Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
w
*' < t
i# % ,s / ***
% JL It "V
- f%\ *m S *A
\
~4 ks # aft
#4 - ,-B~
; ; 1 ## A
.
h *
51-0 .. Less Wfc Should
. x-.

PROFS CLAIM
Salvaging Oath
A Political Move

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligrtor Staff Writer
UF professors and employes
Wednesday night stated a belief
the Florida cabinet is politically
motivated in trying to salvage
the remainder of the state's
loyalty oath.
Representatives of the
American Civil liberties Union
(ACLU), American Association
of University Professors (AAUP)
and the American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) said UF and
Board of Regent administrators
are lacking guts and failing to
protect employes from political
harassment.
Orlando attorney Jerry
Bomstein, who represented the
ACLU in the recent court ruling
which restrained UF President
Stephen C. OConnell from
forcing faculty and staff to sign
loyalty oaths, spoke about the
history of the oaths.
Bomstein also represented an
Orlando schoolteacher, Stella
Connell, who was reinstated in
her job after having been fired
by the Orange County School
Board for not signing the oath.
However, he said, because of
Canon 20, a bar association
rule of ethics preventing
attorneys from discussing cases
still under appeal, he could not
discuss either decision.
Bomstein has said there has
been an increasing number of
loyalty oaths across the country.
He contended the loyalty
oath is a product of die
McCarthy era in every state.
Mrs. Norma Munn, chairman
PALM BEACH Pop
Festival could be blocked
by a local zoning
commission ruling.. .page 4
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 17
FSUNews 4
Letters 9
Movies 12
Small Society 6
Sports. ' 21
What'S Happening 4
4 11 (, *><' v *

of the Gainesville ACLU
chapter, a graduate student and
university employe, said UF has
persecuted her since she
protested to the attorney general
and the Board of Regents about
the oath.
In answer to UF attorney
Tom Biggs, who said the proper
target of those criticisms would
be a committee in the
legislature, Mrs. Munn said the
ACLU has had a lobbyist in
every legislative session.
Jay Zeman, president of the
local AFT chapter, said there has
been precious little action from
our legislators on this oath.
One AAUP spokesman, H.B.
Clark, called the oath
downright silly, repugnant,
redundant and unwise.

LIGHT TURNOUT EXPECTED
Few Students Pick Pass-Fail

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Writer
A total of 471 students, slightly more than two
per cent of the total enrollment of 21,000 for the
fall quarter, have elected to take courses on a
pass-fail basis..
The light turnout was not unexpected.
Where we have had these before theres never
been over three to five per cent participation, said
Dr. Roy Lassiter, assistant dean of academic affairs.
University College Dean Framklin A. Doty
expremed surprise at the small number.
There seemed to be such a hue and cry to get
the thing on the road, he said. I thought we
would have hundreds and hundreds of students
applying,
Pass-fad permits a student to take a course and
receive either satisfactory or unsatisfactory for
a grade. The students grade point average is not
affected, although the course and whether it was
passed or not is recorded on the students transcript.
The purpose of pass-fad is to allow students to
take courses outride their major without
jeopardizing thefr grade point average.
-V This is the first quarter that pass-fail has been in
effect at UF. The idea was originally proposed by
State University Chancellor Robert B. Mautz in
October 1968. The proposal was taken up for
consideration by the administration and the
curriculum committee, headed by Lassiter. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell approved the
measure last February.
**. \ V V-i '-v* > f n v'"V *

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 62, No. 37

Loyally Oath Appeal
Awaits Board Review

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The states decision to appeal
last weeks federal district court
ruling on loyalty oaths has been
postponed until the Nov. 18
meeting of the State Board of
Education.
Gov. Claude R. Kirk and his
Cabinet voted unanimously
Tuesday to stop paying
employes who refuse to sign
the entire loyalty oath

University of Florida, Gainesville

Many proposals, including limiting the number of
times a student could take courses on pass-fad,
whether first quarter freshmen should be allowed to
participate and what courses should be made
available under the system were suggested.
Those eligible must be in good academic
standing, that is, not under probation or suspension,
classified as an undergraduate student and approved
by proper university officials.
There is no limit to the number of times a
student may take courses on pass-fad, but may take
only one per quarter.
The system is so any student
should be able to take courses on this basis in ad
colleges and schools. Ad courses taken must be
electives to qualify for pass-fad. Many courses, and
in some cases an entire college, are not available to
students on pass-fad because of this provision.
The College of Nursing has no students taking
pas&Tad courses, Dean Dorothy M. Smith said this
was because ad the courses offered at the college are
upper-division and wouldn't be considered as
electives for most students.
The Art Department wdl not accept any students
taking courses on a pass-fad basis because of the
many students who wish to take art courses on a
grade basis.
Languages, on the other hand, are ideal for this
use and have more pass-fads than any other courses.
Sixty-one students, for example, are taking various
levels of German on pass-fad, and French and
Spanish have a similar turnout.
* V . : ***' V v V V A-A

f # * T ", ' v V / * / :*
Gators Meet

Bulldogs
Saturday
The game time for the Gator-Bulldog dash in the Gator Bowl
Saturday has been changed to 1:50 to meet a contract agreement with
ABC TV.
Channel 9 in Orlando, WFTV, announced Wednesday that it will
broadcast the game.
Tickets for the Miami-Florida game on Nov. 29 are now on sale for
$6 at the athletic office in the west stands.
Tickets can be bought Monday through Friday from 9 ajn. to 4:30
p.m.
Forget Ray Graves

including the portions declared
unconstitutional by the
three-judge panel last week in
Orlando. They also voted to
appeal the courts decision.
But Kirk sent a letter late
Wednesday afternoon to all
education board members
stating because the courts
report contains information
not futiy considered at the
Cabinet meeting, no appeal
would be made until after the
Nov. 18 meeting. By that time,

Friday November 7, 1969

Kirk said, the board will have
had time to fully consider the
report.
Jerry Bomstein, an Orlando
lawyer representing the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU), obtained a federal
court order from the same
threejudge panel restraining the
Board of Regents from cutting
off paychecks while the
constitutionality of the oath is
tested in court.
Assistant Attorney General
Herbert Benn said Tuesday if the
state files the appeal with the
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in
New Orleans it would have the
effect of staying the court's
restraining order. Because the
appeal has been delayed, the
restraining order will continue to
be in effect and loyalty oaths
will not be administered.
Commissioner of Education
Floyd Christian issued a
statement Thursday morning
saying the special Cabinet
meeting he was planning to call
to settle the confusion over the
oath will not be necessary
because of the postponement.
The Board of Education's
attorneys and the Attorney
General's office will go into all
the details of the various legal
decisions concerning the oath,
Christian said.
Both Kirk and Christian
assured board members the
decision made at the Nov. 18
meeting will allow plenty of
time for any administrative or
legal action.*'
Since state employe's
paychecks are not distributed
until the end of the month,
whatever decision is made at the
meeting will effect this month's
paychecks. If the appeal is made,
the restraining order will be
stayed and employes will be
required to sign the loyalty oath
before being paid.
V > i A ''*' '*



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

Page 2

SENATE APPROVES $1,500
Allocation Kicks-Off Ravine

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senates decision to allocate $1,500
for improvement of Ravine Park will kickoff a
long-range beautification program for the area.
Hie heavily-wooded park is located between
Graham Area and the Reitz Union across from the
sewer plant. It already has a 15-foot deep natural
ravine with a creek at its bottom, and a bridge built
in 1967 during Charles Shepherds first term as
student body president and named the Charles

i
Deepher-Pike
Dinner Set
For Nov. 17

REPLY TO ALLIGATOR LETTER
Employees Deny Work Discrimination

BySUECUSTODE
Alligator Correspondent
Three groups of men employed by UFs Physical Plant Division
Thursday said black and white employes do equal amounts of work
on campus and no discrimination is apparent to them.
The interviews were conducted in an effort to investigate the facts
OConnell Believes
Vote Shows Support

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Wednesday the
overwhelming approval of the
Education Building Amendment
by the voters of Florida
demonstrates again the
confidence in and the support
by our citizens of higher
education in this state.
The vote was a firm
endorsement of the junior
colleges', vocational-technical
centers and state universities,
OConnell said. He said it was a
firm commitment of our citizens
to support the enlargement and
improvement of these
institutions so students will find
a place when they seek
admission.
Passage of the amendment
means expansion of the J. Hiflis
Miller Health Center and
activation of the College of
Dentistry is now assured, he
said.
In succeeding years,
hopefully it Will mean the
renovation and/or replacement

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and to published five times weekly except daring lane,
July and August when it is puMsbed semi-weekly, and daring student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of tbdr
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida AUgator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gaiuesvie, Florida 32601. The AEgator to entered as
second class matter at Hie Untoed States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subacoption rate to SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Affigator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or tan away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wfll not consider abutments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
to given to Ae Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator wi not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to rah several tiroes. Notices
for correction must be given before the next insertion.
TiSjmSmRLYjsHER^

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The first annual Deepher-Pike Dime for Dinner
Campaign starts Monday, ends on Thursday, and
the barbecue is Nov. 17 which doesnt mean
much unless you know what a Deepher or a Pike
is and what the dimes are for.
A Deepher is a member of Delta Phi Epsilon
sorority, and a Pike is a member of Pi Kappa
Alpha fraternity, and Dimes for Dinner means
that both of these groups will be collecting dimes
for a Gainesville Boys Club barbecue starting
Monday.
There will be about 150 sorority and
fraternity members out to get enough dimes to
pay for a barbecue, and to entertain for two
houn about 50 boys who like to eat, play ball

of many of our older buildings
and the construction of new
facilities enabling us to lift some
present restrictions on
enrollment while improving the
quality of all of our programs,
O'Connell said.
MINI-POSTER
a i
- *
tMh
HOW SWEET IT WAS
0

Shepherd Bridge.
Secretary of Student Affairs Howard Lube! has
called the popular picnic and study spot one of our
last natural vistas.
The first of the three walkways is already under
construction. It will run from the Union, across the
bridge and out of the park adjacent to Graham.
In keeping with the pastoral atmosphere of the
area, a pine-chip on asphalt pathway will be laid,
and curbed with railroad ties. The asphalt beneath
the woodchips will prevent drainage problems that
plague a similar walkway near the law school.

of a letter written by Ernest K. Johnson HI, 3AS, in which Johnson
said he had observed groups of workers in which black men were
doing all the work while lily-white watchers stood by in the shade.
Johnson called one white watcher a moron and said the man
could not even communicate in English.
Three workers interviewed said they were familiar with Johnsons
letter and they knew the man whom Johnson called a moron. They
said the man has a speech impediment and naturally talks funny.
Another group of black workers, interviewed out of hearing
distance of anyone other than the interviewer, said their white
co-workers did just as much work as they did and that, if their
supervisors were white, they work right along with us.
When contacted and told of the workers comments, Johnson said
their statements could not be taken as fact because the black workers
are complacent, happy to take home just a little bread and
fearful of losing their jobs.
Assistant Director of Engineering and Utilities W.T. Mitchell of the
Physical Plant Division said Thursday there are black as well as white
supervisors, though most are white.
He noted there are more UF white workers than blacks.
Michael admitted some white workers may discriminate against the
blacks and vice versa. But he said no men on the supervisory level
discriminate and if they did they would be removed from their jobs.
The personnel department, which operates at the Hub separately
from the Physical Plant Division, does not choose workers according
to race, Michael said.

M J f DOWNTOWN
N THE SQUARE
NOW OPEN
SUNDAYS
From 1 P.M. m 6 P.M.
Shop Wilson s now 7 cloys o week
9:30 til 9 daily, 1-6 p.m. SUNDAYS
Opn and use your E.S.A. (early shop pop account)....

and just have a good time.
We would tike to make it an annual event. All
we want to do is make these kids happy for a few
horns, according to Rusty Tanner, coordinator
for the picnic at the Pike house.
Tanner said there will be plenty of food for
the boys to eat, and lots of activities.
We*H have softball and football games, potato
salad, baked beans and plenty of hamburgers for
them.
Coordinators at the Delta Phi Epsilon house
are Suzanne Wollner and Sandy Esserman.
Miss Wollner said, We would like to collect
more than anough for the barbecue. Their
program needs all the funds they can get.
A lot of people do this for them. We want to
do our part too.

Beautification
The rairoai ties e
Pi fraternity in cooperation with the university at an
estimated savings of $2,600 to the SG Icketbook.
The entire park area will be enclosed by a
decorative two-foot high rope fence.
Lubel expects the first walkway to be completed
early next quarter, with the rest done by spring.
Future plans call for rustic benches placed
throughout the park, and a waterfall to be built at
the north end of the creek.
The overall program must still be approved by the
Committee on Campus Planning and Development.

Bailey Seeks
ACLU Help
In Case
Campus conservative Jimmey
Bailey, under investigation by
the traffic court for alleged
possession, of an all-area parking
sticker, has enlisted the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) to conduct a separate
investigation of the charges.
ACLU spokesman Joel
Wadsworth said Wednesday, We
are making an investigation of
the evidence supporting the
charges, what has happened to
date and what is going to happen
in the future.
Traffic Court Chief Justice
Bob Watties recently appointed
one of the courts associate
justices, James Loman, to
investigate Bailey for using what
is suspected to be an illegal
parking sticker.
The investigation was
prompted by an Alligator report
which said Traffic Coordinator
Lee Burrows has no record of
issuing Bailey a permit.
It the ACLLTs investigation
shows Bailey's case warrants a
defense, the members must vote
on whether his case will be taken
up or not, Wadsworth said.
We do not represent people
because of their political beliefs
but because of the way their
cases are handled, he said.
Mexican Schools
MEXICO CITY Mexico will
spend $58.2 million o.i
classroom construction this year,
according to Agustin Yanze,
Secretary of Education.



SEN. 808 SAUNDERS
... takes one side

USFs Rat Dies Os Thirst;
Local Law Denies License

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Beer flows freely to people over 21 at UFs
Rathskeller, but the University of South Florida in
Tampa has been forbidden to serve alcoholic
beverages on cammis.

USF wants to open a rathskeller serving beer and
wine, but a local law prohibits beverage licenses
within a one-mile radius of campus, including the
campus itself.
Gainesville has a similar zoning law but with
differences that allow the existence of the
Rathskeller at UF.
The Gainesville law does not specifically forbid
serving alcohol on campus, although it does prohibit
beverage licenses to be issued for any area within
300 feet of the campus.
The zoning law was avoided when the Rathskeller
was begun by making it a private club, according to
Joe Hilliard, chairman of the board of dhectors of

DEMANDS WITHDRAWAL
Hanoi Replies To Nixon

TOKYO (UP!) North
Vietnam replied to President
Nixon's policy speech Thursday
by demanding withdrawal of all
American troops from South
Vietnam and an end to U.S.
support of the Saigon
government.

Agnew For President

HONOLULU (UPI) Sen.
Barry Goldwater said Thursday
if Vice President Spiro T. Agnew
keeps talking the way he is, he
may be drafted as a presidential
candidate.

If Ted Agnew keeps on
La Accidents
NEW ORLEANS r An
in-depth study of 40 Louisiana
holiday accidents showed that
the type driver most involved in
such accidents was a person in a
familiar car, in familiar territory,
close to home and in no hurry.
The study, by the American
Association, also showed that 60
per cent of the accidents
occurred in darkness.
_o|
llliS
ifcv/.'.vXX y. ;
ylNCft/

SMC Subject Os Debate
SPONSORED BY PHI ETA SIGMA

Controversial philosophy Prof. Ken Megill and
State Sen. Bob Saunders, D-Alachua, will face each
Other in a debate Monday night at 7:30 in the
Spessard L. Holland Law Center Auditorium. < v
Megill and Saunders along with several others,
will hash over the effect of the Student Mobilization
Committee's strike and march on Washington late
next week.*
Scheduled to participate are Ray Morrison,
president of the UF chapter of SMC; Steve Fahrer
of SDS; Jim Hollis, ex-president of the UF Veterans
Club; Dr. Irving Goffman, UF economics professor;
Presbyterian minister Rev. Dan Beardsley;

Hanois Vietnam News
Agency broadcast a statement
which it said was issued by
North Vietnams ministry of
foreign affairs in reply to
President Nixons Nov. 3 speech
on his efforts for peace in
Vietnam.

expressing the sentiment of the
vast, overwhelming majority of
the American people, he may
find himself being groomed for
president even before it's his
turn, Goldwater said.

