Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Ad Amthim.

Vol. 62, No. 39

v flg S^ :
'js'.\%Skk SHH|n -^H

.|^H
IP' '^ISP
VHH IP' PHP|::v
WAYWARD SAINTS
Harry Murphy, 'The Captain," left, and Robert Nadar, "Scopino,"
look over a full house for the opening performance Monday night of
"A Company of Wayward Saints." The Florida Players production is
being presented nightly this week in the Constans Theatre. Tickets are
on sale at the Reitz Union Box Office.
A POP FESTIVAL could be irt UFs future if the
Jefferson Airplane show next month is. successful.
Student Government and IFC are combining efforts
for the big production page 4
Classifieds II Movies < 11
Editorials 8 Orange and Blue 10
FSU News 3 Small Society 4
Letters 9 Sports 14

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Veterans Day program today at the Plaza of the
Americas will pay tribute to those who have served our
country, and offer homage to those who have died, Jim
Hollis, program chairman, said Monday.
We want a mature program. Our program will not be a
circus but a sincere observance of Veterans Day.
Starting at 12:45 pan. at the Plaza, the program is
sponsored by the Veterans Club and is the first of its kind
at the UF in recent years. The University Choir will sing,
former Congressman Billy Mathews will speak and colors
will be presented preceeded by a bugle and gun salute.
At the end of the program, after the colors have been
returned to the military representatives, Delta Chi
fraternity will accept pledges for blood donations from the
audience for the Veterans Administration.
The program has the support of UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Student Body President Charles Shepherd, the
Student Senate, the Benton Engineering Council, and other
persons and organizations on campus and in the
community.
OConnell Monday urged all members of the academic
community to join with citizens of Gainesville in support of
the services.
It is an opportunity to express our gratitude for the
sacrifice of our veterans, to pay special tribute to the many
who have paid the supreme sacrifice, and to thank
Almighty God for the blessings we have, and the freedom
that we enjoy as a nation and as individuals.
Shepherd, in a letter to Hollis, said Let me offer my
support and that of the Student Body of UF to the
Veterans Day program.
The Student Senate last Tuesday passed a resolution
supporting the memorial service but in an amendment to

The
Florida Alligator
o
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

VETERANS DAY

Non-Political
Program
Begins
At 12:45
mBH

23 POINTS OUTUNED
Traffic Crisis Report
Given To Shepherd

ByCAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
In a spurt of paperwork, paper promises and
concrete action, the fudent Parking and
Transportation Commission, appointed in the midst
of UFs traffic crises, concluded more than six
weeks of work Nov. 5.
A report submitted to Student Body President
Charles Shepherd Monday outlined 23 points of
conflict investigated by the commission under the
direction of Chairman Harvey Alper, president of
Omicron Delta Kappa mens leadership honorary.
Among the most significant achievements of the
commission, whose report was submitted to
Shepherd in less than half of the time allocated, are:
Obtained checks on the prior practice of
University Police in voiding tickets;
Advocated and been assured of reforms in the
management of the Reitz Union parking lot;
Achieved better designation of bus routes and
buses running on these routes;
Obtained reforms in policies governing married
student parking rights;
Opened commuter lots to border zone
residents; and
t Sought and obtained a clarification of
authority of the police department, vice president
for business affairs, traffic and parking coordinator
and University Traffic and Parking Committee.
It is my hope students will use all available
avenues of communication to further reform the
existing system which is .indeed, flexible, Alper
said.
He also recommended a cabinet officer be
charged with continuing the work of the
commission.
During the course of the commissions
deliberations several open meetings with Chief
of Police Audie Shuler, Parking and Traffic

|&||s. ... :
answer HBjnHB
to our ALPER
problem is action.
-Harvey Alper
Commission
Chairman
Co-ordinator Lee Burrows, and the University
Parking and Transportation Committee were helt^.
Alper and the commission members recommended,
that Shepherd take immediate action following their
first report submitted in early October.
The only decent answer to our problem is
action, Alper wrote.
Since that time the traffic and parking rules,
condemned as vague and frequently unfair by the
commission, have undergone studies for revision and
clarification as soon as possible.
Suggestions for refunds in decal fees to those
students who will not be in attendence here three or
more quarters and for more equitable treatment
of sophomores with a 3.0 or better grades who
currently cannot register their cars are also currently
under consideration as the result of the the
commissions work.

the bill said they would not support any political stand
taken by any person or organization at the service.
Nothing seems to be working against the program. Brook
Rood, a member of the Young Socialist Alliance (YSA) and
the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC) said Monday
that neither the YSA nor the SMC have any plans to disrupt
the program.
It would take a lot of time to organize for this. We
would be spreading ourselves too thin because of the
preparations that need to be made for Fridays
moratorium, she said.
The YSA and SMC are planning to meet at the Plaza of
the Americas Friday at 11 a.m. for a march to the Alachua
County Court House for a short program promoting the
end of the Vietnam War.
Although Hollis said the program wont be political, he
had no reservations about expressing his personal feeling
about the program and how it will compare with the
Moratorium ceremonies.
Referring to the Oct. 15 Moratorium program on the UF
campus, Hollis said, It was a circus. It seemed ridiculous to
put an arm band on a dog and say he is against the war.
Their program seemed to say that the more ridiculous
you are, the more people you will bring out to support the
fun and games.
Also, some organizations have offered to help the
Veterans Club with todays program The Young
Americans for Freedom and the Young Republicans but
Hollis said the club turned these groups down.
Bringing politics into the program might be appropriate i
for this time in history, however, this program shouldnt be i
political but an expression of gratitude to those who have ;
served their country.
As far as the political leanings of the Veterans Club, j
Hollis said Members used to be in the service, they were ]
honorably discharged, and damn glad of it

Tuesday, November 11, 1969



Page 2

The

IN COMPLIANCE WITH STATE LAW
UF Employes Have Two Weeks To Sign Oath

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Copies of the revised loyalty oath were
distributed to UF faculty, administrators and staff
members Monday.
Employes have two weeks to sign and return the
notarized cards if they want to be paid in
November, according to a memorandum issued by
UF President Stephen C. OConnell Friday.
Assistant to the President Rae 0. Weimer said UF
is just complying with state-wide law.
Those institutions which do not require the
oaths will be violating the law, he said.
Norma Munn, chairman of the local chapter of
the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said
loyalty oaths have been required for over 20 years,
but suddenly the Board of Regents and OConnell
have decided to enforce them. She said she does not
hold either the Board or OConnell responsible for
the oaths.
The requiring of an oath is an act of legislation
so the legislators are responsible for them. The

CIO May Obtain SI,OOO
From SGs Special Fund

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Council of International
Organizations (CIO) long fight
to obtain funds finally paid off
last week when the Student
Senate passed the first reading of
a bill to give the group SI,OOO
for International Week.
The bill comes up for its
second reading at the Senate
meeting tonight.
Although the senate voted in
October not to release money
from the Special Requests Fund
for the groups left fundless in
the 1969-70 budget, the SI,OOO
was transferred from the line
item for National Student
Association (NSA) convention
to the International Week.
Jim Reinman, chairman of the
senate budget and finance
committee, said Monday
approximately $1,600 was
allocated to the NSA
convention, but was listed under
cabinet funds. Since UF is no
longer a member school, the
extra money was available for
other groups.
The additional S6OO in the
fund has not yet been
transferred, he said.
Foreign Students Advisor
Glenn A. Farris said Monday the
ClOs International Week
request was $1,270, but CIO
President Juan Clark told the
senate if that amount was not
available the event could still be
undertaken with SI,OOO.
We are grateful International
Week which is a tradition at
the UF has been approved,
Farris said, but we are going to
try again in the next fiscal year
for funds for the entire CIO.
The ClOs member clubs have
not been granted funds but
Farris said the clubs are going
dutch treat. Members are
being assessed for special

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wffl not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
k given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for mote than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
for correction must be given before the next insertion.
.* i iv.v,!7v':v. i 1

functions and some of the
activities are practically as
interesting and useful as when
SG supported them.
The number and type of
activities has been cut down,
Farris said, but not too
noticably.
Reinman said the budget
committee originally requested
the CIO be given funds for
International Week since it did
effect the entire campus, but the

Senate Expects Furor
Over Fee Referendum

The Student Senate is bracing
itself for the furor expected to
erupt over the wording of the
ballot for the referendum for the
proposed University Activities
Center fee.
The ballot calls for an increase
in registration fees of $6 per
quarter to provide funds strictly
for the financing of an Activities
Center.
The attack is expected to
come from opponents to the fee
hike who claim that students are
overcharged for their education
and fear the state legislature
might take the increase as an
indication of student willingness
to pay higher tuition.
Senate President Jack Vaughn
said that anybody who has an
opinion on the issue is welcome
to speak at the meeting.
Senate officials also
announced that there are still
senate seats vacant from the

question to the Regents and OConnell must be why
they have chosen to enforce the law at this
particular time, she said.
Mrs. Munn stated a belief that loyalty oaths
appear in either times of economic depression or of
political repression. She thinks the revival of the
oaths at this time is general reaction to present
political events.
They are an attempt to stifle dissent, she said.
There were loyalty oaths during World War I and
in the 30s. However, oaths really became an issue
during the McCarthy era. Later, enforcement of
these oaths became law. Legislation concerning
loyalty oaths was passed in Florida in the late 40s,
and the law was revised in 1961.
To say this oath is a legacy of the McCarthy era
is probably technically correct, Mrs. Munn said.
However, their revival now is actually a result of
the actions and attitudes of dissent in the country
today.
She said the loyalty oath issue is being used as a

senate was in a cutting mood.
The ClOs clubs are
continuing to function actively,
Farris said, because the students
are not without pride and
initiative and they are not going
to just sit around.
A meeting has been scheduled
for 8 tonight in room 316, Reitz
Union, when plans will get under
way for the week of
international events planned for
April.

college of Health Related
Professions and the College of
Medicine.
The meeting will convene at
7:30 p.m. in room 349 of the
Reitz Union. Focus party will
caucus at 7:00, and First party
will meet at 7:15 pjn.
MINI-POSTER
mm D m start
REP STUMS?
is. J

with Rollim. sim, i nit i ntemew with Bob Dylan, based on a four hour rap
uh Rolling Stone Id,tor .Jam, Wenner, is complete and unedited. I
Wl X/.IMIM (,l \R \\ii I [). I
Sind SI.OO to "Dylan Interview," 746 Brannan Sir t. s- i | I

political football and she believes the state will
appeal at least the Orlando decision.
This decision deleted portions of the oath which
madethe signee affirm he was not a member of the
Communist party or any other group which
advocated the overthrow of the government.
No one from the ACLU has decided not to
appeal the constitutionality of the oath. The oath
with the third point which states I do not believe in
the violent overthrow of the government is
definitely unconstitutional, she said.
The legal argument against the constitutionality
of that provision concerns the fact that it is
thought-control.
The government can control actions, but not
beliefs, she said.
Rivers Buford, legal advisor to the State
Education Department said Monday he could not
make any comment on the case.
In a special report to Gov. Claude Kirk, Buford
had said in view of the recent federal cases involving
loyalty oaths, he feels the state has won not lost
- the battle.

