Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Veterans Day Program
Receives Positive Reaction

By BILL EVANS
Alligator Correspondent
UFs second Veterans Club-sponsored Veterans
Day program met with a positive reaction Tuesday
as approximately 350 students and Gainesville
residents turned out at the Plaza of the Americas to
hear featured speaker Billy Mathews and pay tribute
to the men in uniform.
The program was a huge success as far as Im
concerned, said program chairman Jim Hollis.
The people who attended the program were there
because they were concerned and interested.
The events began with an invocation by Father
Michael Gannon. Gannon set the mood for the
entire Veterans Day program by stressing the need
for peace and the role of the American veteran.
Lester Hale, vice president for student affairs,
then introduced Mathews, a former Congressman,
who now teaches Political Science at Santa Fe
Junior College.

State Paid
Students Must
Sian Oaths

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
All students paid with state funds will now be
required to sign loyalty oaths.
In the past, students who worked directly for
the university have had to sign the oath.
However, beginning with the next pay period,
those people in student publications and student
government who receive salaries will also be
required to sign the oaths.
This will include the president of the student
body, vice president, treasurer and chancellor of
the honor court.
Students will be paid for the two-weeks which
ends Nov. 14. However, if they expect to be paid
for the next two-week period, they will have to
sign the oaths before that time.
Students who receive loans for their education
may also be required to sign because, in many

Mathews opening remarks described the
background of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam and
emphasized how important it is to support the
Presidents decisions on foreign policy, no matter
how unpopular they may be.
He then turned to the morale problem of
Americans today and the divisive forces which are
worsening the problem and said:
But we are not here today to talk about what
divides us, but to talk about what unites us, and
that is the grateful appreciation to the veterans of
this country and to the men in uniform who have
stood for the security of America.
America can not exist as a free nation,
Mathews said, unless we have a goodly number of
people who are willing to give more to this country
than they take away from it.
The program was concluded with a two-minute
pause for silence and the playing of taps in honor of
the war dead.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 40

SHEPHERD DECIDES
Traffic Commission
Dismissal Declined

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President
Gharles Shepherd refused
Tuesday to dismiss the Student
Parking and Transportation
Commission and charged them
with following through the
recommended solutions to the
campus traffic problem.
It is my decision that the
Commission is not dismissed,
Shepherd said in a letter to
commission chairman Harvey
Alper.
He told the Alligator that the
commisson had established too
much monentum to alter it
now.
However, Shepherd is
following the recommendation
to appoint a cabinet officer to
assist the work of the group.
I am accepting the
commission's recommendation
and will ask the Student Senate
to create such a position, the
student president said.
He said turning over the
commissions responsibility to a

cases, at least 10% of their money does come
from the state.
Students on the work-study program as well as
graduate assistants and graduate students will
also be required to sign the oaths.
Rae 0. Weimer, special assistant to UF
President Stephen C OConnell, said if students
are paid with state funds they will have to sign.
Salary checks for these students are signed by
Gov. Glaude R. Kirk and State Comptroller Fred
0. Bud Dicikinson and are considered to be
state funds.
Friday OConnell had given faculty and staff
two weeks in which to sign the oaths if they
wanted to be paid in November. Copies of the
oath were distributed to all deans, directors and
department chairmen Monday.
Students have not yet been issued the oaths
which they must sign.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAifcY

University of Florida, Gainesville

cabinet officer at this point
would be detrimental to the
interests of the student body.
Student Senate President Jack
Vaughn, however, questioned
whether there is a need for a full
time cabinet position to deal
with campus traffic problems.
It seems to me that it would
better come under an already
existing secretariate, perhaps an
undersecretariate of the
interior, Vaughn said.
The commission has been
able to establish working
relationships with the Parking
and Traffic Committee and
other officials in the
administration and the students
involved have developed a
knowledgeable background in
these problems, Shepherd said.
I dont think this experience
should be lost, which it would
be if I dissolved the commission
at this time, he said.
Shepherd said the commission
would probably continue to
operate throughout the
remainder of his administration.
I am not satisfied that the
job is complete, he said.
Alper said the commission
would first go back to Vice
President for Business Affairs
William Elmore to find out the
disposition of the
recommendations made to him
regarding the parking situation.
If we discover that no action
has been taken we are going to
find out why, Alper said. He
also promised to make positive
moves to see that the necessary
so 1 low-throughs are
implemented.

The commission has been able to establish working
relationships with the Parking and Traffic Committee
and other officials in the administration and the
students involved have developed a knowledgeable
background in these problems.
- Charles Shepherd

Wednesday, November 12, 1969

CHARLES SHEPHERD
... accepts resontmendatfon
HMHPBHpr. -;
Jr* jr*
JACK VAUGHN
... poses question
Senate OKs Ballot
The Student Senate Tuesday
night approved the ballot which
will allow students to decide if
they favor a $6 increase in
tuition for the construction of a
University Activities Center.
The special referendum
election on the question of the
Center (Coliseum, Ampitheatre,
Natatdrium and Performing Arts
Auditorium) will be held Nov. 4,
1970.
THE SEMINOLE may be
discontinued in two or three
years unless student interest
picks up -page 5
Classifieds *5
Small Society 6
Editorials
FSU News 3
Letters 9
Movies 15
Sports I 7
Whats Happening 4



Page 2

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 12,1969

Gainesville Celebrates Armstice Parade

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PETE KNOCKE

Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC), which was
having trouble chartering buses
for the Nov. 15 Moratorium in
Washington, D.C., has solved its
problem.
Kris Loken, member of the
SMC steering committee, said
her group has chartered two
Trailways buses to take 80 SMC
members to Washington, D.C.

ON ACTIVITY FEE HIKE
Student Rejects
Referendum
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Focus Party Independent member Tom Infantino Tuesday
accused administration and student leaders of trying to pull the wool
over the students eyes by endorsing the Feb. 4 referendum on
raising activities fees to help pay for a Student Activities Center.
UF President Stephen C. O'Connell, Student Body President
Charles Shepherd and ODK President Harvey Alper have put the
financial burden on the student, who can least afford to pay,
Infantino said.
The referendum seems to imply that the student who votes no to
paying extra does not want an activities center, but this is not the
case, he said.
Focus Party feels there are pressing needs for student funds in
academic and socio-economic areas on campus.
Thousands of students need financial aid in order to attend
school. Yet National Defense Loans and other programs were
drastically cut this year.
A student tuition rise at this time seems inconsistent with the best
interests of these students, Infantino said.
He also said the black studies program is in need of funds.
We think it is time OConnell and Shepherd stopped shirking their
responsibility and started representing the university and the students
to the legislature.
If they cant do it, the students will, he said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR k the ofckl student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is pubshed semi-weekly, and durii* student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Attgator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The ASgator k entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable
The Florida Alligator wBl not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsflrie for mote than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
V for cpnectjqn mint be given before the next insertion.
* I'dn iii pr 1.. i .livwgrrit i I, i r>T .

SMC Charters Buses

Miss Loken said SMC was
lucky to charter the Trailways
buses at this late a date.
Trailways has been very
cooperative in helping us get the
buses, Miss Loken said.
SMC was denied an earlier
request for five buses from
Greyhound Bus Lines because
none were available. Greyhound
buses had been previously

FIRST TIME IN 43 YEARS

chartered by the Gator football
team, the band, and local high
schools.
Sixty one buses were also
chartered for the Apollo 12
Moon shot on Nov. 14, making
it difficult for SMC to charter
any from Greyhound, even
though SMC had made a deposit
on Nov. 6.
Miss Loken said the buses will
be leaving the Plaza of the
Americas at 7 p.m. Thursday.
MINI-POSTER
*
You Pont have
T 9 BE JEWISH
TOOeWSS£P4T6fAIttOS

seminole
senior pictures
6-9 pT NOV. 17-20
;-k.
Sign up in Seminole office
or coll 392-1687 12 Dm-spm
- £

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
It was to have been a war to end ah wars.
And every year since Nov. 11, 1918 Americans
have celebrated Armistice Day with parades,
flowery speeches and memorial services.
But somehow Gainesvilles townspeople must
have sensed World War I could not be the last great
conflict, that no war could bring a permanent peace
and a return to normalcy.
Only eight years after the first Armistice Day
Gainesville held its last parade, Nov. 11, 1926. It
took 43 years for the University City to hold
another parade Tuesday complete with marching
bands and speeches.
In between there has been another world war,
countless revolutions, a three-year United Nations
conflict in Korea, and five years of all-out war in
Vietnam.
So much for peace.
The 1926 parade began at 10 a.m., started from
the UF campus, traveled up University Avenue, and
wound-up at the courthouse square.
Tuesdays parade started at the Gainesville
shopping center, and went down Main Street.
Nothing else changed much.
The turnout was small. The crowd was comprised
of senior citizens and middle aged residents. Young
people were noticeably absent. Armistice Day, now
called Veterans Day, is no longer a holiday except
for federal employes.
Leading the 1926 parade was the Gator Band.
Three bands marched in Tuesdays procession, the
Gainesville, Lincoln and P.K. Yonge High School
groups.
Accompanying them was UFs Billy Mitchell drill
team with ROTC sweethearts.
Speakers at the courthouse gathering included
U.S. Rep. Don Fuqua and retired Adm. H.T.
Deutermann, past commander of the U.S. Second
Fleet.
Fuqua said such programs show the rest of the
world, even those with different ideologies, that we
are stillone United States of America.
Deutermanns speech was more political, and the
admiral took jibes at Americas war demonstrators.
Attempting to divide a nation at home is an age
old war tactic, he said. Opulence smothers
patriotism.
Patriotism should have more champions, the
admiral said. He admonished veterans for seeking
silent shelter from war protests and moratoriums.
The 1926 parade was hailed as perhaps the
greatest attempt to celebrate Armistice Day ever
held in Gainesville.
The city gave tribute to those boys who paid the
full price in the fields of Flanders that oppression
might be kept of a free world.
Tuesdays speeches made few references to
Vietnam specifically. More apparently lacking were
eulogies for war dead.
The program was presented by VFW Post 2811
and American Legion Post 16.
There was no confrontation, no protests, no signs
and no slogans.



Saunders. Student Protesters Uninformed

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Staff Writer
State Senator Bob Saunders, D-Alachua, called student protesters
uninformed and said that it is not logically sound to make policy
in the streets.
Saunders, participating in a debate Mondify night on the effect of
Saturdays planned march on Washington in protest of the Vietnam
war, asked the audience to believe that President Nixon is acting in
their interest. He said that none of us are burdened by the facts of
the war and know all the reasons (for our policies).
The debate, sponsored by Phi Eta Sigma, the freshnam honorary,
reflected the variety of opinions among the seven speakers. Also
participating in the program were- philosophy Prof. Kenneth Megill;
Jim Hollis, ex-president of the UF Veterans Club; Steve Fahrer of
SDS; Methodist minister John Pennington; Ray Morrison, president of
the UF Student Mobilization Committee; and journalism professor
Hugh Cunningham. Harvey Alper, president of Omicron Delta Kappa
mens leadership honorary, moderated the discussion.
About 150 people were at the debate, held in the new Law School
CRAIG Dr. Paul G. Craigs appointment to the post of vice
president for academic affairs culminated the seven-month work of
the 15-member Advisory Council on the Selection of a Vice President
for Academic Affairs.
The committee, made up of administration, faculty and students
was set up by President J. Stanley Marshall last spring when he was
appointed acting president of FSU. Former Vice President for
Academic Affairs Larry Chalmers resigned last fall and the post has
been vacant since then.
MOBE The president of FSU*s Student Mobilization Committee
has accused Student Body President Canter Brown of political
opportunism in his veto of a measure allocating funds to the anti-war
group to finance its trip to Washington this week.
MOBE President Bob Gordon charged Tuesday that within the past
year Brown has signed at least four bills appropriating funds to groups
for political purposes.
BILL Crying Bill Peterson was pessimistic about the chances of
his Fighting Seminoles in this Saturdays encounter with the Memphis
State Tigers. Prognosticator Tom Harmon predicted a 25-23 defeat for
the Noles in their appearance in Doak Campbell Stadium. Going into
the game the Seminoles are 5-1 -1.
DIALOGUE WITH A
THEOLO6UE
'Reforming and Radicalizing
the Jewish Establishment'
speaker
Rabbi Michael Monson
director Hillel Foundation
Wednesday, Nov. 12, 4:00 P.M.
Room 123 J.Wayne Reitz Union
RB ADMISSION t REFRESHMENTS
*> -- Sponsored by 4 Wayne Bette Union-end eligiowAsw. ....... r.