DANCE
Saturday, Nov. 8
9 p.m.
Reitz Union Ballroom
Come and meet the
Student
Mobilization Committee

the Rathskeller.
Under a 1951 ruling of die Florida Supreme
Court, a private club is not a vendor of liquor,
because it serves only its members and certain
guests. Thus it is exempt from zoning regulations
concerning sellers of alcoholic beverages.
For a private dub to obtain a license to serve
liquor, the club must have been in existence for two
years. The Rathskeller became part of the Faculty
Club to meet this qualification.
But the situation at USF is different, Business
Manager Andrew Rodgers said.
Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth, in an advisory opinion
to Chancellor Robert Mautz, said the special local
law specifically forbidding alcoholic sales on the
campus precludes any possibility of serving beer or
wne under any circumstances.
In spite of the ruling forbidding liquor on the
USF campus, plans are continuing feu: a rathskeller
without beer, Rodgers said.

* North Vietnam's statement
said: In a word, President
Nixons November address is a
speech of war, his plan for peace
is a trick to prolong the war.
This is a challenge to the
Vietnamese people, and to the
people of die world and the
progressive people of the United
States who are resolutely
demanding that the Nixon
administration stop its
aggression in Vietnam.
Hanois statement praised the
American people who have
demonstrated against the
Vietnam War.

journalism professor Hugh Cunningham; ana
Methodist minister John Pennington.
The panel discussion is sponsored by Phi Eta
Sigma, men's freshman honor society, and will
be moderated by Harvey Alper, president of
Omicron Delta Kappa, men's leadership honorary.
The SMC strike is scheduled for Nov. 14, with the
march on the nations Capitol Saturday. The action
is planned as a protest of the Vietnam War.
The public is invited to the debate. .A short
question and answer period is planned to allow
audience participation.

GOLF
fi PAR 60
DRIVING RANGE
ijm -CLUBHOUSE
ELECTRICCARTS
Mji k OPEN 7 DAYS
ffflfli Ist NINE $1.25
inr $2.25 FOR 18
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3!v Ml. WESTOFI.7S ON
NEWBERRY RD.373-2J2J

INSURED
CLASS
RINGS
AGAINST
Â¥ Loss of ring by
1 theft, robbery,
burglary, or fire
\ Loss of stone from
\
tS#? of stone
mk¥svi Buy now for Christmas
\Jfo\Z*HGustoniG*&fc
N Ww*y |/X*b| Convenient Terms Available
I ZALES
VfeVe nothing without your love.
GAINESVILLE MALL
Si?- : ?
f| Vhw
VyHIB JIB a fla fVf MPPHI
9 If I If /f ji M mmtmmmmf B jm 111 mM w A& M f mllm
i pE'
IP.M. 'til 6P.M.1
Monday I
Thru Saturday
' -j\£'''*~- '*' -. /::;' '. .*' >4iSr> ".**' *t '.c 'r| / v .,;''
| 9 3QA.M. 'til 9P.M. [
Ihhibhhhhb

Friday, f.ovaanbar 7,19ee. Tha Florida AHiprtor,

PROF. KEN MEGILL
... on the other
JEWELERS
1802 W. University
Adjaeant Kinds Food Hoot
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB
* .*
8 X>TRA4|eiek watch repair
8 Diamond Satting
8 Ring siting
0 Jawalry rapairs
Charms soidarad
8 Trophys-piaqoas
BECK BECHTOLP 373-1026

Page 3



Page 4

Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Novernliar Y, 1969

rALivi PtAin rur rmwwm l
Zoning Commission Could Block Festival

By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator CorrwpondMit
The establishment in the form of
a zoning commission could block the
three-day Palm Beach Pop Festival
scheduled for Nov. 28-30.
Top name add rock performers
headlined by the Rolling Stones have
been booked for the festival.
Promoter Dave Rupp says there*s no
chance local politicians a bunch of
bigots will stop a massive journeying
of psychedelic/rock fans to the
Thanksgiving event.
Palm Beach County Zoning
Commission Attorney Paul C. Wolfe
told Rupp he would have to apply for
conditional use of the Palm Beach
International Raceway because the

House Committee OKs
OEO Antipoverty Funds

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House Education and Labor
Committee broke a five-month
deadlock Thursday by approving
a $2.3 billion lull to continue
operations of the antipoverty
program. The amount was nearly
S3OO million more than
President Nixon asked.
The measure, approved on a
21-12 party line vote by the
De mo era tic-con trolled
committee, would authorize
money for the Office of
Economic Opportunity for the

news 'lfch-.
from...jlliSl^iFSU
SENATE The Student Senate in its regular session Wednesday
night approved appropriations valued at $5,383 and an amendment to
abolish the Assotiation of Women Students as a constitutional body.
The senators also called a special session for Thursday night to
discuss a bill requesting $1,824 to send 1,400 students to Washington
for the Nov. 15 march against the war.
The penalty-making authority of the House Council was seriously
restricted by a bill which now allows only verbal reprimands.
UDALL Former Secretary of Interior Stewart Udall Tuesday
night warned of the dangers involved in the continued use of
pesticides and other chemicals.
Udall said this is one of the major problems facing the U.S. today.
CAMPUS SPEAKER SERIES
DR. TED IAN OSMAN
Speaking
CENTER OF
JIMANBk
Lounge 123 IRIM
J. W. Reitz Union,
I'V.v I
.v.

current zoning would not permit the
festival. A commission hearing on
Rupps application is set for Nov. 13.
I dont know what the commission
will do. Theyre unpredictable, Wolfe
said.
If the commission rules against
Rupps application, Wolfe says he will
seek an injunction to stop the festival.
The S2O tickets for the festival are
selling well on the UF campus according
to Eddie Floyd, chairman of the Gator
Loan Fund.
Floyd said tickets would continue to
be on sale in Room 326 of the Reitz
Union, Donnigans, Subterranean
Circus, University Shop, and
Recordsville. No tickets will be sold at
the gate.
He says a percentage of each ticket

1970 fiscal year which began
July 1. Actual funds must be
approved in a separate
appropriations bill.
The increase over the $2
billion proposed by Nixon
would go to the popular Head
Start program of pre-school
training, for emergency good
and medical service to the poor
not adequately reached by other
government food and aid
programs and for two new
programs of public service jobs
for the poor.

WATCH
for
A$E
and
IIKA

I Ihe Man-On-Campus Colleen I
I from I
OF NEW HAVEN / SHIRTMAKERS I
JM
U 'WF" >: I
S 111
Ijf I f l ll |j 1 1 j: | j j!. jj m H Jjj B
y I{|{;ji| t 11 rj \ >iiVmU" :
Bristol pin -or-not in either jj
n! J.l | 1 1| H1 |lijlf rench or barrel cuffs. fi
JX : *} ).| > i i 11' t \ 111 vl
s- -p-1 £sSB9KSBBBsK3uKeKMsmw'Mm
wm f: Wkx- x % :£ £ S £ >: \ Xx§£Hl
P h e d The celebrated Purist* buttwwlown I
$ * Pur,st button-donwi. with regular taperad body. y-v^tA
Sero presents a distinctive collection of fall HHHBHHI I
and winter dress shirts designed-for todays
I Man-on-Campus. Meticulously tailored in I
M no-iron, wrinkle-free Sero-Press of 65% I
I QACRON Polyester, 35% Cotton for a 1
fresh all-day appearance. ; I
B r r
Available at: UNIVERSITY S I
I JviHR tV gT" t*Y" * ;* fc.\V7v 'y
* DuPont registered trademark
** ! .I mi ...

sale goes to the loan fund. He hopes to
raise over $2,000 from the sale of
tickets to the festival.
The promoter and Floyd said there
would definitely be refunds if a court
canceled the festival.
They will not stop this pop festival
from coming... there will be a pop
festival. If the so-called establishment
tiys to put a stop to some of the best
music of our times then 111 turn into a
hippie. Whereas right now Im happy
being a capitalistic pig, Floyd said.
Other groups booked for the festival
include The Canned Heat, Steppenwolf,
Jefferson Airplane, Chambers Brothers,
Iron Butterfly, Janis Joplin and other
voices of the underground sound.
The whole thing is very
blown-up ... A lot of politicians have

Gator PAWN SHOP
GUNS
(LOANS) .cameras
N, RADIOS A TVS
BUY-SELL-TRADE
"We specialize in Gator-Aid
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

been harassing us.. Theyve made
some of the most asinine statements
youve ever heard in your life, R U p p
said.
Meanwhile, Palm Beach County
Sheriff William R. Heidtman promised
strict enforcement of drug laws at the
festival.
Dick Gruenwald, Rupps public
relations man says they are fighting
possible drug problems.
The Rev. Arthur Blessitt, Loss
Angeles minister of hippies, will be here
for three full days. Hes bringing a
campus crusade; of 500 young
people... So youll have a rehgious
atmosphere, he said.
The sheriff wouldnt reveal specific
enforcement plans



;? -ee.' -' a
| Conservatives Cancel Rally I

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
I Alligator Writer
Plans for a Veterans* Day rally in support of
5 1 American troops in Vietnam were cancelled
jj; Wednesday night.
\ i The rally, to have been sponsored jointly by
I'" the college Young Republican Club and the
Young Americans for Freedom (YAF), was to
have followed a Veterans Day memorial service
to be held in the Plaza of the Americas by the
Veterans Club.
Difficulty in obtaining qualified speakers for
the program was the reason given for the
cancellation.
The rally was intended to coincide with a

Physical Society
Meets In Union

By RON CRESPO
Alligator Correspondent
The 36th annual meeting of
the Southeastern Section of the
American Physical Society
(SSAPS) is underway at the
Reitz Union Thursday through
Saturday.
More than 600 physicists,
professors and students of
related fields mainly from
southeastern campuses
gathered Thursday to discuss
questions of mutual concern.
Dr. Charles F. Hooper, UF
professor of physics and member
of the societys local committee,
said the main purpose of the
conference is the contact
between physicists and
colleagues to discuss mutual
problems.
Formal activities started
Thursday morning with the
presentation of the first of 287

V By BRENDA GEVERTZ
HAPPINESS HAPPENING: A Diawali Festival, the Indian festival
of happiness, will be presented in the Reitz Union by the India Chib.
Indian music will be played, costumes will be on display, and Indian
sweets will be distributed. The festival will be in room 360, beginning
at 7 p.m., on Saturday.
AN EITHER OR AND OPPORTUNITY: SMC has a busy
weekend scheduled. Saturday night theyre inviting everyone to a
dance in the Reitz Union Ballroom, beginning at 9 p.m. On Sunday
evening there will be a general meeting in rooms 361-363 of the
Union, at 8. This will be the last chance to sign up for buses to
Washington.
SHRIMP SOCIAL (THIS COULD BE A SMELLY AFFAIR): The
TKE house is having an after prog social on Sunday afternoon at 2. A
boiled shrimp dinner will be served and anyone wanting more
information should call 373-1948.
BOUNCE BACK BIG: The great Gators return to get Georgia.
Jacksonville will be the scene of our victory.
HERES THE CRUSADE, BUT WHERE IS THE
BATTLE?: College Life, sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ,
will meet Sunday night at 9:13, at the Kappa Delta sorority house.
CHECKER CHECK-UP: The Chess Club meets tonight at 7, in
room 118 of the Union.
A BIG HELLO: Phi Eta welcomes their national second vice
president to the home of the Alpha Lamba chapter. She will be
meeting with the chapter on Saturday and Sunday.
[ nittmtiiiimptiMMi |
I -BECKUM OPTICIANS I
II 22 W t Uwlrmy Aw., GalneivlHe. Fla. Pfton* 376-3516 |

dissertation papers which will be
delivered during the meetings.
Some of these are invited
papers which are considered to
have particular relevance to the
field.
Out of 34 invited papers, four
are authored by UF professors.
UFs Dr. Robert Cade,
developer of Gatorade, will
address a formal banquet at the
Reitz Union Friday night. The
meetings have featured speakers
from MASA and one from the
Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Among the subjects of
discussion will be how to
increase the number of students
going into undergraduate study
in physics, the number of those
who go mto graduate studies and
how the draft is affecting
recruiting in graduate schools.
The UF graduate school is
not suffering much because of
the draft, Hooper said.

> % -jt n
national day of support for the troops in |
Vietnam called for by Sen. Barry Goldwater after
the Oct. 15 Moratorium.
The rally will not be pro war or to support jj:
Nixon, said Terry Hedden, treasurer of the §
Young Republicans before the cancellation. It is |
only to support the troops in Vietnam.
A political variety of speakers had been hoped
for, conservatives and liberals Hedden said.
Possibly, he said, they would have had a
representatives from the Student Mobilization §
Committee on the platform.-
The Veterans Day memorial service is §
unaffected by the rally cancellation and will be
held as scheduled. &

214 N.W. 13th St.
376-6472
BRING
COUPON
.f.'-Vgfo, 1 ; -T;%; if}

SAT. & SUN.
Jf j

A KERTUCXY nBKNKXBI
[ 2 PC. CHICKEN
| MASHED POTATOES
GRAVY AND ROLL

: e < r ; % - r
I? ;.H- .- : '
." ; V-v y '' -wt ~
. .. L-'. A.,/,
i' yiy- u v- ; y yi-" V ?.>. .s'-l y y].; v ( u- y i:
Bring a $1.50 sitting fee.
Dress for men is dark coat, dark tie, light shirt
Dress for women is a dark sweater.

FRIDAY NOV. 7
12 -4 JUNIORS (I THRU L)
4-5 GREEKS-All
6-9 SENIORS
MONDAY NOV. 10
12-4 JUNIORS (M THRU N)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS
(Delta Sigma Phi, DTD, Tri Delt,
Delta Gamma, Sig Ep)
TUESDAY NOV. 11
12 -4 JUNIORS (O THRU P)
4-5,6-9 GREEKS (Delta Upsilon,
KA, DPhiE, Kappa Alpha Theta, TEP)

CALL 392-1687
Between Noon-sp.m.
FOR APPOINTMENT

REPRESENTATIVES
Jim Bartlett John Potocfci
GeorfaCert Phil Tarver
l
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. i jjtw.tw.An.
376-1208
: PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADER I* SALES TOCOtLEQE MEN
' V Student Special
I (With The Coupon)
I Regular 93< Steak burger
| Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
I SI.OB Value Only9oi plus tax |
! Steak n* Shake
I 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville

-Ct* Sanders mmmmmmmmmm
§§ss Kentucky fried
y

SNACK
BOX

FKmrt. Affltor,

WEDNESDAY NOV. 12
12 4 JUNIORS (Q THRU T)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Kappa Sigma,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Mu, Phi Delta
Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi)
THURSDAY NOV. 13
12 4 JUNIORS (U THRU Z)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Kappa, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi
Kappa Phi, TKE)
FRIDAY NOV. 14
12-5,6-9 SENIORS

114. N.W. 34th St.
372-3646
BRING
COUPON

69<
REG 85<

Page 5



Page 6

, Tha Florida AWgMor. Friday. Noaanbar 7,196 S

UF English Institute
To Operate All Year

The English Language
Institute of the UF will begin
year-round operation in January
1970. .It will offer foreign
students intensive training in
English grammar, speech and
writing, as well as a first-hand
knowledge of American life.
The students attend classes a
minimum of five hours a day,

Student
Tackles
Prejudice

tat*
mmr \ < ,;
P j, i
jpKpff
JH ; ' % T ' ,l "' T '"* '''*' 1 s ,' r t i j- ,f -\V, ', i. T , r. f rf 'i. , < ** **? jn ,~ ~ T* r 1 * fc^r>
PS
."'-V' 1 '::^.:..' v;';;?:.; '*'-.£ ',/' .--S' '

LATEST EQUIPMENT
Physicists from Southeastern universities, holding their annual
convention at the UF, examine latest laboratory equipment on display
in the Reitz Union. From left are Dr. Stanley Ballard, chairman.
Department of Physics and Astronomy, UF, Dr. M.M. Duncan,
physics chairman. University of Georgia, and Dr. L.W. Seagondollar,
physics chairman North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. The
convention concludes Saturday.
HELP WANTED
Job Prescription: Laying Groundwork and
Providing Manpower for
Operation Outreach and-
Clearinghouse (An Information-
Services Warehouse in the
Ghetto)
Qualifications: A Love for People, Hardworking,
Sincere, Qualified for Work-Study
Program
Contact: Mr. Roy Mitchell's office,
124 Tigert Hall, 392-1265
fbr further information

five days a week. The course
centers on the spoken aspects of
the language by the use of
audio-lingual teaching methods.
Enrollment is open to college
students from abroad who plan
to enter an American university
and to others who need
concentrated training in the
English language.