| Dr. Graeffe Speaks
I On Female Form
A By ANNE B. FREEDMAN A
0 Alligator Features Editor A
$ The ad showed a voluptuous, nubile female, and called the t
0 talk, The Way I See Her, sponsored by the Center of Man in \
A Micanopy. Dr. Didier Graeffe of comprehensive humanities was A
A supposed to lecture on woman as the first part of this years A
\ series of lectures on the problems of man. \
? But Graeffe told his audience of 150 Thursday night, Youre \
? not going to get what you saw in the poster.
t He explained that the female figure on the poster that had i
0 been circulated was Renoirs long-time model, Gabridle. 0
A She is the anatomy of a different era. A time when women A
\ were fed rice and chicken fat and butter and other nice things, \
\ he said with a twinkle. \
Please dont expect my women to be voluptuous they
* arent. f
/ Graeffe looked around the tall-ceilinged, red-bricked $
0 recreation room of the Presbyterian University Center and A
A admitted he had prepared his program for the more relaxed a
a quarters of the Center of Man in Micanopy. \
\ Ive never talked about the female form in a church before, ?
i he said. i
x, He offered his audience, mixed about evenly with students \
v and adults, two explanations of the origin of woman. v
0 The Greek or mythological version claims essentially that o
a Aphrodite, the goddess of life, created man. But, Graeffe asked, a
a Ho you think she would have created man first? X
X Graeffes brief talk was followed by presentation of his own l
i artistic photographs of women. The first section consisted of
black and white pictures with Graeffe explaining specific 1
i techniques he used. The second and third parts were color |
0 slides, moderated by a recorded percussion recital and finally by A
A a dancing exhibition by Beth Ramey to Freak Out, an album A
a by the Mothers of Invention. 1
X After showing a sandwiched double white on black, black on ?
* white impression of the back of a nude, voluptuous female, |
I Graeffe told the attentive crowd that the model was an \
0 11-year-old girl. A
A 1 don t like to explain my techniques because after I do, A
A people say, oh, is that all you do, he said. X
A Citing his trick photography, Graeffe said that by i
X projecting the human face directly onto the human body, you |
i can B e t geometric patterns more interesting than the body %
V itself. & A
A You can take pictures of women where you cant ask them r
he said.



WIPER REFORMS NEXT YEAR?
Senate Committee Supports Lottery

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate Armed Services Committee
agreed Monday to approve a House-passed random selection draft bill
this year and promised to begin hearings on a more comprehensive
selective service reform in February.
Chairman John Stennis, D-Miss., said, the committee passed a
resolution supporting the House lottery system, but making it clear it
opposed any attempts to broaden the scope of the measure before it is
sent to the President.
Action on the lottery bill itself was deferred until Stennis meets
with the Senate leadership, including Democratic whip Edward M.
Kennedy, Mass.
Kennedys insistence on broader reform had stalled further action
on the lottery bill. But last week he agreed to a compromise to get the
lottery this year and make sure wider reform would be taken up next
year.
Under the compromise, the effective expiration of the Selective

Is Your Group Listed Here
For A Budget Hearing ?

The following organizations
are asked to come to Room 316
in the Reitz Union for budget
hearings at the listed time:
Today: 3:30, Association of
Political Science Students; 4,
Association of Women Students;
4:30, Accent *7l; 5, Befrienders;

High Court Approves
Legislators Pay Raise

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Christmas came early to
Floridas 167 legislators Monday
in the form of a Supreme Court
decision upholding validity of a
ten-fold salary increase that has
piled up sl.l million in the state
treasury.
It amounts to approximately
$6,800 per legislator.
Gov. Claude Kirk, who

news
from...;

NEW VP FSU President Stanley Marshall announced Monday the
appointment of Paul G. Craig, an Ohio State University dean, as vice
president for academic affairs. The new vice president will report to
FSU Feb. 1. He is currently dean of the College of Social and
Behavioral Sciences at Ohio Jtate.
TRANSFERS FSITs new general education policy for junior
college transfers, enacted by Faculty Senate last month, is now in
effect. All currently enrolled and future transfer students who meet
two criteria are now exempt from FStPs basic studies requirements.
The criteria are: fulfillment of a junior colleges general education
requirements; and completion of at least 36 semester hours (54
Quarter hours'! of liberal studies work at the iunior college level.

111 " (W. Sunders
fe ferttuckljTiwl
W Hidken
BRING lt- BRING
COUPON COUPON
B) TUES. & WED. ONLY
K
MNNER j
BOX
Reg. 1.25 S
bRINGCOUPONMMMMIMi

5:30, University Religion
Association.
Wednesday:. 3:30, Billy
Mitchell Drill Team; 4,
Cheerleaders; 4:15, Student
Occupational Therapy
Evaluation; 5, Diamond Village.
Thursday: 3:30, Engineering

challenged the increase from
$1,200 to $12,000 a year as
unlawful, has 15 days in which
to seek a re-hearing.
The 6-0 Supreme Court
decision, written by Justice Joe
Boyd, said the raise lawfully is
retroactive to April 1, the start
of the 1969 season, even though
the pay raise law did not become
effective until Aug. 5.

v.,
>Xvt****v.. ./.y
sfMlH c FSU

Service Act would be moved up from July 1,1970, to Dec. 31,1970,
forcing Congress to act on the draft next year.
Kennedy had planned to offer amendments to the lottery bill
seeking far-reaching changes in the law particularly to stop selective
service boards from using the draft as a device to punish dissenters.
But Stennis said the committee individually and collectively agreed
to oppose the consideration and passage of any amendments to the
House bid. He said members felt that restriction was the only chance
the bill had for passage this year.
But Stennis said the compromise proposal also was rejected.
He said moving the expiration date up six months would be unwise,
since we would not be able to predict conditions that far ahead.
Sen. Edward W. Brooke, R-Mass., who has been a leader in attempts
to reform the draft, said the solution the committee offered was the
only practical thing that could be done. The alternative, he said, was
no draft reform at all.

Fair; 4, Flavets ID; 4:30, Florida
Players; 5, Gator Band.
Nov. 18: 3:30, Gator Guard;
4, Gator Loan Fund; 4:30, UF
General Dames; 5, Graduate
Student Association for College
of Education.
Nov. 19: 3:30, Homecoming
7O; 4, Interhall; 4:30,
Intramurals; 5, Mayors Council.
Nov. 20: 3:30, Mens and
Womens Glee Club and
University Choir; 4, Public
Functions Authority; 4:30,
SAMSON; 5, Speakers Bureau.
Nov. 21: 3:30,
CELEBRATION 7O; 4, Student
Government Productions; 4:15,
Student Senate; 4:30, Council of
International Organizations; 5,
Symphony Orchestra.
If there are any questions,
contact Faith Tulino, budget
director, at 392-1621 or
373-1063.
Blooming Idiocy
Sunflower watchers of the
world, go home! Those bright
yellow blossoms arent going to
follow the sun across the sky
after all.
The notion that sunflowers
turn to face the sun all day has
existed as long as the plant itself,
but is is a mistaken one," says
Dr. Freeman K. Johnson,
director of sunflower breeding
research for Cargill, Inc.,
international agribusiness firm
here.
Heliotropism the tendency
of certain plants to face toward
the sun occurs in the
sunflower only during early
stages of growth.**

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Lower prices eTrained technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
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Cricketeer captures the
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Page 3



, The Florida Alligtor.Tti*d*y, November 11,1969

Page 4

Will UF Pop Festival
Come Via 'Airplane *?
IFC and Student Government Productions merger to produce the
Jefferson Airplane Show Dec. 2 may bring UF its first pop festival,
Miles Wilkin, co-producer and agent for IFC, said Monday.
Alan Howes, co-producer and agent for the SGP said the concert
will act as a pilot and if it is successful, the proposed pop festival
could become a reality.
IFC and SGP decided on the merger Monday and in a. contractual
agreement between the two groups agreed that any pop concerts to
exceed two per quarter (one SGP and one IFC) will be co-produced.
SIGNING AIRPLANE CONTRACT
... Alan Howes, left, and Miles Wilkin

High Bids
Submitted for
New Building
Bids for the construction of
UFs proposed Life Sciences
Psychology Building, submitted
Tuesday, were all above the
$1,891,000 budgeted to
construct the facility.
Apparent low biddei, M.M.
Parrish of Gainesville, had a baSe
bid; of $2,333,238 with eight
alternate deductions reducing
the cost to $2,122,218. Other
contractors bidding were
Fielland of Tampa, Biltmore of
Clearwater, Dyson & Co. of
Pensacola and API of Orlando.
No contract was awarded, but
all bids were taken under
advisement for consideration of
further reduction in the building
planned primarily as a research
and graduate teaching facility.
fIHP&fPHMEH
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

HOWS
THIS
FORA
CHALLENGE?

Our representative will be on campus
November 12, 1969
THE RUST ENGINEERING
DIVISION OF LITTON
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Rust is an engineering-construction firm thats
9,000 people strong and 12,000 contracts old.
We are committed to an unusually high growth
rate during the next five years. We need young
and eager architects, civil, mechanical and elec electrical
trical electrical engineers to step in and help achieve or
surpass that growth.
With Rust; your professional development
comes fast. And you have the opportunity to ex expand
pand expand your interest in the newer disciplines that

the small society^

Yod'fZe
V tfeV&P lptmego
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SoLP | &p. /
Sf?u:KMArA)
Murdet Attempt Suspect Held

University, police arrested a
Gainesville man early Monday
and charged him with assault to
murder on the UF campus.
Police say Robert Walker and
a UF employe, Oliver Porter,
were arguing over Walkers wife
in the parking area directly
behind Hume Hall.
According to police, Walkers
wife Usher Mae, a member of
the Hume Hall housing staff, had
been driven to work by Porter.
Walker became mad and the two

men became involved in an
argument.
A nearby construction worker
who summoned police, said
Walker pulled a gun from his
pocket and fired a .22 caliber
bullet into Porters shoulder.
Police rushed Porter to
Shands Teaching Hospital where
he is listed in good condition.
University police apprehended
Walker and charged him with
assault to commit murder.
Walker has been freed from

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by Brickmon

EWING ST.
TIMES
AT THE RAT
THURS. FRI.
&
SATURDAY



SIN ATE.AU.QQ.ATIQN DENIED
FSU Prexy Vetoes Bill To Pay SMC Bus Fare

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida State University Student
Body President Canter Brown Monday
vetoed a Student Senate bill that would
have paid half the bus fare for 114
Student Mobilization Committee
members to go to Washington, D.C., for
the Nov. 15 Moratorium.
The bill, allocating $1,824 to the
group, passed on the tie-breaking vote
of the student body vice-president
Thursday.