CALLS STREET POLICYMAKING 'UNLOGICAI

Auditorium.
Fahrer countered that he thinks the moratorium is already an
outstanding success.
Megill conceded that protests will not end the war, but that because
of them anti-war movement is moving into the realm of respectable
politics. He added that the question is not whether one is against
the war, everyone is, even the President of the United States: but the
question is what does it mean to be against the war in 1969, and what
will be done about it?
Cunningham theorized that the movement is having a
demorilizing effect on the country. This leaves the U.S. without
the strength it needs at the bargaining table. Its sort of like cheering
for the other side at a ball game.
SMC President Morrison argued that we cant let Nixon and his
gangsters in Washington tell us what to do. There can be other
Vietnams, and will be too, unless we take some action to end these
policies.
The silent majority like myself, replied Rev. Pennington, are
beginning to speak up.,,
'Soil Soil UF Police
Investigate Pignapping
University police are investigating an unusual crime today,
pignapping.
David Rowlands, UF herdsman supervisor called the University
Police Department early Monday and reported one of his pigs was
missing when he made his early morning pig pen poll.
The pig is just the right size to put on a spit with an apple in its
mouth, Rowlands said.
Rowlands explained that he didnt know if the 80 lb. porker was
male or female.
I havent had the time to go thru the other 45 pigs to find out,
he said.
Rowlands said the pig was probably taken by someone but may
have gotten out by itself and could be at large on the UF campus.
Police havent any idea where the animal is but admit it could be
walking around, trying to ham it up with a little publicity.

THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some juat for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
1 o
Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road

214 N.W. 13th St.
376-6472
BRING
COUPON

ED TUES.& WED. ONLYIMMWM|
>inner yyc f
RAY I
R 1 2 5
. m.
(I Vt. '.\ .'1- 4I ? 1 .' .' . I
'BringcouponMMMMMMwl"

SORORITY
WINTER RUSH
SIGN-UP
o
Panhellenic Office
Room 315 Union
Nov. 17-Dec. 15
1-5 pm

Col. Sunder*
fe&ntuctoW

WHaMdayi Newomhw 13,1960, The Florida Alligator, 1

ill
Ho $
I Ts Jj B
BOBSAUNDERS
... "believe in Nixon"
Florida Quarterly:
The thrill of a lifetime
$1.25

Page 3

114 N.W. 34th St.
372-3646
BRING
COUPON



Page 4

eclnifa*gyat*B9

*- * rJ'*- 1 **.V.V.V
. r v . <* 'f. ?! v.** .v' ?*/*>
- pesk
lANtdhl
f

! eiy BRENDA GEVERTZ

REGISTRATION
CONFRONTATION (OR TO
QUOTE ONE FORMER
GATOR GROWL SKIT,
REGISTRATION IS A
CONSTIPATION): Here we
are, one week out of progs and
mid-terms, in the midst of
projects and papers and zap
the registrar sends greetings.-So,
relax. The lines only seem long
(wait til drop and add to see the
big ones) and youll probably
enjoy 80 204 more summer
quarter when you have a choice
of either first or ninth period.
Some cheap advice: Never
accept the Word of an
academic adviser, particularly.if
youre a UC student, unless he
promises, in writing, to pay for
the additional two quarters
youll spend here after he
schedules the wrong courses.
YOU MEAN BELLS AND
BEARDS JN THE AEPI HOUSE
ARENT THE. SAME THING?:
Direct from. the center of
radicalism and Controversy,
Rabbi Monson, local cell-block
coordinator for Hillel, will speak
on Reforming and Radicalizing

WEDNESDAY
CHANGE OF PACE!
v Bonanza Beef Stew ?
a mountainous serving with A*
Zy a slice of Texas toast Y
a Wednesday special at our place something a little
different from our other great offerings of bonanzaburgers,
chicken, .rubin sandwiches, seafood, and of course those great
steaks you always knew we had ...
BONANZA SIBLOIN FIT
'try us for a groat lunch
2445 SW 13lh OPEN 11 AM -9 PM
TAKE OUT 378-0946

the Jewish Establishment. Stale
ham sandwiches wont be
provided by Sprvomation
(such a deal, this is), but the
program does start at 4 p.m.
(more or less) in room 122 Reitz
Union.
SEE, SEE, SEE
CICERONES: See them at all
UF events and at their meeting
on Thursday night at 7:30 in
123 of the Union.
Hes Coming
Back Home
MUSKEGON, Mich. (UPI)
Only 35 days to go, Mom, get
the tuikey ready, Spec. 5 Bo
Grover wrote Mrs. Arnold M.
Westerback in his last letter
home.
But the soldier was killed in
actio Nov. 4, just 16 days
before he was to leave Vietnam.
His body will be escorted
home by his brother, Gordon, a
Navy career man stationed in
Hawaii.

Guest Rooms Booked 1
For Football Weekends
By GLENN CORILLO
Alligator Correspondent
\ Reservations are being taken for football weekends in 1972 for the
I Reitz Union guest rooms.
/ For 1969 Homecoming and most other football weekends,
reservations were gone as of last April, according to Diane Turney, a
Union staff member.
Because the UF-Miami football game is being played in Miami
Thanksgiving weekend, there are still some rooms open, Miss Turney
said.
Bill Woodcock, 4AR, staff member, said members of the Board of
Regents have standing reservations with first preference to rooms on
football weekends.
The Union is not in competition with similar establishments in the
area, but ftels people would come here first as the rooms are
$2-$3 cheaper, Woodcock said.
The price range is from $9 per night for a single to $23 per night
for a suite. There are two floors of guest rooms.
Nancy Clyatt, staff member, said although the hotel is operated as a
convenience for students, faculty and university personnel, it is run
like a business, but all profits go into Union funds.
Steve Crouch, 4PE, staff member, said many people, after seeing
the high quality of the rooms, are disappointed that the televisions
are not color.
Among the known personalities that have stayed at the hotel are
former Chief Justice Earl Warren, sports writer Red Barber, and Gov.
Claude Kirk,

seminole
pictures

Bring a $1.50 sitting lee.
Dress for men is dark coat, dark tie, light shirt.
Dress for women is a dark sweater, i

WEDNESDAY NOV. 12
12-4 JUNIORS (Q THRU T)
4 -5, 6 9 GREEKS (Kappa Sigma,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Mu, Phi Delta
Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi)

FRIDAY NOV. 14
12-5,6-9 SENIORS
CALL 392-1687
Between Noon-sp.m.
FOR APPOINTMENT

ROBBIES
SBest In Steaks^^^
loJk§^ ndwiches
V & BILLIARD^
Fniversity Ave.
i Gold Coast

A H k w
Mr. Roys
I STYLE & BARBERSHOF
I
Haircuts from S2.QO UP.
Wa Specialize in Long hair.
I Appointments Available.
I Four Barbers to serve you.
| lI2SW.UNIV.AVE. 372 3678

THURSDAY NOV. 13
12-4 JUNIORS (U THRU Z)
4 -5, 6- 9 GREEKS (Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Kappa, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi
Kappa Phi, TKE)



Seminole
May Be
Discontinued
v. A.-.-.,-: 'i,!.. £ s*

OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
African Humanities Offered

By CARON BALKANY
Alligator Correspondent
A course in African
Humanities will be offered again
next quarter at UF.
CHN 254, Section 0635, The
African Humanities, is taught by
Dr. Didier Graeffe of the
University College humanities
department.
The African Humanities
course is open to all students,
including juniors, seniors, and
those who have already taken
CHN 254, The Non-Westem
Humanities. It will be a
five-credit course. Students will
register for four hours of class
time, and one hour of lecture,
but will not be required to
attend the lecture.
This will not fulfill the
Humanities requirement of
University College but may be
taken as an elective on the
pass-fail system.
Ten per cent of America is
of African origin, yet nothing in
the past has been done that
corresponds to our constant
pre -occupation with our
European heritage, Graeffe
said. It is important that we
find out something about our
African heritage as well. I stress
the our because all of America
has an African as well as a
European and American
heritage.
CHN 254 is not a study of
Afro-American culture, but of
the African humanities itself. It
will include African literature,
mostly contemporary, and
African art, music and religion.
Students will also read bodes
about Africa and the African
culture.
There will be a student
project. Students will try to
create the particular

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Alligator Correapondent
Hie Seminole may be discontinued in two or three years
unless student interest picks up, Seminole Editor Ken Driggs
said.
Seminole sales have decreased for the past three years while
the size of the student body has increased, Driggs noted in
support of his prediction.
Last year approximately 3,200 copies were sold to a student
body of almost 20,000, he said.
That year the Seminole sold for $5 and cost sl2 to publish.
This year it will sell for $6 and cost about $ 14 to publish.
The annually increasing cost of publishing the yearbook,
coupled with an apparent lack of student desire for it, may
prove fatal sooner than most UF students realize, Drigg? said.
1969-70 may be the crucial year, he feels.
In an attempt to avoid the publications discontinuance,
Driggs says he is trying to improve the Seminoles format and

psychological atmosphere under
which African art arose,
Graeffe said.
The African artist does not
say, as do other artists, Here is a
piece of wood. I will make a pair
of eyes out of it.' The African
artist says Here is a piece of
wood. I can feel that it wants to
become a pair of eyes.'
African art is therefore an
art of the imagination. It will be
easy for my students to learn
how to create this armosphere of
imagination.
The class will read Tutuolas
The Palm Drinkird, a
contemporary novel written in
West-African English. Graeffe
describes the language as
ungrammatical but completely
comprehensible. Rather like
what the English man might
think of the language spoken by
todays college student.
They will also read
Sunbiata, an African epic
comparable to the Greek
Iliadanthologies of African
poetry and prose and other
African literature. Graeffe will
discuss the many African
artifacts he has personally
collected as well as the
photographic studies he has
made of blacks.
Graeffe does not expect the
majority of his class to be black.
I am dismayed that I have not
yet had a single black in one of
my classes. I am hoping for some
in this class. Black Americans in
the past have found it difficult
to develop racial pride that
extends to racial heritage. They
are starting to do this gradually
today.
Graeffe has spent months
among the Nigerian and
Cameroon tribes of Africa,
researching African music and
musicology. He has also worked

in the Upward Bound project,
teaching African performing arts
to blacks. He is noted around
campus for his yearly
Happenings and his
humanities lectures on art and
music.
Student Vets
About 23,519,000 wartime
veterans qualify for benefits,
says the Veterans
Administration.
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contents as well as its income.
I feel the yean a person spends at college are his most
important years, the period that determines the course of the
rest of his life. I want to capture that in this yearbook,** Drifts
said. r
Specifically, a newspaper approach is being adopted.
Hopefully this will prove more responsive to the student's
needs by including all those events that affected him during this
period, Driggs said.
The 1969-70 Seminoles contents will range from coverage of
obvious campus activities such as orgpnizations like Samson and
experiences like finals tension to relevant events in the local
community and the nation.
In addition, the material will be arranged chronologically by
the signs of the zodiac instead of activity grouping as in the
past, Driggs said.
A new junior section will be added to improve finances. A
$1.50 sitting fee is charged.

