Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Voters Pass
Education
Amendment
1

PM
.A8 jAmeuai*.

Vol. 62, No. 35

m >/v i i
Hr 9|
I
m'; ~..v^.:j: : : ; .: 9
PETE KNOCKE
ITS COLD OUTSIDE
Tanya Bowen and Ron Clark come into the Reitz Union to keep
out of the cold. Tuesday night's low was predicted to have been in the
40's and it's going to be colder today. Get out that woolen
underwear!
SCAT Endorses
$5 Fee Increase

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Center Action
Team (SCAT) has endorsed the
Feb. 4 student referendum on
increasing activities fees $5 to
pay for a University Activities
Center.
The referendum will test
TRjecJfeoi? ;
STUDENT EVALUATION in
granting tenure proposed by
University Chancellor Robert ;
J -5
Mautz
Classifieds ## 11
Editonsb 6
Entertainment .** 13
FSU News 10
Letters 7
Movies 11
Small Society 4 I
Sports.*.* 1^
Whats Happening .. < .5
M.U'v.w.... r*y r w.*y&

r']"- \
The
V; .i. i ,< ~'. -y .".v* '_;,A" * ~d~ 4%:-- : Jsjk .£Jp-iv?iw|. !|L j 5? &< v isf' ¥r ;^s*oSfeu
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
-

whether the students are willing
to pay additional activities fees
for construction of the center.
If the students vote yes,
legislators have virtually
guaranteed the legislature would
approve the hike as long as the
added funds are used only for
the center.
SCAT Chairman Steve Rohan
said Tuesday SCAT will donate
about $3,000 to a committee set
up by Omicron Delta Kappa,
leadership honorary to promote
the referendum.
The $3,000 is most of the
SCAT fund gained from IFC, the
SCAT Quarter Drive, and
donations from TEP and DU.
Rohan said he feels the
money would be better spent in
promoting the referendum,
making $3,000 generate $6
million rather than in
(SEE'SCAT'PAGE 2) c ...
AVVV%**aa 3 <* * r r T.*
WtoliL AY*?-;. ? .

MIAMI (UPI) Fiorida voters, buffeted by the
first cold front of the season, made s pitiful
turnout at the polls Tuesday to pass a higher
education bond amendment to cope with the
college population explosion.
Unofficial returns Tuesday night showed th£
constitutional amendment which will provide
construction money for the state university and
junior college systems was passing about 3-1. Early
returns from 991 of the states 2,717 total precincts
listed 126,101 voters favoring the bond amendment
and 46,038 against. > v
As the only statewide issue at stake in the
off-year general election, voters showed little
interest in going to the polls in most areas. Their
enthusiasm was further (tampered by a cold front
which zinged into the peninsula, pouring rain onto
the populous northeast tier of counties around
Jacksonville and wind gusts up to 60 miles an hour
with rain in the voter rich Tampa Bay area.
Voters in the counties housing the big universities

University of Florida, Gainesville

OATH CONTROVERSY

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas state cabinet Tuesday voted to appeal
the validity of the loyalty oath all the way to the
U.S. Supreme Court and Gov. Claude Kirk said he
will not sign paychecks of state employes refusing
to sign the oath.
However, UF President Stephen C. OConnell has
officially recognized an Orlando District Court
restraining order against the controversial loyalty
oath and notified faculty and staff that they will
not be required to sign the previously distributed
oath.
OConnell said he will cease all efforts to obtain
signatures of faculty and staff. The UF will take no
further action in regard to the loyalty oath until
such time as we receive instructions to do so from
the Board of Regents, the Board of Education or
the Attorney General.
Instructions are expected within the next two to
three days, said OConnell.
Assistant State Atty. Gen. Herbert Benn said the
state does not have to abide by the restraining order
if it files a supersede petition to stay all
interference with the loyalty oath, pending outcome
of appeal.
Kirk, whose signature is necessary on state pay

HES GOT THE TICKETS
> 'l' CL iti G.ti L jA.- J i- *? ft :... . .. .. .1 i < , 'S'

Gator Loan Fund Chairman Eddie Floyd, left,
has just relumed from West Palm Beach with 2,000
tickets to the three-day Thanksgiving pop festival
being held there. The festival headlines the Rolling
Stones. Tickets for.the. program ace S2O each, wiJb a.

'You Wont Get Paid,
Kirk Tells Non-Signers

favored the bond amendment by heavy margins
except in Dade County, site of the independent i
University of Miami, one of the nation's largest i
state-supported junior colleges and a new state i
university to be built. Dade voters, however, passed i
the issue by a little better than 3-2 margin.
Alachua, home of the University of Florida voted :
7,785-637 for the amendment, Duval County ran up
a 22-3 margin and Escambia 7-1.
Leon County Elections Supervisor Wilma Sullivan
summed up the feelings of most elections
supervisors when she described the turnout in the
capital city as pitiful... at this rate well be lucky
to get 10 per cent.
Even in Dade County, where several mayoral
races and a proposed one mill levy to finance the
debt-plagued interama project spiced up the ticket,
elections supervisor Martin Braterman predicted
only 80,000 of 470,000 registered voters would cast
ballots.

checks, said he won't sigh any unless they are
accompanied by an affidavit affirming signature of
the oath, swearing non-membership in the
Communist Party.
UFs much disputed loyalty oath was distributed
to faculty and staff Oct. 16 with a copy of the
employes contracts. The oaths were to be signed
and notarized by Nov. 15 or employes would be
subject to immediate dismissal.
Theoathsfour main points included: 1) I am not
a member of the Communist Party, 2) I am not a
member of any organization believing in the
overthrow of the government by force or violence,
3) 1 do not believe in the overthrow of the
government by force or violence, 4) 1 support the
constitutions of the U.S. and Florida.
U.S. District Court Judge George Young last
week found the first and second points
unconstitutional and said the UF oath should not be
administered in its present form. An order
temporarily restraining the Board of Regents from
refusing to pay university professors or personnel
that don't sign it, pending final decision, was issued.
The ruling came on a suit filed by an Orange
County schoolteacher who was contesting the same
oath.
Orlando lawyer Jerry Bornstein, with the backing
(SEE 'OATH', PAGE 2)

percentage of the Gainesville sales going to the loan
fund. They are available at room 326 of the Raft*
Union. Only 50,000 tickets will be Sold, None wH
be available at the gate.
~, With Floyd is.Malcolm-Marvin. .. .v.v.