Greyhound Lines Refuses
SMC Request For Buses

Greyhound Bus lines has
denied a request by the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)
for five chartered buses for the
Nov. 15 Moratorium in
Washington, D.C., because of a
lack of buses.
Don Kell, manager of the
Greyhound bus station in
Gainesville, said Monday he
requested five buses for SMC
when they gave him their
deposit on Nov. 6, but the
request came back from Bus
Control in Jacksonville, where
all charter requests must go,
where it was turned down.
The reason for the denial of
the buses was that no buses were
available. 61 buses have been

U.S. Seeks Action
On P.O.W. Treatment

UNITED NATIONS (l)PI)
The United States will begin a
major drive today for action on
North Vietnams treatment of
American prisoners of war.
Mrs. Rita E. Hauser,
permanent UJS. representative
on the U.N. Human Rights
Commission, will raise the
question of the fate of 400 to
1300 UJS. servicemen believed
in Hanois hands when the
General Assemblys Social,
Humanitarian and Cultural
Committee begins its rights
debate today.
Washington chose to raise the
question in the relatively
subordinate committee rather
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Friday FSUs newspaper, the
Flambeau, was flooded with calls and
letters strongly opposing the passage of
the bill, Flambeau Assistant News
Editor Lany Balewsky said Monday.
Brown released a statement with die
veto explaining his reasons for the
move.
I feel that the precedent involved in
allocation of funds to a political
organization provides grounds for such a
disagreement.
He further explained that he

chartered for the Apollo 12
moon shot, and other groups
chartered the remaining buses
earlier.
Kell said this time of year is
very busy and requests must be
made early. The Gator football
team and band and the local
high schools put in orders for
charters several months in
advance.
SMC contacted Kell on Nov.
1, confirmed plans for chartering
buses on Nov. 4 and gave him
the deposit Nov. 6, Kell said.
I requested 5 buses for them
then. The company refused them
due to the fact that we have 61
buses over the regular schedule

than bringing it before the full
assembly as a major agenda issue
because the desire was to
emphasize the human rights of
the captives rather than stir up a
political issue, an American
spokesman said.
Make an
executive
decision.
Check out
Federated
Department
Stores,
Inc.
Write
Federated Department Stores Inc.,
Director of
Executive Resources,
Cincinnati, Ohio 4&02
It couldnt hurt.
' -'* *'** 4.

for the moon shot on Nov. 14,
he said.
We just dont have any buses
available.
Kell emphasized that if there
were any way to get the buses
for SMC he would do it, because
he works on commission and
the more I sell,- the. more I
make.
Kell went to the Trailways
terminal in Gainesville Monday
to try to get buses there.

I The Man-On-Campus Collection I
I ** * ***^^ / SHIBTMaw'eRB I
I II(I The Bristol pin or not in either I
I Margate spread, shown The celebrated Purist button down H
above, and the Purist button-down, with regular tapered body.
I Sero presents a distinctive collection of fall
I and winter dress shirts designed for todays K?
§ Man-on-Campus. Meticulously tailored in
no-iron, wrinkle-free Sero-Press of 65%
DACRON Polyester, 35% Cotton for a fek \
fresh all-day appearance. J
I Available at: UNIVERSITY SHOP I
1620 UNIVERSITY AVE. I
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
DuPont registered tradamark e cowum *am
supported the Oct. 15 Moratorium as an
individual rather than as student body
president, and that he did not feel he
could speak for all of Student
Government on such an issue.
The senate can override Browns veto
with a two-thirds vote, but this is
unlikely considering the closeness of
Thursday's vote.
If the senate does override the veto,
the bill must still be approved by the
vice president for student affairs, the
University Budget Committee and FSU

, frn> i|/j%vmli A two-dayexhibition a sale
presented by
ARTS
H Publisher* of contemporary printmakers
mmm More than 400 lithographs, etchings,
|U|inW!] '? woodcuts and screenprints on show,
including works by : PICASSO, DURER,
GOYA, CHAGALL, DAUMIER, CASSAT.
T* GAUGUIN, TOULOUSE-LAUTREC
= : V- R Also MANUSCRIPTS AND MAPS
ITEMS FROM $8 to S3OOO
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Mj Main Gallery Reitz. Union
HKitHii. Tuesday and Wednesday
November 11 and.l2, 1969
10 a.m. -7 p.m.

Tuesday, Neeemhar it, 1960, Tfie Florida Alligator,

President Stanley Marshall. Any one of
these people can veto the bill.
Friday three law students went to the
Student Supreme Court to ask for an
injunction against the bill. But the Chief
Justice asked the students to wait until
the bill was officially passed and signed
by Brown.
State legislators are planning to take
the case to Circuit Court if it re-passes
the senate and gains the proper
approvals, but hopes for passage are
slim, Balewsky said.

Page 5



Page 6

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 11,1969

Astronauts Practice Emergency Procedures

CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
Veteran Charles Pete Conrad and
space rookie Alan L. Bean, who
thinks the Apollo 12 mission is
worth 6J4 years of waiting,
rehearsed emergency procedures
Monday for their critical moon
landing.
The third member of the
team, command module pilot
Richard F. Gordon, was given a
briefing on lunar landmarks,
particularly the three possible
targets for future manned
landings which Apollo 12 will
photograph for study.
While the astronauts, already
pronounced physically ready,

Supreme Court Denies Segregation Appeal

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court followed up its
recent crack down on Mississippi
school segregation Monday by
turning down an appeal of 44
Louisiana school districts which
sought to keep freedom of
choice*' school systems.
The high court took the
action by refusing to review a
lower court ruling against the

Mclntyre Joins Opposition
In Haynsworth Controversy

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Thomas X. Mclntyre, D-N.H.,
who had been counted among
the undecided in the controversy
over, the Supreme Court
nomination of Gement F.
Haynsworth, announced
Monday he would vote against
the Greenville, S.C., appeals
court judge.
This brought to 44 the
number of senators considered
firmly against President Nixon's
nominee, against 37 in favor and
19 still undecided.
It is those who still have not
made up their minds who wfll
decide the issue after Senate
debate on the nomination begins
Thursday. A vote is expected by
Monday or Tuesday of next
week.
After Mclntyre's
announcement, Sen. Robert J.
Dole, R-Kan., said he would vote
for Haynsworth, but this had
been expected and Dole had been

ONeil Denies Knowledge
Os Illegal Tire Purchase
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Transportation Secretary Michael O'Neil
told a Senate committee Monday that he did not know it was against
the law for the Turnpike Authority to buy tires from a company with
which he was associated while he was a member of the authority.
The committee opened a hearing on a confirmation of O'Neil by
leading a statute that provides that any member... of the Turnpike
Authority who is interested, either directly or indirectly, in... the
sale of any property, either real or personal, to the authority, shall be
punished by a fine not exceeding SSOO or by imprisonment not
exceeding one year.
Another legislative committee brought out last week that the
authority purchased nearly $29,000 worth of tires while ONeil was a
member of the authority from General Tire Services Co., Miami, of
which he was then president.
But ONeil said he had no financial interest in this company and
that he personally owns less than 10 per cent of the stock of the
parent company, General Tire & Rubber Co. of Akron, Ohio.
He said later, in reply to a question from Sen. Joe McClain,
R-Tampa, that his family founded the parent company, a $1 billion
sales corporation, and altogether probably owned in excess of 10 per
cent.
He said the chairman of the board, president, chairman of the
finance company and three directors are his cousins, but that he quit
as president of the Miami subsidiary July 1 and is on leave without
pay as assistant to the president of the parent firm.
He also said there are 109 male O'Neils alive, most of them
associated with the family business, if old enough to work.
Vi** i

sharpened themselves for their
scheduled 11:22 a.m. EST
blastoff on Friday, launch pad
crews ended a 12-hour break and
began readying the Apollo 12
spacecraft for flight.
Technicians removed a maze
of test equipment from the
command ship and lunar landing
vehicle perched on the nose of
the Saturn 5 rocket and bolted
panels back into place.
Preparations began for the
tridry job of loading a highly
unstable form of helium,
necessary to pressurize the fuel
tanks of the lunar vehicle's
descent stage.

Louisiana school boards.
The rejection was announced
in an unsigned order without
comment.
In other actions, the court:
Rejected a government
request to review an overtime
pay ruling which the Post Office
Department said could affect
approximately 450,000
employes and cost SIOO million.

counted among the
pro-Haynsworth senators in
UPls poll.
The decision by Mclntyre, an
independent-minded Democrat,
was a blow to administration
supporters who had hoped he
would split with many of his
New England colleagues and
back Haynsworth.
In a statement, Mclntyre said
he did not question
Haynsworth's character or
integrity but that he did not
think his record as chief judge of
the 4th UJS. Circuit Court of
Appeals met the high standards
necessary to inspire public
confidence in the Supreme
Court.
As Mclntyre disclosed his
decision, the Senate Judiciary
Committee awaited a minority
report from its seven members
who opposed the nomination.