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V. _ r* i

Page 5



Page 6

W|ne*Jav,jyqyember 12* 1969

j- jj- -wafts**.. --.-s
Astronauts Ta seOtf
Rigorous Training
CAPE KENNEDY (UPI) Apollo 12s astronauts eased off their
rigorous training schedule Tuesday and got a go-ahead from
weathermen for their Friday blastoff to the moon.
Mission Commander Charles Pete Conrad, Richard F. Gordon
and Alan L. Bean spent much of the day relaxing in their quarters and
reviewing flight plans for their journey.
The space fliers were confident they are ready for the risky 10-day
mission.
Weve been ready to go for a long time, Gordon said recently.
I think were well enough trained. If the hardware holds together
and we dont have too many problems, I think well be able to do the
job.
At the oceanside launch pad where the 36-story combination of the
Saturn 5 r rocket and the spacecraft was poised in its service tower,
ground crews had a 16-hour rest period before activating the
spacecraft fuel cell batteries early Wednesday, a critical step in
pre-launch preparations.
Courad, Bean and Gordon are scheduled to blastoff at 11:22 a.m.
EST Friday on Americas second moon landing mission, which Conrad
calls the opener of the next generation.
Weathermen forecast satisfactory conditions at launch time despite a
cold front expected to move through Central Florida Thursday. The
prediction is f or partly cloudy skies, moderate northerly winds and a
temperature of around 60 degrees.
Mission plans call for their second orbit to fire the Saturns third
stage engine a second time to put them on course to the moon.
Conrad, the 39-year-old veteran of two Gemini spaceflights, and
Bean the youngest of the trio at 37 should land on the moon in
the middle of the night, at 1:53 a.m. EST Nov. 19, for a 32-hour stay
that will include two walks on the lunar surface.
They head home Nov. 21 for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean
Nov. 24.
158 American Airmen
Held Laos Prisoners

VIENTIANE, Laos (UPI)
An official of the Communist
Pathet Lao organization said
Tuesday more than 158
American airmen are being held
captive in Laos and repeated a
threat that they will be tried as
Black Candidate
Up For Queen
In Ala. Election
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (UPI)
Students will vote Wednesday to
determine if the first Negro girl
ever to be a finalist for
Homecoming queen at the
University of Alabama will be
selected for the honor.
Dianne Kiiksy of Eutaw was
one of three selected by a panel
of judges as finalists. The other
are Sue Shimoda of Dothan and
Karen Parvin of Birmingham.
Among judges in the contest
was former Gov. James E.
Folsom, a candidate for a third
term next spring.
Alabama meets Miami in the
Homecoming football game
Saturday.

NOTICE
ALL SORORITY
PLEDGES
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Wed. Nite Nov. 12
Union Ballroom
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criminals.
The official, Soth Petrasi,
displayed a list of the Americans
and said it included 51 whose
planes were shot down over Laos
last year and 41 who were
captured between January and
June of this year.
The United States and Laos
have never formally declared war
and therefore there will be no
prisoners, Soth told newsmen.
They will be tried by a Laotian
peoples court as criminals.
The threat of trials has been
raised several times by the
Pathet Lao, but there has never
been any information on
whether such trials are actually
held or if the threat is merely a
propaganda move.
For the first time, however,
Soth said Tuesday he would try
to forward letters arid telegrams
sent him by the relatives of the
captured Americans.
He has previously rejected all
such requests.
The list Soth displayed
Tuesday is one which originates
from American sources and is
forwarded to him periodically
by the International Red Cross.

the woll ociety Brick won
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HEAVIEST BOMBING IN 2 WEEKS
U.S. Bombs Nam In Raid Series

SAIGON (UPI) US. Air
Force 852 jets bombed targets
from one end of South Vietnam
to the other in a 24-hour series
of raids reported Tuesday by
American headquarters.
Some of the raids, heaviest in
two weeks, centered on jungles
near the beleaguered Bu Dop
Green Beret camp.
Two more American
helicopters were shot down by
North Vietnamese gunners
pressing a winter campaign.
U.S. spokesmen said the 852
Stratofortresses unloaded tons
of bombs on targets ranging
from An Xuyen Province in
southernmost Vietnam through
the provinces around Saigon to
the area just below the
Demilitarized Zone.
Two missions were flown

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against North Vietnamese
staging areas in Phuoc Long
Province near the Cambodian
border northwest of Saigon
where Bu Dop and other Green
Beret outposts have been under
pressure for the past two weeks.
Bombs from the eight-engine
jets fell near artillery base
Jerry, an outpost manned by
troops of- the UJS. Ist Air
Calvary Division which came
under attack early Tuesday from

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North Vietnamese forces in an
assault that killed five Americans
and wounded five.
The outpost is about five
miles from the Bu Dop camp
and an equal distance from the
Cambodian border.
One of the helicopters
reported lost Tuesday was shot
down about 85 miles north of
Saigon, wounding two
Americans aboard. The other fell
about 51 miles northeast of
Saigon and its two crewmen
were also hurt.
Communist gunners early
Tuesday fired about 10 122 mm
rockets into the U.S. Army
headquarters base at Long Binh
18 miles northeast of Saigon,
but no American casualties were
reported and damage was
described as light.



UNHARMED HOSTAGES RELFAXFI^- 9 ** 0 llDm! sH
Deputies Capture Bank Bandit

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (UPI) A bank bandit
who fled with two hostages was captured Tuesday
by two deputies posing as a motel bartender and a
cocktail lounge customer.
The gunman was seized shortly after he held up a
branch of the Merchants Bank & Trust Co. and fled
with branch manager and vice president as hostage.
Police tracked him to the Holiday Inn South on
Indianapolis South Side.
Witnesses saw him walking into the motel behind
two persons whose hands were above their heads.
State, county, and city police converged on the
motel, seeking ways to flush the bandit without
harming the hostages.
As part of their strategy, Sgt. David Wahrlach of
the sheriffs department donned a red jacket and
took up a post behind the bar in the motel lounge.
Another deputy, Detective Sgt. Kenny Gladson, sat
at a nearby table.
The deputies said the gunman entered and
Wahrlach served him. When the opportunity came,

Nixon, Wife Visit War Patients
In Veterans Day Observations

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President and Mrs. Nixon
observed Veterans Day Tuesday
by spending an hour chatting
and joking with patients at the
District of Columbia Veterans
Hospital.
The President was one of
about 500 prominent Americans
who took part in a Very
Important Patients program
which he said was intended to
let them know that the
nation has not forgotten their
service and sacrifices.
At the hospital in far
northeast Washington, Nixon
and the First Lady toured wards
separately, exchanging greetings
and light-hearted banter with
those they met, including Gen
Seaman, a veteran of the

Huge Veterans Demonstrations
Support Nixon f s Vietnam Policy

By United Press International
Americans observed Veterans
Day Tuesday with traditional
ceremonies honoring the
nations war dead and
coast-to-coast shows of support
for President Nixons policies to
end the war in Vietnam.
Members of what the
President has called the great
silent majority worked to turn
an often ignored national
holiday into a massive public
demonstration of faith in how
the government is handling
peace efforts.
Thousands of Americans
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Spanish-American War who at
88 was the oldest patient in the
hospital.
One young patient 'told the
President, Im a good voting
Republican, too.
Good, Nixon replied, Tell
me when you are on the
promotion list.
The President, an avid sports
fan, shared with some patients
his impression of Sundays 28-28
tie between the Washington
Redskins and the Philadelphia
Eagles.
They both have got great
passers but they dont have any
defense, Nixon said. He
confided that on one occasion,
he watched telecasts of four
professional Football games at
the same time.

turned out for parades and
ceremonies, drove cats with
headlights turned on and flew
the flag in front of their homes
and businesses.
The accent on support of the
nations 1969 fighting men and
the governments policies in
Vietnam was heightened by
antiwar demonstrators plans for
a new round of Moratorium

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they grabbed him without firing a shot
Wahrlach and Gladson said the man had a gun
stuffed up his sleeve and another tucked in his
waistband, but was not able to draw either weapon.
He was identified as George Herman North, 46,
Trenton, NJ., and was charged with robbery and
kidnaping.
Bank officials said the loot totaled $24,973.
The bank loot was recovered in the motel and the
hostages, branch manager Lawrence Dietz, 62, and
Vice President Joseph A. Kiefer, 60, were found
unharmed.
The bank robbery occurred during the noon
hour. Police said the gunman forced Dietz and
Kiefer into Dietzs station wagon and drove off with
them. <
Police said the station wagon was reported
abandoned a short time later.
The bandit apparently stole another car, forced
his hostages into it, and drove with them to the
motel, police said.

Mrs. Nixon, wearing a blue
suit with scarf at the neck, went
from bed to bed shaking hands,
smiling and saying, Good
morning, how are you today?
One young Vietnam veteran
in a wheel chair asked, Is that
you, Pat?
When she said yes, he shook
her hand and said, Im so
happy, Im so happy.
Nixon and former Presidents
Lyndon B. Johnson and Harry
Truman are chief patrons of the
VIP program of visits to
veterans hospitals across the
country.
One visitor at the Washington
hospital Tuesday was Sen. Strom
Thurmond, R-S.C., who told
newsjnen he was unaware that
Nixon also was coming.

Day activities in Washington
and across the country later this
week.
Ah administration spokesman
bid for support of the great
silent majority in the nations
traditional no. 1 Veterans Day
ceremony the laying of the
Presidents red, white and blue
wreath at the Tomb of the
Unknowns in Arlington National
Cemetery.

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Page 7



Page 8

\, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 12, 1969

* "ST
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

Silent Majority Mobilizes,
Supports Nixons Policies

MR. EDITOR:
The silent majority is finally beginning to
mobilize. All across the nation patriotic and
concerned Americans are begining to voice their
strong support of President Nixon in his efforts to
obtain an honorable settlement of the war.
Americans are uniting to show the North
Vietnamese that delaying serious negotiation will
not result in the breakdown of our will to resist.
Americans are uniting to show people everywhere
that the United States will not bug out and leave
Vietnam without insuring that the people of South
Vietnam are provided the right of
self-determination.
In Washington, Dr. Edmond Dombrowski has
organized his Committee for a National Unity. Bob
Hope has accepted the role of honorary chairman.
This group has set November 9 through 16 as its

ROTC.. A Threat To Academic Freedom?
By E.O. George

This year demonstrations against ROTC have hit
at least 50 colleges. Radical leaders vocally assert
that such demonstrations will continue and
intensify. Such tactics have forced the abolition of
ROTC at Columbia, Harvard, and Dartmouth. The
claims are that the abolishment of ROTC will curtail
U.S. imperialism in Southeast Asia and rid the
college of training that has no place in the
curriculum of a free university.
Just what is the role of ROTC on the college
campus? Does ROTC actually threaten academic
freedom? What are the advantages of retaining this
program?
At the present time, 200,000 men in 365 colleges
and universities are enrolled in. ROTC and at the
same time pursue a full course of academic studies.
During 1969, Army ROTC will turn out 16,000
officers, 21 times more than West Point produces.
This means the nation will gain college educated
officers at nowhere the cost for training at West
Point or Officer Candidate School.
Abolition of ROTC would necessitate expansion
of the OCS program, resulting in in-breeding by
which the commissioned officers would lose
virtually all contact with civilian academic attitudes.
This would not benefit the Army or society.
Upon reflection its evident that the ROTC
program in fact liberalizes the Army. There is a need
to educate future military leaders on academic, not
military, campuses. Failure to do this will result in
precisely the militaristic atmosphere that ROTC
critics claim to be oposing. Our top military leaders
have openly stated that the military decisions of the
next century must be made by those who can make
military judgements in the full perspective of human
, culture..