How can racial prejudice among high school students be reduced or
eliminated?
A student in the UF*s College of Education has tackled this
question as part of his doctoral dissertation requirement.
His answer: If interracially grouped students regularly discuss
current moral, social and ethical problems, their prejudices will
decrease significantly.
This is the Ending of Dr. Glenn Gorham Tucker, who has received
his doctorate in education curriculum and instruction and is now on
the staff of Marshall University.
Under the direction of Dr. Glen Hass, the study used as a test group
96 randomly selected students at a rural North Central Florida high
school.
Half of the group- 24 black and 24 white students split up into
sub-groups and met three times a week for four weeks in free and
open discussion ... on various social problems selected by the groups
themselves.**
The remaining 48 students were used as a control group (not

the smoll society

I WAS Vest/ AT LEAST
\Afc>[Z£l&l? WHEN PI PM T Oo ALL
WAS WAT WOIZIZYIN6
ELecT&P- Rsf 2 NoTHIM<&-
"

ART SUPPLIES
Oils, Water Colors, Palettes
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St.' 376-2431
COMES
THE
REVOLUTION
CRL 757506
BLUES IS BACK AND THE
REVOLUTIONARY BLUES
BAND IS LEADING THE
WAY. ROCK-BLUES? SURE!
DIGIT. GET IN STEP WITH
THESE YOUNG SPIRITED
ACTIVISTS. THE REVOLU REVOLUTIONARY
TIONARY REVOLUTIONARY BLUES BAND
NO GIMMICKS JUST
SOME OF THE BEST NEW
SOUNDS AROUND
TODAY.
rari INCREDIBLE NEW
1 EXCITEMENT ON
J DECCA RECORDS

participating in the discussions) tor the purpose oi naving a standard
by which to measure changes in the experimental group.
Using scientific questionnaires, Tucker measured prejudice,
humanitarianism and worldmindedness of both groups at the end of
th After the results, Tucker found that the experimental
groups prejudice level had decreased whfle the control group not
involved in the regular free and open discussions showed a slight
rise in prejudice. ~
Concerning the study, Tucker said, It proved successful in
reducing intercultural differences and conflicts, but, he added, The
time period should be extended to at least one semester or more.
Advisor Hass commented that Tuckers careful research on this
difficult problem appears to have demonstrated that cultural
differences and conflicts can be reduced.
Additionally, Hass urged more testing under many other
circumstances to clearly establish the general effectiveness of this
approach.

mam fitct/im
GAINESVILLE MALL
the name of the game
is TRIPTIC!
Here now the 3-dimensional
tic-tac-toe game of skill thats sweeping
the nation. Get it for your
next party or night alone $lO.
Large chess sets (31 x 33" rug) S6O.
Maas stationery.
*'*? % r * . 'hi'-mt.m -J'"' j "I*a r
** X V'l <4

by Brickmqn



pi
4 m WLJSm
m % j&fm
|f§ ,sagfL- la
..JAV,
J|3
w s*s',P it il
11
iiJ M|im3|Hvl
-
TH
I 1
I
FLORIDA BEES DYING
... insecticide carfoaryl blamed
New Insecticide
Endangers Bees
Insecticides have always been a threat to one of Floridas most
beneficial insects, the honey bee. And the trend away from persistent
insecticides could make matters even worse for the poor bee.
In the last three years Florida beekeepers have shown sharp
increases in. their losses to insecticides. The losses have been linked to
the increased production of soybeans in the state or, more directly, to
the insecticide carbaryl (Sevin) which is used extensively to protect
soybeans.
Carbaryl is one of.the newest group of insecticides, the carbamates.
Because they are less persistent in the environment than the
chlorinated hydrocarbons like DDT, the carbamates appeal to
conservationists, who are concerned about environmental
contamination. But many of the carbamates have been shown to be
hightly toxic to bees.
Some of the chlorinated hydrocarbons among them, DDT have
been shown to be relatively safe for bees. Less than a week after it
has been applied in the field, DDT ceases to be any threat to bees,
though kills when it is first applied may be high. Sometimes bees are
able to develop a tolerance for DDT.
John Haynie, an apiculturist (bee specialist) with the UF Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), explained why the use of
carbaryl on soybeans in particular had become a problem to Florida
beekeepers. Soybeans involve a large acreage, and there is such a
serious insect problem on soybeans that the grower has to use carbaryl
often and in large amounts.
Frank Robinson, another apiculturist at the university, says that
last year several beekeepers reported losses ranging from 100 to 300
colonies (there are about 50,000 bees to a colony), in areas where
large acreages of soybeans were being grown. Robinson warned that
if this continues there will be large areas of the state in which
commercial beekeeping will be impossible.
Beekeeping in Florida profides a total income of about $5 million a
year in bees, honey, and beeswax. The state has over 8,000 beekeepers
with around 300,000 colonies of bees. Beekeeping is concentrated in
five sections of the state: 1. Northwest Florida, 2. the Central
Florida citrus section, 3. South Florida, 4. the Lake Okeechobee
area, and 5. the Indian River section.
Other states have suffered much worse insecticide bee kills.
Clarence Benson, of the American Beekeeping Federation, said that in
1967 agricultural pesticides were responsible for the loss of over
500,000 colonies in this country.
I.R .
JHL STEAK HOUSE i
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westg&te Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

..... ; -r-'fj
f JWJVQ
GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I THE IN-FASHION STOREj
I j&ml wmmam I
fit
I I ? t 111
--1 mm£> m
a BH PRB sfe iv
jA |H|jp Ipp* 1
a I la
I I
Safi? '/,?,s> Ulittfto' i rv .. iHH
;?&*: > i /- -yT* Hmj
PHOTO BY MATHEWS' AND O'NEAL 9H
I COAT FASHION
I Choose your Pants Suit outfit now from our large collection.
Complete your selection with a knit from our tops department for Wm
E coolest look in town. mm;
Our collection of 2 & 3 piece outfits are in orlons, wools & knits.
I 2 pc. shown 22.99
I turtle neck sweater 4.99
m Hi
I I OPEN SUNDAY 1-6 P.mH
WL' Mm
L W

Friday, Novambar 7,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

!, fha'fWkb

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
13*1 Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel I
. Executive Editoi News Editor
AM. Amumn
I rs
nn. f
It's A Household Word Just Aim At Effete Snobs
And Spray

*£>:::: oT X OW D6 X fy rIBIOS* 85 8888 88^^
Rest In Poo
| :j:|
By Carol Sanger ;:*:*:*S

Lo! Stillness and solitude such
as is seldom known in the
Kigndom of Poo has descended
over and upon the land and all
the great and growing multitudes
of peasants, nobles of great and
lesser stature, and warlords of
sober and solemn dispositions.
Woe! There is something
wrong in die Land of Poo in this
the second reign of King Charles
the Shepherd, cried them all.
But none could tell what it was
that made the strawberries wilt
even as they grew in the fields of
the land.
Perchance there is something
of dark and devious nature
which has cast this spell of
gloom and forelomeness
throughout this kingdom, the
mighty and wise king chanted in
bored and boring tones.
No, wise and benevolent sire
who rules all of Poo with justice
and truth, me thinks it is
something of a far graver nature
which does plague and pestilence
our kingdom, Bruce of
Boudreau, greater noble and
administer of state intoned.
And then, as all of the greater
and lesser nobles who lined the
long and marble halls of Poodian
state nodded approvingly and
with much gusto, up spake the
Prince Regent of Poo, Walter of
the Morgans.
Harken, the kingdom has
died in the middle of this the
second reign of you, King
Charles of Poo, he of the House
of Morgans droned into the
night.
How speak you, prince of
Poo? thundered Charles the
Shepherd, and silence flooded
the marbles halls of brilliance
; 4hd gmatj length- q

Swallow your anger* oh
mighty one of Poo, I speak not
in treasonous torifes nor do I seek
with malice to cause the
temperature of your royal blood
to rise in its veins, the great
noble chided.
*Then with much and great
haste you had best deign to
expound profusely on your
testimony, noble prince, the
shepherd king warned.
And so with slow and sober
tones the bravest of princes did
begin expounding profusely.
The long and brilliant halls
of Poodian state are all but
deserted. Nary a minister nor
noble of varying degrees of
stature frequents these palacial
grounds with much regularity
nor intensity of soul, he
chanted.
Woe! Tis true in essence, I
fear, sighed Charles the
Shepherd, Speak on, Prince
Regent of Poo.
Verily, I shall, my king.
Things are different now in this
your second reign. The peasants
laboring daily in the long and
sprawling fields of strawberries
are no longer beset by the
warlords in the fortress known
as Tigert to dangerous and
worrisome degrees, the Morgan
prince stated.
In essence, tis true,
chanted the king and it was
repeated four times by the long
lines of weary nobles standing
into the Poodian night in the
long and beautiful halls of
Poodian state.
But woe! Then there is no
apparent cause for this plague
and pestilence which now does
most heartily strangle and maim
our vast and abounjc|i#g (

EDITORIAL
At Last, A Light
. J A- A a. aa.a.l 4

After nearly a weeks whirlpool of
indecision, decisions and reversed decisions,
apparently somebody somewhere is
beginning to shed some light on the
controversy surrounding the signing of
loyalty oaths.
Thursday, Gov. Claude Kirk and his
cabinet decided to postpone any appeal on
the loyalty oath ruling until after the Nov.
18 meeting of the State Board of Education.
After another typical Kirk move Tuesday
in which our governor decided he need not
abide by any simple court ruling, were glad
to see someone reminded him that the
Supreme Court holds a little bit of power.
Even if that fact took Kirk three days to
swallow, we commend his ultimate wisdom.
Meanwhile, both Kirk and Commissioner
of Education Floyd Christian have assured
us that there will still be plenty of time for
administrative or legal action before
paychecks are due to state employes at the
end of this month.
We would hope so.
We deplore the entire idea of loyalty
oaths which smell just a little too much of
McCarthyism for the year 1969, and view
the idea of refusing to pay university
professors who decline to sign the" arbitrary
and discriminatory oath as absurd.
And what is even harder to understand is
the fact that this university administration,
the people whom this controversy most
strongly involves, was kept more in the dark
about what was going on in Tallahassee than
anyone.
As late as Thursday afternoon, before

kingdom, the prince did speak.
And darkness did descend
heavily as the brows of all in
attendence grew into deep and
deepening furrows.
And silence did abound
through the halls until broken in
fashion most rude by one known
to all as Marcus of Glick.
Forsooth! It is the oath most
vile and nauseating which has
caused an odorous stench of
such magnitude so as to wilt
even the sturdiest of strawberries
from their vines.
Oath? My royal office knows
not of the existence of any oath
of greater or lesser magnitude
and we shall not permit such an
oath, of which we know not of
its existence... Charles the
Shepherd chanted from great
depths of memory.
No, mighty sire. The oath of
which I speak finds not its blame
at the foot of your shining and
regal throne. It was conjured
from out in the provinces
surrounding Poo in order to
purge the kingdom of any and
all witches who would do harm
to any and all peasants, the
minister intoned.
And with great ecstacy and
glee the king and all his varying
degrees of nobles and ministers
did begin to chant and cry out
into the Poodian .skies causing
the peasants in their hovels to
toss and turn angrily in their
sleep.
And on into the night the
esteemed gathering did chant and
curse the evil oaths of swome
loyalty imposed upon the
merlins of the land. And for the
first time in several moons the
Land of Poo did show some
* y&gue.aad nebulous signs of life.

Small Club Raps

MR. EDITOR:
The following letter to the
Seminole represents only one
problem that small clubs
encounter on this campus.
This and our other
difficulties seem to arise
from the fact that we are
attempting to be independent
on membership dues of S6O
per year.
Student Government cut
off travel funds, as everyone
knows, thus depriving UF of
student representation at
national meetings of
professional groups. Our club
was thus unable to send a
student to Dallas for the
American Occupational
Therapy Association meeting
this November which
deprives the rest of the
members of the information
which could have been
brought back from this
professional meeting.
Our club reserved a room
in the Union for a meeting
and we wanted to supply
our own refreshments. We
were told that we could not
do this, but had to buy
refreshments from Food
Service in the Union. This
unnecessary cost, however
small, deducted just that
much more from our funds
to participate in community
service projects.
I feel futile in my protest
against the overwhelming
odds of the bureaucracy, but
in this age of protest, I
must sound my small but
determined cry: Remember
the Underdogs!! Its now or

Christians statement was released to the
press, the Presidents office had been given
no indication as to what the governor
planned to do.
To pay or not to pay and to sign or not to
sign were the two completely unnecessary
questions no one could understand and no
one in Tallahassee seemed willing to answer.
This can be called little more than unfair.
First of all the oath comes out with the
obvious intention of purging the states
schools of Communist-leaning propagandists.
Then the professors rebel.
Then the courts say well, wait a minute,
this could be unconstitutional and we will
muse upon it for awhile.
And then Kirk says wait a minute, youre
not getting any money from this fine state
to pay any Commies.
And then Kirk says well, wait a minute,
maybe well let the appeal ride until the
board of education meets.
And apparently no one is the least
concerned about the professors of this
institution, whether they are to be paid for
this months work or find out at the end of
the month that there are strings attached to
their well-earned checks.
Kirk has put the matter back into the
hands of the State Board of Education
where it belongs, and into the hands of the
courts where the people involved have
chosen to take it.
There it should stay.
And we urge the governor to keep his
hands off the educational institutions of this
state and keep his politics in Tallahassee,
where he visits once in awhile.

never; were going down for
the last time.
MARTI SOUTHAM, 4HP
PRESIDENT
STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY ASSOCIATION
Dear Sir:
I wish to lodge a protest
against your policy of
prohibiting one-half page
spaces.
The new policy is only
detrimental to small
organizations. The larger
organizations such as
fraternities and sororities
purchase at least one full
page and often two, anyway,
and have the funds available
to continue doing so even
with the increase in price. In
addition, it seems illogical to
assume that SIOO from one
organization is preferable to
SSO from each of two
organizations.
Indeed, your announcement
of a deadline for the
1969-70 Seminole arrived at
such a late date that it was
impossible for me to arrange
an agreement with another
small organization, thus
assuring you of the sale of a
complete page, or failing
that, working out a fund
raising campaign to get the
money. When I requested
additional time, someone in
your office refused me.
In conclusion, it appears
that the student annual is
not for all students, but
only for those students who
have a large corporate
influence.
.MARTI SOUTHAM



OPEN FORUM:-^.
(jAltltL oml
hope frr the rrmf fr"** I** 1 **
Protest Light
MR. EDITOR:
With the sudden culmination of protest directed
against the Vietnam war, I feel the American people
need an active symbol of their protest of this war. It
should be simple yet moving. I feel that to bum a
candle in every home and business window as a
light of hope would be most appropriate for this
cause and would be something in which everyone
could participate.
I call upon the editors of the Alligator and
various student organizations to promote this idea
as a peaceful yet effective protest.
TED VODDE lUC
Sp6oklllQ OUt .k k kv^ kvw;swkw?wnvav.'^
| Factory Houses f
By RoCj6T M Sp6Hs6r
The following is addressed to Robert S. Bolles, Dean of the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts at UF.
(To somewhat identify myself: in the late fifties I was an
Architecture student for a time but dropped out when I
became confused and angry by the the conflicts I began to
perceive...)
Where is your sense of proportion?
You are handling and getting paid a lot of money to
educate young people to become architects. And why? Only
one in a million or so actually designs to a large extent the
buildings of the cities. A few more help draw up the plans.
What are you doing with all that money?
Why dont you educate young people to become architects
to design to a large extent the houses ordinary people live
in? Is the problem of limited space and income too much for
you to solve interestingly?
People need to be employed for at least another generation.
Better it be at construction and peaceful production than
most other things. The world certainly cant survive the kinds
of warfare and destruction possible now. And there are many
people with a good sense of design who with training and
impetus could help their communities evolve indigenous
architecture.
Whether politically left or right, architecture as a cultural
influence will die completely when houses are produced in
chemical factories. Subdivisions are a half-measure.
As a matter of fact I think the public has a right to
know where your private investments are.
Most of your rhetoric that Ive heard sounds like petty
squabbling children or half-sinister, power/money-mad
pedagogues leading the naive into stupidities. Surely now with
the obvious threat of factory-produced houses you can get
together and flood the field with truly human scale architects!
A valuable ally might be the lumber companies or tree
farmers. Why dont you talk realistically with them? You
could talk with the mining and metals people too since they
need a substitute for war.
Have you thought of advertising? It really works to educate
large audiences, they say.
Do or die, as I see it.
V



' \
* \
-y-v .