PREPARE FOR MOON LANDING

jp
mmKK
The flight will be the third
space mission for Conrad, 39,
who flew twice aboard Gemini
spacecraft, and the second for
Gordon, 40, who was Conrad's

9 Turned down a Federal
Trade Commission effort to
reinstate a regulation aimed at
protecting UJS. consumers from
misbranded wool imports. The
UJS. Court of Appeals held that
authority for such regulation
rested with the Customs Bureau.
Upheld an Interstate
Commerce Commission order

They were outvoted by 10
other committe members.
The report was expected to be
ready in time for debate to begin
later this week. Senate
Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield said debate would
begin Thursday and that a vote
by the entire Senate should be
possible in about a week.

r* iV ''
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For a free reprint of this ad (suitable for framing)
without advertising
Write: Bud. Man Label, 721 Pestalozzi Street, St. Louis. Mo. 63118

partner aboard Gemini 11. For
the 37-year-old Bean, Apollo 12
is the first flight beyond the
atmosphere, and he concedes
that just getting off the
ground is what he looks
forward to most.
When youve been around
six and a half years, you re ready
to go, Bean says. But he has no
complaints about the long wait.
Its been worth it, he said
recently. The wait is worth it.
Conrad is commander of the
mission and Bean is pilot of the
lunar landing craft. Leaving
Gordon palotiiig the command
module in orbit around the

setting national freight car rental
rates.
9 Let stand a Kansas state
court ruling that a prison parolee
is not entitled to a hearing and a
lawyer before his parole can be
revoked.
The Louisiana School board
cases were brought under one
legal tent by the UJS. sth Circuit
Court of Appeals.
The Supreme Court had
already ruled in an important
1968 case that freedom of
choice plans were invalid when
they were clearly failing to bring
about desegregation.
The sth Circuit said the
freedom of choice plans were
not adequate in the Louisiana
cases. In all but one of them, the
sth Circuit ruling overturned
lower court cases.
In the case involving the
Tangipahoa Parish school board,
it affirmed the lower court,
which had ordered the board to

moon, Conrad and Bean will fly
the long-legged lunar lander to a
touchdown on the moons
Ocean of Storms scheduled for
1:53 ajn. EST Nov. 19.
Monday, the lunar spacecraft
simulator practicing split
second procedures they would
have to use if something went
wrong during the landing.
In an emergency, they would
ignite their ascent engine and
blast back into lunar orbit to
re-join Gordon.
The Mission Control Center at
Houston monitored the'
rehearsal, just as if it were the
real thing.

scrap its freedom of choice
program and use instead
geographic zones, or pairing
of classes, or both.
Three law firms joined in the
appeal petition with Attorney
General Jack Gremillion of
Louisiana.
They told the Supreme Court
in a written petition, This
system of freedom of choice
was not a fradulent scheme to
fetter Negro development but
rather a markedly courageous
plan put through with the
endorsement of the courts and
the appellants.
No one who paused to
reflect on two centuries of
segregation in the South
expected a racial balance to
occur quickly.
The government, however,
contended freedom of choice
systems have delayed effective
desegregation.



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Were a petroleum and energy company.
But we believe that making our world a
better place to live in makes good sense
as well as good business. And this kind
of thinking demands individuals with

Our interviewer will be here next week. Talk to him.

ARCO

ideas and energy. People who can see
the potentials-usual and unusual unusualwhich
which unusualwhich our products have for improving
the world. People like you. Bring your
ideals, and your motivation, where they'll

YiMxftry, NovwniMr 11,ld60,Tha Florida A'Hifator,

make good things happen. See our ;
interviewers on campus. Or send a
resume to: Manager Professional
Recruitment, 717 Fifth Avenue,
New York, N.Y. 10022
ARCO Chemical Division
Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation
Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company

An Equal Opportunity Employer

Page 7



Page 8

. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. November 11.1960

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
A jlfl Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
Executive Editor News Editor
j\ turnout
r r >:-l q Mancha
No Foliage?
By Marc H. Glick &&
Three more trees were cut down this week their ages were no less
than 90 years old.
The fatality rate of trees and the rate at which the general
landscape is being destroyed on the UF campus can not much longer
go unnoticed.
In the past three weeks alone, five trees 40 to 100 years old and
three to four stories tall were cut down and uprooted.
What are we going through if a blind stampede toward progress
disregards the heritage of our environment?
We must never let the beauty of our campus be sacrificed to what
may be current architectural fads which exclude foliage where will
we be when foliage comes back in?
Let us move forward with a mind toward progress which conserves.
A sincere effort should be made to impose upon the consideration
of the architects who design our buildings and the planners who place
them to incorporate the lovely Kurst topography which is UFs setting
into their design.
Never again should hills be smoothed out for the placement of
buildings. Neither should we again permit the building and landscape
designs which replace pines and great spreading oaks with date palms.
There is only one man who can stop the wholesale destruction of
the beauty of this campus Stephen C. OConnell.
With the stroke of his pen he can provide the bounds which the
Campus Planning and Land Use Committee must follow.
These bounds should include:
The placement of buildings where the least destruction of the
natural surroundings can be effected.
The institution of a comprehensive planting program of oaks,
pines, maples, and other foliage in those areas where previously
planners permitted the sacrifice of this natural resource.
The placing of a moratorium on the use of land for building
where the few remaining groves of trees stand.
The imposition of ground rules for our designers providing for
the incorporation of the natural wealth of the campus in their art.
The moratorium should be of first priority. Those areas affected
should include Ravine Park, Lake Alice, the grove across the street
from the new museum, and the grove bordering Center Drive which is
now threatened by the construction of an addition to the Life
Sciences Building. The addition could be placed where it would affect
no trees.
There are two directions in which the appearance of our campus
can go: it can look lice a concrete and brick jungle, sterile in the sense
tha plant life has been passed by in the name of progress; or there can
be progress which preserves and conserves the natural wealth which
this campus is quickly eradicating.
President OConnell, the decision is yours ....
P X'''* : : l ijr J -.' T'ik iTo aool
C,A MAPINOT AT AU SECRET
- credit Ollie Harrington/Daily Wortd/LNS

EDITORIAL
Lest We Forget

If we are ever to have a lasting peace, a
peace fostered by the American will, there
first must be a renewal of spiritual unity
once present during times of crisis in this
country.
It might be argued, of course, whether
this unity is necessary prior to the achieving
of that peace. Is it necessary to sacrifice
healthy and responsible dissent for silence in
order to show solidarity at the negotiation
table? Some political leaders would have us
think so.
But, their castigation of young dissenters
has been just as irresponsible as peace
marches sometimes are. Both left and right
have been guilty of muddying the issues with
simple solutions and reactionary, gut-level
quick answers.
Amidst all the arguments for and against
the war, complete with rampant chauvinism
and revolutionary jargon, one important
factor in the war has been overlooked: the
soldier doing the fighting and the dying.
His is a non-political war. With some
exceptions he was sent into battle against his
will, taken away from his family, to fight in
an alien land where his presence is neither

A Time Os Division

Frank Mankiewicz-
WASHINGTON lf common sense is still valued
at the White House, President Nixon will follow up
his speech on Vietnam with hard concessions to
those who want rapid disengagement. This would
mean an announcement sometime before Nov. 13
of a substantial troop withdrawal.
If he has no such plan in mind, he and the
country he leads faces a time of frightening
division and of head-cracking in the streets. There
can be no other end to it, and surely Mr. Nixon has
too much common sense not to know it.
Moreover, the procession of Republican leaders,
including the Presidents spokesmen in both House
and Senate, who speculated aloud on the eve of the
speech about everything from cease-fires to troop
withdrawal timetables, cannot have lied or been lied
to.
Therefore, common sense says that having made
himself solid with the Hawks, Mr. Nixon will now
do something to appease the Doves.
In the wake of Mr. Nixons speech, there is a
frightening possibility that he has lost his political
common sense and is ready to pose a hard line
against the hard line of that tiny minority of
crackpot militants in the peace movement. That
possibility should cause the Great Silent Majority
in and out of the peace movement to shudder.
If this is the reality, Mr. Nixon may find himself
on unfamiliar ground. There are short-term political
benefits for him in pictures of long-haired
demonstrators charging the police. But the
long-range odds are more even. The peace
movement in this country does not consist of a few
professors willing to sign a full-page ad in the New
York Times defending Owen Lattimore. It will be
hard to label roughly half the population as soft on
communism.
Meeting on the morning after the Presidents
speech, the leaders of the Peace Moratorium here

cherished nor welcomed.
Yet, talk of excalations and of quick
withdrawal do not speed his return. Instead,
his plight is somehow forgotten
overshadowed in flowery rhetoric and
caustic denounciations.
We do not ask that dissent end, that a
great cloud shroud the nation with silence.
We only ask that the soldiers predicament
by not forgotten. While the war may not be
honorable morally, the soldiers individual
fight certainly is not without honor.
The Veterans Day memorial services
today in the Plaza of the Americas is to be
non-political. It should remain that way.
The presentations purpose is to thank our
servicemen for a job done in the interests of
the country, regardless of the morality of
those interests.
Those men did their job without
argument. Their 45,000-plus fallen comrades
are a real silent minority. They can no
longer speak of the American dream.
They did their duty when they were
called.
Let us do our part by respecting their
memory.

determined that the Presidents feet must now be
held to the fire. Their fears of being linked with the
crazies of the mobilization are cast aside. They
simply do not believe that the Great Silent Majority
is prepared to go on with an endless, debilitating
and self-brutalizaing war. They believe that they are
the Great Silent Majority, and they are determined
to prove it.
The danger -as in all confrontations is that
the Silent Majority will be crushed between
extremists between the Hawk extremist whom
Mr. Nixon appeased with his speech and those peace
extrimists who really seek confrontation more than
peace. And so there is only the common sense of
the President and that of the peace moderates which
now can keep Washington from violence and which
can put Mr. Nixon in tune with the Silent Majority
he seeks.
Surely the President does not really believe as
he implied in his speech that the war in Vietnam
was begun by Russian and Chinese-inspired
Communist aggression. The Silent Majority has read
too much history to accept such a simplistic
explanation.
Surely he does not think as he implied he did
that the United States is saving freedom by
propping up President Thiu and Vice President Ky.
Surely he does not think as he implied he did
a South Vietnamese army which has never had less
than a 10-1 superiority in the field can defeat the
enemy without us when it does not do it with us,
and loses 10,000 deserters a month into the bargain.
If, in the privacy of the Oval Room, the President
really came to believe these things, he is far more
simple-minded than his reputation, and the Silent
Majority which he assumes is his constituency is not
his constituency at all. It will be an opposition,
more sophisticated and now mobilizing.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Mary Toomey Anne Freedman
Editorial Assistant Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



WOKtt
By Being Unemployed We Are Saving Ourselves From
A Ruinous Inflation

Infirmary Alw
MR. EDITOR:
I am concerned about the satirical article on the
Infirmary which appeared in the Alligator on
October 29th. If the article should raise doubts in
any students mind about the availability of
competent and reasonably prompt medical care here
it should be a dis-service both to individual students
and the University community. I would like to
emphasize two points which are alluded to in the
article:
A physician is on duty in the building at all times
including the noon hour for patients needing
emergency or urgent care. For those who can
anticipate their needs in advance we strongly urge
the use of the appointment system. Inevitably,
students who drop in for problems which are not
urgent will have some waiting time. We work

Pazar Day: A Turkish Village Comes Alive

Wednesday was pazar day.
In other towns it was Friday or
Thursday. Or even Saturday. But in this
town it was Wednesday. Every
Wednesday.
Wednesday was like a holiday. It was
a time for walking around, buying ice
cream cones, sitting in the park and
watching the people. It was come-alive
day, a happy day, the best day of the
week. Wednesday was my favorite day.
From Thursday through Tuesday, the
town was empty. The small shops and
coffeehouses were always open, of
course, but there were never many
people on the streets. It wasnt until
Tuesday night that things started to
happen the baklava-maker made extra
baklava; the shoemaker stayed up extra
late pounding away with a piece of
leather in his mouth; the tailors sat
outside in the evening coolness pulling
their needles with extra vigor; all of the
small shops stayed open a little later
than usual.
And on Tuesday night neighboring
villagers on donkeys and camels began
pouring into the town. Sidewalk stands
were set up with fruits and vegetables
and merchants slept outside with their
goods, ready to awaken with the
sunshine. If you forgot what day of the
week it was, you knew when it was
Tuesday.
On Wednesday morning I always
awakened early, usually before the
wind-up alarm which rested on the floor
beside my bed. Id put some water on to
boil and I always shaved on Wednesday.