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

kick-off week. This same week has been designated
by another group of Americans as the National
Week of Confidence, when Americans are asked to
show their support of the President in his efforts to
end the war and bring the troops home after an
honorable settlement.
As a member of this silent majority I plan to join
with these groups in demonstrating my support of
the President. The Committee for National Unity
has urged that Americans everywhere wear red,
white and blue arm bands November 9 through 16.
They urge further that the American flag be flown
and car and porch lights be burned.
I plan to comply with these requests and thus
show my confidence in and support of President
Nixon. I urge that students who feel similarly do
likewise. Lets show how America really feels about
our president.
MICHAEL S. HAWKINS 4EG

On closer inspection, the academic freedom
argument used against ROTC is hardly supportable.
An Army ROTC member at Stanford described his
ROTC courses as the only place he could find an
honest give-and-take debate on the Viet Nam war.
Herman B. Wells, chancellor of the University of
Indiana says IF we should be persuaded to cancel
ROTC programs, we would be yielding to the same
kind of pressures which have demanded we cease
teaching anything about Karl Marx and Slavic
literature. \
Although there have been many changes in the
Abolition of ROTC would necessitate
expansion of the OCS program, resulting in
in-breeding by which the commissioned
officers would lose virtually all contact with
civilian academic attitudes. This would not
benefit the Army or society.
ROTC course of studies, the image of drill, shoot
and salute persists. A number of experimental
programs have emetged which will be tested either
this year or the following. These programs caD for a
first year study of a broad, philosophical course on
the military's impact on civilization, followed by a
second-year course covering the ingredients of
military power. Training in the military arts would
be restricted to summer camp.
A recent survey shows that from the
approximately 4 percent of college men who have
received ROTC training have come 22 per cent of

editorial
Just That Simple
The Student Senate Tuesday night approved the wording
of the referendum students will use to voice their opinion
on a $6 student activity fee hike to partly finance a
Coliseum complex.
Senate approval came after much fanfare and opposition
from a small but vociferous group of senators who claimed
the wording of the ballot was some kind of a political
Senator Jim Comander, off campus, who hurled the
charge, did not indicate just whose political tool the ballot
would be.
He limited himself to issuing similar nebulous charges
about the simplicity of the ballot and the motives of the
never-identified-powers-that-might-be.
Fortunately, the overwhelming majority of the senate
members did not swallow Comander s pill.
For it is no secret that the outspoken senator views the
idea of students contributing to their own welfare as some
kind of dubious plot by state legislators to make students
carry the burden of supporting our institution.
And that is pure hogwash.
The idea of a referendum came from students.
It has been approved by the student senate.
Students will be doing the voting next Feb. 4.
And students will be the ones benefitting from the
Coliseum, should it ever become a reality.
No similar facility has ever been constructed in the South
with state funds.
And there are no signs on the horizon that would indicate
the Florida State Legislature, facing critical needs in purely
educational areas, will deviate from this norm to provide the
UF with a University Activities Center.
Lets face it, the only realistic way in which the students
at this institution will be able to enjoy such a facility within
the next 25 years will be by showing their desire and
concrete support for its construction.
Senator Comander said the referendum, the way it is to
be worded wont reflect the true feelings of the Student
Body.
We cant swallow that pill, either.
The ballot confronts the students with the question of
whether or not they are willing to pay $6 from their
activities fees to finance one third of the coliseums cost.
If the students desire such a facility, they will vote yes. If
not, a negative vote would be forthcoming.
Its as simple as that.
And we commend the student senate for making it just
that simple.

the men earning SIOO,OOO to $300,000 a year; 14
per cent of our state governors; and 16 per cent of
our Congressmen.
Also relevant to the future job-seekers is that
many of the larger employers seek out the ROTC
graduate in their recruiting. Ford Motor Company
feels that military experience as an officer is a
significant asset. Many times military experience is
directly applicable to the positions from which the
ROTC graduates might be applying. Honeywell,
Inc. says that ROTC graduates consistently show
more singleness of purpose, a deeper sense of
responsibility, and an increased willingness to
exercise leadership...
The ROTC objective, then, is to produce well
educated men of high character, with the leadership
potential for peaceful pursuits of civilian enterprise,
as well as for command in emergencies that may
arise in the nations defense.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley
. -r Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
ditorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-168 T. or 392-1683.
Opinion, ex preyed in the Florida Alligator are those
ot the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



A Lass Chance
MR. EDITOR:
Remember when we nodded when our parents told us that those
campus anti-war agitators on TV were Communist inspired and should
be jailed? That people who arent willing to fight for the country they
love, ought to leave.
Our high school American History taught us how throughout
history from the Manifest Destiny period, Spanish-American conflict
and First and Second World Wars to the present, we have fought
justified wars. In fact, we had never lost a fight; what could be more
logical? Weve fought good wars and won them.
In the Second World War, we fought the German murderers who
were burning up women and children, and the treacherous slant-eyed
little bastards of Japan, who were enslaving our little friends, the
Chinese. But after beating them up real good, we forgave them, and
they became our friends and allies.
We helped our friends, the Russians, to win the war, but they
turned rotten on us. Americanism Vs. Communist explained how
they had been rotten all along, and were planning to take over the
whole world and bury us from afar.
That then, must be the reason were in Vietnam today we, the
Watchdog of the West, must hold back the war-mongering Russian and
Chinese Communists from burying us and our allies, the murdering
Nazis and the merciless, slant-eyed little bastards of Japan.
But one thing is still puzzling me; how are kids history books
gonna explain our losing the war? If they all agree it was a good
war, what then?
Perhaps, theyll say Vietnam was too big and we didn't have enough
bombs to blow it up; or that the little yellow men we were fighting
werent Viet Cong tall, but Chinese reinforcement paratroopers,
armed to the teeth.
But what if history decides it wasnt a good war? That we lost a
bad war with a tiny country and murdered a half-million of its people
who can they point the accusing finger at? Johnson ... Nixon? Or
you -for believing all the garbage youve been fed?
Maybe history books will go easy on the ordinary American who
just didnt know what atrocities his country was committing, i.e.
didnt bother to find out which end of the ol horse was which.
In any eventuality, ten years hence, are you gonna be embarrassed
when someone mentions The War? If you were given one last chance
to make up your mind and lay your cards on the table, would you
take it?
Well, youve got it cause tomorrow, you can leave for Washington
to show your protesting agitator-face to the police cameras, the
Administration, and maybe national TV.
This could be your last chance to become a g-d- Commie
protester.
JIM PECK, 3BA

Strawberry Fields
Pestilence In Poo
By Carol Sanger '

Dastardly are the devious
deeds being wrought upon the
Land of Poo this day.
Far and wide, throughout the
kingdom and all surrounding
provinces, spreads the tale of the
errant and evil knights and
nobles of the Poodian Oblong
Table.
Woe to all of Poo in this, the
second reign of Kind Charles the
Shepherd, for these errant beings
have brought plague and
pestilence most grave and
worrisome to the ox-carts and
royal strawberry coaches of the
land.
Forsooth, in the darkness and
black of Poodian night a band
and horde of barbarian nobles
and knights have thrice wrought
pestilence in the Land of Poo.
Mounting ox-carts of varying
sizes and colors they have set off
from the long and brilliant
marble halls of Poodian state
with numerous rolls of tissue
paper in hand.
And verily, they have
proceeded with gusto most
fierce to plague and paper the
ox-carts of all who share power
in the land.
And, in deeds most vile these
knights did first strike out at the
royal coach of the Poodian king,
Charles the Shepherd.
Woe to these evil beings,
the king thundered. Verily, I
say, heads will roll in Poo this
day.
And with great silence the
errant nobles and knights did
creep into far and distant
peasant hovels to escape the
wrafiToT CMrW Shepherd

And finding no errant beings in
the long and brilliant halls of
state, the king soon forgot his
anger.
Lo! the tale yet is not
complete. For so vile and
dastardly a group of evil beings,
they did soon venture out and
with malice to plague and
pestilence the kingdom yet
again.
He of the Pale Blue Key did
fall to this horde, as did he of
the Ox-Cart Court and he of the
Council of Jesters and he of the
Poodian Journals.
But nay, with vileness
unbound the Prime Minister of
Poo, Marcus the Click; the
Pounder of the Golden Gavel,
Jack the Vaughn; the Minister of
Greater Party, Sam of Poole, and
shameless numbers of other
nobles did abscond with I, the

chronicler.
With great and growing
consternation and distress did
c only serious drawback / can see about bringing this
I weapon into production is that it might bring civilization, as
we know it, to an end. credit lns

LIL
Rvfe-r
fr m March On
TOt- Washington
illffi FORUM:-^.
L/nopjvl? ui XmT)
: float tor a,,
'Moratorium* Mob Action
Threatens Majority Rule

MR. EDITOR:
I am opposed to the planned
march on Washington on
November 15 but not because of
the Vietnam war issue. In my
opinion, the real issue is whether
this country shall be ruled by
the majority of its citizens
within the limits set by the
Constitution and through duly
elected representatives chosen
by secret ballot, or whether it
shall be ruled by mobs in the
streets or in public buildings.

blackness of these souls as they
covered the Land of Poo in rolls
of fragile paper.
And again did they dare to
strike out at King Charles the
Shepherd and his royal coach.
And at he of the Oak Leaf Circle
and he of the Peasant Hovels
Council, and he of the Market
Place Ministry.
And great divisiveness spread
throughout the kingdom as these
errant knights and nobles did fail
to heed the words of their king
to cease this plague and
pestilence.
So dark clouds converged
upon the Land of Poo, and the
shepherd king did declare the
Poodian Wars of State in session.
And even now do the forces
amass, naught seeking peace, but
paper pestilence and plunder in
great and growing amounts.