Wednesday, November 5, 1969



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 5,1969

By United Press International
Republican William T. Cahill,
carrying President Nixons
endorsement, won the New
Jersey governorship from the
Democrats Tuesday and the
Nixon-backed GOP entry in
Virginia was making a strong bid
to end 100 years of Democratic
rule there.
Cahill, a veteran of 11 years in
Congress, defeated former
Democratic Gov. Robert B.

Obscene Sign Investigation
Forwarded To Veep Hale

By BARBARA JOHNSON
Alligator Correspondent
No official action has been
taken on complaints about
obscene signs reportedly
displayed in dorm windows on
Center Drive before the UF-FSU
football game.
However, there are no dorms
on Center Drive.
In a letter to University
Chancellor Robert Mautz, State
Rep. Tom Tobiassen,
R-Pensacola, related complaints
from some of his constituents

SCAT Asks 'Yes
In Coliseum Vole

PAGE ONjJ
contributing that amount to the
activities center foundation;
$17.5 million is needed to build
the center.
The administration has
promised to raise $lO million for
the center if the referendum
passes, thus assuring the
necessary funds, Rohan said.
This is the only solution,
Rohan said in reference to the
activities fee hike. If we dont
pass the increase, we can forget
about the activities center.
Last spring the student body
voted 2-to-l in favor of
allocating $5 of the existing
activities fee (approximately
S3O) to the activities center
fund, but the legislature rejected
Prof. Picked
FFLA Head
Dr. Thomas Ackerman,
assistant professor in the College
of Education, was elected
president of the Florida Foreign
Language Association last week.
A member of the Department
of Secondary Education for the
past three years, Ackerman came
to the UF from Washington,
D.C., where he had been a
Research Associate and a Fellow
of the U.S. Office of Education.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR k the official student newspaper of the
Univenity of Florida and k pubikbed five times weekly except daring Jane,
July and Augu* when it is pubSshed semi-weekly, and during rtudent holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida A Riga tor, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The AKgator k entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is $lO3lO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which H considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wfl not consider adjustments of payments for any
' advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
h given to the Advertiring Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for mote than one
' incorrect insertion df an>advMHnhetit'scheduled-to tfrin sevtfallMies. Notices
forconectibd fhhrt he given befdrt the-next-insertion. ... >

GOP Runs Strona In National Vote

Meyner, to become the first
GOP governor to win the New
Jersey state house in 16 years.
In Virginia, Republican A.
Linwood Holton was running
ahead of his Democratic rival
William C. Battle in the early
count. With 22 percent of the
vote tabulated, Holton led by
approximately 25,000 votes and
held a margin of 55 to 43
percent for Battle.
Cahill headed for a runaway

and asked for investigation into
the matter.
Mautz said Tuesday he wrote
to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell asking him to take
appropriate action, if any and
observe all regular procedures
and rules in investigating the
complaints. He added that as far
as he was concerned this is
strictly a University matter.
OConnells office has
received Mautzs letter and
referred it to Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale for

the plan, Rohan said.
If the entire fund consisted of
donations, the length of time
involved in raising the $17.5
million would be impractical.
The possibility of using
existing tax revenues has already
been rejected by the legislature.
Rohan stressed that the center
will benefit students now
enrolled even though they will
not be at UF when the center is
built, because former students
return to UF for games and
often eventually send their
children to UF.
It is very selfish for us to
say, 4 I wont get use out of it, so
why pay for it? We pay too
little tuition compared to other
institutions to worry about $5
extra, he said.

ELECT GOVERNOR IN NEW JERSEY

investigation.
Presidential Assistant Rae O.
Weimer said Mautzs letter
contained a copy of the
complaint sent to Tobiassen. He
said the complaints were pretty
vague and that nobody seems
to know what it was that
happened.
Tobiassen said Tuesday he
believed the signs in the dorms
were in poor taste but added
he really didnt intend to do
anything else about the
complaints.
Im not a crank. I went to
college and I know what its
like, Tobiassen said. But there
are some indecent things people
shouldnt have to be confronted
with.
Somebodys, got to say
something, because nobody's
said anything in the past, he
said.
MIM-POSTER
tm
I SUPREME
V Usw
I pMMrtl
9
OFFICE
FOR RENT
0 _

in the early returns when he
polled a two to one advantage
over Meyner.
Nixon had personally gone
into New Jersey and Virginia on
behalf of the two GOP
gubernatorial candidates. The
two governorship races were
viewed as a deliberate test of his
off-year election coat-tail
political power.
Several dozen mayoralty
contests were also being decided

"Take mo home ldf*
Win a
Poodle
Tonight at the...
1 N.W. 10 AVI
Yes win a pup tonight-or one of
the bottles of Champagne woro giving
away FREE. And while youre hero, enjoy
THE SOUNDS OF CHUCK CX)NLON
%\ .. . 14
" l>liniTUniflM l 1 nn |V.w-t.r ..... ... r v

with Negro polling power at
stake in such cities as Cleveland,
Detroit, Buffalo, Dayton, Ohio,
Hartford and Waterbury, Conn.
In Louisville, the Democrats
scored a grass roots victory by
recapturing the mayorship as
former Congressman Frank W.
Burke easily defeated
Republican John P. Sawyer.
The Democrats also regained
City Hall in Waterbury, Conn.,
when former three term mayor
Edward Bergin unseated GOP
incumbent George Harlamon.
In the Dayton contest,
incumbent Dave Hall won
reelection by a three to one
margin over his Negro opponent,

| UAC Board Seeking f
| People With Ideas
| The University Activities Center (UAC) is looking for §
:j: workers, and people with ideas, Committee Chairman Ralph
Glatfelter said Tuesday. |
The committee is working for passage of the Feb. 4 ijj
| referendum which would increase the tuition to help finance the :
i| activity center.
;! There is no way the UAC can be built unless the students |:j
$ take the initiative in financing it, Glatfelter said. J
§ If this referendum is passed it might prompt alumni and state $
>: contributions, he added.
The Campaign for the referendum will be bigger than any
UF presidential campaign, Glatfelter said. Anybody who is at >i
all interested in working for this project should contact me, he
v said. §
Ballots for the referendum will be mailed personally to each
student, he said. $
| The committee was formed under the initiative of Omicron £
: Delta Kappa (ODK), mens leadership fraternity, and $
|:j incorporates all groups and persons who had been working for \
the Activities Center previously.
This is not a political movement, but a committee working $
on the basic concept that an activities center is vital to the UF,
:ji Glatfelter said.
Loyalty Oath Unsure

ffroM PAGE oN^|
of the American Civil Liberties
Union, has filed a suit also
contesting the third point.
UFs chapter of the American
Association of University
Professors has said the UF is
acting alone in ordering the
signing and is doing so in a
calculated attempt to carry
out a last minute purge of