ays Available
constantly to minimize this delay, but no system I
know of can provide sufficient numbers of doctors
and nurses to give immediate attention to every
person who uses the system.
Nurses do provide medications and instructions
for many of the ordinary illnesses which college
students are prone to develop. They do this with
considerable skill and understanding.
Any student has the right to request consultation
with the physician if he wishes it, and his request
will be honored, but our nurses can usually
anticipate genuine needs for the patient, and make
this decision for him.
WJ. COGGINS, M.D.
DIRECTOR
DEPT. OF STUDENT HEALTH

I The Adventures Os
I
a
Joe Torchia
ft
ft
8
Peace Corps
I
I Volunteer
1

There was something about the air on
Wednesday morning which was usually
more refreshing.
There was always more noise on
Wednesdays.
As I walked toward the market-place
from my house, a steady hum seemed to
grow. Id be passed on the streets by
women with full baskets balanced on
their heads and their veils clenched
between their teeth. Id be passed by
school children helping their parents to
carry things, by moustached men on
donkeys, by men with turbans leading
their brightly-saddled camels down the
street, by beggars, by farmers, by
housewives, by dogs, by cats. Even the
animals were extra excited by the smells
of outdoor grills with their kofte and
sis-kebab enticing the passers-by.
I, too, had a basket and Id have to
push my way into the main market area,
past the beggars and past the other
baskets coming out. I had to do my

Blood For Fighting Men

MR. EDITOR:
At the present time, the local
universities and junior colleges in
the central Florida area are
engaged in a Blood for Peace
drive. We feel that the concepts
behind this drive are important
enough to warrant your
institutions consideration in the
hopes that participation may be
undertaken on a larger and more
national scale.
First of all, it must be
emphasized that the Blood for
Peace campaign is not a protest
for or against our current
policies in Vietnam. It is
essentially a constructive
declaration of concern for the
real issue in this, war, our
fighting men.
A donation of blood for these
men is the best and most
effective method of presenting
such a declaration to the
American people, as opposed to
violent demonstration. The
picture of todays collegiate
youth is one of confusion and
protest. A campaign such as
Blood for Peace could be
instrumental in helping change
this image.

*rartrart^^rSrra^rar 9 trm*m*m 9 t^trm**m^m 9 m^mm*m*m*m ,l rrtrm 9 mVwrtrm9rVirr9

weekly shopping.
At the far end of the marketplace
stood women clutching their veils
behind the butter, eggs and cheeses
which were spread out on the table
before them. They had probably been
up most of the night churning the
butter and cleaning the eggs. Some of
them were my students parents and
they always smiled, inquired about their
children, then gave me a discount on
whatever they were selling.
There were mounds (literally
mountains) of tomatoes, potatoes,
onions, apples or oranges, or grapes, and
other fruits and vegetables. And beside
each mountain was a person calling the
villagers to buy from them My
grapes are extra sweet! or My olives
ate extra fresh! I would hear shouts of
Hocam, Gel!(My teacher, come!) as
I passed and I would politely smile and
shout back above the roar that I dont
need any.

Originally conceived as a
central Florida affair, the Blood
for Peace idea has now been
extended to include both UF ans
FSU, and the interest to further
the endeavor to the national
level has been high.
The NBC television network
sent a news team to investigate
the area for possible coverage.
Local newspapers have also given
their support as the attached
excerpts will attest.
A Blood for Peace drive
should be coordinated with the
local blood banks in your area.
In central Florida, for example,
the campaign is conducted on a
competitive basis with donated
awards made to outstanding
contributing factions such as
colleges, fraternities, clubs, etc.
A Blood for Peace drive at
your institution would be both
beneficial and rewarding. Our
campaign in central Florida was
timed to coincide with the

Racist White Bosses
MR. EDITOR:
Well, I just read another rather enlightening editorial by a blade
man. It seems there are various situations noted by Mr. Johnson where
the white man (damn his soul) is the boss of blacks on our campus.
This case also seems to me to be very unfair and racist as is typical of
all whites anyway.
It is hard to believe that in our country of equality and justice for
all, that a white can supervise a black. It does not matter whether the
white has been working for the UF for twenty years and KNOWS
WHERE TO DIG THE HOLE, and the black who has probably
worked fewer years and KNOWS NOT WHERE TO DIG THE HOLE.
Is it any wonder that in any society for work to be done there must
be a boss who knows what to do and can give the orders for the job to
be done?
As for the white sitting in the shade while the blacks sweat in the
sun, I for one would not sweat if my job was only to supervise, of
course Mr. Johnson might believe otherwise.
But this is beside the point of this article. Why must a black work
under a white? This is nothing but pure, out and out racism. Whites
should only work for blacks so there will be equality and justice in
America. Mr. Johnsons editorial has opened my eyes: anytime 1 see a
white who has the gall to supervise a black I will run right up to the
pig and scream RACIST right in his white fadst face. I am glad that
I now understand the black mans plight on our campus.
RONNIE CLARK, 2UC

Tuesday, November 11,1968, The Florida Alligator,

When I did buy, I was amazed at how
cheap the prices were. One Bra for a kilo
of potatoes, nine Bra for a kilo of meat,
25 kurush for an egg.
And there were butcher shops, with
huge carcasses hanging in the glassless
windows and cow and sheepheads
resting on the floor or window sills. You
would merely point to what section of
the cow you wanted and say half a
kilo or whatever. With one move of his
wrist (clutching a huge, scimitar-like
knife), the butcher would have your
meat ready.
Then theres blocks of tents with
drapery material and other cloths
hanging like a shieks desert palace. And
more blocks of kitchen wares and
basket stands and umbrella repairmen
and knife sharpeners and funnel-makers
and rug-sellers and simit-sellers. People
everywhere. People shouting and people
selling and people buying and people
smiling.
And even more than buying-day,
pazar day is greeting-day. People come
in from the villages and see people they
havent seen since last pazar day. They
exchange kisses on the streets as others
push by- they go through a
complicated formal greeting of
inquiring about the other person, the
other persons family and friends and
business and what-not. They smile.
They laugh. They sit together and drink
tea or raki or wine or vodka. They play
cards or tavla. They watch each other
watching each other.
Theyre happy.

Vietnam Moratorium last
month. It is scheduled to last for
six weeks. If future moratoriums
are planned on a nation-wide
level, then it would be
advantagous to launch your
Blood for Peace drive at the
same time, a move that will
show your concern in the best
possible light.
In any case, we would like to
hear your thoughts and ideas on
the Blood for Peace concept. If
there are any questions
concerning this drive that you
would like answered, please
write for an immediate reply at
the below named address.
TAU Fraternity of Florida
Technological University
c/o 4060 Alfaya Trail
Orlando, Florida 32807
For phone communication,
call John Davis 305-2774178.
JOHN DAVIS,
BLOOD FOR PEACE
CAMPAIGN COORDINATOR

Page 9



>Th.R|uil AUio
Page 10

Orange ami

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative
Notices

? ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
Dec. 6. The last day for receipt
by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, N.J., 08540,
is Nov. 12 for application and
$lO fee for reading knowledge
examinations in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
Registration fees increase $3 aftsr
Nov. 12 and up to the closing
date of Nov. 19.
GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION (GRE) will be
given Dec. 13. The last date for
receipt of registration form in
Princeton, N.J. without paying
the $3 penalty fee is Nov. 18.
Application booklets and
information are available in
Room 235 Tigert Hall.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
NOV. 17: MARYMOUNT
COLLEGE; CROW, POPE &
CARTER ENTERPRISES
BCN; U. S. CIVIL SERVICE
COMMISSION All degrees *;
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR
OF NATIONAL BANKS Bus.
Ad., Acctg., Econ., Fin., Law *;
MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE
INSURANCE CO. All degrees
*; U. S. DEPT. OF
AGRICULTURE Consumer
and Marketing Service
Agriculture majors, Acctg.,
Chemistry. *.
NOV. 18: NUCLEAR
MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT

ROTATING TOPICS COURSES
FOR WINTER QUARTER
' T i-t
DEPT COURSE SECTION CREDIT DAY/S PERIOD BLDG ROOM EX GP Course TITLE
ATG 490 0862 C 1 F 7 MAT 16 208 RECONCILING BASIC PRINCIPLES OF
J ACCOUNTING WITH DEMANDS OF USERS
" A6V 59S 0&22d ,3 t tH 6 sta 405 isc principles of advertising r^SeaCh
APV y. 630 I~isv > VAR - TH 6-9 ASB 3C 18C CULTURES OF MELANESIA
APY 630 '* 1162 V VAR MT THF ASB 3C_ 16A AYMARA
, SPY 630 v 1163 V VAR > W 2-4 ASB 3C 17A URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
GYP 621 3602 C > 3 M W F 5 BRY 203 18A NUMERICAL APPROACH TO INDUSTRIAL
.. ,> : : LOCATION
.JM ? 599 ? 4037 C 3 TTH ; T STA 223 188 URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING
gyp; 695 3606 V VAR M 9-10 BRY 203 178 GEOGRAPHY OF RURAL SETTLEMENT
TH 7- 9 BRY 203 ~
MGT 690. 4186 C 3 TO ARRANGE f NFE MANAGEMENT RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
PCL 630 < DEP-C 5 MTWTHF 5 PEA 301 18A BLACK POLITICS
PSY 430' DEP-C 3 M 6-8 LIB 407 18D PRECISION BEHAVIORAL MANAGEMENT
ZY 664 DEP-V VAR to arrange NFE ECOLOGICAL GENETICS ~
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f _,
fiaKin' '9
oor seW a T \ TC\
Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... MI
A Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, 7 J
W King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your "" /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The wholes* \ 3

CORP.; NASA, J. F. KENNEDY
SPACE CENTER; CENTRAL
INTELLIGENCE AGENCY;
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES,
CALI FORNIA; SYNTEX
LABORATORIES, INC.
Pharm, Vets., Chem., Mktg.
NOV. 18 & 19: IBM CORP;
PROCTER & GAMBLE
DISTRIBUTING CO.
NOV. 19: RALSTON
PURINA CO.; ARTHUR'
YOUNG & CO.;
OWENS-ILLINOIS, INC.; GULF
POWER CO.-EE, ME.
CANC EL L ATIONS: NOV.
17: SINCLAIR OIL CORP.;
TENNESSEE COPPER CORP.
NOV. 18: WARNER ROBINS
AIR MATERIALS AREA.
* Indicates U.S. Citizenship
required.
GENERAL NOTICES
LECTURE: The Changing
Ethos of World Religions lecture
will be given by Dr. Joseph M.
Kitagawa, professor of Far
Eastern Languages and
Civilizations, University of
Chicago, in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on Monday, Nov.
17, at 8:00 p.m.
'
UNION BOX OFFICE
"LA TRAVIATA", $3.00,
$2.00 & $1.50, Univ. of Fla.
Students tickets, one-half price:
Florida Players "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Faculty Staff
& General Public, $1.50. High
School Students, SI.OO, Univ. of
Fla. Students, $.75. Rathskeller
Membership, $2.00. "Jefferson
Airplane" $1.25.