An Attempt To Appease

MR. EDITOR:
The American people have been insulted long
enough. The insanity of Vietnam continues and
Richard Nixon, in what was supposed to be an
important speech, has the audicity to tell us of
secret plans.
All the administration nonsense of token troop
withdrawal is a sorry attempt at appeasing public
opinion. A recent position paper (Oct. 21) of the
New Mobilization Committee points out there can
be no real end to the war until:
The U.S. stops all military action against the

Offer Me Honor, Bathed In Blood

MR. EDITOR: How about your HUMILITY,
that none can touch.
Oh my dear Country, Will you offer me REASON,
What have you to offer me achieved by injustice?
this new sunrise? Can you give me HONESTY,
not bought by corruption?
Is it your IDEALS, tarnished Are you able to show
with deceit? LOYALTY, not
Maybe its your HONOR, manufactured on Madison
bathed in blood. Avenue?
Could it be your VIRTUE, Can you offer me FREEDOM, in
decaying like the books it the hands of tyrants?
is written in? Will you give me JUSTICE,
Perhaps it is your MORAL at the risk of losing
FIBER, thats forever power?
frayed. Can I visit your SLUMS,
Would it be your with your aspiring political
GENEROSITY, which few candidates?
can buy? Perhaps you offer me
Stand Behind Nixon
MR. EDITOR:
The burden for the achievement of peace now rests preponderately
upon the enemy. Either he will meaningfully negotiate or continue to
do battle. If he continues to wage war, he will not only be prolonging
the suffering of his own people, but merely delaying his certain defeat
and the annihilation of his troops on the battlefield.
We shall either achieve peace in Paris or we shall seize it by the
defeat of the enemy on the field of battle.
The aggressor has shown his true character. Unwilling to seek peace
in a spirit of compromise, he holds fast to his aims for conquest.
As the blast of war and the clash of resounding arms ring in our ears
we shall not stand idle. The Hanoi regime cannot last a thousand
years. Like the Third Reich it too can be blasted from the face of the
earth.
Some claim Thieu and Ky are dictators but when was the last
election held in North Vietnam? Who can question the fact that Ho
Chi Minh, and his cohorts are among the most treacherous killers since
Hitler and Stalin?
Heartfelt desire for peace cannot be served by a heartless
abandonment of South Vietnam. Let those who wish wave their
placards of submission and appeasement. Let those who earnestly
desire peace reject the voices of defeat.
Claims of patriotism are not enough. We must stand shoulder to
shoulder behind the President in a coalition for victory. We must
strive on together to finish the work we are in.
Remaining steadfast in will and united in purpose we shall prevail.
BRUCE DAVID ALPER, 3AS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed 300 words,
f Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer shows just cause. The editor
reserve**!!*right tb edifcaH-letters foriipae*. <

- Friday, Novambar 7 V 1969, Tba Florida Alligator, I

Vietnamese on the ground and in the air.
. AH U.S. troops, equipment, planes and
helicopters are withdrawn, and US. bases are
dismantled.
+ All support is withdrawn from the Thieu-Ky
government, and the people of Vietnam are
permitted to decide their own fate.
Richard Nixons long-awaited speech was just
more of the same. And now ON TO
WASHINGTON!
DENNIS ROCKWAY
SMC PUBLICITY CO-CHAIRMAN

FRESH AIR, contaminated
by industry.
Could I see your PRISONS,
those pillars of
rehabilitation?
Maybe I can visit your
UNIVERSITIES, the toys
of vour astute politicians.
Will you show me how you
silence DISCONTENT,
by denying it exists?
Will you give me the
RIGHTS to my beliefs,
then persecute me for
beliving them.
Can you offer me LATIN
AMERICA, after its
annexed?
Will you still insist on selling
me VIETNAM, 44,000
times paid for by your
young dead?
Yes, this dawn brings much
for you, my dear country,
as I arise.
Perhaps I should IGNORE it
all and go back to
dreaming.
But dreams no longer accompany
my sleep,
Only endless NIGHTMARES.
STEVE AVART, 3JM
'The Fox Is Bad?
MR. EDITOR:
What are you thinking about,
giving the flick The Fox a
rating so bad that you think its
ncftsyen worth reviewing.
I believe if you did see the
picture, you would find it well
worth reviewing. It would
definitely be better than Yours,
Mine and Ours, Barefoot in
the Park, and Support Your
Local Sherrif, all of which
recieved better ratings.
The Fox is an above
average movie, and should be
rated above average.
BES!NVMILLS,3BA

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

Page 10

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
Dec. 6. The last day for receipt
by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, N.J., 08540,
is Nov. 12 for application and
$lO fee for reading knowledge
examinations in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
Registration fees increase $3 aftar
Nov. 12 and up to the closing
date of Nov. 19.
FULBRIGHT GRANTS
applications and brochures are
available for American seniors
and graduate students at the
International Center, south of
Walker Auditorium. Deadline for
filing application is Dec. 1.
GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION (GRE) will be
given Dec. 13. The last date for
receipt of registration form in
Princeton, N.J. without paying
the $3 penalty fee is Nov. 18.
Application booklets and
information are available in
Room 235 Tigert Hall.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
t. ,i£ '* ' *:-
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
NOV. 11 & 12: ST. REGIS
PAPER CO.
NOV. 11, 12 8t 13:
PROCTER & GAMBLE CO.;
THE BELL SYSTEM.
NOV. 12: AL JOHNSON
CONSTRUCTION CO.; TRW
SYSTEMS; SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE CO. OF
CANADA; INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE;
KI MB ER LY -CLARK CORP.;
AIR PROVING GROUND
CENTER ELGIN AFB; J.C.
PENNY CO.; THE RUST
ENGINEERING CO.
NOV. 12 it 13:
DEPARTMENT OF THE
ARMY.
NOV. 13: COLLEGE LIFE
INSURANCE .CO.;
CONTINENTAL OIL CO.;
WASHINGTON & LEE UNIV.
SCHOOL OF LAW; HUGHES
AIRCRAFT CO.; TAMPA
ELECTRIC CO.; BANK
BUILDING CORP.; SIMMONS
CO.; WATSON & CO.
NOV. 13 & 14: BLOUNT
BROTHERS CORP.
NOV. 14: SYSTEMS
ENGINEERING LABORA LABORATORIES;
TORIES; LABORATORIES; CONTINENTAL CAN
CO., INC.; GENERAL FOODS
RESEARCH 8i
DEVELOPMENT; U.S. PATENT

u ~Z[{W S> become a chef...
|f yX, Dl | Yfl J you build that new patio you've been A
JL L JbfXCs& thfwnrlri'c f We Ven let you include w
kionstoo! 9r ,L and outdoor

OFFICE; CONSOLIDATED
CITY OF JACKSONVILLE;
EXCHANGE NATIONAL
BANK OF TAMPA; EBASCO
SERVICES. INC.
CANCELLATIONS: NOV. 12
- U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH
SERVICE; PENNSYLVANIA
DEPT, of HIGHWAYS
GENERAL NOTICES
LECTURE: The Changing
Ethos of World Religions lecture

Campus
Calendar

Friday, November 7
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Odd Couple,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 81
10:30 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "One
Million 8.C.," Fletcher
Lounge, 7:00 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00,
Please Bring Sets.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 8
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation, 10:00 a.m.
Football: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Georgia, Jacksonville
Union Movie: "Odd Couple,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 8t
10:30 p.m.
India Club, "Diwali-lftdian
Festival of Happiness," 361
Union, Indian Music and
Candies, 7:00 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "One
Million 8.C.," Fletcher
Lounge, 7:00 p.m.
Student Mobilization Dance,
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 9
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Hillel Foundation Bagel & Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 6:30 pan.
Univ. Film Series, "Ninotchka,"
Greta Garbo, Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, Kappa Delta House,
9:13p.m.
r "

BLUE BULLETIN

will be given by Dr. Joseph M.
Kitagawa, professor of Far
Eastern Languages and
Civilizations, University of
Chicago, in the Reitz Union
Auditorium on Monday, Nov.
17, at 8:00 p.m.
PHI ETA SIGMA Honorary
Fraternity will sponsor a panel
discussion titled: SMC Strike
and March Its Effect On The
War Effort on Nov. 10 at 7:30
p.m. in the New Law Center
Auditorium.

Monday, November 10
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Lecture, Dr. Ted
Landsman, 122 Union, 4:00 I
p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "The Balcony,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:00
p.m.
Sigma Xi Lecture, Dr. Frank
Wood, Astronomy, & Dr.
Parker A. Small, McCarty
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints," Constans I
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, November 11
Seminole Student Picture
Taking, 346 Union, 8:00 p.m. I
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Union Humanities Film, 'The
Balcony," Union Aud. 7:00
& 9:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Jujitsu Club Meeting, South
end of Gym, 7:30 pjn.
Florida Cicerones Meeting, 122 I
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "A Company of
Wayward Saints," Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
SGP: "LA TRAVIATA," I
Goldowsky Opera Co.,
Florida Gym, 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: "LA
TRAVIATA," $3.00, $2.00
& $1.50. Florida Players: "A
Company of Wayward
Saints," $1.50, Faculty, Staff
and General Public; High
School Students, $1.00; Univ.
of Fla. Students, $.75.
Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00. I

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

We'd like to, of course.
But when you only come
out once a quarter, you
have to print enough to
last a quarter.

But not until you get yours.
And there are still enough
Quarterlies for you and
your friends.
So if your neighborhood
bookseller doesn't have
them in the racks, he's You've got it conning.

one
hip magazine
that hasnt
sold out.

probably waiting to be
restocked (if he isn't, tell
him to get on it).
Oh, we'll sell out eventually.



mam StoiAm
GAINESVILLE MALL
i
*
i %*
&f- 7 m 11 I
f/* 7*#- -/ Mr M |1 |
M jf 1 jjf
\ ft*
jjfi'
- *| J
fflHHli MWHj^^^K:#b<::; jiv?- 1 --*' -.*%"i ; *.* v. v fv-*.x. v J
- V '' J *&*, r#> %. %
' -i ~ :. *£>,.% W -' *** V., ?'v V V
. V >.._
%

Friday, November 7,1969, Tha Florida Allipior,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
1965 Honda *SO "excellent
condition Call 378-0554 for more
information* (A-4t-37-p)
CARPETS and life too can be
beautiful If you use Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-37-c)
1969 Honda Superhawk 305 CC
Excellent Mechanical Condition 4000
miles some dents & scratches $470.
Call 376-4736 Student (A-3t-37-p)
1969 SL 90 Excellent Shape, four
months old, low mileage, must sell
drafted $350. Phone 378-6182
anytime. (A-4t-36-p)
Touring cycle 1969 BMW R-50 low
mileage, sacrifice for SB9O.
One-wheel utility trailer for VW. S6O.
60 watt am-fm hlfi new Gerrard
changer S4O; 22 cal. 6" Hl-standard
revolver with holster $30.00.
376-9996. (A-2t-36-p)
Guitar Amplifier. Stereson Stereo
Dual 400 Professional with matching
15 Inch speakers in separate
enclosures. 400 stereo watts!
372-2777. (A-2t-36-p) <
4-track stereo tapes 52.50 4 foot
black lights sls. Boosey & Hawkes
flat clarinet slOO. Portable tape
recorder B5O. 376-5808. Olane.
(A-3t-36-p)
AUCTION new used antique
merchandise. Saturday, Nov. Bth
7:30 p.m. C & J Auction House
Archer, Florida. (A-3t-35-p)
SPORTSCAR OWNERS!! Specially
built trailer hitch for Triumph, tow
bar complete for MG or TR, also
front light protector bar for MG. Call
Harvey at 373-2713. (A-3t-35-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
1969 HONDA 50 Only 250 miles
Book rack and helmet included.
SIBO. Call 392-8208 after 7:30 p.m.
(A-st-34-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
FOR RENT
Sublet Jan-June 1 bdr ac carpeted
apartment 2 balconies IV2 blks from
campus or 1 coed roomate 373-1921.
(B-3t-35-p)
Efficiency apartment. 1 bedroom
kitchen, bathroom. Available on or
before November 1. Inquire at 102
NW 15th St. Phone 372-9855.
(B-3t-34-p)
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Uni. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals $220/
quarter. Some financial aid available.
378-4341. (B-st-35-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato
79<
GAINESVILLE MALL I
mmm

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

Page 12

jp* FoTrEnT'^PI
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within watking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
LANDMARK one male roommate
must lease immediate occupancy
available rent 46.25 + util. Pool ww
car pgt central heat. Call Steve
373-2207. (B-st-37-p)
Sublet 1-bedroom efficiency apt. 2
blocks from graduate library Call
373-1664 or see at 1830 NW 4th
Ave. Apt. 16. (B-3t-37-p)
jj". I ""wANTEP ~"jj
Male roommate for immediate
occupancy In Hawaiian Village
luxurious living for $55 per month
Nov. rent paid. Call now! Jose or
Fernando 378-4732. (C-2t-37-p)
Female roommate wanted winter and
spring terms for attractive SBS apt. 2
blocks from campus. Prefer senior or
grad student, non-smoker 372-2666.
(C-st-35-p)
2 female roommates for modern apt.
NW section. $55/mo. TV Hi FI. Call
Janine 392-2501 Sam spm Mon. thru
Frl. (C-4t-37-p)
WANTED Recurve hunting bow. Call
481-2628 after 6:00 p.m. WANTED.
(C-lt-37-p)
PAPERBACKS WANTED! Clean out
your bookshelves and bring your old
paperback books to the Browsing
Library, 2nd floor, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. A section of the Browsing
Library has been prepared for
paperbacks and will be operated on
an exchange basis. (C-st-32-c)
Wanted: Girl to share 1 bdr apt
Landmark 67. Move in Nov. 15 or in
Jan. Call after 5 pm, 378-5766.
(C-3t-36-p)
One roommate for furnished 2 br.
apt. Central heat and air. Part util,
included. Really nice. $51.70 mo.
829 NE 4th Ave. or call Jeff at
378-4630. (C-2t-36-p)
1 female roommate for Summit
House Apartment. Call 373-2289.
(C-4t-36-p)
Immediate occupancy Laonne Vie
Apt RENT & UTIL. FREE til Dec 15
if you live with us (3 jr girls) Winter
& Spring qtrs for $165 per qtr. (incl.
rent & util.) Call 373-1029 NOW.
(C-st-35-p)
Female roommate 2 bdr apt 3 blocks
behind Norman $lO9 per qtr. Call
373-2513 after 3 p.m. (C-st-35-p)
HELP WANTED
:
HELP WANTED SOPHOMORE
THROUGH GRADUATE
STUDENT. Part-time position
available as a manager for on-campus
advertising, market research and sales
promotion programs. Liberal fees will
provide a steady income all year. If
interested, call collect:
404-892-1881, Mr. Frldlin, Atlanta,
Georgia. (E-2t-36-p)

|i HELP WANTED j
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
HELP WANTED: TTS tape punch
operator. Student wife preferred but
will consider student who can work
regular schedule at least 20 hours per
week. Experience desirable but will
consider person with good typing
(60wpm or better). Good pay.
Regular hours, no Saturday. Storter
Printing Co., 1024 S. Main St., Phone
376-2658. (E-2t-18-p)
1 C AUTOS ji
8 a 0 iiWWWP
1957 Chevy P. steering, P. breaks,
fact, air, aut. trans., radio, heater,
283-4 V V-8, dual tailpipes, 37,000
actual miles, 392-8905. (G-st-37-p)
65 MGB. Own a real sportscar. Very
well cared for. Mechanically perfect.
Radio, heater, new top, tonneau,
boot, lucas light, etc. Call Harvey at
373-2713 or come by La Bonne Vie
no. 339. (G-Bt-35-p)
1969 Karmann-Ghia, 3 months old.
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., S2OOO. (G-st-35-p)
VW 1966 new tires, radio, low
mileage, dark green owned by
female student. $925. Call 372-5796.
(G-st-34-p)
67 Cougar, light blue, automatic
transmission, power brakes, power
steering, air cond., call 376-0329.
(G-st-34-p)
66 SI MCA for $535, rebuilt engine,
good mechanical condition, 34 mpg.
See at 1117 SW 7th Ave. or call
378-8033. (G-st-36-p)
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be in
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-34-st-p)
RIDERS WANTED: NEW YORK
CITY leaving Dec. 18, returning Jan
2 Roundtrip $35. One way S2O. Call
Lisa at 373-2760. (J-st-37-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE
Admission 50<
"Megatonic comic explosions! ime Magazine I
"Uproariously funny! New York Daily News I
j I Matthau
'yj Couple |J|Pjj
Produced by HOWARD W. KOCH Directed by GENE SAKS <; f ,. jTjpij r ,1,/riKI
M.ic NEAL HEFTI * HOWARD W. KOCH PrMuctioa. PANAVISON* TECHNICOLOR* A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY NOV. 7&8 5:3Q. 8;00. 10:30 PM