Lawrence Nelson, a foundry
worker. Dayton, which has a
city manager form of
government, generally votes on
non-partisan lines.
In the small town of Glasgow,
Ky., Republican Luska J.
Twyman became the first Negro
mayor to be elected in the state,
defeating his Democratic rival in
the predominantly white
community.
Four other major cities new
York, Cleveland, Detroit and
Pittsburgh chose mayors with
Negro candidates involved in
two of the contests and the
problems of the nations big
cities at issue in aU.

professors whose views it finds
unacceptable or embarrassing.
Tom Biggs, UFs attorney,
said Monday the oath as it exists
cant be administered. However,
the oath with the first and
second points deleted is
constitutional, he said.
State University Chancellor
Robert Mautz said Monday his
office is now seeking advice as
to what out our position will
be.



SG Names New Secretaries

Several new high-level appointments have been announced by
Student Government officials.
In the cabinet, Jeff Estes has replaced Quinn Wiggins as secretary of
student organizations, and David Glassbum has replaced James Lott as
secretary of married student affairs.
Estes stepped in when Wiggins resigned because he was too busy
with studies and a part-time job. Estes, a sophomore, is a former
senator and undersecretary of interior.
Glassbum is a former mayor of the Flavets. He took over when
Lott resigned for personal reasons earlier in the quarter.
Craig Hunter, a director of fall elections, has moved over to director
of labor. Hunter is a sophomore transfer from St. Petersburg Junior
College. He replaces Jay Scott, who was forced to resign because he
M
I
RANDY BASSETT
MONSTER MAKING
When studying got too boring, a couple of UF coeds turned their
creative talents to making a monster (modeled after one of their
neighbors). This papier-mache monstrosity graces a Sin City
apartment living room.

Mautz Wants Evaluations
Noted In Tenure Checks

TALLAHASSEE, (UPI) Chancellor Robert
Mautz says M student evaluations'* should be taken
into account in die proposed tenure regulations for
university professors.
I have left open the question of how the
evaluation is to take place or the weight it is to be
given/' Mautz said in the board of Regents current
weekly newsletter. By setting forth the desirability
of using some method of evaluation I hope I have
again emphasized the importance we all should
place on performing one of our primary missions
that of teaching those who entrust themselves to
us."
Shortly after taking the chancellor post last year,

Col. Sanders 11
W thicken
BRING 5£L- BRING
COUPON COUPON
E> TUES. & WED. ONLY
>INNER 990 I
Reg. 1.26 S

bringcouponMMlMMM.

HIGH-LEVEL CHANGES ANNOUNCED

Mautz said he was concerned about student
complaints that the quality of teaching in state
universities was subpar. He said he's been
heartened" to see institutions placing renewed
emphasis on good teaching, and outlined four
programs which are being developed to encourage
good teaching: The mandatory requirement by
UF for teacher evaluation by students. A program
at Florida Atlantic University to nominate a
teacher of the year. Publishing by students at
Florida State University of an evaluation of their
professors. Earmarking by Mautz of $ 10,000 for
the lump sum appropriation to the Board of
Regents for giving visibility' to outstanding
teaching.

was unable to devote the necessary time to the job.
Faith Tullino will fill in for John Englehardt as budget director.
Miss Tullino is a junior math major, has served on the senate's Budget
and Finance Committee for a year, and is the first female appointed
to the position. Englehardt resigned when he was appointed the first
student president of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Several new positions have been created to carry out Student Body
President Charles Shepherd's new projects.
Former Whip of the Student Senate George Seide will serve as UFs
liaison with other state universities as director of inter-university
affairs.
Senate Clerk Ralph Nobo was appointed director of SG's new
poll-taking service, PULSE.
No Timetable Set
Yet For UC Report

No timetable has been set for
acting on any of the
recommendations made in the
controversial University College
Report it was learned Tuesday.
No timetable has been set as
of yet, and no proposals have
been made, Vice President for
Academic Affairs Frederick W.
Conner said.
But in about two weeks
Conner plans to present a
proposal concerning general
education at the UF to the
University Curriculum
Committee.
This proposal, the nature of
which he did not want to reveal
yet, was made separate from the
committee report, Conner said.
I worked on this over the
summer, he said.
The University College
Report, compiled under a
committee chaired by Dr. Hal G.
Lewis of the Foundations of
Education, criticized UF's
comprehensive curriculum and

questioned the need for a
University College.
University College Dean
Franklin A. Doty met the report
with criticism. He felt the
committee members
misunderstood the goals of the
courses.

HELP WANTED
Job Pescription: Laying Groundwork and
Providing Manpower for
Operation Outreach and
Clearinghouse (An Information-
Services Warehouse in the
Ghetto)
Qualifications: A Love for People, Hardworking,
Sincere, Qualified for Work-Study
Program
Contact: Mr. Roy Mitchell's office,
124Tigert Hall, 392-1265
for further information
k ||f
M mk
. Photos by Mathews and ONeat
Dear Little Anthony,
Youll be so proud of mommy at the
Florida-Georgia game. Everybody will be
cheering for me in my outfit from MR.
ANTHONYS ORIGINALS. Mr. Anthony is
having a big sale Entire stock reduced -up to
%off.
Love,
Mommy
; J74OS.W. J3thSt Across Hut ~ > t >V j
'*** * m m *n~* * *-* -. %. -* -Vs££> .. .*"-* 'W *.*VV "5 fc -JT

*--! HI vvMinuwuy r movwmior 9 # iwwf# nwnn MiigaiM

ffn IfiwJj#i wl : : : : : 'jii
yawG^r

Page 3



Page 4

* ....... w. w m V f ll V 1
l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 5 r .1969

Hearings On Vietnam
Will Begin-Fulbright
WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate war critics, disappointed over
President Nixons Vietnam speech, Tuesday declare' 1 they would take
their case to the same silent majority he says supports his policy.
Chairman J. William Fulbright, D-Ark., said the appeal would be
made through a new series of educational Vietnam hearings by his
Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
Senate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield immediately supported
Fulbrights plan to reschedule the hearings that were cancelled after
Nixon announced he would give the major Vietnam policy address.