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, November 11
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Union Humanities Film, "The
Balcony," Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Cicerones Meeting, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Law Dames Meeting, Law
School Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players, "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
SGP: "LA TRAVIATA", Florida
Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 12
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Union Religious Discussion,
"Dialogue with a Theologue",
Rabbi Michael Monson, 122
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Plymouth Campus Film Festival,
8 Award Winning Film
Shorts, Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:00 p.m. Free
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma Meeting,
"Classified Advertising in
Review," 122 Union, 7:30
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.

-V. -"j>
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES


Thursday, November 13
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Latin American Club Meeting,
347 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Dept, of English Lecture: Prof.
Maynard Mac, "Anthony and
Cleopatra", AFA-105, 8:30
p.m.
Rathskeller, "Eric Van
Schmidt", Folk Blues, 830,
10:30 & 12:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.

We only did it
for you.
We think we've got a Pittsburg who pots
pretty good idea who geraniums and plays the
our readership is by now. organ.
They're you. But you might want a copy
for yourself.
And when we select our
material, we keep that CI/wt/4/i
in mind. jIUIUIU
So you probably won't t
want to send a copy to (JUClttCtlU
. your maiden aunt in / J

Friday, November 14
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Univ. of Fla. Young Democrats,
Discussion on Vietnam",
150 F & G Union, 12:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "The Great Race",
Union Aud., 6:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 150 A & B Union,
7:00 p.m. Please Bring Sets.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints", Constans
' Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, "Eric Van
Schmidt", Folk Blues, 8:30,
10:30 & 12:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "RIFF", Union
Terrace, 9:00 p.m.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
1965 Honda 50 excellent
condition Call 378-0554 for more
information. (A-4t-37-p)
1969 Honda Superhawk 305 CC
Excellent Mechanical Condition 4000
miles some dents & scratches $470.
Call 376-4736 Student (A-3t-37-p)
BOGEN STEREO AMP 65 watt S6O
call 378-7886. (A-3t-39-p)
1966 Honda Scrambler alum fenders
race camshaft high top pistons fast
and reliable. $450 392-9417.
(A-2t-39-p)
Motorcycle trailer custom built can
carry any size bike 4mo. old $l5O.
392-9417. (A-2t-39-p)
Zenith stereo four speakers good
separation diamond stylus 2g tone
arm take best offer come by or call
Mike 133 Trusler Ph. 392-8411.
(A-2t-3 9-p)
Ladies drinks $.35 at the Friday
Afternoon Club. A weekly cocktait
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd at the
Lamplighter Lounge this and every
Friday. Two private rooms are
reserved for us. This is where its at.
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (A-4t-39-p)
1969 SL 90 Excellent Shape, four
months old, low mileage, must sell
drafted $350. Phone 378-6182
anytime. (A-4t-36-p)
Attention Ptdeges Zeta Tau Alpha
membership pin yellow gold crest
surrounded with 23 pearls one
diamond in center point 378-5068.
(A-3t-38-p)
CAM-Chrysler 284 and anti-pump up
lifters; ISKY barrel valve springs fits
440, 383 Roadrunner, etc. All brand
new. sap SIBO. 392-9362. (A-3t-38-p)
Kawasaki 120 Scrambler a sacrifice
for $265 1968 model Call Bob at
373-2748. (A-st-38-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-l4t-34-p)
G uns Guns Guns Inventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
New Argus Automatic Electriceye
Camera-Zoom Lens super 8 Projector
Carrying Case, Pistol Grip, Light bar,
screen SIOO.OO Call 378-4200 after
5:30 p.m. (A-4t-38-p)
FOR RENT |
.V X*XX;.%Sv:*X >>W44MeXX*SSSSSS;MMSi I
Tired of your old drab apartment
sub-lease a poolside Village Park apt.
available winter quarter. Call
373-2442 after 4 p.m. (B-st-39-p)
TO SUBLET: One furnished bdrm.
apt. at Tanglewood Manor for winter
quarter. Call Wayne after 7:30 p.m.
392-9972. (B-3t-39-p)
For sale or rent one bedroom trailer
and Cabana gas. heat 8t air
conditioner $975 or $65 mo.
392-0939 or 376-3322. (B-st-39-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Uni. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals $220/
quarter. Some financial aid available.
378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance 6f
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
LANDMARK one male roommate
must lease immediate occupancy
available rent 46.25 + util. Pool ww
car pgt central heat. Call Steve
373-2207. (B-st-37-p)
Sublet 1-bedroom efficiency apt. 2
blocks from graduate library Call
373-1664 or see at 1830 NW 4th
Ave. Apt. 16. (B-3t-37-p)
1 bedroom Ac apt. Fully furnished in
quiet neighborhood. 100 per mo. Call
376-0362 aft. 5 p.m. (B-3t-38-p)
Sublet Jan-June 1 bdr ac carpeted
apartment 2 balconies IV? blks from
campus or 1 coed roommate
373-1921. (B-2t-38-p)
| I
Female roommate 2 bdr apt 3 blocks
behind Norman $lO9 per qtr. Call
373-2513 after 3 p.m. (C-st-35-p)
Wanted roommate for University
Gardens Apt. Call 373-1364 Ask for
Kathy Immediate Occupancy.
(C-3t-38-p)

I
>:

WANTED***!
,SWWSYX*XvX*X*X^.X-MW*>WX.X.XX?
1 female roommate for Summit
House Apartment. Call 373-2289
(C-4t-36-p)
Female roommate beginning winter
qrt. La Mancha private bedroom air
carpet utilities included in rent. Call
378-9824 or 378-7224 apt. 8.
(C-4t-38-p)
Female roommate. A two bedroom
house, a.c. close to campus. 1246 SW
13 St. 376-0578. (C-4t-38-p)
Female roommate for French
Quarter for 2nd and 3rd quarters
available Dec. Ist $45.00/month. Call
Shaaron at 372-5554 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-38-p)
Female roommate for 2-bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus. Available
immediately call 372-7550 noon or
between 5-7p.m. Rent 36.25 mo.
(C-3t-39-p)
Female roommate needed for one
bedroom apt. winter quarter only or
for the rest of the year. Call after
five. 376-2909 (C-2t-39-p)
The university crowd who enjoy
action and reasonably priced drinks.
The Friday Afternoon Club is going
again. Sponsored by graduate
students at the Lamplighter Lounge
this and every Friday. Two private
rooms reserved for us. Ladies drinks
$.35. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (C-4t-39-p)
Immediate occupancy Laonne Vie
Apt RENT & UTIL. FREE til Dec 15
if you live with us (3 jr girls) Winter
& Spring qtrs for $165 per qtr. (incl.
rent & util.) Call 373-1029 NOW.
(C-st-35-p)
Female roommate wanted winter and
spring terms for attractive SBS apt. 2
blocks from campus. Prefer senior or
grad student, non-smoker 372-2666.
(C-st-35-p)
2 female roommates for modern apt.
NW section. $55/mo. TV HiFi. Call
Janine 392-2501 Bam spm Mon. thru
Frl. (C-4t-3 7-p)
I HELP WANTED |
A;*x*;*>x*:*x<*x*x.:.%nx.w*x*x*x*x*x-%nvA
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
Part time work, early morning hours.
Need not interfere with present job or
college schedule. Deliver Tampa
Tribune for supplementary income.
Call Ed Wyatt or Dale Wesley for
information. 372-4902. (E-st-38-p)
Desk Clerk over 21 2 Nights Per
Week Midnight 7 AM Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn 4029 S.W. 13th Street
Neat Appearance. (E-4t-39-p)
$2-5 hr. student photographer needs
girl models all types; face, figure or
fashion. Apply Prairie View Apts.
6315 SW 13 apt 11 7- 10 p.m.
(E-3t-39-p)
;-XrWXX-W<444SXWWW 8!!S;
| AUTOS I
:5 9 9|M4 if
1968 Sprite, excellent condition,
serviced + tuned every 3000 mi.,
radio excellent heater, front sway-bar
Stebro exhaust, BRG, other extras.
Asking $1650. 378-2235. (G-st-39-p)
66 SI MCA for $535, rebuilt engine,
good mechanical condition, 34 mpg.
See at 1117 SW 7th Ave. or call
378-8033. (G-st-36-p)
1969 VW sunroof sedan 11000 miles
perfect condition call 378-9219 after
4:30 asking $1750. (G-3t-38-p)
65 MGB. Own a real sportscar. Very
well cared for. Mechanically perfect.
Radio, heater, new top, tonneau,
boot, lucas light, etc. Call Harvey at
373-2713 or come by La Bonne Vie
no. 339. (G-Bt-35-p)
1969 Karmann-Ghia, 3 months old.
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., S2OOO. (G-st-35-p)
1957 Chevy P. steering, P. breaks,
fact, air, aut. trans., radio, heater,
283-4 V V-8, dual tailpipes, 37,000
actual miles, 392-8905. (G-st-37-p)
ired pin da
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Tuesday, November 11,1969. The Florida Alligator.