' _'_ Ni 441 fctnJ^^l
nnui from '* w
*kpostl
L.: I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

# * % *

%
V* */!
Sail to Freeport...
Nov. 27 to Nov. 30 t
All expenses included for
77.50.
Call 392-1655 for '****
information & reservations %
by Nov. 7 or come by 4
room 310, the Program 0
Office JWRU
1 it*
. 1
e *
#
.. *
1 ; t_
* A
ALLI6ATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order dasrifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 boot for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredMjnimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
.0,-1. (cocutiM) STUDENT # PHONE
O for font D 1 day
a *.0.0 o 2 <** ADDRESS
help wanted O 3 days (MO% discount)
Q autos D 4 days (*lO% discount) CITY STATE ZIE
personal Q 5 days and ovar
lost'found (*20% discount)
D r,ic \ WORDING
1 1 I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 11 l l l l l l l l M-~
2l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TTTT
a n
4l I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I'

Friday, November 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13

I PERSONAL I
\ v
The Underground Zoo is a living
thing. Birds, mammals, reptiles,
amphibians from the far corners of
the world. Visit the Underground
Zoo at 7NE Ist St. A bizarre pet
bazaar awaits you. 373-2681.
(J-3t-36-p)
Gators: I got it from the day
bartender who got It from the
cocktail waitress who got it from the
white pig tied up behind the Thirsty
Gator, the beer Is Free on Saturday
win or lose 1 Dickson. (J-lt-37-p)
Sacrificial Offering, cheap, goodies
8-track tape player $45, air
conditioner $75, Electric knife sl7,
All almost new 372-6749. Please call
anytime. (J-lt-37-p)
"Flghtln Gators Were no. 1
Bumper Stickers in orange and blue.
$1.25 each or 10 for SIO.OO. Send
check or money order to: Bumper
Stickers, PO Box 99, Perrlne, Florida
33157. (J-3t-27-p)
The Celebration up and coming,
versatile, rock-group welcomes
bookings for second quarter. If
Interested call 372-7493 after 6 p.m.
(J-st-37-p)
3 months in Europe s4so. June 17
Aug. 27 bicycle trip. Student
organized, Informally planned. Fare
will Include air fare, food, shelter.
Call 378-3395, ask for Wenda Snow
after 5:30 p.m. (J-st-36-p)
Free astrology lecture by noted
astrologist Nov. 11. If Interested In
astrology, psychic phenomenon or
Edgar Cayce call 372-7883 or
378-9797. (J-st-36-p)
LOST & FOUND |
FOUND: One pair of women's glasses
with cllp-on sunshades, In the
Seminole office. Room 337 JWRU.
Come by to claim. (L-3t-36-p)
Found near the Cl, a dk. calico
kitten about 7 wks old, lively cute
and cuddly. If lost or interested call
392-9035 or 378-8979. (L-3t-37-p)
| SERVICES |
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your, own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
TYPING IN MY HOME 5 YRS.
EXPERIENCE on IBM ELECTRIC
STANDARD MODEL CALL
JEAN, 376-7809. (M-st-36-p)
Joys Paint & Body Shop. 2017 N.E.
27th Ave. Gainesville, Fla. Student
- s Pcial Any car or color $49.95.
Come see us. You will find us a
Joy to do business with.
(M-st-34-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight Instruction instrument flight
Instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport In the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
Tennis racket restringing. Free
pickup and delivery. M&R Tennis
Services. 378-2489. (M-22t-l-p)
HO LY
TRI NITY
SUNDAYS
89 : 30ll
ALL KINDS OF
PEOPLE ARE
WELCOME
k 116 HEIST
/Ji\ EPISCOPAL
CHURCH

wTiQam
W ilk 8 jB 8 fffi 8H
D Bk H mm ¥VB |1 B
V The most terrifying I
thriller since carol white!
Rosemaiy's Baby!" paulburke!
I -napors iEcwm I
gcJNb m=sss tm*W
I /T-HuffliltfS ~*9 l
I _GREGORY-EVA MARE I
I PLUS PECK SAMT
- in PMiuli Mu*iqh ProducHowof <;
I AT THE SfAUONG MOON
| 9:15 TECHNCOLOBV P*NAVI9tON
r
I J CENTER I
/_ BATTLE OF BRITAN
CENTER II \
CASSAUETES
I faces I
f FLORIDA f
\ THOSE WERE THE J
HAPPY TIMES /
w WITH J
I
Bfcl HELD OVER! 2ul WEEK!
WINNER! 3 ACADEMY AWARDS JL
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS Katharine hepburn W I
JOSEPH . LEVINE nn AN AVCO EMBASSY FILM
P6T6R OTOOLe KATHARINE H6PBURN
FEATURE AT... 4 (&r FIRST TIME
2:04 4:30 AT REGULAR
7:00 9:30 LION IN PBICES!
SiankTodouf AT
At long last... I; 3g 3.37
the long awaited 5:58 7:42
Durrells 9:45
Jugnnel : I Bjjuj^ 16 is won an: I
20tti Century-Fox presents
e Pendro S. Berman-Oeorge Cukor Production o( Lawrence DurreHs "JUSTINE" "'
starring ANOUK AMEE. DIRK OOSARDE, ROBERT FORSTER ANNA KARMA. PHUPfE NOIRET. MICHAEL VORR^^



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

TO START NOON FRIDAY
Apollo 12 Countdown Moved Up A Day

CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
The launch director took
advantage of trouble-free work
Thursday and ordered the
Apollo 12 countdown started at
noon EST Friday, a day early,
for the Nov. 14 flight of three
men to the moon.
In Washington, the White
House announced that President
Nixon will view the shot from
the cape at the suggestion of
Apollo 11 *s moon landing
pioneers.
' The early start of the
countdown will not change the
11:22 a.m. launch time, but will

Nixon To Fly To Cape Kennedy
To Witness Apollo 12 Launch

WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon will fly
to Cape Kennedy Nov. 14 in the midst of a
three-day mass antiwar demonstration here, to
witness the launching of the Apollo 12 lunar space
flight, it was announced Thursday.
Nixon will be the first incumbent President to see
the launching of a manned space flight since they
began in 1961.
The trip to Cape Kennedy next week was
suggested to Nixon by the Apollo 11 astronauts,
who were overnight guests at the White House at the
end of their 38-day world tour. Nixon has
frequently expressed a desire to view a liftoff first
hand.
The White House said the President probably
would fly to the cape the morning of Nov. 14 for

Urban Affairs Specialist Tells
Why Fewer Disorders This Year

WASHINGTON (UPI) An
urban affairs specialist who set
out to learn why there were
fewer riots this year than last has
concluded that civil disorders are
as hard to explain when they
dont happen as when they do.
Lisa Hirsch, associate editor
of Chronicle, a publication of
Urban America, Inc., wrote in
the latest issue that the answers
she got for the relatively bool
summer of 1969 pointed up
the fine line between riotology
and mythology.
However, she said federal
officials had little doubt that
there was a real reduction. The
Department of Justice, which
counted 24 riots and 216
disturbances in all of 1968,
officially recorded only six riots
and 127 serious disturbances in
the first eight months of this
year.
She said department experts
felt the big difference was the
movement of violence away
from big cities and into smaller
communities.
Miss Hirsh noted that the

lisn?nnn^[S3uT^iMVEAN^i
I SAVE!
I I STARKE. 1 FLORIDA I
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEA LER I
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
SATURDAY BAM IPM I
jGAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT |
.L. J) A rfV Il ' i J V i . Aa l 1

. *
save the government money by
eliminating overtime work for
launch workers on Saturday.
Now many will have the day off.
While their countdown was
being rearranged, Apollo 12
lunar landing pilots Charles
Pete Conrad Jr., and Alan L.

Lemberg Center for the study of
violence at Brandeis University
kept a differing count of violent
incidents, counting reports of
disturbances involving schools as
well as the general community.
In 1968, Lemberg counted 687
disorders and reached 340 in the
first five months of 1969.
Miss Hirsh also got somewhat
conflicting analyses of the
violence that did take place in
1969. The Justice Department
said there had been a noticeable
increase in sniper and
hit-and-run incidents by small
groups, usually young persons.
Lembergs spokesman said
there were more confrontations
between militants and police,
but little sign that there was an
increase in planned attacks.
The reasons for the difference
between the two years? Miss
Hirsh listed a series of pet
theories general progress by
the poor, a rebuilding spirit in
the ghettoes, a more restrained
attitude by both police and news
media, realization that the

the scheduled 11:23 a.m. launching and return to
Washington in the afternoon. Opponents of U.S.
involvement in the Vietnam War will be
demonstrating in Washington Nov. 1315.
Nixon had wanted to view the Apollo 11
launching in July, having dinner with the three
astronauts the evening before, but he canceled the
trip after space agency doctors complained that he
might transmit germs at a pre-launch meeting.
The President was on the Carrier USS Hornet
when the Apollo 11 crew, Neil A. Armstrong,
Michael Collins and Edwin A. Aldrin, splashed down
in the Pacific.
Nixon met for more than an hour Thursday with
prominent supporters of his Vietnam policy before
flying to Key Biscayne for a long weekend.

Bean went flying in an Air Force
jet called the weightless
wonder, to get the feel of
walking on the moon.
The third Apollo 12 crewman,
Richard F. Gordon, remained on
the ground and practiced flying
the command ship Yankee
Clipper in a spacecraft
simulator.
Conrad and Bean, who like
Gordon are Navy commanders,
spent three hours in the big,
red-nosed KCI3S five to six
miles above the Atlantic. The
plane flew roller coaster patterns
that briefly counteracted all but

ghettoes suffer most from riots
and finally, luck.
One of the strongest theories,
she said, was that the residents
of the ghettoes have been
preoccupied by such causes as
organizing community control
-of schools and supporting black
and other minority candidates
for public office.

I II > Tired of the Gville scene? k
bobby s I
HIDEAWAY Ride-a-way I
1 MILE NORTH OF WALDO tO the I
ON U.S. 301 U §
"" 1 Hideaway I
NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT I
Fri. Sat. & Wed. Nights I
RAY PARRISH DANCE BAND I
Mon Tues &Thurs Nights I
the folk-Rock & Country Sounds of I
WALTW OODW ARP I

one-sixth of earths gravity to
duplicate the strange, weak lunar
gravity.
Conrad and Bean are
scheduled to land on the moon s
Ocean of Storms at 1:53 a.m.
, EST Nov. 19. They will begin
the first of two walks on the
lunar surface at 6:09 a.m. under
the gaze of a new color
television camera that will show
millions on earth whats
happening.
Never
heard of
Federated
Department
Stores?
Now
you
have.
Write
us
quickly.
Federated Department Stores Inc.,
Director of
Executive Resources,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
What the hell,
we havent
heard of you
either.

WATCH THE GATORS
BLAST GEORGIA!
/2jj\ 2 Color TVs To
Catch All The
Action While
Ijlmx You Tackle LUMS
IHHH Fabulous Lineup
Os Food & Beer
1621 SW 13th . come early for pregame warmups

The countdown had been set
to start at 7 p.m. Saturday. But
launch director Walter J.
Kapryan decided to advance it
by 31 hours. To make up for the
early start, a 31-hour rest period
was scheduled to begin at 2 a.m.
Saturday.
The reason, for this is simply
economics, and saving Saturday
work, said a space agency
spokesman.
TIME I
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest I
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor- I
mation about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing U.S. time
zones, youli find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to I
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000 I
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time yo owned one? Only
$6.50 for 17 o 0 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore
JEBBBBS&h
JHMVHR9MSW tel



Communists Step Up War,
Launch Four Ground Attacks

SAIGON (UPI) Communist
forces stepped up the tempo of
the war Thursday, launching
' ground attacks against four
allied bases and inflicting heavy
casualties on South Vietnamese
units for the second time within
72 hours.
U.S. military spokesmen said
nine Americans were killed and
27 others wounded in defending
two 4th Infantry Division camps
near Pleiku, about 225 miles
northeast of Saigon.
In its weekly casualty report,
the U.S. Command announced
that 83 Americans were killed
and 724 wounded in fighting last
week.
It was the fifth time in the
past six weeks that the American
dead toll has been below 100 in
the weekly report.
Spokesmen declined comment
but other U.S. military sources
confirmed a Viet Cong radio

6 Common Market Members
To Draw Up Balance Sheet

By Unitsd Press International
On Nov. 17-18 leaders of six
West European nations will meet
at the Hague to draw up a
balance sheet on a grave new
world they entered 12 years ago
Two Aviators
Injured In
Copter Crash
FORT STEWART, Ga. (UPI)
- An Army helicopter crashed
near here Thursday, injuring two
aviators, military authorities
said.
The UHI craft went down at
the Dow Tung staging area north
of the Fort Stewart reservation.
Authorities said
instructor-pilot CWO 2 Walter
%. Topp, 27, of Grandville,
Mich., sustained contusions of
the lower bade and 2nd Lt.
Donald R. Thompson, 21, of
Wermo, Calif., was hospitalized
with a fracture of the left arm
and a sprained ankle.
Topp and Thompson were
reported in good condition at
the Hunter Army Airfield
hospital.
An accident investigation
board has been convened to
determine the cause of the crash,
the Army said.
KIT
Reitz Union
Ballroom
Nov. 16th
7:30 p.m.
"..TIME AIN'T REAL
NOHOW

claim Thursday that four
American helicopter crewmen
were captured early this week
after being shot down near the
Due Lap Special Forces camp,
120 miles northeast of the
capital.
The major Communist attack
Thursday was hurled against the
headquarters base of a 500-man
South Vietnamese marine
brigade in the Mekong Delta 140
miles southwest of Saigon.
Striking under cover of
darkness and behind a barrage of
heavy mortar fire, the
Communist force killed 27

and to decide where they go
from here.
They are France, West
Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
Belgium and Luxembourg,
members of the European
Common Market that came into
being on March 25,1957.
In the beginning, the market
itself was seen only as an interim
step on a path which would end
not only in economic unity but
political unity as well, a United
States of Europe with a
population of 300 million.
The dream of political unity
faded quickly and today is held
by a comparative few.
But as an economic union it
had fantastic success and its
members entered upon an era of
prosperity greater than any they
had known before-
A 12-year transition period
was to provide total agreement
on subjects ranging from
abolition of tariffs to free
movement of labor and from
atomic energy to money and
agriculture.
On Dec. 31 the transition
period comes to an end with
deep Fissures appearing.
Hi. maiket has split on

Miss Debbie Bartley (Roy Green Studio) I
state of Florida Junior Miss |
THINKING OF CHBISTMAS? YOU SHOULD BE. 1
And what would make a better present than a beautiful
rotor or black & white portrait. And for students only, §
from now til December Ist you can get one Bxlo color
X* a* n s29 95 agift that he I
cherish forever. 1
1232 W. UNjy._AVL3Z2d6S6_J