SUPPORTING PEACE PLAN
%

Nixon Receives Telegrams

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon said today he
was overwhelmed by an
outpouring of public support for
his plan to extricate the United
States from the Vietnam War.
On the morning after his
broadcast saying he had worked
out with Saigon a plan for
complete withdrawal of all
American forces from Vietnam,
Nixon met briefly with
reporters, sitting behind stacks
of telegrams on his Oval Office
desk.
Its very important in our
quest for peace to realize the
country is behind you, he said,
some 13 hours after appealing
for public support for his
coinage to wind down the war.
He added: I would put it this
way very flatly this
demonstration of support can
have more effect on ending the
war sooner than the most skilled
diplomacy, military tactics or
training of South Vietnamese
forces.
Miami Banker
To Speak
On Vietnam
Jade D. Gordon, prominent
Miami banker and chairman of
the Florida Mobilization
Committee To End The War in
Vietnam, will address a luncheon
meeting of faculty and
interested individuals in rooms C
and D, of the Reitz Union today
at 12:30 p.m.
The meeting is sponsored by
an informal group of faculty
members who are concerned
about the war in Vietnam,
according to Dr. Morris B.
Storer, professor of humanities.
The purpose of the luncheon
is to raise funds for the student
march on Washington.
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
USt $5 Thats aH it costs for our Special
ntroductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
IQ Waldo Road
Waiftw

In the speech to the nation nationand
and nationand the world Monday night
from the same desk where he
displayed the wires, Nixon had
asked the silent majority of
Americans to support him in his
plan to get out of Vietnam.
He did not fix a timetable for
pulling out all troops, saying it
would be a gradual process
which could be accelerated as
South Vietnam was able to take

AMONG FOREIGNERS

Speech Arouses
Little Enthusiasm

By United Press International
President Nixons Vietnam
speech aroused little enthusiasm
Tuesday among foreign friends
and foes of the United States.
The Communists saw it only as a
propaganda maneuver. Saigon
called it reassuring.
hl \ """ f *§
iSiHfc M JP9
JACK GORDON
... addresses luncheon

1969
FLORIDA-GEORGIA
BARBEQUE
Saturday, Nov. 8
Jacksonville Coliseum (next to Gator Bowl)
Delicious Barbeque
Served from 11:00-1:30pm
2.25 p p.
2.50 Per Person at the door I
Order your tickets today send
money to- Fla.-Ga Barbeque
P.O. Box 21
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
GIGANTIC PEP RALLY Entertainment "The Ray
Graves Decade" Films of the best plays during the
"Graves Era" at Florida will be shown on large
screen.

the I mail sdttety

I h Av'e &&T
Vofte AHp HoW Oo I Kt-JOVJ?
~ explain to w m mot wo/a&- yet/

over more and more of its own
defenses.
About 50 per cent of those
sending telegrams used the term
silent Americans, he said.
He also held up a long, yellow
roll of paper he described as the
longest wire in history. He said it
came from some fellow in
Colorado who got 20,066
signatures on it pledging support
to Nixon.

West German Chancellor Willy
Brandt said he believed a
military solution in Vietnam is
impossible and urged Hanoi
leaders to react in a positive
manner. The Japanese Foreign
Ministry also urged Hanoi to
respond to the peace bid.
North Vietnam and Viet Cong
delegations at the Paris peace
talks joined in condemning the
Nixon speech as a maneuver
designed to prolong the war in
South Vietnam. An American
delegation spokesman expressed
hope they would take time to
study the text because theres a
lot in it for them.
The Soviet reaction to the
speech was one of
disappointment at Nixons
failure to announce new
proposals on ending the war.
Tass and the government
newspaper Izvestia said the same
mood was prevalent in Russia
and the United States
disappointment and irritation.

UFS REPRESENTATIVES
ItFv^ 5 Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl PhH Tarver
Skip Lujack Mel Ward
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. Ave
PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADERjNSALESTOCOUEGEMEj^ M^^M^
r 3dSb\ ~ STCfIK,"SHRK I
I Student Special |
| (With The Coupon)
I Regular 93< Steakburger
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink I
| SI.OB Value 90 (£ nil l *tax |
1 Steak n Shake i
|_ l6lOS.WJ3tt>St _ Gainesville
Jill l STEAK HOUBB*
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
, jj Ig| .BP |Bfe*-
4 < i S- / m /
IB Jf II ig ||j|
M k jB9
I Jerry Uelsmann I
acclaimed U.F. photographer will ft
"RAP ON IMAGES
repeat performance
ft 7:30 P m N v. 6in Lounge 123 JWR Union. Free, but M
tickets are required for admission. Available at the
Office 12:00 4:30

by Brkkmon



Students Learn From Underprivileged Children

By KENNETH ANDERSON
Alligator Correspondent
UF's College of Education has
turned the tables on the poor.
The school has an educational
program in which the
underprivileged children of
Alachua County help the college
student learn.
The program, Project Aid, is
actually a part of the school's
EDF 345 class, entitled Human
Growth and Development.
Students in this class are
required to have field work
involving observation of actual
teaching situations. Until a few
years ago this consisted of five
visits to P.K. Yonge Laboratory
School.
But the students weren't
satisfied with the experience.

Center Os Man s Program
'Appreciates The Female

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Writer
An evening for the appreciation of the female"
through poetry, the dance and a lecture will be the
Center of Man's first program of the fall quarter
Thursday at 8 p jn.
Dr. Diddier Graeffe, professor of humanities will
give his presentation of The Way I See Her at the
centers new temporary home in the Presbyterian
University Center, 1402 W. University Ave.
The Center of Man is described as a community
growth center dedicated to the ideal of man as
unlimited in potential for love, creative
achievement, and continued self-renewal. The
center is under the direction of Dr. Sydney Jourard,
professor of psychology, and Dr. Ted Landsman,
professor of guidance and counseling.
The size of the lecture series* audiences forced
the center to move from its Micanopy location this
year.