These mobs usually represent
the efforts of a minority to
thwart the will of the majority
since the majority has the
machinery of representative
government available to it.
In the present case, Gallup
polls prior to President Nixons
speech indicated that a majority
of the people favor his current
Vietnam policy. A Gallup poll
following his speech indicated
that 77% favored the policy
outlined in the speech. The
march on Washington is a clear
attempt by a militant minority
to frustrate the majority.
The defense of these
moratorium activities has
been based on freedom of
speech and freedom of assembly.
I do not believe that these
freedoms give license to interfere
with the rights of others.
Assemblies of large numbers of
people in public streets, in
administration buildings, and
near government buildings
always imply a threat of bodily
harm to those who oppose these
mobs and very often prevent
freedom of movement of those
carrying out their legitimate
duties.
It is often claimed that, if the
crowd is nonviolent, no threat is
present. And yet even the
antiwar Senators are expressing
fears of violence in the
Washington march. I do not
believe you can bring large
numbers of people together on a
political issue in the vicinity of
our administrative officials
without raising fears of violence.
So far as I know, these

WadnMday, November 12,1969, Tha Florida Alligator, I

assemblies are often legal at the
present time. However, I am
beginning to wonder if our
nation has not passed into a
phase that calls for legal action
against them. None of us like
additional laws on the books
that restrict our freedoms.
When, however, there is a clear
and present danger of an ever
greater loss of freedom if
nothing is done, I believe it is
time to act.
My fear of the reality of this
danger of mob rule is enhanced
when I see minorities gaining
concessions from univeristy
administrations over the country
by occupying buildings. If these
concessions were never granted
and if President Nixon sticks by
his promise to remain
uninfluenced by the Washington
moratorium, then I would not
feel the necessity of government
action to suppress these
demonstrations.
There are those who seek to
organize counter-demonstrations
of the same type. I cannot
accept this as a solution to the
problem. We cannot reinforce
the operation of our government
in a reasoned arid democratic
manner by placing more mobs in
the street. The course chosen by
our elected representatives
should be reached by careful
consideration and should not be
based on the emotion generated
by mob action.
ARTHUR A. BROYLES
PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Black Watchers
MR. EDITOR:
In regard to your recent
stories concerning the white
Watchers, I would like for it to
be known that there are also
black watchers on campus.
Today the research Library
windows are being washed by a
white washer and two black
watchers are just watching! Its
nice to know that both races can
now be accused of just watching.
DANA BECKHAM
LIBRARY ASSISTANT

Page 9



Page 10

'The Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, November 12,1969

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Page 11



Page 12

!; TlMf Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 12,1969

DRAFT REFORM ADVOCATES AGREE
Rush Bill Without Amendments

WASHINGTON (UPI) Draft
reform advocates agreed
Tuesday to permit President
Nixons lottery bill to be rushed
through the Senate and to the
White House without
amendment.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy,
D-Mass., who has been a leader
in the fight for more
comprehensive change in draft
laws, yielded to members of the
Senate Armed Services

Treat Prisoners Better
U.S. Urges N. Viets
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) The United States, appealing Tuesday
for humane treatment of 1,300 American captives believed held by
North Vietnam, urged international pressure on Hanoi to reduce the
anguish of the prisoners and their families.
For each of these men, there is a wife, a child, a parent who is
concerned with his fate, Mrs. Rita E. Hauser, permanent U.S.
delegate to the U.N. Human Rights Commission, told the General
Assemblys Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee.
They are subjected to uncertainty and despair which grow as each
day passes, she said.
Several wives of prisoners and their children sat silently in the
public gallery as Mrs. Hauser told the 126-member committee of the
chilling record of maltreatment of prisoners which had been noted
and deplored by a great many international observers.
From the reports of the few men actually released by North
Vietnam and from other sources has come disturbing evidence that
prisoners arebeing deprived of adequate medical care and diets aid
that, in many instances, they have been subjected to physical and
mental torture, she said.
Defense Department figures show at least 414) US. servicemen
known to be held by North Vietnam with another 918 missing and
believed captured.
North Vietnam contends that the 1949 Geneva Convention of
protection of war prisoners does not apply to its captives because the
Vietnam conflict is not a declared war and the Americans it holds are
war criminals.
Wallace Tours Viet Capitol

SAIGON (UPI) George C.
Wallace got a tour of Saigon
Tuesday and declared he had
been heartwashed by the
people of the Vietnamese city.
There was somebody who
came over here to Vietnam and
was brainwashed, Wallace said.
Ive been heartwashed. It
heartwashes you over here. It
makes you love humanity.
The brainwash comment
was a reference to a remark
made by Michigan Gov. George
Romney, now secretary of
housing and urban development
in the Nixon administration.
Col. Do Kien Nhieu, the
mayor, briefed Wallace at city
hall in midaftemoon and then
escorted the former third party
presidential candidate to a beige
minibus for the tour. Wallace
Blacks Return
After Boycott
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI)
Thousands of Negro students
returned to classes Tuesday
despite a boycott called to
protest the use of tear gas in a
Black Monday demonstration
led by the Rev. Ralph David
Abernathy.
School officials said only
23,418 of the cityfs 133,500
Negro students were absent
today and 135 teachers failed to
report for school.
Pennies
At least 55 billion Lincoln
pennies have been minted since
1909, says the National
Geographic.

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Committee and agreed to the
unusual procedure during an
hour-long showdown meeting.
The agreement brightened

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chances for passage of the
Selective Service lottery measure
before Congress adjourns for the
year.
The bill, which has already
passed the House, would make a
simple, one-line change in the
Selective Service Act to
authorize random selection of
draftees drawing their names
out of a hat, in effect.
With that change, Nixon plans
to rise his executive power to
institute a system early next
year whereby a young man
would be exposed to the draft
only once normally at the age
of 19 and would be thereafter
ineligible if he were passed over,
barring a national emergency.
Under the present system,
draft boards are instructed to
take the oldest eligible men first.
Kennedy and several other
senators wanted broader reforms
- such as elimination of
deferments for college students
and a bar on using the draft as a
punitive tool to stifle dissent.
But, in an hour-long meeting
with Armed Services Chairman
John Stennis, D-Miss., the draft
reformers agreed that the lottery
proposal was the best they could
do for the tune being.
Kennedy said he was
persuaded by Stennis* promise
that die committee would begin
hearings cm the draft next
February even though the
current Selective Service Act
does not expire until June 30,
1971.
Because of these assurances,
the Massachusetts senator said
he was dropping his plan to offer
an amendment that would push
back the expiration date six
months to Dec. 31, 1970. That
would have forced the Stennis
committee to act on draft
reform next year.

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The I
Florida
Alligator j

FLORIDA PLAYERS REVIEW
'Company Os Saints
Presents Serious Comedy


By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Reviewer
La Compagnie de Santi Ostinati will make you
laugh, make you think and may even touch your
humanity.
George Herman's satirical comedy about a
stranded commedia troupe opened Monday night in
the Constans Theatre.
This play is really something different for both
the Florida Players and UF.
A Company of Wayward Saints" teOs the story
of actors who have lost their interaction. Petty
concerns have cracked their unity, and now they are
no longer a performing unit.
Generally, Saints" can be considered an actor's
play with universal implications. The players must
learn a lesson concerning human relationships if
they are to get home a dominant theme.
The plot line of the play then follows this
concept. The play has a prologue and two acts. The
audience looks upon a sparsely furnished set and a
dark stage as the action starts.
Scapino, Bob Nader, sits alone, upstage right and
the play begins.
Music, which is a splicing of a saltarello (an
Italian dance of die 16th century) and David Rose's
Stripper" swells in the background. This, it seems,
takes the place of the curtain rising.
Now Pantalone, Tom Nash, and Colombine,
Melissa Shepard join Scapino on stage and the
audience is informed of the tragic plight of the
company.
Their leader, Harlequin, Gene Touchet, lost the
troupe's scenery during an ill-fated crap game in
Peoria, Illinois.
The trio is frantically awaiting the arrival of
Harlequin in order to begin the play. So the
audience finds out that they are watching a play
about a play.
At this point, Harlequin bounds out of the
audience and immediately justifies his absence.
He informs the company that he has found a

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patron of the arts, a certain duke, who will pay for
their way home if they will perform a work of his:
The History of Man."
The prologue is too long and involved and is the
weakest part of Herman's play. It drags when the
characters go into an individual history of his or her
traditional role in stock commedia.
Dialogue brightens up the action considerably.
Dr. L.L. Zimmerman and the actors must be
commended on their localization of the play. Cuts
directed toward UF President Stephen C. O'Connell,
Student Body President Charles Shepherd, the
Gatorade controversy and even certain Alligator
columnists are sharp, well directed and humorously
taken.
The farcical tone is carried through the*first act as
conflicts continue to rise in the company. The act
ends with the complete deterioration of the troupe.
The second act begins and the trip gets heavy.
The humor turns to the serious and the players
begin to act out life. The traditional commedia
masks are removed and they confront each other
face to face.
Over-all, the acting is good. However, at times,
members of the cast tend to over-act. Richard
Council, Tristano, is perfectly cast in the role of a
prissy, but handsome lover. Deborah Kondelik,
plays his cohort, Isabella. She comes across as not
quite convincing. Nash and Sam Zimmerman as
Dottoie, are highly competent supportmg actors.
They are very enjoyable.
Touchet is professional m the leading role, but Ms
true acting merit really comes through is the second
act which he dominates. Miss Shepard makes a
charming bitch but she also tends to work too hard
in her role.
The last members of the company, Nader and
Marilyn Wall, who plays worldly Rufflana, are
enthusiastic in their roles but defmitely lack polish.
This production was colorfully complemented by
quality costuming. The production would be worth
it if only to display them.

Wednesday, November 12,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Black Poet Lecture
Planned By Accent

Accent 70 will present its
theme of Tomorrow in
Perspective** Feb. 914.
However, a preliminary event is
planned by Accent for this
Sunday.
Gylan Kain will lecture on
Poetry, Music and Song* at
7:30 pm in the Reitz Union
Ballroom. Admission is $ 1.
Kain was bom in Harlem 27
years ago. He spent most of his
life in the black ghettos of the
Bronx and Queens. He is a
product of the New York City
school system, started writing
when he was a teenager and
attended Hunter College.
Beginning as a playwright,
Kain went to poetry to find a
freer form in which to work.
He founded the East Wind
Workshop in Harlem last year.
This is a black cultural center
where two of his plays have been
performed and much
experimental poetry has been
developed.
New forms are explored and
exciting ideas are projected at
the workshop.
Kain has recently formed a
new group called Kam From
the Tongues of Fire,** which

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Entertainment Editor

GYLAN KAIN
...to speak Sunday
incorporates rhythm, guitar
music and poetry.
He has been a lecturer on
Black Art at the University of
Ohio and is currently at
Wesleyan University in
Middlestown, Connecticut where
he leads a poetry workshop.
Kain is an admirer of Leoi
Jones, James Brown, preachers
from sanctified churches and
Coltrain. He is married and Beat
in Harlem with his wife and
child.

Page 13



Page 14

Ctlii Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November M] 196 V

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Dialogue Today
Rabbi Michael Monson, director of UFs Hillel Foundation is the
guest speakers for todays, Dialogue With A Theologue.
His topic is Reforming and Radicalizing the Jewish
Establishment.
The Dialogue With A Theologue series is sponsored by the Reitz
Union in conjunction with the University Religious Association. As
with all others in the series, admission is free.
The program starts at 4 p.m. in Union Lounge 123. Refreshments
will be served.
Sponsores of the series hope to run it throughout the entire year.
Its purpose is to bring the religious leaders of the area in contact with
students in a panel type atmosphere.
. ............... m m m m _m--m mm >*_** mm mm m

Dont Get Stung

Every spring, Dr. Milledge
Murphey, professor of
entomology, offers a course in
apiculture.
Apiculture, or beekeeping, is
fun and profitable, Murphey
said. The course is offered only
spring quarter because that is the
best time to study bees.
Ey 411 may be taken as an
elective by anyone who is
interested in learning about the
life habits of bees. It is a three
credit course, two lectures and a
lab.
Students are taught how bees

Creases Stay in, Wrinkles
Hang out of the Minimax
2 v .m - / -srV;
Dacron Polyester and Rayon
The Minimax takes a days wear in
stride and keeps on looking neat right
into the evening. And with two pairs
of pants, you get extra wearability.
Only at Sears ... in checks, plains and
plaids.
*BS
CHARGE IT on Sears Revolving Charge
The store within ;i store at Sears, Roebuck and Co.
TOP OF THE MALL N. W. 13th at 23rd Blvd.

collect nectar and how the
honey is extracted. Best of all,
they get to eat the honey.
We all have fun and learn a
lot, Murphey said.
Down Hill
NEW YORK The toboggan
was conceived and developed in
1890 by a group of thrill-seeking
American and English
vacationers in Switzerland, and
is known in the sports world as
the sporting way to commit
suicide.