South Vietnamese and wounded
98 others before withdrawing
from trie three-hour battle at
dawn.
The 125 South Vietnamese
casualties represented 25 per
cent of the bases strength. The
Communist force, which
spokesmen said appeared to be
composed primarily of North
Vietnamese troops, lost 75 dead.
To the north near Due Lap,
where regular North Vietnamese
soldiers killed or wounded more
than half of a 200-man South
Vietnamese ranger force in an
ambush Tuesday, Communists
Thursday attacked a government
artillery base 1,000 yards north
of a U.S. Special Forces camp.
They broke through the bases
defensive perimeter, battled
government troops in
hand-to-hand fighting and knifed
one South Vietnamese soldier to
death before withdrawing.

issues of nationalism as
exemplified by Charles de.
Gaulle.
There has been no agreement
on agriculture. When France and
West Germany respectively
devalued and revalued their
currencies, neither followed the
rules of advance notice and
consultation.
The market has stalled on
dead center and even now could
disintegrate.
Britain, barred twice from the
Common Market, is losing an
interest in achieving
membership.
The British, enjoying a
favorable trade balance for the
first time in many years, are
gaining new confidence that
they can go it alone.
The European Free Trade
Association (EFTA) which
Britain sponsored has enjoyed
economic success almost equal
to the Common Market.
CUSTOM FRAMING
PICTURES, DIPLOMAS, etc.
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St., 376-2431
Portrait I
Photography I
by
Bill R. Horne |

Don't Miss Saturday's Game
JL Teddy Bear Nursery
AH day Set 7 era -6 pm $2.00
(** - ,tn Also ell night Fri. & Set.
TRAINED AND EXPERIENCED BABYSITTERS
Children can be left end
\ HTWn picked up anythin convenient to you.
1214 N.W. 4th Street
Ph. 3764)917 for further information
BKSBBSSSSSSSSSSSSESESSSSSSSSS
THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM'TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
NW TMi ST & UNI V. AVE.
> iA'tft >VK k v *.. I-, '> j.j
When you know
for keeps
_ REGISTERED
Keepsake*
DIAMOND RINGS
I HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING
Please send new 20 page booklet, "How To Plan Your Engagement and Wedding"
I and new I 2 page, full color folder, both for only 25c. Also, how can I obtain
the beautiful 44 page Bride's Keepsake Book at half price?
Name ... " 1
I
Add'tv - --
City C
Slate k TiP J
I KEEPSAKE DIAMOND RINGS. BOX 90. SYRACUSE. NEW YORK 13201
I

Friday, November 7,1969, Tim Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

*hWoriifci Alligator,.Friday., Nowmbc?.

DISCLOSURE OF SECRET TALKS UPSETS THUY
r 'yP' : \ / I
Americans Do Not Keep Their Word: Hanoi

PARIS (UPI) North Vietnamese
negotiators charged Thursday the
United States broke its word by
publicly disclosing that Hanoi diplomats
had met with Americans at secret talks
behind the scenes at the Vietnam peace
conference in Paris.
The Americans do not keep their
word, Hanoi delegate Xuan Thuy
complained bitterly at the 41st formal
negotiating session of the talks.
The North Vietnamese delegate was

Foreign Affairs Committee Backs Nixon Plan

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House Foreign* Affairs
Committee approved Thursday a
resolution supporting President
Nixons efforts to negotiate a
just peace in Vietnam.
The vote was 21 to 8 on the
measure first expression of
House sentiment on Vietnam

Robin Hood Is Alive And Well,
Shooting Arrows At Viet Cong

SAIGON (UPI) When Spec.
5 Garciano Hernandez ran out of
ammunition for his Ml 6 rifle
during a Viet Cong attack on his
base, he turned to an older
means of defense the bow and
arrow.
Now his buddies refer to him
as the Robin Hood of Buttons
Base, an Army spokesman
reported Thursday.
Hernandez, who has 2S days
left to serve in Vietnam, shot
eight arrows into the attacking
force and wounded at least one
Viet Cong during the battle

EPIDEMIC THREATENS RACOONS
Rockys Ga. Buddies In Trouble

ATLANTA (UPI) Rabies in
racoons has reached epidemic
proportions in south Georgia, a
State Health Department official
said Thursday.
Dr. Russell Currier,
department veterinarian, said 70
cases of rabid racoons have been
discovered during the first-10
months of the year, compared to
43 last year.
Dr. Currier, warning that the
rabies easily could be spread to
domestic animals, and thus to
v
As Rain Leaves
So Do Students
INTERLOCHEN, Mich. (UPI)
Charles Eilber, director of the
Interlochen Arts Academy, got
disgusted because it rained six
out of seven Mondays in a row
and told students if there was
sunshine on Thursday they
could have a holiday.
The sun came out Thursday,
and the 407 students took off.

referring to the revelation of the secret
talks, held at the demand of American 1
negotiators, by President Nixon in his
Vietnam policy speech Monday night.
Nixon had referred to the step as
unprecedented in his statement to the
nation.
Observers in Paris said that following
Nixons disclosure and North Vietnams
irritated reaction, it may be difficult to
hold any further private talks with the
Hanoi negotiators.

since the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin,
resolution.
Before endorsing the
resolution, the committee
rejected on a 15-12 vote an
amendment, proposed by Rep.
Paul Findley, R4IL, and
endorsed by President Nixon, to
put the House on record

Tuesday at the artillery support
base 65 miles north of Saigon.
I had done a little hunting
with them before but, of course,
nothing like this, said
Hernandez, whose home is in

humans, urged that all pets,
including cats, be vaccinated
against the disease.
He said that it is a sad
fact... that in some sections of
Georgia, only one-third of the
dogs are vaccinated and a very
small percentage of cats in the
whole state.
The veterinarian said the
infection of rabies in racoons
began in south Georgia in 1963,
spreading from an epidemic in
northern Florida, but that it is
slowly spreading northward.
Laurens County led the state

% TACO % o _ p i
§ r* BUDWEISER Res. 30* 25<
i OLE l % fI V MICHEIOB Res. 40t 3<* V
F.ESTA PLATE j
£ GATOR STEAK TACO 79< TACO* TAMALE* FRIJOLES* V
£ BEEF BURRITO .49( MEXICAN SALAD* JOSE CHIU* A
$ SPECIAL TAMALES. 49( RANCHITOS 99c S'
V JOSE CHILI .39< V
V 16245. W. 13th St. V

favoring the Presidents
expressed determination to
withdraw our remaining ground
combat forces at the earliest
practicable date.
The Tonkin resolution was
rushed through Congress in
August, 1964, following a
reported attack on a U.S..
destroyer by North Vietnamese

Bridgeport, Conn. I was only
trying to help my friends and
save my life.
Hernandez, a cook at the
camp, said he had carried the
long bow and target arrows with
him since an Army friend gave
them to him several months ago
before leaving Vietnam.
After the battle, Hernandez
recovered only four of the
arrows he had shot. He said the
retreating Communists probably
took the others as souvenirs at
least one of them catching his
arrow in the shoulder.

in the number of cases reported
with 13. Glynn County had
nine, and other counties
reporting from one to six cases
were Bleckley, Brooks, Calhoun,
Colquitt, Cook, Crisp, Dodge,
Dougherty, Houston, Irwin,
Lanier, Macon, Mitchell, Pierce,
Seminole, Sumter, Tift, Toombe
and Wayne.
PAINT All types & Uses
Color Guild Quality
See the New Deep Tones!
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431

Nixon, in his nationwide speech
Monday, disclosed that his Paris
delegation headed by Henry Cabot
Lodge had a number of fruitless private
contacts with Hanoi diplomats.
He also revealed he exchanged letters
with North Vietnamese President Ho
Chi Minh shortly before the Hanoi
leaders death Sept. 3.
t
Thuys angry blast came after Lodge
had put Hanoi and the Viet Cong on

torpedo boats.
It authorized President
Lyndon B. Johnson to take
whatever steps necessary to stop
Communist aggression in
Southeast Asia. It was often
cited by Johnson as
congressional justification for
the big U.S. buildup in Vietnam.
Rep. Cornelius Gallagher,
D-N.J., said the Findley
amendment was rejected for two

| "THE BRUOIIV |
Imonday ft Tueiday, now. IS ft II I
Reitz Union Ttlooie shown at I
Auditorium 7: OO A & : 30 p; m. I
so* |
See the
GATORS BEAT GEORGIA
on Color T.V.
EAT-IN
Free Chicken & Cold Cuts
Beer sl/ pitcher
372-9408
******************************
Free beer for 1 hr. after Gators win!

notice that Nixon had decided to end
the war through a Vietnamization of the
conflict turning the burden of
fighting over to the South Vietnamese
because he believed the Communist side
could block the talks indefinitely.
No progress emerged from Thursdays
session of the talks and the two sides
wearily agreed to meet next Thursday
by which time the four-sided conference
will be 10 months old.

reasons first, the time
conceivably might come when it
would be in the national interest
to send in more troops and,
second, that it might open up a
pandoras box of related
amendments.
Seven Democrats and one
Republican voted against the
other resolution which had
181 sponsors as of Thursday
morning.



The
Florida
Alligator

j||r,:jgil jaifl
vSc;
THE BAND IS A GOOD BAND
... and their new album is ahead of its times

i--- I '.C'-vC'-' ,-.t
According to Campus Music, a
new weekly magazine that bills
itself as Aanericas College
Music Authority, sortie neW
album releases look interesting:
The Band by The Band on
Capitol: Sometimes referred to
as Dylans Band, this is The
Band with its long-awaited
follow-up to Music From Big
Pink. Dylan and The Band do
have much in common, though
the Band is a true innovator
their music is a blend of rock
and American country and folk
themes. This album is way ahead
of its times, but dont let that
throw you its good too. Pick
album of the week.
The First Songs by Laura
Nyro and Verve-Forcast: You
may think youre not familiar
with Laura Nyros work. But
forget it. You are. Her songs
make the Top 40 charts (notably
Sweet Blindness) but usually
when performed by others. Not
that Laura does them badly;
quite the contrary, she has a
beautiful style which is all her
own. Remember, dont ge;
brand X get the original
product. Includes Wedding Bell
Blues plus And When I Die.
Good Morning Starshine by
Oliver on Crewe: The album
suffers occasionally from a case
of over-production too many
frills and recording studio
extras. Yet over all this is a
good first album. Oliver, with a
very pleasant voice and more
than adequate instrumental

Climb aboard h
A The S.S. Winnjammer* A
i Meals served from 11:00 AM to Ik
u Midnight w
i Bernie Sher //
| at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday 11
} Oysters & clems on the half shell f* #
Michelob on draft Ml
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager 1/
Reservations Accepted 520 S W 2nd Ave I

: flf S:S .:B wm. Mat'Wm Wm ,W&Bk
m -I S mm
Mb iiaS-; : :S : '':SP'SiiS-y.SiytJlSS^^SMl^SMSSikxmiS&Sl:':^
# s 9 ft m II V VBIfSBwi St
*********************

'The Band Album Pick Os

backup, does three original songs
plus Good Morning Starshine
and Jean.
The Marx Brothers by the
Marx Brothers on Decca: This
album just goes to prove that the
best comedy is old comedy. It
includes some of the classic
Marx routines that will go down
in comedic history. The disc is
I ...This I
I Way I
I To Beat I
I INFLATION I
Imp
I MILLER-BROWN I
4222 N.W. 13th ST.
| 376-4552

BY 'CAMPUS MUSIC 9 MAGAZINE

made up of excerpts out of their
old movies. Groucho sings,
insults, and knocks the
establishment. Chico follows suit
and adds his talents on the
piano. Harpo honks and plays
the harp as only he could. The

JfariT~ taajL.tedL W hxa> -tor fexafr |( Jnftrt,Eilffi T,|SK|
slip, mrrMrPmnr
If Its a Happening ||
tg§ Today Nov. 7th THE RIFF playing ft
lj|t from 8:30 PM until 10:00 PM ft
ft Free Cokes Prizes IE
ft Saturday, Nov. Bth Free cokes ft
H Big prizes 7:00 PM until 10:00 PM
Its the ||
GRAND 1
OPENING I
dCH& of ip
I r dljottii i
*at our new location: S?
1642 W Univ. Ave. j
§ftf A Few of Our Features lfS|
Jfgfr RUANAS ARE HERE! -§§'
|Q| Tapestry mini suits
pG> Tapestry Bell Bottoms from India figj'
Hand embroidered shirts from India
i||Ei Monk's robes in handwoven cotton
Hand blocked Batiks: Dashikis &
IflS 2-piece shirtwaist mini dresses
H|£r Folk dresses, Bell Bottoms, shirts
Il Beaded earrings filagree earrings from India BQjl
-fUr Sterling Silver Rings from Mexico n||H
Silver Gauntlet Bracelets
L Silver Barefoot Sandals from India U||iJ
Tortoise Shell Earrings from Mexico y||f||
Handmade Leather Belts from Brazil rjSB4
B@9 Handmade Leather watchbands from Brazil
i Handmade Leather Bags and Sandals from Brazil jjfjO
Handwoven Sashes from Mexico rJSrI
|jjf|p All your in-sense needs
yJjP Plus A large selection of gifts and decorations P|P|
Hslr for you and other special people.
Don't miss it! Open Both Days 10AM until 10PM Lj|lLJ

Friday, November 7,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

album is formatted almost the
same as Deccas W. C. Fields
album including narration by
Gary Owens. You get a poster
too!
Electric Church by Buddy
Miles Express Murcury: To go

TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor

The Week

Page 17

with Buddy Miles Express in you
record collection is almost as
bad as no vitamin C in your
diet. Call this jazz-rock done by
expert musicians. A definite Jimi
Hendrix though, as he produces
four of the seven cuts.



W£o Z^^i
f : ~, --? | z BEHBy
111 it lip
-\;^ : Ss& f|| ,- JA W:> r :
I
MARLIN WALL (LEFT) AND 808 NADER WHOOP IT UP
... at Florida Players' rehearsal of "A Company of Wayward Saints"
Farce Comedy Planned
For PlayersFall Production

The Florida Players are
experimenting again.
For their first major
performance of the year the
players will perform George
Herman's farce-comedy A
Company of Wayward Saints."
The fall production opens
Monday at 8 p.m. in Cons tans
Theatre.
The play is unusual in that it
is written in the style of the
fourteenth century commedia
dell arte. The characters are
taken from that period. One
somewhat familiar
characterization is of the
Harlequin, a comical buffon who
has away with women.
Actors in Hermans play are
stock from this period and they
specialize in improvized humor.
It is frequently wild and
boisterous.
A Company of Wayward
Saints is a mixture of Laugh-in
humor, Gator Growl satire and
classic burlesque jokes,
according to Dr. L. L.
Zimmerman, the director.
Saints involves a company
of actors stranded on the UF
campus after losing their scenery

GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
-Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
guns and ammo. Bring this
ad and your student I.D.
care |
offerexpires NOV. 8
1969
Harry Beckwith Gun Dealer
Micanopy, Fla. Ph 466-3340
'"'l .. lIIJIU'M-i ULH _l.ll, UU
**C***

in a craps game in Peoria, Illinois.
Cast in the role of Harlequin,
the leader of the troupe is Gene
R. Touchet. The braggart
Capitano will be played by
Harry Murphy.
Deborah Kondelik and
Richard Council portray the
young lovers, Isabella and
Tristano.
Others in the cast are Melissa
Shepard as Colombine; Marilyn
Wall, Ruffiana; Thomas Nash,
Pantalone; Robert Nader,
Scapino; and Sam Zimmerman,
Dottore.
A Company of Wayward
Saints will play through Nov.
15. Tickets are on sale now at
the Reitz Union Box Office.
Student admission is 75 cents
GOLF
Jft PAR 60
DRIVING RANGE
I: Wp CLUB HOUSE
imvL ELECTRICCARTS
MiJgL* OPEN 7 DAYS
PPM| Ist NINE $1.25
flf §L $2.25 FOR 18
STUDENTS $1 FOR EA. NINE
WEST END
GOLF COURSE
3 Vt Ml. WEST OF 1-75 ON
NEWBERRY RD. 373-2721

and general admission is $1.50.
All seats are reserved.
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
q Cl Per game
3 games SI.OO
Sat. 9am 6pm
Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

Arby's
Buy 2 oeueious Bfl
ay's RoasT bbbf BUM
sanDwieHes anD
| GGT One FR66!! VHRill |
Monday
1969. amm
1405 SW 13th St. f I
Just South of the Underpass %

'LA TRAVIATA
Opera Tuesday

In the world of grand opera,
no other work is performed as
often as Verdis La Traviata.
His stirring opera pours forth
one favorite aria after another,
in a rare combination of intense
drama and glorious splendor and
color.
The Goldovsky Grand Opera
Theater, sponsored by Student
Government Productions, will
bring La Traviata to campus
Tuesday.
The opera is based on
Alexander Dumas' famous novel,
The Lady of the Camelias.
This tale of a lovely lady of easy
virtue who captures the heart of
an upstanding lover caused a
scandal at its first performance
in 1853.
Queen Victoria refused a
permit for Dumas play in
London on moral grounds.
Verdis opera will be
performed in English. A special
translation has been prepared for
the Goldovsky Theater.
Boris Goldovsky has become
grand operas most articulate
spokesman for millions. He is
known as Mr. Opera for his
Saturday matinee radio

Garbo
in
Ninotchka
Sun. Nov. 9,7 & 9:30 pm.
Reitz Union Audtorium
50
The Florida Alligator, Friday. November 7,1968

Page 18

BORIS GOLDOVSKY
... "La Traviata" producer
broadcasts from the
Metropolitan Opera House.
Goldovskys entire company,
including 11 singers, full chorus
and orchestra, will be involved in
the UF presentation.
La Traviata will be
performed in Florida Gym at
8:15 p.m. Tickets are now on
sale at the Reitz Union Box
Office for $3, $2 and $1.50.