WHAT S HAPPENING
By BRENDA 6EVERTZ
HELP! IM RUNNING OUT OF IDEAS: Honest, the Befrienders
keep meeting and having these groovy bring-your-own dinner
meetings, and Im having trouble thinking up nifty little catch phrases
for them (actually, I always have trouble). This week they meet at 6,
at 1804 N.W. 39th Ave.; if you need a ride, meet in front of the
Infirmary at 5:30.
ON THE INSIDE, LOOKING OUT: Roy Mitchell, director of
disadvantaged students, will be the featured speaker for the Young
Republican meeting tonight at 8. Mitchell will focus on the
perspective of the disadvantaged student in university and political
living.
ROUNDTABLE ROUND-UP: Mensa meets tonight at 8 in the
Reitz Union.
* m w ft

9K a
Sail to Freeport...
Nov. 27 to Nov. 30 #
All expenses included for
877.50.
Call 392-1655 for
information & reservations
by Nov. 7 or come by
room 310, the Program #
Office JWRU b
I
V



..
.
: . _ _g ,_va.

IN EDUCATION COLLEGE'S PROJECT AID
-

They came back to their
instructors and requested the
program be made more
meaningful. The school came up
with the idea of Project Aid.
Project Aid was originally the
idea of Dr. Ira Gordon of the
College of Education. He was
given a research grant to work
on improving the teaching
techniques used for
underprivileged students.
His idea was a tutoring
program in which a single
teacher worked with a single
student, ironing out whatever
individual problems the student
might have.
This work took place in 1964,
ending about the same time the
EDF 345 classes were looking
around for a more meaningful
program.
That is how Project Aid got

All lecture programs will be preceded by guitar
concerts and poetry readings this season," Jourard
said.
A new fee policy has been set to encourage
general community involvement" in the programs.
'Those attending workshops and the lecture series
will make the determination themselves as to their
ability to pay," Jourard said. A fee will be
announced but collected only from those who judge
themselves able to pay.
he fall lecture series will include a program by Dr.
Richard McGee, director of the new Community
Crisis and Suicide Pervention Center, entitled On
Responding to Self-Destruction. Thaxton
Springfield, associate professor of religion, will give
a lecture on What Has Happened to Mans God and
to Gods Man." A visiting professor of architecture
from the University of Florence, Italy, Dr.
Leonardo Ricci, will present A City Fit for Man.
A special event Will be presented by the Center of
Man each month at a different location.

its start. Students from the
College of Education were
matched with underprivileged
school children around the
country.
The student's job was to
determine what problem his
child had and to help the child
overcome it. It was found that
most of the children had
difficulty with reading.
The program started in 1964
with just a hand full of schools.
In the beginning the Alachua
County school board was
dubious about permitting
university students to work with
young children, especially
children with school problems.
But this has changed.
Dr. Gordon Greenwood, the
faculty adviser to Project Aid,
said that the program is now
well received. It is presently

KAIN IS
Com ing!
Nov. 16th

In Honor of Their 1969
Fall Pledge Class
The Sisters of
Delta Plii Epsilon Sorority
would Ike to invite you to their
Mf.,'
Open House
featuring jl;
The Celebration
Friday, November 7,
from 9 until 12 at the a*e house

operating in 25 area schools, the
Gainesville Boys Club, the First
Christian Church nursery, and a
Manpower training center.
The College of Education now
contacts the organizations and
arranges to pair off children with
tutors. The tutors work with the
children's classroom teacher in
their individual programs. There
are now 350 education students
workmg with the project.
IMr. Rays
JIsTYLE & BARBER SHOf
Haircuts from $2.00 UP.
Wa Specialize in Long hair.
Appointments Available.
1. Four Barbers to serve you.
1 113$ W. UNIV. AVE. 372-367$

Gator PAWN SHOP
guns
(LOANS) cameras
A y RADIOS & TVS
BUY-SELL-TRADE
"W specialize in Gator-Aid
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575
ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks.
Meals & Q
TV & BILLIARDS^]
1718 W University Ave.
On The Gold Coast I
i

Wednesday, November 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

George Etheridge, 7ED, was
the coordinator of the program
last year. He said that the
program was very well-received
by the EDF 345 classes.
Students are given the choice of
either spending five sessions in
the traditional observing
program, or 10 sessions in the
tutoring project. More than
two-thirds of the students are
now choosing Project Aid.
UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
1802 W. Univtrshy
Adjacent King's Food Host
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB
X-TRA quick watch repair
Diamond Sotting
Ring sizing
Jswelry repairs
Charms aoldorad
Trophys-piaquea
nerir" RcruTni n

Page 5



*, Tttt FtorkftAmfritafr Vttlhwdy t 4<^mbT&,l96fl

Page 6

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

sassHHaasaasHssHu m o r
Gators 7-11 Curse
.By Carol Sanger And John Sugg=sss

Appearing before Century Tower at 7 pm.
Sunday, John Reaves, Gator quarterback, confirmed
rumors that the Gator football team met its demise
in a plane crash over Tupelo, Mississippi, late Friday
night.
Speaking to a crowd of more than 7,000 persons,
all of whom canted blade carnations in their left
hands, Reaves admitted the fact that he is dead.
Os course I am dead. Wouldnt I be the first to
tell you if I werent dead? the blue-eyed super-star
said.
This fact was further confirmed by an FBI voice
analyst who said the widely circulated testimonial
about the Nov. 4 higher education amendment
supposedly recorded by Reaves was not the voice of
the player.
And if you play back the tape at 16 rpm you
will be able to make out the chant Gators are
dead... Gators are dead' in the background, the
highly informed source said.
However, Coach Ray Graves denied these rumors.
The team is not dead. I just spoke to them last
night and they were rather tired, but certainly not
dead, he said.
But Reaves, Sunday night, charged Graves with
maligning his spirit and the spirits of all his
teammates.
Just look at his name, the young quarterback
said. ''That should tell you
something... G-R-A-V-E-S.
As he spoke he stood with his bade to the crowd
while the other members of the team faced the
gathering, which was apparently spontaneously and
subconsciously standing in the form of a walrus.
UF historians and literary scholars note that the
walrus is the symbol of death in Wales.
Reaves explained that a group of impostors,
winners of the never-publicized Gator Look-Alik'i
Contest held here last spring, had played the SEC
game against the Auburn Tigers Saturday.
The Alligator has confirmed Reaves statement
through an investigation which reveals significant
discrepancies between the appearances of the Gators
and the impostors.
t Reaves, who had become famous among UF
co-eds for his large baby-blue eyes now apparently
has greenish-grey eyes.
The team, noted for usually stepping onto the
field with their right feet first, was seen by several