Mind Expands
In Center Os Man
ByTEDREMLEY
Entertainment Editor
Some good and some bad effects stem from the Center of Man,
said Dr. Ted Landsman, one of the centers growth directors.
Landsman, who is a professor in the College of Educations
Personnel Services Department, spoke to a group of UF students
about his two-year-old program Monday afternoon. The talk was
sponsored by the Reitz Union.
The Center of Man was formulated by Landsman and one of his
friends in the College of Education. Syd Gerard and some other
crazy humanistic people at war with society within their professions
started the whole thing, he said.
Last year the center of operation was set in the Museum of Modern
Art in Micanopy, but now it has moved to the Presbyterian Student
Center on University Avenue. A search for more room prompted the
move.
The first program of the year was given recently by Dr. Didier
Graeffe of the Comprehensive Humanities Department. He presented
The Way I See Her, a combination of commentary and slide show
about the face of a black girl.
Describing the Center of Man as a place where people can search
for the best of themselves, Landsman said that it is aimed at the
enitre range of ages. The center feels that people should reach up
higher for a better world for themselves and society.
Were not aiming at a therapy center, Landsman explained. The
center is aimed at the adjusted person with a dull, ordinary existence
who wants to reach out for something more in life, he said.
However, were very far from our noble effort, he said.
Commenting on centers similar to Gainesvilles, Landsman said,
Some growth centers foster transitory intimacy (by running intense
encounter groups for a period of time with no follow-up). This isnt
healthy because it isnt responsible. Were after something more
permanent, he said.
He explained that some of the people involved in the nation-wide
movement of growth centers ire actually immoral. Theyre looking
for nothing more than easy sex, he said. Landsman explained that
growth and development of one of these centers is a very slow
process, and that a solution is being searched for at the Center of Man,
but not necessarily the easiest one.
The Center Man is pro-intellectualism. Growth is a matter of
the mind and the heart not the genitals, as some growth centers
seem to think, Landsman said.
The Center of Man is a powerful new, social force as are the other
growth centers in the United States, he continued. He hoped that a
powerful good would come out of these centers of experimentation.
But like all powerful things, they can be destructive if not directed in
an appropriate way.
Lecture sessions and encounter groups are the main functions of
the Center of Man at the present time.
Three new directions are being explored, however. An encounter
group for elementary school children is now in the planning stages. A
solitude service, providing a place for people to meditate in complete
quiet, and an authentic interaction service, directing people to
self-actualized individuals with whom they can relate in an open
manner, are also planned.
A presentation about many different ways of life is now being
formulated into a series, Landsman said. The man living in religious
ecstasy, the hippie, the square and the soul brother are some of the
people being considered for the program presentations.
DR. DIDIER GRAEFFE, HUMANITIES PROFESSOR
.. ... presented center's first program of the year. -

GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I/Jrf. ANNIVERSARY I
/ f ||| SALE I
H ~ lliv.,dar-Fdda,-S.u>da, I
/j lilitar Nov. 13-Nov. 14-Nov. 15
--SkiSH I Knit News!
\ \ | Fashion Dresses I H
\jg \ v A 1 regularly 12.99 1
\ A \ \ I Stunning 1& 2 piecers! Care I
M I A I free acrylic knits and more I
I I \-m I fine fabrics. Misses', juniors, I
HI m I petites, youthful half sizes! jp
Specially Priced Now! I Now-Look Wide Leg ft w
| Shirt Sale Proportioned Pants I H
I regularly 3.99 regularly 7.99
3.19 6.39
f Now-looks including pocketed Flawless fit linen-look rayons. I Mm
I safaris, deep-pointed collar See zestful new colors. In short, Jg
I styles. In Arnel* triacetate average and tall lengths...
I crepes, more. Sizes 32 to 38. sizes 6to 18. Choose yours now. I |g|.
I Girls Fun-Time I K
TZ "IT' I Slacks & Slack Sets |
I Han ag uys I ENTIRE STOCK I I
I ertire stcck I 2XW OFF OUR
| $ I TICKET PRICES H
I- " ~-/arr.pie: reg. 4.99... sale 3.99 I
I Genuine leathers, glistening ft Save on fine acrylics, cotton
I or crinkle plastics with the ft corduroys, cottons, easy-care
I look-of-leather. Snapp. new I blends. Some sashed, many wide
V silhouettes' Black & 'colors! ft leg styles. In sizes 3 to 14. |
I .A

Wednesday,November 12.1969.T1n FMkj AlHgrtor

Page 15



- - -
n in
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE
1965 Honda 50 excellent
condition Call 378-0554 for more
information. (A-4t-37-p)
BOGEN STEREO AMP 65 watt S6O
call 378-7886. (A-3t-39-p)
1966 Honda Scrambler alum fenders
race camshaft high top pistons fast
and reliable. $450 392-9417.
(A-2t-39-p)
Motorcycle trailer custom built can
carry any size bike 4mo. old $l5O.
392-9417. Zenith stereo four speakers good
separation diamond stylus 2g tone
arm take best offer come by or call
Mike 133 T rusler Ph. 392-8411.
(A-2t-39-p)
Ladies drinks $.35 at the Friday
Afternoon Club. A weekly cocktail
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd at the
. Lamplighter Lounge this and every
Friday. Two private rooms are
reserved for us. This is where its at.
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (A-4t-39-p)
Attention Pldeges Zeta Tau Alpha
membership pin yellow gold crest
surrounded with 23 pearls one
diamond in center point 378-5068.
(A-3t-38-p)
CAM-Chrysler 284 and anti-pump up
lifters; ISKY barrel valve springs fits
440, 383 Roadrunner, etc. All brand
new. sac SIBO. 392-9362. (A-3t-38-p)
Kawasaki 120 Scrambler a sacrifice
for $265 1968 model Call Bob at
373-2748. (A-st-38-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity In
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
New Argus Automatic Electriceye
Camera-Zoom Lens super 8 Projector
Carrying Case, Pistol Grip, Light bar,
sqreen SIOO.OO Call 378-4200 after
5:30 p.m. (A-4t-38-p)
AMPEX 750 4 track 3 speed tape
deck stereo play-record, echo effect
sound on sound etc. Includes walnut
base & cover tapes $l5O firm
378-6129. (A-st-40-p)
Martin 0018 c Classical guitar with
hardshell case, Roberts 770 x
taperecorder with AKG and Roberts
mikes stand earphones assesories
372-7024. (A-4t-40-p)
1956 MG good engine tires top side
curtains wirewheels some materials
for restoration 372-7024 after 5.
(A-4t-40-p)
Heavy duty VW trailer hitch.. sls.
Call 376-0710 between 8 and 5.
(A-3t-40-p)
8' x 42 2 bedroom mobile home, air
conditioned, redecorated; with utility
shed. Call 372-3112 or 372-8032.
$1750. (A-st-40-p)
| FOR RENT I
Tired of your old drab apartment
sub-lease a poolside Village Park apt.
available winter quarter. Call
373-2442 after 4 p.m. (B-st-39-p)
TO SUBLET: One furnished bdrm.
apt. at Tanglewood Manor for winter
quarter. Call Wayne after 7:30 p.m.
392-9972. (B-3t-39-p)
For sale or rent one bedroom trailer
and Cabana gas heat & air
conditioner $975 or $65 mo.
392-0939 or 376-3322. (B-st-39-p)
LANDMARK one male roommate
must lease immediate occupancy
available rent 46.25 + util. Pool ww
car pgt central heat. Call Steve
373-2207. (B-st-37-p)
THE
IN I
Valley^
of tire
Dolls!
2 COLOR HITS I

; I FOR RENT i
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
1 bedroom Ac apt. Fully furnished in
quiet neighborhood. 100 per mo. Call
376-0362 aft. 5 p.m. (B-3t-38-p)
Private bedroom for male fully
carpeted paneled house with 2 other
students only S4O per month. Call
372-7789 or Ken at 378-0618.
(B-2t-40-p)
' -- -
1 WANTED f
Female roommate beginning winter
qrt. La Mancha private bedroom air
carpet utilities Included in rent. Call
3 78-9824 or 378-7224 apt. 8.
(C-4t-38-p)
Female roommate. A two bedroom
house, a.c. close to campus. 1246 SW
13 St. 376-0578. (C-4t-38-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters
available Dec. Ist $45.00/month. Call
Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-38-p)
Female roommate for 2-bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus. Available
immediately call 372-7550 noon or
between 5-7p.m. Rent 36.25 mo.
(C-3t-39-p)
Female roommate needed for one
bedroom apt. winter quarter only or
for the rest of the year. Call after
five. 376-2909 (C-2t-39-p)
The university crowd who enjoy
action and reasonably priced drinks.
The Friday Afternoon Club is going
again. Sponsored by graduate
students at the Lamplighter Lounge
this and every Friday. Two private
rooms reserved for us. Ladies drinks
$.35. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (C-4t-39-p)
Wanted roommate for University
Gardens Apt. Call 373-1364 Ask for
Kathy Immediate Occupancy.
(C-3t-38-p)
2 female roommates for modern apt.
NW section. $55/mo. TV HIFi. Call
Janine 392-2501 Bam spm Mon. thru
Fri. (C-4t-3 7-p)
One male roommate for La Mancha
apartment. Private bedroom. Call
373-2642. (C-3t-40-p)
One Female Roommate needed for
2-Bedroom Landmark Available
Dec. 15 Dec. rent free $46.25/mo.
No Deposits Call 378-3518.
(C-3 t-40-p)
Male roommate La Mancha S7O per
' mon including utilities Furnished
Prefer grad student. Available Now
Call 378-9441 Apt. 53. (C-st-40-p)
Male roommate wanted University
Apartments Immediat Occupancy
Available S3O per month. Call
378-4061. (C-2t-40-p)
I HELP WANTED |
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
Part time work, early morning hours.
Need, not interfere with present job or
college schedule. Deliver Tampa
Tribune for supplementary income.
Call Ed Wyatt or Dale Wesley for
information. 372-4902. (E-st-38-p)
Desk Clerk over 21 2 Nights Per
Week Midnight 7 AM Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn 4029 S.W. 13th Street
Neat Appearance. (E-4t-39-p}
$2-5 hr. student photographer needs
girl models all types,- face, figure or
fashion. Apply Prairie View Apts.
6315 SW 13 apt 11 7-10 p.m.
(E-3t-39-p)

.HKI IHaui iMiri a ru
I l7t? /Jrd WEEK STARTING TODAY\
/ AND AT REGULAR PRICES! \
winner 1 3 ACADEMY AWARDS & V
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS Katharine hepburn i I
JOSEPH 6. LEVINE pten AN AVCO EMBASSY FILM Jt
K PeT6ROTOOL KATHARIN6 H6PBURN I
Production i I
THE LION IN WINTER /
AT 2:00 4:30 7:009:30 /
k'MimSj 4k Durrell's \
Hl^s h^
* * ' - *** * .... %WV ;;. ; ; ;* *