NEW LOCAL GROUP
Hammer Bound For Miami Pod Festival

By MAGGIE COE
Entertainment Writer
Hammer strikes. Music
vibrates. The sound is
tight.
Taking their name from a
popular Beatles song, the
new, five-man hard-rock
group comes from
Jacksonville and is currently
appearing in Dubs Steer
Room.
Hammer is only three
weeks old. But a few days
after its conception,
representatives from Edcoe
Productions, sponsors of the
Miami Pop Festival,
approached the manager,
Rusty Caughron.
According to Caughron, a
former UF student, the
festival sponsors heard the
group play during the finals
of the South Eastern Pop
Festival held in Gainesville
last month. Then they
asked us to come to Miami
to play over Christmas, he
said.
Hammer formed when
Tangerine, another well-known
hard-rock group broke up
during the South Eastern
competition.
Jack Spires, 18, and
Dewitt (Dog) Gibbs, 18, both
from Jacksonville, form the
core of the new group.
Spires plays drums and
sings lead.- He is known to
audiences for his twenty-five
minute to an hour and a
half In-a-gadda-da-vida solo.
Gibbs plays organ in the
group. I started playing
professionally when I was 10
years old, Gibbs said. He
also plays the piano and
guitar.
When the reorganization
took place three new
members were added to the
group.
Rickey Medlock, 19, is
Hammers lead singer but
exchanges places with Spires
to play the drums. He also
takes the part of the rythmn
guitar when needed. Ive
been singing since I was
three, Medlock said. My
first professional appearance
was on WNBR, now WIXT,
in Jacksonville.
Playing the bass guitar for
the band is Greg (Possum)
Walker, 18. Walker also dubs
in as lead or background
singer.
Both he and Medlock are
from West Palm Beach.
GATOR
GOLF
2 hr 1
Fri. Data Night
Your Date will
bo admitted
free when you
buy one regular
admission ticket
and present this
ad.
2425 S.W. 13THST.

Ride and I played together
in elementry school, Walker
said.
These four members have
known each other for several
years -but this is the first
time theyve played together

hl' Ikj <4

*
HAMMER STRIKES AT DUB'S
... (Left to Right) Hargrett, Walker, Spires, Medlock and Gibbs

mam 3/ictAm
GAINESVILLE MALL
psfi

in the same band.
We should have gotten
together long before this,
said Medlock. This is how
it should be.
The last member of the
group is Charlie Hargrett, 20.

He plays lead guitar. Hargrett
comes from New York and
has been playing for only
3H years.
Describing the type of
music the group plays
Caughron said: Our music is

Restaurant
ASK ANY OLD TIMER ABOUT US
AND OUR FAMOUS
LONDON BROIL STEAK
CHOPPED SALAD FRBICH HUES ROUS A RUTTER
* $1.15
AND THE REST SELLER M TOWN
BLACK ANGUS STEAK
AR The Trimmings 1.45
RREAKFAST SERVED AU DAY
'WE RELIEVE WERE THE REST RESTAURANT M TOW NT
OPEN FROM 4(30 AM TIL 300 AM
1225 W UNIV. AVI 372-6666
- II Ml

Friday, Novambar 7,1903, Tha Florida Alligator,

tight. It has definite starts
and stops like the hammer
striking a nail.
All of us have written
pieces but we haven't had
time to arrange them yet,
manager Caughron said.

Page 19



The
Florida
"V' . V. - -J
Alligator

BBBBBMII i M&,.
s ,^a.>-V>^ ;i :: ~ :- Us M /S ; yBH i; -j| :
V'Kiis .Wi' J J .rv3i l aV -v % v''<- : -4^s'll' 1 w/kSPvHe <*sa*R* : i
Wm 1 111
t '&>
.: '" V" ' ; £f; '**--- Jpl
r <. SU 1 -T
- ._ tip- M&zmmm. vs
BB*.::jMB j^p| l jjmm K BF
gjt/ >£ > ''lie' s ;4 ,1 f -.y ''i .< =xi : B IfflPlrFfFT
'' K "BnH il

pK# f Ab P :ri r ap 'SH Up
!* Wr IMBKir aiiii i yri T/m Br IIIhsI MB MB-iffmjj
-iffmjj MB-iffmjj Bp aBBEMBBaIa BMti; \>' SBKk SH
~
>.:, UPB I BMI I m
1 P*
gjfea: : iHR > :' -.
nmr vj &
*''' jjBHBjBHHHwBE 1 '*/, '^Mk'^BW^H^MH^HM^^^^MW|
m w ¥
Hfeiij: BAM k 3 (JP f .... /
;i ,/.:.'% S 'l:ggll ipsr # K-,g K#
HUH
888 BlMbb A i B . a I
Bp Bfvl9
B I 1 I ppfe
a %f. bph

;. b aBL I
jkT v msk
f""' S |i|:
B B Bffrrffr
b B^ffSrF-
B 1
\%JM i __., 1
>sf.- B f #;utl B >* ~'
B|Bb %_ ,|
0 si -b
Bk. Sr % $M |
I ;. {*' >. ' ~ 0, J V-. i * i; K p I
h r" B
I j
pr^\ : jJM bP* JaH P
Jb MKrfUH b-# tH^'Lw
£Lg| JH -- m
*-i ttma-jid cit jr.iti*i§;

aw^^fl^WiHiosy^OPwPyr^^^^jOk//PxAA^6syo^9S2SSooQwM6ofisZMtPYiiiPy
.^BQ^b£Xx'm 'l9b x^^HC^^E x v^^b^^* x <>, K '^ l^B£^B^-JBK i<
Br> :; :|B' < -' br ; wHiik : ...Saxx ('
v n^a* *'*V%*
wl^^B > s/al^K? 4 ''''' '*''' V' '^^X\Bp.-BK,- 1 <

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Page 20

1, Th. FKKW. AUi9.tor. FHd.* N<

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor



IN tjATOR BOWL RIVALRY
Bulldogs Favored Over Reminded UF

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Remember 51-0?
Coach Ray Graves, the assistant coaches and the
players do but especially Graves.
Signs with nothing but 51-0 on them have been
plastered everywhere inside the athletic offices since
Monday.
Graves, when asked if this was some kind of
psychological build-up for the UFs traditional
Gator Bowl battle with Georgia, merely said no.
Its just a reminder, Graves said, lest we
should forget.
It is seriously doubted by many that any of the
Gators could forget the unmerciful 51-0 beating the
Gators endured in the rain, the mud and the slush of
Jacksonville last year.
There are many people from last years crowd of
70,000 who remember very well the most
embarrasing washing Georgia has ever dealt Florida
in the series which dates back to 1915.
Georgia leads the series 28 games won to
Floridas 17 victories. There has been one tie, back
in 1930 when the two rivals played a score-less
battle.

Baby Gators
Play Today
The UF Baby Gators play
their first home game of the
season today, as they take on
the Georgia Bullpups at Florida
Field at 2 p jn.
A pep rally for the
Gator-Georgia clash in the Gator
Bowl Saturday will highlight the
halftime intermission of the
freshman game
The Baby Gators, who have
been hampered this season by
injuries, carry a 1-1 record into
the game. Georgia also holds a
1-1 mark.
Florida has lost to Auburn,
54-13 and defeated Florida State
28-26. Georgia stopped Auburn,
28-7, but lost to Clemson 27-20.
The Gators center their offensive
attack around Nick Nichol, their
quarterback. The 6-foot-4, 200
ponder from Dallas, Texas has
completed 28 of 55 passes for
390 yards and two touchdowns.
'Outf Record
ST. LOUIS Hall of Famer
Stan Musial says he holds one
record in baseball that a lot of
people dont know about.
Sure, I hold the record for
the most base hits and most
times at bat, Musial said. But I
also hold the record for the most
outs.
join the fan!
nicidaitfiC
m mwmm
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of It, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 Thats all it coots for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
[378-26461
CASSELSINTHE AIR
1 Gainesville Airport
Waldo Road

BULLDOG BRUCE KEMP SCORES
... will start for Georgia Saturday

{, ~wr
GAINESVILLE MALL
' y. r 'JSj MLJi/ ( TMmm
jM r 1
JM I k: / / x ;
i Br Ml
z V x xv< :
WHEELS! 11
, 5; -t V" -* '' ;Js
Bikes designed for campus or community. FOLDING MINI BIKE folds to
fit into a car trunk, has front hand brake, coaster brake on rear. Luggage
carrier, tool kit. whitewalls. 20" wheels, red. white, blue, $55. CAMPUS
COMPACT duffle bag, coaster brake, contoured handlebars. 20". olive,
$49. ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHT 26" for woman or man. black only, S4O.
Choose and charge in Maas Sporting Goods.

Friday, November 7, 1969, The Florida Alligator

But all that is oyer and this year's Gators enter
the game 6-1, while Georgia brings a 5-2 record to
the Gator Bowl.
Both teams have suffered tough defeats. The
Gators fell for the first time last week 38-12 to
Auburn, and Georgia, 17-3 to Tennessee, the
nation's number three ranked team. The Bulldogs
were stopped earlier in the year by Mississippi and
Archie Manning 25-17.
The Gators again are matching their number one
Southeastern Conference total offense against
another top SEC defensive team. Last week it was
Auburn's number two defense, this Saturday its
Georgia's number three defense.
In the scoring department the Gators rank second
in the SEC with a 35.7 average, while the Dogs rank
seventh with a 28.0 average.
But the Bulldogs have only given up an average of
9.4 points to rank first in the SEC, while the Gators
have given up 21.7 points in ranking seventh.
The Bulldogs will be missing their All-American
pass-catching candidate Dennis Hughes. The Gators
are without Paul Maliska, Ted Hager and Robbie
Rebol.
The Bulldogs are listed as seven-point favorites.

Page 21



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

Page 22

BEST W THE SOUTHEAST
Harriers Looking For Eight

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
UFs unbeaten cross country
team, called the best in the
Southeast by Track and Field
News, runs its first home meet
of the season today against
South Florida at 4 p.m. The
four-mile course begins across
the street from the track by the
varsity tennis courts.
For the Gator runners the
meet amounts to little more
than a tune-up and try-out.
Twelve runners will compete for
the top seven UF positions in
the conference meet Monday,
Nov. 17.

in By Albert the Alligator
Alberts six week dream came tumbling last week, but having
sobered up a lot, Im willing to take a look at this weeks scores.
Miami over Navy by 6 This week, were going to talk about a
certain breed of campus man. What has blue eyes and thinks a lot of
himself?
Auburn over Mississippi State by 23 The answer is a fraternity
pickle. You get the game?
California over Oregon State by 7- What is green and just finished
a six pack of beer?
Colorado over Kansas by 12 A pickled pickle.
LSU over Alabama by 9 Whats red and gets out of town on any
weekend he doesnt have a date?
Southern Miss over Memphis State by 11 -An embarrassed pickle.
Whats green and black and blue?
Florida State over Va. Tech A neophyte pickle. Whats green and
didnt get initiated?
Vanderbilt over Kentucky by 15 A balled pickle. Whats green
and pledged without getting a bid?
Wyoming over Utah by 13 A second-class pickle. Whats green
and black?
Houston over Tulsa by 43 a token pickle. Whats green and just
never got a bid?
Texas A& M over SMU by 2 A sour pickle. Whats green and
wars a ROTC uniform?
Texas over Baylor by 28 A drill pickle. Whats green and got
kicked out of the fraternity?
Tennessee over South Carolina by 33 A canned pickle. Whats
green and cuts down rushees?
Southern Cal over Washington State by 10 A picky pickle. Whats
green and has ancestors who came over on the Mayflower?
Arkansas over Rice by 17 A pedigree pickle. Whats green and is
lavaliered to five girls at once?
Purdue over Michigan State by 7 A fickle pickle. Whats green
and wears nothing but Ivy League clothes?
Kansas State over Oklahoma State by 14 A stale pickle. Whats
greertand red?
Ohio State over Wisconsin by 40 A pinko pickle. Whats green
and carries a fifth to the football games?
Missouri over Oklahoma by 7 A smashed pickle.
Thats the scores for all but the most important game, to be played
in Jacksonville tomorrow.
Floridas going to win. Yeah, I go with the Gators. Georgias tough,
were down, but well win. Point spread? Go to the game and see for
yourself.
FREE PIZZA
Saturday (Nov. 8) only
From The
i f|f>
JETr Mi JktmmAm
Free 8 Cheese Pizza
With Purchase of
One Pitcher of Beer
1-5 P.M.
316 5.W. 16th Avo. 376-4521
"watch the Gators Sat on our color TV"

ij
MARK BIR
... returns to action

Although South Florida
boasts two excellent runners in
Del Lewis and Ed Crank, the
Tampa crew has finished far
behind the high-flying Gators in
the large invitational meets in
which both teams have
participated.
We dont anticipate any real
problems with our schedule
from here on in, reported track
coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes.
The big question will be which
runners come through for us
before the conference.
Freshman star Mark Bir is
expected to compete today
following a knee injury that has
hampered his training for several
weeks. Doctors report that Bir
has a cyst which is painfully
moved back and forth by a
tendon. He is expected to
compete in the conference meet
despite the aggravated knee.
The UF runners have defeated
Mississippi State, Baptist College
and Georgia Tech in dual meets
and have won top honors in the
Daytona Beach Run, the Atlanta
Run, the Callaway Gardens
Invitational and the NCAA
Regionals.
Cager Out
Nick Fotiou, one of Floridas
four returning lettermen in
basketball, suffered a hairline
fracture of the foot and will miss
several weeks of practice.
Last season Fotiou played a
reserve role behind
All -Southeastern C onference
forward, Andy Owens.
Aii
Open House
Friday,
November 7
9-12
with
"The Celebration

1969 Florida State Super Stock Manufacturer Championship
over 30 of the Finest Cars in the Nation.
ROUND ROBIN STYLE
FEATURING
1969 World Champions World's Fastest Camaro
SOX & MARTIN BILL (Grumpy) JENKINS
Ford Drag Team 1969 Division II Champion
HUBERT (Hube Baby) PLATT BILL TANNER Lenox Dodge
I SEE THE WORLDS FASTEST BATTLE 3 FULL ROUNDS
Plus Manufacturer Race. Ford vs. Dodge vs. Chevy vs. Plymouth
TIME TRIALS 11AM-2PM RACES 2:3OPM
il||M fm Gn. Ad. $2.50 Students with ID $1.50
mmmi DBRw 3% Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225
Phone 378-0046

Alvarez Second
In Receptions

NEW YORK (UPI) Carlos
Alvarez, with 60 receptions for
959 yards and 10 TDs was listed
second in official collegiate
football statistics released
Wednesday.
Jerry Hendren of Idaho led
the nation in pass receiving with
79 catches for 1,173 yards and
11 touchdowns.
Kansas States Mach Herron
continued to lead in sewing with
108 points on 18 touchdowns,
and Oklahomas Steve Owens
was second with 102 points in
17 TDs. Jim Braxton of West
Virginia, held down thrid place
with nine touchdowns, 22 extra
points and three field goals for
85 points.
Bob Jacobs of Wyoming
continued to lead in kick scoring
with 66 points on 18 extra
points and 16 field goals,
followed by UCLAs Zenon
Andrusyshyn with 56 points on
32 extra points and eight field
goals.
In other departments, Bill
Comman of Pacific led in punt
returns with 30 for 376 yards,
Doug Mathews of Vanderbilt
was first in kickoff returns with
20 for 542 yards and Penn
States Neal Smith was no. 1 in
interception returns with eight
for 70 yards.
Records could tumble
Saturday as Floridas sophomore
offensive aces, Carlos Alvarez
and John Reaves, run into
another standout defensive team
in Georgia in Jacksonvilles
Gator Bowl.

