave Hardt OT
77 Mike Boulware OT
79 Dan Featherston OT
80 Phil Thompson SE
81 Vic King TE
83 Dave Bair RH
84 Tom Crowe TE
85 Jim Mitchell TE
86 Jim Grant SE
88 Roger Greer DE
90 Bob Finnell DE
92 Don Porterfield DE
93 Doyle King DT

16 PURDUE
17 KANSAS STATE
18 NEBRASKA
19 MISSISSIPPI
20 FORCE