. The Florida AHigator, Wednesday, November 12,1969

Page 16

§ HELP WANTED
*****tffft"- r VKionoeooooooftojF
40C per month. Part time evenings.
Must be neat & have own trans.
Report 206 SE Ist St. til 9 PM.
(E-st-40-p)
Oriental girls and boys for waitress
and busboy work in new Polynesian
room. University Inn. Apply in
person to Mr. Sasser. (E-3t-40-p)
| AUTOS |
1968 Sprite, excellent condition,
serviced + tuned every 3000 mi.,
radio excellent heater, front sway-bar
Stebro exhaust, BRG, other extras.
Asking $1650. 378-2235. (G-st-39-p)
66 SIMCA for $535, rebuilt engine,
* good mechanical condition, 34 mpg.
See at 1117 SW ,7th Ave. or call
378-8033. (G-st-36-p)
1969 VW sunroof sedan 11000 miles
perfect condition call 378-9219 after
4:30 asking $1750. (G-3t-38-p)
65 MGB. Own a real sportscar. Very
well cared for. Mechanically perfect.
Radio, heater, new top, tonneau,
boot, lucas light, etc. Call Harvey at
373-2713 or come by La Bonne Vie
no. 339. (G-Bt-35-p)
1957 Chevy P. steering, P. breaks,
fact, air, aut. trans., radio, heater,
283-4 V V-8, dual tailpipes, 37,000
actual miles, 392-8905. (G-st-37-p)
Good cheap transportation *57
Morris Minor $175. Good gas
mileage. Passed inspection. Call Ted
378-2039 anytime. (G-lt-40-p)
1965 MG Midget Needs net top and
brake job. Has new inspection tag,
battery, starter, generator, exhaust
system. Best offer. Call 3 73-2345.
(G-st-40-p)
6 7 XKE convertible. Excellent,
yellow, blk top, chrome wire wheels
$4195. Serious offers call 392-1881 8
to 5, ask for Louise Hardin.
(G-st-40-p)
1966 MUSTANG like new 36,000
miles automatic transmission, radio
heater, 6 cylinders, call 378-8752
after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
| PERSONAL I

Men! Visit all of west or east Europe
next summer for S3OO private and
coop organized trip write box 2657
Gains. U. Sta. for info. (J-st-39-p)
3 months in Europe s4so. June 17
Aug. 27 bicycle trip. Student
organized, informally planned. Fare
will include air fare, food, shelter.
Cali 378-3395, ask for Wenda Snow
after 5:30 p.m. (J-st-36-p)
The Celebration up and coming,
versatile, rock-group welcomes
bookings for second quarter. If
interested call 372-7493 after 6 p.m.
(J-st-37-p)
Candy, thank you for showing me
that UF i,irls can be sweet. Keep
smiling and buying donuts with Jo
Anne. Love and winks, Al.
(J-2t-40-p)
GAA This is the Rise of the fall.
Fulfilling our trust, renewing our
faith that this has always, been that
this will be again ... lyve, vca.
(J-2t-40-p)
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,
BERKELEY CAMPUS: unique
lecture notes. Hundreds of- courses-,
taken directly in class by
professionals from world-famous
teachers. sl-$4. Send for free
catalog. FYBATE LECTURE
NOTES, Dept. 6, 2440 Brancroft
Way, Berkeley, Calif. 94704.
(J-35-lt-p)

| PERSONAL
I : : : ...
Action this and every Friday at the
Friday Afternoon Club. A cocktail
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd. Two private
rooms reserved. Ladies drinks $.35
5:30-7:30 p.m. (J-4t-39-p)
Can you sing? If you can cut it, we
may want you. Call now to join a
well established band. 372-6442.
(J-2t-38-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING 16
NW 7th Ave. (J-st-28-p)
RIDERS WANTED: NEW YORK
CITY leaving Dec. 18, returning Jan
2 Roundtrip $35. One way S2O. Call
Lisa at 373-2760. (J-st-37-p)
Bonjour to Farmer Brown, the
Man-child! My sds precious Joule, I
love YOU! Believe in me. Happy 8
mos! Sexy Sadie SPHN. (J-lt-40-p)
Super-8 automatic movie camera
with FIB lens, manual 200M lens,
and pistol grip. $75 firm. 376-4905
after 6:00 P.M. (A-3t-40-p)
Attention: Friends of Sari K. She will
be home from Univ. of Maryland
during Thanksgiving break. (J-lt-40-p)
DAVID: A happy 19th birthday.
Lets all celebrate tonight at Alice's
Restaurant; its the best house in
Gainesville. CS GA. (J-lt-40-p)
BOYS!!! Your Playboy coed maid
service is here! Hire your bunnies
now. Rates to be arranged. Call
Nancy or Lisa. 373-2760. (J-st-40-p)
I LOST A FOUND |
Reward for return of UF camera lost
at Ga. Fla. game Sat. 392-7665.
Haines. (L-3t-40-p)
Lost: keychain and keys on Friday
on or near the drill field or socer
field. Keychain has sentimental value.
378-0847. (L-3t-40-p)
Found Post Versalog behind stadium.
Identify at 392-8184. (L-3t-38-p)
Found a black dog at Gainesville
Shopping Center Nov. 1. Call
373-2686. (L-39-nc-p)
Keys found in north parking lot of
Norman Hall. Can be picked up at PK
Younge front office. (L-3t-nc)
| SERVICES
Cocktail party sponsored by graduate
students for the university crowd at
the Lamplighter Lounge this and
every Friday. Two private rooms
reserved for us. This is where its at.
. Ladies drinks $.35. 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(M-4t-39-p)
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1126*6 N.
W. Bth St. 376-8506 prices not given
over phone, depends on garment.
(M-st-39-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot fiight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport, in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-001 i. (M-20t-30-p)
I FOR SALE
r .*
TYPING IN MY HOME 5 YRS.
EXPERIENCE on IBM ELECTRIC
STANDARD MODEL* CALL
JEAN, 376-7809. (M-st-36-p) 1

I
(CENTER 1 times S V
L2SSS] "BATTLE OF BRITAIN" \
* CENTER 2 LAST 2 DAYS "FACES" I
% FLORIDA LAST 2 DAYS "THOSE WERE THE**
MAY ALCOTTS
LITTLE WOMEN"
~ NOW PLAYING
A COMPANY OP
11 WAYWARD SAINTS
"a farce-comedy, blending topical and classical satire"
A Florida Players Production Tonight through Saturday
8:00 P.M. Constant Theatre
U. of F. Students: $.75. General Admission: $1.50
All seats are reserved. Box office: 392-1653
*****, - A i

FOR SALE ]
NOW Two new services available at
the Student Activities Desk 1) Ibt
of typists term papers, master's
theses, and doctoral dissertations
(financial arrangements the
responsibility of the typist and
client). 2) Xerox service ($.lO per
copy.) __
Let PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE xerox your thesis,
dissertation or manuscript work. We
type them so we know how to handle
them. Call 376-7160. (M-6t-38-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station. 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists who
can type your manuscripts
professionally and in good form. We
also have a XEROX machine. Call
Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160.
(M-7t-25-p)
Health foods, natural vitimins,
complete line Hoffman products. For
information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-13t-40-p)
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of tirfie and 27 idiomatic
' uses, such as time of ones life.
: In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time you owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore



The Florida
Alligator
GATOR SPORTS

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JERRY VINESETT
... out for season
UF-Miami
Sold Out
Tickets for the Florida-Miami
game Nov. 29 are officially sold
out, UF Ticket Manager Ray
Dorman said. He added he has
called Miami requesting more
tickets but received word that
demand for tipkets was
tremendous and the probability
of UF getting more tickets was
very slim
* *
Tickets are available for the
Kentucky-Miami game this
Saturday at Florida Field,
Dorman said.
This is the UFs first home
game in three games and the last
home game of the Gator football
season.
CHAMPAGNE I
CHAMPAGNE I
CHAMPAGNE I
CHAMPAGNE I
mampagnel
TONITE I
- v '.* .
55t I
THE GLASS I
muni
TUISTT
QAlb^
THIRSTY
tbikty
I
633 NW 13th ST. I

| BOWL HOPES on THE LIMg
I Graves Worried About UK

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
Coach Ray Graves says hes
worried that his UF football
team may suffer a letdown in
preparing for its Saturday
meeting with Kentucky. But he
also says that bowl possibilities
may provide an incentive.
After, the tie with Georgia,
Graves was saying the other day,
getting ready for Kentucky will
be a problem. But if we beat
Kentucky, we might have our
choice of some bowls.
A team cannot discuss
formally, or make a
committment to any bowl
before November 17.
I think this football team
would be a fine bowl team,
Graves said. Its young and its
explosive. And I think its the
kind of team that a bowl looks
upon with favor. But well have
to wait until after Kentucky and
see.
As far as getting up for
Kentucky, Graves said theres
Drags Tonight
Its Run What Cha Brung
time again tonight at the
Gainesville Dragway, with over
100 can expected for practice
and time trials.
The strip is located three and
one half miles north of the
Municipal Airport on SR 225.

44
S CAMERA SHOPS

NOW
MARKS
POSTKRS
YOUR PHOTO
BLOWN UP TO
HUGE
POSTER
FOR
51.,T0
1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657

really nothing a coach can say or
do to the team. You can drive
them.. but in this situation,
the desire has to come from
deep inside.
The Gators played to a 13-13
standoff Saturday afternoon
against Georgia in Jacksonville
leaving the UF with a 6-1-1
record.
Tailback Jerry Vinesett, who
injured a knee during the game,
will be lost for the remainder of

//G£r\
====== _[[ jrc?r > yl_ ====^___^
WELCOME FALL WEEKENDS
IN OUR FULLY FASHIONED KNITS
FROM THE BRITISH ISLES
V %

Here are three handsome warmers of unsurpassed excellence for casual wear
this Fall and Winter ... our cashmere cardigan sweaters by Pringle of
Scotland in rich new colors . and the distinctive V-neck pullovers of
lambswool from Pringle. They, with our classic pullover turtleneck of fine
gage wool by Allen Solly, make a most appealing selection for good looks
and comfort.
4
m
cashmere cardigan by Pringle $47.50
pullover cashmere $39.50
V-neck pullover of lambswool by Pringle $17.00
lambswool cardigan by Pringle $25.00
turtleneck of pure wool by Allen Solly $16.00
Number 6 Main Street South
THE HOME OF HICKEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES

C SAM PEPPER
V Sports Editor

Wednesday, Naeamber 12,1N9, The Florida AMaataa, I

the season, Graves said, and
comerback Harvin Clark will
begin working out a little at the
tailback position.
Split-end Paul Maliska will
miss the Kentucky game but the
possibility exists that he may be
ready for Miami, Nov. 29.
Defensive back Ted Hager is
still recovering from a knee
injury sustained during the
Tulane game and will not play
Saturday. He wiU play in the
Miami game, however.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

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HARVIN CLARK
.. move! to tailback

Page 17



Page 18

, w ,\'i E "i* rf r*.-vi*.*yv I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 12,1969

IN SPORTS EDITORS POLL
Reaves Named Soph Os The Year

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Ole
Miss Archie Manning and
Floridas John Reaves, two of
the nations top offensive
leaders, were named Player of
the Year and Sophomore of the
Year respectively, in a poll of 10
SEC campus newspaper sports
editors conducted by the
Vanderbilt Hustler.
University of Tennessee coach
Doug Dickey was named Coach

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GATOR NOTABLES
John Reaves (above) garnered Soph of the Year honors and
runner-up as Player of the Year in the SEC Sports Editor P6II. Carlos
Alvarez (right) placed second in the Soph of the Year voting and Ray
Graves (left) missed Coach of the Year honors by one vote. (Photos
by Phil Cope and Doug Case)
V Climb aboard L
y The S.S. Winnjammer** /J
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to it
Midnight )
'J Bernie Sher //
f at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
J Oysters & clams on the half shell p\
Michelob on draft \/|
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
n
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager \/
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. /I
Closed Sundays a)'
mm ppui

of the Year, barely edging out
Floridas Ray Graves.
Reaves took the Hustlers
Soph of the Year honors with 39
points, including seven of the 10
first place votes. Points were
awarded on a baas of five points
for first place vote, three for
second, and one for third.
Teammate Carlos Alvarez
placed second in the voting with
17 points, followed by