ELROD'S rsr
iftO/ Discount
lU/O To Students
All Makes And Models Corvair Specialist
Geta Fair Shake.... See ELROD
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 SO. MAIN Phone*. 376-7771


IPPF I
fes
Wfrj, **^l^^**,^ W BSSfSRi
: -: ~ i ~ 'iXi ts
ji.' i
iv-'-
BHH \ >
v' it lllf
;X, % .V
jm
CARLOS ALVAREZ
.. catches 60 passes
ANTIQUE, DECOUPAGE
All Needs Old Masters lines
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431
!ife
Take out sendee**
ASSORTED
SOX LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
SY THE POUND
Call ahead lt'll be
wait bis for you.
1202 NC Sth AVI.
(NEXT TO TRIANGLE
PACKAGE STORE)
378-3206



URALS
(Towers 111-North IV Victors
*
dorm basketball
North IV and Towers 111 moved
to easy victories in opening
games of dorm basketball. After
an easy 59*9 opening game
victory Towers 111 looks like the
team to beat in dorm action.
Phil Wooleys 18 points paced
the towers and Rich Smith
followed with 10 points and 12
assists. After receiving at least
seven points from the other four
men on the squad, coach Bob
Red Telfer said Were going all
the way.
North IV may have something
to say about that however, as
they combined good defense and
balanced scoring to defeat a
much taller South 1,48-37. Mike
Sappington and Craig Smith led
the team with 12 and nine
points respectively. Chris
Mobley, the team playmaker was
close behind with 11 points.
Morth IV finished second
runnerup in its football bracket
and if it continues to play with
such large quantities of heart
and hustle they could go all the
way.
SORORITY SOFTBALL
AOPi defeated DPhiE 24-6 to
win the Orange league sorority
championship in action Tuesday.
Marti Cochrane pitched a
brilliant game for the AOs
limiting the Deephers to 10 hits
while the AOs recorded 19 hits
of their own. The Deephers
appeared to be all wrapped up in
Cochranes curves.
Pat Tuck and Bags Rundell
each collected a homer for
AOPi. The game was iced in the
I
NOW
MAKES
POSTERS
YOUR PHOTO
/
BLOWN UP TO
HUGE
POSTER
FOR
$4.50
1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657

first inning as AO scored 14 runs
holding the Deephers to one run.
The only inning the Deephers
outscored the AOs was the
fourth when DPhiE scored five
runs.
AOPiYnust now face Tri Delt
for the Sorority championship.
BOWLING The Intramural
Department is now sponsoring a

1 | n
"fill!1, -.ml^lSfclilt.....
SORORITY SOFTBALL CONCLUDES
... AOPi wins Orange League championship

SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A.M. TIL 9:30 P.M.
V : V :
Pandoras "sheer magic nighties...
cast a bewitching spell in two fetching nylon tricot styles! Both
in sizes P-S-M, 6.00. Bedazzling bikini set in beautiful blueberry
j * T 1 *i
or black with opaque bra and panties under sheer coat. Extra
sheer peek-a-boo shirt with jewel button trim and bikini panties in
precious pink or adorable aqua. Maas Lingerie
mam &/iet/ieu
GAINESVILLE MALL v

co-recreational bowling
tournament for all interested
couples.
All interested people should
find a partner and sign up for
the tournament in the
intramural department office
room 229 FLG by 5 pjn. Nov
13.

Super Stocks To Run
At Local Drag Strip
The biggest names in professional super stock drag racing will
converge at the Gainesville Dragway this Sunday to determine the
fastest automobile manufacturer.
1969 World Champions Sox and Martin will lead a host of
Hemi-Plymouth entries to face an onslaught of Fords headed by the
Eastern Ford Drag Team captain Hubert Platt.
Representing Chevrolet ranks is the fastest Camaro driver in the
UJS., Bill (Grumpy) Jenkins. Jenkins recently clocked .4 under his
Super Stock national record and will head the Chevy force against the
1969 NHRA Division II champion Bill Tanner with his Hemi-Dark the
Lenox Dodge.
Stock, competition and E.T. eliminations will also be held.
Time trials begin at 11 a.m. Sunday with the first Super Stock race
at 2:30 p.m.
Bill Tanners Dodge is now on display at Poole-Gable Motors. The
Sox and Martin Barracuda will be on display Saturday at
Hawes-Powers.
Want your money to AGQ
be worth something? \KX>
Just 20 minutes away North on 441
Lower prices eTrained technicians
ePersonal service eFriendly atmosphere
JIM DOUGLAS CHEVROLET
Santa Fa Boulevard High Springs, Florida
Call 454-1488 Toll Fraa

Friday, November 7,1969, The Florida Alligator, l

Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 7,1969

GATOR'S BRITT SKRIVANEK

1967 Fist Fight Champion

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
Britt Skrivanek led the UF's
football team in fist fights in
1967. When I was a
sophomore, he said, I got into
fights every day at practice.
Skrivanek started as a
sophomore at defensive end but
injured his left knee during the
Gators game with Florida State
last fall and was finished for the
season.
I became a little conservative
then, Skrivanek said. No more
fights. And almost no more
Britt Skrivanek the football
player.
Britt reinjured his knee during
the spring drills in May and his
playing status was unknown,
going into this season, to say the
least. As a matter of fact, he
said, the coaches didn't know it
I'd be back this year.
Skrivanek has returned and
hes letting UF opponents know
it. Against FSU last month he
dropped Bill Cappleman for
several losses and he helped
make life miserable for

~ :v S :
Handsomely
LUNAR
GOLD,.,.
(hand-sewn front, too)
Never was a hand-sewn more handsome! Modern
as tomorrow, with bronze ornamentation
and Lunar Gold leather (it
brings the moons golden glow
down to earth). Yet traditionally
Jarman in the high qual quality
ity quality and wear-tested com comfort.
fort. comfort. Let us fit you in a pair.
flv.7nitd>eir*
1127 WESTUNIV. AVE
TH itched s
IN THE MALL

U P
p fr
r% f
BRITT SKRIVANEK
... out to get Bulldogs' QB
Vanderbilt'S quarterback two
weeks ago.
When the Gators play Georgia
Saturday afternoon at the Gator
Bowl, Britt is hoping he gets the
opportunity to deck the
Bulldogs Mflte Cavan, their
junior quarterback. Britt will do
it nicely, of course. He's a good
guy now.
I still like to scrap though,
he said. Anyone who plays-

football has to.
Many people didn't expect
Skrivanek to be playing football
at all this fall. The doctors
weren't too sure about my
knee, he said.
Britt's knee got slammed in
the Gators' game with Tulane
last month and he still is having
it drained once a week.
Skrivanek worked out during
the summer on campus lifting
weights with his legs. One day he
dropped by the UF Sports
Publicity Office. He wanted to
know if we had written him
off, said assistant sports
publicist Richard Giannini.
IH be back, Skrivanek told
Giannini at the time. And he is.
Super-Sports Town
GREEN BAY, Wise. The
Green Bay Packers are not the
only supermen living in this
northern Wisconsin city. Frank
Howard, the 6-7,265-pound left
fielder of the Washington
Senators is an off-season resident
here.

The Harmon Football Forecast
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 1095 Right, 365 Wrong, 35 Ties 750)
1 'Tennessee 6L.S.U. 11Missouri 18Florida
2 Texas 7Auburn 12Kansas State 17Nebraska
3 Ohio State BU.C.LA 13Stanford 18Purdue
4 Arkansas 9Southern Cal 14Georgia 19Mississippi
5 Notre Dame 10Penn State 15Michigan 20Oklahoma
Saturday, Nov. BMajor Colleges Other Games East

Air Force 24 Utah State 7
Arizona State 31 New Mexico 0
Arkansas 33 Rice 7
Army 14 Oregon 10
Auburn 35 Mississippi State 6
Brigham Young 24 San Jose State 7
Buffalo 21 Boston College 17
California 17 Oregon State 13
Cincinnati 23 Louisville 20
Citadel 24 Maine 14
Clemson 22 Duke 13
Colgate 27 Bucknell 14
Colorado 23 Kansas 10
Cornell 20 Brown 7
Dartmouth 38 Columbia 0
Davidson 20 East Carolina 8
Florida State 25 V.P.I. 20
Georgia 17 Florida 10
Georgia Tech 30 Tulane 17
Houston 35 Tulsa 12
Indiana 21 lowa 15
Kansas State 33 Oklahoma State 15
Kent State 22 Marshall 7
Kentucky 17 Vanderbilt 15
L.S U. 24 Alabama 9
Memphis State 34 Southern Mississippi 7
**Miami, Fla. 28 Navy 6
Miami (Ohio) 14 Maryland 3
Michigan 45 Illinois 14
Minnesota 27 Northwestern 16
Mississippi 45 Chattanooga 0
Missouri 27 Oklahoma 21
Nebraska 21 lowa State 7
New Mexico State 24 El Paso 23
North Carolina 38 V.M.I. 7
North Texas 26 Wichita 7
Notre Dame 38 Pittsburgh 6
Ohio U 20 Bowling Green 16
Ohio State 45 Wisconsin 7
Princeton 22 Harvard 21
Purdue 28 Michigan State 20
Richmond 35 Furman 0
Rutgers 21 Connecticut 14
Southern California 33 Washington State 0
S. 23 Texas A & M 19
Stanford 42 Washington 6
Syracuse 25 Arizona 13
Tennessee 31 South Carolina 0
Texas 42 Baylor 0
T. 24 Texas Tech 21
Toledo 35 Northern Illinois 0
Villanova 27 Dayton 14
Virginia 14 Wake Forest 13
West Texas 27 Western Michigan 24
West Virginia 35 William & Mary 6
Wyoming 21 Utah 17
Yale 31 Pennsylvania 12
Other Games South and Southwest
Abilene Christian 24 Arlington 22
Alcorn A & M 33 Mississippi Valley 0
Angelo State 21 Texas Lutheran 14
Appalachian 28 Presbyterian 7
Arkansas A & M 21 Arkansas State 20
Carson-Newman 28 Maryville 6
Centre 18 Hampden-Sydney 15
Delta State 21 Jacksonville 13
East Tennessee 28 Morehead 14
East Texas 24 Sam Houston 14
Eastern Kentucky 21 Tennessee Tech 8
Elon 20 Newberry 6
Glenville 22 Concord 0
Guilford 15 Emory & Henry 14
Henderson 17 Harding 16
Lamar Tech 26 Trinity 17
Livingston 21 Mississippi College 10
Louisiana Tech 27 SE Louisiana 6
Millsaps 19 Georgetown 7
Morgan State 42 Hampton 6
Murray 28 Austin Peay 21
NW Louisiana 22 McNeese 21
Ouachita 17 Arkansas Tech 15
Randolph-Macon 35 Bridgewater 0
S. F. Austin 26 Southwest Texas 22
Sewanee 20 Washington U 14
Sul Ross 20 McMurry 19
Texas A& I 33 Howard Payne 14
Troy State 26 Martin 7
Washington & Lee 16 Southwestern, Tenn. 15
West Chester 27 Lenoir-Rhyne 24
Western Carolina 30 Samford 14
Western Kentucky 28 Middle Tennessee 10
Wofford 24 Catawba 6

I UF- Georgia I
Starters
Gators

OFFENSE
Andy Cheney SE
Wayne Griffith LT
Donny Williams LG
Kim Helton C
Skip Amelung RG
Mac Steen RT
Bill Dowdy TE
John Reaves QB
Carlos Alvarez FL
Tommy Durrance TB
Mike Rich FB

OFFENSE
Charles Whittemore SE
Tom Nash LT
Mayo Tucker LG
Mike Lopatka C
Royce Smith RG
Wayne Byrd RT
Mike Greene TE
Mike Cavan QB
Craig Elrod FL
Steve Farnsworth TB
Bruce Kemp FB

Bulldogs

Alfred 26 Union 13
American Internl 17 Southn Connecticut 7
Amherst 24 Trinity 7
Bates 20 Colby 7
Boston U 35 Rhode Island 7
Bridgeport 30 Glassboro 6
Clanon 26 Slippery Rock 20
Cortland 20 Northeastern 15
Delaware 28 Lehigh 6
Delaware Valley 28 Drexel Tech 13
Johns Hopkins 14 Swarthmore 7
Juniata 26 Western Maryland 14
Lafayette 21 Vermont 13
Middlebury 19 Coast Guard 14
Montclair 31 Jersey City 13
Moravian 24 Upsala 6
Norwich 21 Worcester Tech 7
Rochester 20 Hobart 13
Springfield 28 New Hampshire 20
Tufts 21 Bowdoin 16
Temple 27 Gettysburg 26
Williams 25 Wesleyan 20
Readers probably aren't aware of just how much
the consistency of football team varies from one
section of the country to another... but it does!
We're speaking now of college division teams, not
major colleges. Through the weekend of October 18th,
the first six weeks of the season, our forecasting
accuracy broke down like this.
In. the very unpredictable East, our average was just
61%l (We took a flunking mark there, no doubt
about it.) In the Midwest, our accuracy picked up
considerably ... a percentage of 73%. In the South and
Southwest, we continued to improve... our batting
average climbed to 79%. Then in the Far West, we
picked enough winners for an A-plus forecasting
average of 83%. We aren't about to try to explain a
22% variation from the East to the Far West, but
suffice to say, this is fairly consistent with each
season.
And how about that "new look" in the Top 201
The names are the same, but there's been a bit of
shuffling and re-shuffling. Tennessee, as a result of its
very convincing win over powerful Georgia last week,
is our Number One team. Texas remained in second,
but Ohio State slipped to third, just fractions behind
the Longhorns and the Volunteers. If these three
remain undefeated, all three should share the national
championship.
Tennessee is favored to take the Gamecocks of
South Carolina by 31 points... Texas should hustle
over Baylor by 42... and Ohio State will whistle by
Wisconsin by 38.
Fourth-ranked Arkansas will roil over Rice by 26
points, and Notre Dame, no. 5, will bury Pittsburgh
by 32.
"Who's On Top?", that new game being played by
the Big Eight Conference this fall, still finds half the
conference playing it very seriously! Kansas State met
destruction last week, and dropped a notch in the''
ratings to 12th. The Wildcats will beat Oklahoma State
by 18 points. Missouri, no. 11, bumps heads with
20th-ranked Oklahoma, and Missou should break up
the crowd a bit, beating the Sooners by six points.
Nebraska, no. 17, is 14 points stronger than lowa
State.
Louisiana State dropped only two rungs on the
national ladder after being upset by Mississippi. The
6th-rated Tigers will dip Alabama this week by 15
points, and Auburn, no. 7, will muss up Mississippi
State by 29. Southern California, in 9th, will whip
Washington State by 33 points.

Bob Coleman LE
Robert Harrell LT
Danny Williams LG-RT
Jade Youngblood RG-RE.
David Ghesquiere RT-LLB
Tom Abdelnour RE-MLB
Mike Kelley LLB-RLB
Mark Ely RLB-LCB:
Jack Bums LHB-LS
Skip Albury RHB-RS
Steve Tannen S-RCB

DEFENSE
Chuck Heard LE
Larry Brasher LT
Tim Callaway LG-RT
Steve Greer RG-RE
Lee Daniel RT-LLB
David McKnight RE-MLB
Chip Wisdom LLB-RLB
Ronnie Huggins RLB-LCB
Phil Sullivan LHB-LS
Billy Darby RHB-RS
Buck Swindle S-RCB