--"-Hftftf r v n nnrm-Tfl nfWKNXXXXWWOOOOQ OSD
1 PERSONAL I
Men! Visit all of west or east Europe
next summer for S3OO private and
coop organized trip write box 2657
Gains. U. Sta. for info. (J-st-39-p)
Howard, it might be a lot loonger
than you think. (J-lt-39-p)
Reb, Its been 3 yrs. and a fantastic
voyage every minute. Your tiger wuvs
you. Love, Porky. (J-lt-39-p)
Gail, I love you most when I least
express it. Will you marry me? Cary.
(J-lt-39-p)
Happy 19 Everything. This
much ... Avogadros Number to
infinity squared plus. I. L. Y. A. B.
M. A. P. The future Mrs. E!
(J-lt-39-p)
Action this and every Friday at the
Friday Afternoon Club. A cocktail
party sponsored by graduate students
for the university crowd. Two private
rooms reserved. Ladies drinks $.35
5:30-7:30 p.m. (J-4t-39-p)
Can you sing? If you can cut it, we
may want you. Call now to join a
well established band. 372-6442.
(J-2t-38-p)
RIDERS WANTED: NEW YORK
CITY leaving Dec. 18, returning Jan
2 Roundtrip $35. One way S2O. Call
Lisa at 373-2760. (J-st-37-p)
The Celebration" up and coming,
versatile, rock-group welcomes
bookings for second quarter. If
interested call 372-7493 after 6 p.m.
(J-st-37-p)
3 months in Europe s4so. June 17
Aug. 27 bicycle trip. Student
organized, informally planned. Fare
will include air fare, food, shelter.
Call 378-3395, ask for Wenda Snow
after 5:30 p.m. (J-st-36-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING 16
NW 7th Ave. (J-st-28-p)
,;X-x*x-x*x-v.v.v;n*Xvx*x*x*x*x-x*.v-v.v.v
I LOST & FOUND |
.< .-Sfe X
~ 'X-:*X*X-X-X*X-XXVA!WM.V.X.SY£":*XX"X*X*K
Found near the Cl, a dk. calico
kitten about 7 wks old, lively cute
and cuddly. If lost or interested call
392-9035 or 378-8979. (L-3t-37-p)
Found Post Versalog behind stadium.
Identify at 392-8184. (L-3t-38-p)
Found a black dog at Gainesville
Shopping Center Nov. 1. Call
373-2686. (L-39-nc-p)
Keys found in north parking lot of
Norman Hall. Can be picked up at PK
Younge front office. (L-3t-nc)
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You won't
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time you owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore
iV,K J
/. it a-- v * -m w,Vw v* aft ww# 4? %>

Page 11

| SERVICES I
Cocktail party sponsored by graduate
students for the university crowd at
the Lamplighter Lounge this and
every Friday. Two private rooms
reserved for us. This is where it's at.
Ladies drinks $.35. 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(M-4t-39-p)
Co-eds Eliminate facial hair for ever
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist (over
20 yrs experience) 372-8039. By
appointment Only (M-st-33-p)
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS 1126 V? N.
W. Bth St. 376-8506 prices not given
over phone, depends on garment.
(M-st-39-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you can't beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
NOW Two new services available at
the Student Activities Desk 1) list
of typists term papers, masters
theses, and doctoral dissertations
(financial arrangements the
responsibility of the typist and
client) 2) Xerox service ($.lO per
copy.)
TYPING IN MY HOME 5 YRS.
EXPERIENCE on IBM ELECTRIC
STANDARD MODEL CALL
JEAN, 376-7809. (M-st-36-p)
Let PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE xerox your thesis,
dissertation or manuscript work. We
type them so we know how to handle
them. Call 376-7160. (M-6t-38-p)
You probably didnt know it,
but you can order your Florida
Quarterly by mail.
Just send $1.25 to Room 330,
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
And well mail you a Quarterly.

NOW PLAYING
A COMPANY OF
WAYWARD SAINTS
"a farce-comedy, blending topical and classical satire"
A Florida Players Production Tonight through Saturday
8:00 P.M. Constans Theatre
U. of F. Students: $.75. General Admission: $1.50
All seats are reserved. Box office: 392-1653
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
V 2 BROILED CHICKEN
Yellow Rice $1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti _
"c
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A J> A A -A- *9 :.1A ,*** 4 -WW.. r k *.*.*-*. A

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Page 12

- - wot w t - M
The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 11,1969

Daley Willing
To Testify
At Riot Trial

BOY HOLDS GIRL HOSTAGE
Skyjack Attempt By 14-Year-Old Foiled

CINCINNATI (UPI) A 14-year-old
boy, using a teenage girl as a hostage,
boarded a Delta jetliner at Greater
Cincinnati Airport Monday and
demanded the plane be flown out of the
country.
The boy was arrested before the
aircraft took off on a flight to Chicago.
Police identified the would-be
skyjacker as David L. Boothe, 14, of
Norwood, a Cincinnati suburb. Delta
officials said he held a knife to the
throat of Gloria Jean House, 18, of
Milford, another Cincinnati suburb.
Delta officials said the hijack attempt

Cities Would
'SeH-Destnicf
Without Farms
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Agriculture Commissioner Doyle
Conner said Monday that
although urban lawmakers are
reluctant to admit it, their cities
would self-destruct in three
weeks without agriculture.
Conner told the House
Agriculture Committee a study
of civil defense preparedness in
Miami showed enough food in
grocery stores and warehouses to
support the city for three weeks.
He said the man in the
condominium, up on the 14th
floor eating his eggs and orange
juice, doesnt realize he couldnt
survive much more than three
weeks without the farmer.
Conner said many urban
legislators make war on rural
legislation, tagging farm
programs pork chop bills.
He said some have the
philosophy that if its good for
the urban areas, its bad for the
cities,
cities.
The image of rural and urban
being at cross purposes still
exists, but really they couldnt
be more interdependent,
Conner said. Its frightening.
He said the Agriculture
committee should establish a
liaison with the Appropriations
Committee to muster support
for farm programs.
Nixon
Healthy
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon underwent a
complete medical examination
Monday his first since taking
office- and his doctor reported
he was in excellent physical
condition.
It was just a routine physical
with routine results, Nixon told
reporters as he left Bethesda
Naval Hospital in suburban
Maryland.

was foiled when airport officials and
police persuaded the youth to
surrender.
Delta said in an official statement
that Boothe approached the girl at a
gate and, at knifepoint, forced her on
Flight 670 which was enroute from
Lexington, Ky., to Chicago.
George East, resident manager for
Delta, was told of the situation and
approached the youth.
The boy said he couldnt make a
decision on whether he wanted to go
but later told East he wanted to go to
Sweden, the Delta statement said.

The CPA: hes
where feat.
'-1.. ...
(§||| lilfl | M llllf | When theres a tough business deci deci'
' deci' 1 sion to be made, the Certified Public
* ii American Institute of Certified Public Accountants
' *****'* * ***#*- .. .

CHICAGO (UPI) A city attorney said Monday
Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley is willing to testify
as a defense witness in the riot conspiracy trial of
the Chicago Seven.
However, corporation counsel Marvin Aspen
asked the U.S. District Court to quash subpoenas
calling for testimony from Chicago police
superintendent James Conlisk and James J.
McDonough, director of streets and sanitation.
Subpoenas served late last week caDed for Daley,
Conlisk and McDonough to appear in court Monday
with records pertaining to the 1968 Democratic
National Convention and disturbances during the

East told him the plane, a DC9,
would not fly the Atlantic even with
refueling, the airline said. The boy later
said he wanted to go to Mexico. He also
said he had a bomb.
Delta said the aircraft was backed out
of the gate position to a runway where
airport and Delta officials decided to
board the plane.
Two airport policemen went to the
back door of the plane Ito distract the
boy while Byron Dickey, general
manager of the airport, and Byron
Kinman, chief of the airport police,
went in through the front door and

convention week. r
The seven defendants in the trial are accused of
conspiring to incite riots during the convention.
Daley has been a prime target of those who claim
that Chicago police used brutal tactics against the
convention week demonstrators.
Aspen said Daley was willing to comply with the
subpoena. But he asked for more time to gather
some 5,000 documents the subpoena ordered the
mayors office to bring to court.
A policewoman who followed one of the
defendants in the trial was to be cross-examined by
defense attorneys today.

started moving passengers off the plane,
Delta said.
The airline said Kinman approached
the boy and convinced him to give up
his knife and release the girl, which he
did. He was taken into custody by the
FBI for questioning.
The drama lasted one hour and 15
minutes.
Delta said the flight departed at
10:10 a.m. EST enroute to Chicago
with 68 passengers and a crew of five.
The Greater Cincinnati Airport is
located across the Ohio River from
Cincinnati near Florence, Ky.



The
Florida
Alligator

I *if v. II
| i ft /a il [
S / | I JfPlra'v t B
I. i islb bi 11 iljj I*^l
£' *s> > I9H9Ew: if 1 :W i t'i IB |. t 4- \ -v
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THE REAL THING WILL BE HERE TONIGHT
... as the Goldovsky Grand Opera Theatre presents "La Traviata"

Traviata-A Bawdy Story

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government
Productions, in an effort to
enable students to enjoy
exposure to cultural events, is
offering a special half-price
discount for tonights
performance of La Traviata.
The show will begin at 8:15
p.m. in the Florida Gym.
Discount tickets will be
available today between 10 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. at the student
service booth across from the
Hub and at the Reitz Union Box
Office from 12:30 to 4:30. If
there are any seats left, discount
tickets will also be sold at the;
door. The special discount
tickets will be 75 cents, $1 and
$1.50.
*.'- :. .*.* . {* -' *''
The show, performed by the
n ationaQy known Goldovsky
Opera Company, will fulfill one
of a students humanities
cultural requirements. This is a
good chance for the student to

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see an opera for 75 cents which
would cost him at least $lO in
New York, Alan Howes,
chairman of SG Productions,
said.
SG presents cultural as well as
popular shows and tries to make
prices fit the pocketbook of the
students, Howes said.
In the way die modernized
-Romeo and Juliet made
Shakespeare more appealing to
todays audiences, this English
version of la Traviata is bound
to be a success at UF, Howes
said.
The opera, which was banned
cm moral grounds in the 18th
century is did story of a woman
of easy virtue who wins the
love of her respectable lover.
The Goldovsky Company has
new sets, elaborate costumes and
j||SHyhii^mdH&9UH^^AK!^^l^Bl^^Bl

the type of equipment which
makes it possible for them to
play in a gym, Howes said.
GATOR
GOLF
- _.. i >.';;vT*^?^i ,r .- v .S
Miniature Golf
Maximum Fun
2425 S.W. 13th St.
6 -12 P.M. MON. -FRI.
9 A.M. 12 P.M. SAT.
2-12 P.M. SUN.
.ll.teMtelteiWtfflli

||p~ J J§& u x t'k 1
Bring a $l3O sitting fee.
* :. *'; ' ' f- / .'.' *' : Vj? !_
Dress for men is dark coat, dark tie, light shirt.
Dress for women is a dark sweater.
TUESDAYNOV.iI
9-11 Greeks (ChiO, Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Tau)
12 4 JUNIORS (O THRU P)
4- 5,6 9 GREEKS (Delta Upsilon,
KA, DPhiE, Kappa Alpha Theta, tEP)
v V- t >
- WEDNESDAY NOV. 12 THURSDAY NOV. 13
124 JUNIORS IQ THRU T) 12-4 JUNIORS (U THRU 2)
4 ;9;e 9 GREEKS (Kappa Sigma, 4-S r 9-9 GREEKS(PiBataRW,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Mu, Phi Delta Sigma Kappa, iuta Tau Alpha. PM
Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi) Kappa Phi, TKE)
fc: '.." ~y£ : '' : ' .:.:
;. : > .. .'.* i'-v &\. *. ..'. .. r :
.; ; v t .. -..* . .. '?. v '-.. .. -a. > '.*'* v# '-31 ,-.s
FRIDAY NOV. 14
12-5,6-9 SENIORS
CALL 392-1687
Between Noon-sp.m.
FOR APPOINTMENT

Tuiwky, Nowmbar 11,1969, Tha Florida AMgator,

II Free Film Festival 1
If opera isnt your bag, Plymouth Motor Company is presenting
eight film shorts and a commercial at 7 and 9 tonight in the Reitz
Union Auditorium. Admission is free.
The films have won awards ranging from the Cannes Film Festival
to the Academy Awards.
A Cannes Award winner, Soldier, plummets to tenor when
materialism injects another reality, lighter, but penetrating moments
are reflected bv Alan Arkin and Barbara Harris in Museum Piece.