jcrow Speaking OUt
Sugg Found Guilty |
| I
By David Miller *-*

I was amused to read John Suggs recent attempt
at being a literary critic. A literary critic, I would
think, strives to be somewhat objective. So what
book did Mr. Sugg review? Why, Against The
Crime of Silence, of course. Well, I guess its about
time for a bourgeois liberal such as myself to
comment on Mr. Suggs most recent column.
The 1967 International War Crimes Tribunal was
a Kangaroo Kourt, to put it rather charitably. The
United States was automatically guilty, and the
verdict was a mere formality.
Mr. Sugg listed some Tribunal members, none of
whom seemed t 6 be particularly objective. Isaac
Deutscher is an outstanding Trotskyite, author of A
Trotsky Anthology. Carl Oglesby was one of the
Port Huron founders of SDS. Jean-Paul Sartre
wouldnt recognize the Third World if it bit him,
yet he continues to produce anti-U.S. rhetoric that
would put a Sophist to shame. And Stokely
Carmichael is, alas, Stokely Carmichael. The jury
reminds me of the characters of The Devil And
Daniel Webster.
Dave Dellingers Liberation magazine published a
special War Crimes Tribunal issue, which I read
last summer. Though Dfllenger defends the
onenudedness of the Tribunal, the last several pages
of the issue are devoted to a dissent by Staughton
Lynd. Lynd felt (as I do) that atrocities ate
atrocities, whether they are committed by the UJS.,
by the Viet Cong, or by anyone else.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-1 n-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

eye-witnesses Saturday stepping off with their left
feet first.
At least two sources report that Reaves double
wore blade shoelaces while the rest of the team
wore white.
§ Carlos Alvarez, Gator flanker, was seen wearing
his helmet backwards in the pre-game huddle.
t Alvarez was also heard speaking with a distinct
Brooklyn accent.
Reports from an internationally recognized
member of the UF Religion Department specializing
in Mid-East religions and an expert on the stience of
numerology further confirmed the mystery of the
Gators.
He points out that the numbers seven and 11
have been turned into a curse for file team and
contribute to their deaths in the hushed Tupelo
plane crash.
We have deduced that the crash took place in
Tupelo, Miss, because Mississippi has 11 letters and
the score of the game (38-12) is the exact latitude
and longitude minus seven and plus 11 of Tupelo,
he said.
His reports also show the following:
There are seven letters in Florida, Alabama,
Georgia and Alachua.
The team flew to Auburn from Jacksonville
airport (seven letters) to Atlanta (seven letters),
Georgia (seven letters) on a 707 plane.
The game was played on the seventh day of the
week, the first day of the 11th month.
It was the seventh game for both the Gators
and Auburn.
§ Alvarez has seven letters in his name.
The team lives in Yon Hall (seven letters) in
the Stadium (seven letters).
There are 11 men on the Gator offense (seven
letters) and the defense (seven letters).
Steve Spurrier, former Gator quarterback
(11 letters), wore the now dead number 11.
Reaves now wears number seven.
t The Gators plane was due to land in Alabama
at 11 pm.
t Pat Sullivan, Auburn quarterback, wears
number seven and has 11 letters in his name.
But the Gators cant be dead, UF President (11
Tetters) Stephen C. OConnell said today. They
won the toss ... even if 'the toss does have seven
letters!

It is absurd to put the UJS. on trial and no one
else; it is absurd to claim that only the U.S. is to
blame for death and destruction. A human being
must be responsible for his acts of violence, whether
he is part of the Free World or the Third
World. Dave Dellinger had the courage to print
Staughton Lynds dissent; it appears that John Sugg
lacks that quality.
It is easy to collect a group of agreeing for the
purpose of condemning a scapegoat; it is easy to
brand, to label, to seek good guys and bad
guys. It is far more difficult to rationally seek an
end to the atrocities committed by the varied
representatives of mankind, without using
partisanship as a blinding force.
The 1967 Tribunal wished to forsake legality for
the purpose of condemning an easy target, thus
convincing themselves that they were correct all
along. And justice is summarily neglected.
I suggest to Mr. Sugg that, if he wishes to
propagandize on behalf of North Korea, El Fatah,
and the French Communist Party, he should not
pose as a literary critic, for such a claim of
objectivity is quite hypocritical. Also, I suggest that
John and other self-appointed radicals refrain from
the childish practice of ending each message with a
capitalized, frenzied cry, such as: END THIS! or
SMASH THAT! But, of course, by advice will be
ignored, because all good radicals know that you
cant trust a liberal.

EDITORIAL
Why Secrecy?
Last August 8, the Alligator printed the following
editorial on the Council of Academic Deans refusal to allow
an Alligator observer to attend its meetings.
Today, nearly three months later, an entirely new set of
students comprises the editorial board of the Alligator. But
we feel the Deans continued denial is just as paradoxical,
illogical and inexcusable as it was this summer:
The inner sanctum of UFs academic deans remains
unmolested.
And the public students, faculty and staff of this
university have once again been denied free access to
information which vitally affects them.
The Council of Academic Deans, made up of the chiefs of
each college, has reportedly denied an Alligator request for
a non-reporting observer to be present at its meetings.
The request specifically stated that the observer would
not report on the meeting itself or on the discussions
therein. The observer would later be able to check the
accuracy of related news stories, he would understand the
background development of a decision and he would
represent, to some extent, student opinion.
We viewed the request as a fledgling step towards opening
the centers of power and decision-making to the sunlight of
public scrutiny.
Our request was, we thought, a small one, requiring little
concession from mfen of goodwill.
Apparently, we were wrong.
The request was denied.
Or so Vice President for Academic Affairs Fred Conner
told us, although in the same breath he admitted the council
had not met since the proposal was presented.
Conner said the council believed the presence of an
observer would inhibit candid discussion of important
issues.
We find the argument non-persuasive, although we
recognize that at rare times, such as during discussion of the
pending hiring of a new president or dean, the council
should meet privately.
But for general purposes, the business of the deans is also
the business of the people they lead. Thus, those people
have a right to information about the deans decisions.
Opening the meetings to a single observer would, we felt,
lay the foundation for opening them to the entire university
community.
Our appeal was not a legal one because it is questionable
whether Floridas Govemment-in-the-Sunshine law applies
to university committees. The premise of our request was
moral: people including students have a right to
participate in the decisions which affect their lives.
In principle, Chancellor Robert Mautz agrees and he
created the council of deans.
President Stephen C. OConnell would also apparently
agree.
After all, it was he who ordered all university committees
with student membership to open their meetings to the
public. The principle then was participation.
The principle now and always is the same.
It is ironic that in a day when there are more forces
dividing us than uniting us, the deans would choose a course
of action which joins hands with the forces of divisiveness.
It is ironic that President OConnell has urged
re-institution of the defunct rat caps to give freshmen
identity with the university, while at the same time the
council of deans has ordered its door to remain closed to
students and faculty who wish to identify with their
university, to understand how and why its decisions are
made.
And we urge the Deans to join the cause of fostering a
greater spirit of unity at the University of Florida.
Alligator Staff
Janie Gould Mary Toomay
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Anne Freedman Assignment Editor Helen Hundey
Feature Editor Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
or n?t P h? iOnS exp ; e * d in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.