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Tennessees Curt Watson with
16.
Manning, who was named
Player of the Year, is also a
strong candidate for the
Heisman Trophy. He led his
Rebels to upset victories over
Louisiana State and Georgia,
who previously were undefeated.
Manning drew eight first place
votes, one second and one third,
for 44 points, considerably more
than runner-up Steve Kiner of
the University of Tennessee.
Kiner had 13 points, followed
by Reaves with 12.
Dickey took the coaching
honors, edging out Graves
3029. Charlie McClendon of
LSU was third with 12 points.
Editors participating in the
VOTING FINALS
SOPH OF THE YEAR
1. John Reaves (Fla.)
2. Carlos Alvarez (Fla.)
3. Curt Watson (Tenn.)
PLAYER OF THE YEAR
1. Archie Manning (Ole Miss)
2. Steve Kiner (Tenn.)
3. John Reaves (Fla r )
COACH OF THE YEAR
1. Doug Dickey (Tenn.)
2. Ray Graves (Fla.)
3. Charlie McClendon (LSU)
New Award
NEW YORK The National
Basketball Association and
SPORT Magazine have
announced the institution of a
new award to be presented to
the outstanding player in the
championship series between the
National Basketball
Associations Eastern and
Western Division playoff titlists.
The award is a fully equipped
1969 Dodge Charger R/T. The
winner, as selected by the
editors of SPORT within
moments of the conclusion of
the deciding game in the
championship series, will receive
his prize at a luncheon in his
honor in New York.

l\ntf)slieUer
Foosball Tournament
beginning Nov. 17
No entry fee
Over SSO in prizes
Singles and doubles competition
Deadline
is noon, Nov. 17
Preliminaries begin at 4:00 pm Nov. 17
Non-members invited to participate
M^___^_^_^_No_ag^eJ|rnit_

poll were Chip Hutcheson
(Kentucky Kernel), Joey Morgan
(LSU Reveille), Randy Parsons
(Daily Mississippian), Ed Ruzie
(Auburn Plainsman), Terry
Carroll (The Reflector), Rick
Young (Crimson White), Samuel
R. Heys II (The Red and The
Black), Nick Nixon (UT Daily
Beacon), Sam Pepper (Florida
Alligator) and Don Hemke
(Hustler).
GOLF
PAR 60
DRIVING RANGE
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ELECTRIC CARTS
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ELROD'S Sf
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/o To Students
All Makes And Models Corvair Specialist
Get a Fair Shake See ELROD
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 SO. MAIN 376-7771
THESIS-DISSERTATIONS
All work done to graduate school specifications WE
GUARANTEE IT. Equipment to enlarge and reduce charts,
graphs, computer printouts, etc. THESIS/DISSERTATIONS
reproduced by XEROX or OFFSET COLLATING NO EXTRA
COST.
'Graduate Students Bring Any Thesis Or Dissertation
Problems To Us'
QUICK-WAY COPY CENTER (OUICK-SAVE)
1620 w. university (univ. plaza) 372-7436

I ~.This I
I Way I
I To Beat I
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I MILLER BROWN I
4222 N.W. 13th ST.
376-4552



CHICO TOP VOTE GETTER
Durrance-Alvarez On f Dream Team

Special to the Alligator
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Tennessees Chip Kell and Steve
Kiner were the only unanimous
selections on the Vanderbilt
Hustler 1969 All Southeastern
Conference football team.
The All-SEC team was picked
by sports editors of each of the
ten campus newspapers in the
conference.
Joining the Vols on the
26-man team are their
teammates Curt Watson, a
running back, and defensive
back Tim Priest. Watson is only
a sophomore one of four
sophs on the dream team.
The others are Florida wide
receiver Carlos Alvarez, Gator
running back Tommy Durrance
and Louisiana State defensive
back Tommy Casanova.
Archie Manning of Ole Miss
was the quarterback selection,
gathering all but one vote, which
went to Floridas super soph
John Reaves.
The next three highest vote
getters besides Manning, Kell,
Kiner, Alvarez and Alabama
guard Alvin Samples (nine votes)

OFFENSE
Pos.-Name (School)
Wide receiverCarlos Alvarez (Florida)
Wide receiverSammy Milner (Miss. State)
Tight end-David Smith (Miss. State)
TackleBob Asher (Vandy)
Tackle-(Tie) Worthy McClure (Ole Miss)
Danny Ford (Alabama)
GuardChip Kell (Tennessee)
GuardAlvin Samples (Alabama)
CenterGodfrey Zaunbrecher (LSU)
QuarterbackArchie Manning (Ole Miss)
RunningbackCurt Watson (Tennessee)
RunningbackTommy Durrance (Florida)
KickerJohn Riley (Auburn)

Miami Dolphins
MIAMI, Fla. ln the first
American Football League game
played by the Miami D.olphins,
Joe Auer ran the opening
kickoff back 95 yards for a
touchdown against the Oakland
Raiders. The Raiders recovered,
however, and spoiled the
Dolphins debut with a 2314
win to start the 1966 season.

Win a
Poodle
Tonight at the...
Yeswin a pup tonight-or one of
the bottles of Champagne were giving
away FREE. And while youre here, enjoy
THE SOUNDS OF CHUCK CONLON
- t

were Vanderbilt offensive tackle
Bob Asher, Auburn defensive
back Buddy McClinton and Ole
Miss defensive back Glen
Cannon, each with eight votes.
Also named to the team were

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TOM KENNEDY
DURRANCE (33) ON ALL-SEC TEAM
... shares running back honors with Vols' Watson

GATOR |
GOLF
Miniature Golf I
Maximum Fun 1
2425 S.W. 13th St. I
6- 12 P.M. MON. FRI. I
9 A.M. 12 P.M.SAT. I
2 12 P.M. SUN. 1

DEFENSE
EndHap Farber (Ole Miss)
EndDavid Roller (Kentucky)
Tackle-Steve Greer (Georgia)
Tackle-(Tie) David Campbell (Auburn)
Buz Morrow (Ole Miss)
Linebacker-Steve Kiner (Tennessee)
Linebacker-Mike Kolen (Auburn)
Linebacker-George Bevan (LSU)
Deepback-Buddy McClinton (Auburn)
Deepback-Glenn Cannon (Ole Miss)
DeepbackTommy Casanova (LSU)
Deepback-Larry Willingham (Auburn) (Tie)
Punter-Spike Jones (Georgia)
Deepback-Tim Priest (Tennessee) (Tie)

EWING ST.
TIMES
AT THE RAT
THURS. FRI.
&
SATURDAY

wide receiver Sammy Milner of
Mississippi State, offensive
tackles Worthy McClure (Ole
Miss) and Danny Ford
(Alabama) who tied for the
second tackle spot.

ftMneedey. November 12.1969, The Florid. Alligator,!

Others named include:
Center Godfrey Zaunbrecher
(LSU), kicker John Riley
(Auburn), defensive ends Hap
Farber (Ole Miss) and Daid
Roller (Kentucky), defensive
tackles Steve Greer (Georgia),
David Campbell (Auburn) and
Buz Morrow (Ole Miss),
linebackers Mike Kolen
(Auburn) and George Beavan
(LSU), deepbacks Tim Priest
(Tennessee) and Larry
Willingham (Auburn), and
punter Spike Jones (Georgia).
Danny Fortmann
LOS ANGELES Danny
Fortmann, an All-American
guard at Colgate and later an
all-pro with the Chicago Bears, is
an orthopedic specialist on the
West Coast. Fortmanns
specialty is healing athletic
injuries.

* Catch the
V Freeport Sun....
Spend your Thanksgiving Weekend
I % in Freeport. $77.50 covers most
J everything. Call 392-1655, or come
y. by room 310, Union for
information & reservations by
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ACCENT 70
Presents
GYLAN KAIN
Poet
Musician
Songster
Reitz Union Ballroom
Nov. 16th 7:30 PM

Page 19



Page 20

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 12,1969

ONTAMMtS^=== !^=^==^==^^==!aaH! jl
SAE Pigskin Leaders
BY STEVE ROHAN ==!l

ORANGE FOOTBALL
Tau Epsilon Phi, showing as
much offensive punch as Ricco
Rizzo in a Greyhound Bus, lost
its first Orange league football
game in five years falling 24-0 to
the $AE*s.
Ironically it was the SAEs
who last beat the TEPs way back
in 1964 prior to Mondays
stomp of the once powerful
Orange league football leaders.
In other Orange league action
the Betas and Lambda Chis
battled to a 25-25 score with the
Lambda Chis winning on the
basis of more first downs in the
game.
The Betas took a 25-6 lead
into halftime only to see
Lambda Chi quarterback Bill
Parker, a sandlot scrambler,
bring his team back with three
touchdowns in the last period.
Pi Lam distinguished itself
with a convincing 19-7 win over
the Delts. But the Lammies now
face the difficult situation of
having to play both the Betas

MnJRPHYS
ONE DAY ONLY
WEDNESDAYNOVEMBER 12th
AT ALL MURPHY STORES
KI^DISCOUHT
LL zja DAT
SALE
f ON ALL PURCHASES
TO BUY INCLUDING OUR RESTAURANT DEPT. (WHERE LOCATED)
SHOP ANY MURPHY STORE for 10% discount on ALL purchases you
. C ASH make during this budget boosting ONE DAY ONLY SALE.
10% OFF the regular everyday LOW, LOW PRICES you always find at
CHARGE MURPHY'Ssave on MURPHY'S FIRST QUALITY merchandise.
A terrific day of savings . STOREWIDE 10% OFF in every depart depart
depart LAY-AWAY ment*! Hundreds of needed items for your home and family.
SAVE 10% nowUse our LAY-AWAY plan for Christmas gifts!
Use Our Lay-Away Plan g r ; n g y our shopping list .. including Christmas .. THE MORE YOU
for Christmas gifts BUYTHE MORE YOU SAVE! THIS ONE DAY ONLY!
aBMffHBHn TOBACCO ITEMS EXCLUDED
6th Street and University Ave.
fcj OPEN WEDNESDAY 9:30 to 9:00 PM

FRAT FOOTBALL
... fast and furious
and the Lambda Chis.
Sigma Nu, led by Marie Seally,
whipped the AEPis 31-18
despite the fine play of the
AEPis Luis Lamela. Sigma Nu is
looking forward to their
upcoming showdown with the
SAEs.
Wrapping up the Orange
action, SPE edged Phi Tau 18-6,
Delta Chi crushed FIJI 27-7,
Pike squeezed by Phi Delt 7-6 in

first downs, and Sigma Chi beat
ATO 19,7.
LAW LEAGUE PING PONG
Jack Klausner and Art
Villwock moved into the law
school table tennis finals by
defeating surprising Grover
Robinson and gregarious Jeff
Tobin respectively.
Klausner injured himself
practicing his infamous
under-the-leg slam when his
follow through went too far.
Klausner claimed he was off in
his ping but that his pong was
still effective. Robinson forced
the best of five series to the limit
before falling.
Villwock, who is so stiff he
has to be placed in position at
the start of each game, lost his
first game to Tobin but then
came back to shutout the mad
scrambler.
The final match is expected to
draw hundreds of sports minded
law students from their books to
see this titanic battle.

I MORRISON'S CAFETCRIA
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I WEDNESDAY
I LUNCH AND DINNER
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LUNCH AND DINNER
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
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