KAIN Is
Coming

THE OUNDSOF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM TIL i
ALIBI
Sp** Lounge <
MW 14th ST & UNIV. AVE.

TEDREMLEY
Entertainment Editor

The
Purple
Death
Creeps...

Page 13



The Florida Alligator

SETS SIGHTS FOR SEC TITLE
Cross Country Team Tops FSU

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
Florida State succumbed to
UFs awesome cross country
strength 23-38 (low score wins)
Monday and track coach Jimmy
Hawk Cames is in a quandry.
He doesnt know which
runners to send to the
Southeastern Conference
championships next Monday in
Birmingham, Ala.
FSUs Ken Misner ran the first
two miles in 9:00 flat and went
18:43, second only to Olympian
Jack Bachelers 18:21.4 course
record set Friday.
Gator team captain John
Parker was second in 19:08
followed closely by Jack Nason.
Both harriers had broken 19
minutes against South Florida
Friday, but reported not feeling
well in their second home meet.
Del Ramers, a 4:10 high
school miler last year, finished
fourth for FSU in 19:28. Steve
Atkinson continued his quality
running to finish fifth in 19:33,
just five seconds in front of
surprising freshman A.W. Smith.
Benny Vaughn, another
freshman, jumped back into the
top seven after a short lived
dump with a 19:39, his first
sub-20 minute run.
Johnnie Brown was the sixth
Gator, breaking 20 for the first
time this year with a 19:41.
Wilt Plans
Come Back
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (UPI)
Wilt Chamberlain, recovering
from knee surgery, announced
Sunday he would be bade with
the Los Angeles Lakers and
hoped to help lead the club to
the National Basketball
Association Championship.
The NBAs leading all-time
scorer made his statement from
a hospital bed.
ACCENT 70
Presents
GYLAN KAIN
I Poet
I Musician
I Songster
lltoitz Union Ballroom
|No^^eH^^7|3oPM

HARRY WINKLER
BENNY VAUGHN
... breaks out of slump

BuckeyesUPls Best;
Gators Still Unranked

NEW YORK The United
Press International top-rated
major college football teams
with first place votes and
won-lost-tied records in
parentheses (eight week).
1. Ohio State (31) (7-0) 346
2. Texas (4) (7-0) 303
3. Tennessee (7-0) 269
4. Penn State (7-0) 182
5. Arkansas (7-0) 180
6. Southern Cal (7-0-1) 163
7. UCLA (7-0-1) 161
8. Missouri (7-1) 128
9. Purdue (7-1) 75
10. Louisiana State (7-1) 44
11. Notre Dame (6-1-1) 39

I WHATS IN A
NAME?
I were also chicken, seafood, I
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BONANZA SIELOIN PIT
I 'try us for a great lunch I
I 2445 s.w. 13th open 11 a.m. 9 p.m. I
I take out 378-0946 I

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

> The Florida Alligator. Tuesday, November 11,1960

Page 14

Browns 19:46 last year was the
only time under 20 for the
entire season.
Ron Jon Nabers trained
hard over the weekend after his
19:33 Friday but still managed
to finish seventh on the team
with 19:46.
Other UF finishers were:
Frank Betts (19:55), Don
Laene (20:15), Roy Benjamin
(20:20), Gregg Collins (20:30)
and Jack Stewart (20:44)..
Freshman Mark Bir started
the race for the Gators but
because of a severe leg injury he
had to drop out. Cames said his
status is questionable for the
SEC championships.
Cames quandary is a result of
too many good runners.
These boys have been
beating each other all season
while trouncing all the other
teams around, Cames said. We
never can tell who is going to be
the best on any given day. Its a
pleasant problem for a coach to
have, but that doesn't make it
any easier.
Carnes reports the whole team
is going to the meet in
Birmingham despite the fact

12. Stanford (5-2-1) 13
13. (tie) Auburn (6-2) 5
(tie) Houston (5-2) 5
15. Michigan (6-2) 4
16. Utah (7-1) 1

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

only seven runners can be
entered.
These fellows have worked
hard since two weeks before
school started,* Carnes said.
They dont deserve to sit home
just because they happen to be
on a team with 12 great runners.
If they went to almost any other
school in the conference they
would not have any trouble
making their teams.

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Brown,
Player
Os Week
NASHVILLE, Term. (UPI)
Sophomore Watson Brown of
Vanderbilt says it seems to him
that every time he goes out to
play in a Southeastern
Conference football game, he
faces a better quarterback than
he did the previous week.
I think the quarterbacks
down here in the SEC are the
best there are, and that includes
the Big Ten, said Brown who
failed to note that after the way
he played this past Saturday, the
other SEC quarterbacks are
going to start saying the same
about him.
The 6-foot-1, 182-pound
quarterback from Cookeville,
Tenn., had himself quite an
afternoon in Vanderbilts 42-6
rout of Kentucky. He completed
14 of 18 passes for 132 yards,
three of those passes going for
touchdowns; ran with the ball
15 times from scrimmage for
another 63 yards; and scored on
a 62-yard punt return.
For that performance, Brown
Monday was named as SEC
Offensive Player Os The Week
by United Press International.
Vanderbilt Coach Bill Pace
started the season out with
letterman quarterback Johnny
Miller. But Miller injured his
shoulder and has been below par
since.
We had to throw Watson out
there early (in the season), Pace
said. Watson has fine running
ability, especially running the
option. His hugest improvement
has been his passing.
Brown said he worked harder
on passing than on any other
phase of the game. Coach Pace
has spent a lot of time with me,
getting me to hold my arm up
high.
Brown said Vanderbilt (3-5)
played its best game of the
season against Kentucky. He said
the players were disappointed at
a poor 1-5 start, But I think
everybody is ready to go now.
We are looking forward to our
game with Tennessee.
The Commodores would like
nothing better than to play the
role of spoiler against the Vols at
Knoxville Nov. 29 in the season
finale for both teams.
Vandy, idle this weekend,
should have little trouble against
Davidson Nov. 22. The
Commodores are now 2-2 in the
SEC. A victory against the Vols
would give them their best SEC
worksheet since 1955.
Utility Men!
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.
Cesar Tovar of the Twins and
Bert Campaneris of the Oakland
Athletics are the only two major
league players in history j play
all nine positions in a single
league ball game.

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Page 15



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 11,1969

Page 16

VOLS PUT RECORD ON LINE
Rebels Not To Be Laughed At

ATLANTA (UPI) Nobody
has to tell the Tennessee Vols
that Ole Miss record is
deceiving.
The third-ranked Vols are
putting their aspirations for a
perfect season on line against the
Rebels next Saturday at
Jackson, Miss., fully aware that
this could be their toughest test.
Ole Miss has lost three times
this season an upset at the
hand of weak Kentucky, a 33-32
shootout by weaker-than-usual
Alabama and in a visit to
unpredictable Houston.
But, at Jackson? Thats
another story.
Paced by Archie Manning, the
best quarterback the Vols will be
called upon to face, the Rebels,
in their two previous Jackson

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Purify water
with the flier
that made
men whistle.
Nylon. Reverse osmosis.
A fiber that started making girls legs more beauti beautiful
ful beautiful some 30 years ago.
And a process thats been around a lot longer.
But when Du Pont scientists and engineers look
at them in a new way, they combine into an idea that
can change the world.
Reverse osmosis is a purification process that
requires no phase change. Its potentially the cheap cheapest
est cheapest way to desalinate water.
Du Pont's innovation? Hollow, semipermeable ny nylon
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The result: a semipermeable surface area of about
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So far "Permasep" permeators have been used
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So Du Pont scientists and engineers are even now
working toward improved fibers, units and plant
designs that should make it possible to get fresh
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the ideas and products of the futurethis is the
venture Du Pont people are now engaged in.
For a variety of career opportunities, and a chance
to advance through many fields, talk to your Du Pont
Recruiter. Or send us the coupon.
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appearances this season,
knocked off 15th-ranked
Georgia and llth-ranked,
otherwise-unbeaten Louisiana
State.
A victory over Ole Miss would
be expected to vault the
high-stepping Vols to their first
unbeaten season since 1956,
their second Southeastern
Conference championship in
three years, and a probable bid
to the Orange Bowl, their fifth
straight post-season trip.
Tennessee and Mississippi
both took it easy this past
Saturday while tuning up for
their all-important meeting. The
Vols beat South Carolina 29-14
with quarterback Bobby Scott
throwing three touchdown
passes and the Rebels, with
Manning playing less than half,

coasted past Chattanooga 21-0.
Louisiana State, now heading
toward a 9-1 season and a berth
in either the Cotton Bowl or the
Sugar Bowl, beat Alabama 20-15
Saturday night to hand the
Crimson Tide its third loss in
one season for the first time
since 1958.
Sophomore quaterback John
Reaves of Florida erased Frank
Sinkwichs 27-year-old total
offense record while the Gators
were tying Georgia 13-13.
Reaves gained a net of only
147 yards, half his previous
average, against Georgia
Saturday. But that was enough
to raise his eight-game total to
2,240 yards 53 more than the
previous SEC season high which
Sinkwich set in 11 games in
1942.

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However, Reaves fell 92 yards
behind Purdues Mike Phipps in
their battle for the national total
offense title.
Auburn, a bonafide bowl
candidate, crushed Mississippi
State 52-13 and Vanderbilt, in a
game that had been rated a
tossup, trounced Kentucky 42-6.
With next Monday the
opening date for bids, the bowl
scouts will be out in force
Saturday. Here in the Southeast,
in addition to the
Mississippi-Tennessee headliner,
Auburn will be at Georgia,
Miami at Alabama, Kentucky at
Florida, Mississippi State at
LSU, Notre Dame at Georgia
Tech, Memphis State at Florida
State and Virginia at Tulane.

THESWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Gainesville Airport
Mffig Waldo Road
HtoCwMr ~
l