vjwkwko diock voices
1 4 >
| We Demand Full Privileges Os Citizenship j|
By Mitchell Dasher

As the Chairman of the Black
Student Union at UF, I am immensely
concerned with the finding that the
university will be audited by the
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare to determine whether Gator
Country has been complying with
Federal laws relating to racial
discrimination.
This letter is intended to serve two
purposes. First, to offer relevant
information portraying UF in its proper
role as a dehumanizing, racist
educational institution. Secondly, we
would like to present our facts to the
H.E.W. auditors, which reflect wretched
practices in hiring and promotional
opportunities on the
employer-employee level and limited
academic access to the undergraduate
college or graduate schools on the
student level.
Ostensibly, this is a state university.
Since its founding in the latter half of
the 19th Century, it has been governed
as if the only taxpayers contributing to
its coffers were white; even now we find
less than one percent of the student
enrollment is black (less than 160 out of
20,000). Furthermore, of the hundreds
of Professors on the faculty, none are
black.
Yet when one checks the roles of the
financially unrewarding positions
(maids, janitors, dishwashers, yardmen,
etc.), one finds a wealth of black talent
cemented into positions free of
substantial raises and job mobility.
We know that our parents, and many
of us, pay taxes as citizens of the United
States of America and of the State of
Florida. The United States Government
presently has over a half million troops
in South Vietnam to protect the

Scholarship House Interview Was Twisted

MR. EDITOR:
Through recent articles
appearing in the Alligator
concerning the FEA Scholarship
House, the purpose of the house
has been badly misinterpreted.
The entire house was not
consulted during the interviews
held when only four or five men
out of sixteen were interviewed.
Statements of those
interviewed were not printed in
their entirety and the quotes
printed in the Alligator Were
truly not quotes at all but
phrases taken out of context and
twisted for the purpose of
getting a critical and entirely
misleading article about the
house. Bold headlines were
printed and backed up by only
one or two misquoted
statements and then the rest of
the article was unable to verify
the implications given in the
headline.
No ones individuality is lost
when he becomes a member of
the Scholarship House. All rules
in the house are voted in by a
majority of the house members.
Individuality is enhanced by the
right to vote and the
opportunity to demonstrate
leadership.
The fact that we are residents
of dils house allows us more
individuality than if we were
forced to live in a dormitory,
follow dormitory regulations
and not be allowed to cook in
our living quarters, or follow
other rules of the typical UC
student. Our open house rules
aren't nearly as strict as those of

... if self-determination,
democracy, equality,
freedom, justice and liberty
are monumentally
inalienable political j
concepts, then the half J
. million soldiers in Vietnam 1
should be stationed in
Americas South to
guarantee the quintessence
of human rights to black
people.
uimiuiitiimiHiiwiuiuiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiHiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
interests of people who are neither
American citizens nor Federal or state
taxpayers. Over 100,000 of the
American troops defending the corrupt
and undemocratic regime in South
Vietnam are black.
It is our contention that if self
determination, democracy, equality,
freedom, justice and liberty are
monumentally inalienable political
concepts, then the half million soldiers
in Vietnam should be stationed in
Americas South to enforce recent
Untied States Supreme Court decisions
and federal laws, which guarantee the
quintessence of human rights to black
people.
What we are stressing is fundamental
to the existence of this republic. If we
owe the federal government taxes and
the human ultimate our lives for its
existence, then it owes us the full
privileges of American citizenship and
the indefatigable execution of all its
laws. This we demand and nothing less.
If the Nixon administration is serious
about extricating this country from its
racist quagmire, this unmistakably, is a
chance. If the Nixon administration
(with Attorney General John Mitchell)

SCHOLARSHIP HOUSE
... badly misinterpreted
the dorms. Since we have our
own kitchens, we can cook and
eat whenever and whatever we
want.
In the first article to appear in
the Alligator the members of the
house supposedly sold their
individuality. In the second
article, it was stated that
members range from Jews to
Buddhists and that everyone has
different tastes. What kind of
journalism is this?
The house has been in
existence for two years and the
members of the house have seen
no signs of the unrest and
dissension the Alligator attests
to have uncovered during its
brief interview. Where else could
you find such a diversified group
with so few problems?
The Alligator printed so many
misquotes and discrepancies
from the truth that it
misinterpreted the feelings of

the men in the house. Why does
the Alligator continue its
negative attitude in reporting the
news? Why does it substitute
cynicism for objectivity at other
peoples* expense?
The purpose of a news article
is to be as objective as possible
in printing only the facts and
direct quotes. The place for
interpretation, criticism, and
opinions is in an editorial, not
factual report articles. Quotes
should not be taken out of
context to agree with the overall

f Learning Tree Was Real

MR. EDITOR:
It would seem that Alligator reviewer Glen Few
did an excellent job of living up to his name in his
review of The Learning Tree. For he clearly
understood few things about it the characters,
point of the movie and its background.
Mr. Few complains about the Degenerate Whites
pitted against the Noble Blacks. Missing from this
description, however, were the good white folks
like the doctor, judge, farmer and wife, etc. and the
non-Noble Blacks like the drunks, whores,
hustlers and bums. Apparently a man cant be noble
if he is black, according to Mr. Few.
The red-faced(neck) sheriff, bigoted teacher and
degenerate son may be stereotype characters to Mr.
Few but one does not have to look very far today to
find them in plenty.
But the biggest fault with the review was Mr.
Fews complaint that the movie was a subversion
of reality in a sterile, artificial attempt to put across
a message. Perhaps if Mr. Few knew anything
about Gordon Parks, the black man who wrote,
produced and directed the movie, he would realize
it is the height of reality.
Gordon Parks made his reputation in the white
world through his photography; he is probably the

FORUM:^.
( Aina mi Vii&uit /)
hope for the
, Credit Peninsular Observer LNS

has a get tough policy on criminals,
then it should crush the federal
criminals of Gainesville, Florida.
Kindly remember the moving
eloquence of Mr. Justice Brandeis
dissent in the Olmstead case:
Decency, security, and liberty
alike demand that government
officials shall be subjected to the
same rules of conduct that are
commands to the citizen. In a
government of laws, existence of
die government will be imperilled

* > VTWrwrUry; M t969,iTMI AMigator,

idea the writer is trying to get
across to the public.
Why is the Alligator
continually one-sided and why,
for a change, cant it pick out
the good points instead of
nit-picking in order to create a
scandal?
The men of the FEA
Scholarship House cannot
possibly endorse those articles as
truth no matter how far we
stretch our imaginations, and we
can only say that the
Scholarship House is one of the

if it fails to observe the law
scrupulously. Our government is
the potent, the omnipresent
teacher. For good or for ill, it
teaches the whole people by its
example. Crime is contagious. If
the government becomes a
lawbreaker, it breeds contempt
for the law; it invites every man to'
become a law unto himself; it
invites anarchy.
Vv ' ;V.
Right on!

best known black photographer. A quick review of
Life magazines for the past 20 years will reveal this.
The Learning Tree is an attempt by Parks to
recreate his childhood; it is the true story of his life
in Kansas as a boy. Yet to Mr. Few, a professional
photographer who spends his life trying to capture
reality on film and telling the true story of his own
life is a subversion of reality.
Maybe the movie was a little one-sided, but why
not? It was the first major movie filmed in this
country with a black producer and director, with
mostly black actors and with mostly black
cameramen, technicians, make-up men, etc. After
viewing reality through white producers eyes for so
long, a view from the other side doesnt hurt.
Despite the fact one leaves the movie knowing
the boy Newt is going to make it successfully
(this happy ending obviously is why Mr. Few found
it at least passably good entertainment of the Walt
Disney school), one should be very sad. For,
although it happened in Kansas 35 years ago, the
bigoted sheriff, Yassuh, Boss black man and that
wonderful term for all black males, regardless of
age boy can easily be found today, right
here.
JON ROOSENRAAD

best organizations on this
campus.
RICHARD L. SAWYER
SUBARNA B. MALAKAR
CARL FRIEDBERG
DOUGLAS COSTA
JIMMY TUCKER
THOMAS DAVID SNYDER
BRUCE NAGLER
RANDALL M. GRINER
JOSEPH A. JONES
JOHN J. OMINSKI
DOYLE D. CREWS
JOHN R. MAY
DAVID H. PENOYER
JIM ANDREWS
LARRY SHOWOGA
OLIVERIO SANTIAGO

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Wadnaaday, Novambar 5,1968

MAAS BROTHERS
Hunter green velvet and the purist white satin are laced up with
gold for the best gypsy look imaginable. HOWARD WOLF, the
creator, added a bright fringed shawl to make the look complete for
the young sophisticates. From Maas Brothers* Pacesetter Department
JwWedbyOrenih^
i
mUmm
: I
cl h
SHF gWRBWrur iMH HR
9 : Hr jg s 2
I WjM m m
I W 1
IplF
M, ~ i mr^m,
I J
;



:
I
: '' : : : -:S
j|
V".;; H; v IIH IH
9\ Y' /:.; YV I I ~Y\ I **y r v r t ,'-, H l : ?v ; ">
I
jfl H||Hhg^^^
*j§ j@*
mi I
1
'v Jh L
jawE j |J
JK =r
9
Jp
I fi 1 FJ^
W/fnID 5-
H 1
1
V 9
.

mm [tlgul^^g^drag

B: : | V'
R B
vf '' 7 .:.. : .-- V ,^'
HW '-, Hr
: V'- :....? -' : ?4. ** gBti|f
Ifr w**wff K nDk wjm
PI" W'*wii SB^^b
IMML imjW lp Wm m mKKm B B^B
1 &fbm*MhJLi H
JZr g*. ...'^BM^BBBHHHMMWEH^EiM
: >S., xJyfr M
-4Mbk
m%*::L- J
STAG AND DRAG HHHj
Ready for a flashy win over Georgia, Stag and Drag presents al| Ct i
three-piece outfit of 100% orlon by FOUR CORNERS. Accenting theE§
navy and kelly green plaid skirt and vest, is a white long sleeve blouse IE ',
highlighted by a long kelly green scarf. Available at both Stag andllll
Drag locations: West University, and the Mall. Modeled by Beth. flf J

TWIG
Country Set brings out the
best in everyone. All can be
mixed and matched to make a
long long weekend with a few
pieces in your suitcase. All girls
who shop Twig are
spoiled ... just ask them.
Modeled by Judy.

£s§?d ' ''- '" '4mA
v ,:W
't:'..3'VS; -JB
i x.' r ri
ts['£y jjJll
l b
; 'iii
Mte i* 1 ; 1 J|^|
fl B B

SUSAN SCOTT
A positively purple pant suit E|
with a look of now! The tunic mm
tress is accented with white trim I
down the front and sleeves. A Hfe
glitter of gold buttons keeps SI
everything together nicely Wrap i||
the outfit up with a white lfj|
fringed scarf. Modeled by Lynn. I



h ; ,as* ss?, s.
H : -' V V vaT-TBWvih:- -.4.
1 SILVERMAN'S
Mr. Vito makes a plunge with
I] this two-piece purple crepe pant
m suit. The tunic vest is laced
H lavishly with glittery chain. Be
I daring with high style from
I Silverman's. Modeled by Ingrid.

I m lii SEARS
I Mr. Sergio deagaud this penis dress for a casual but special
I H occasion. The dress is very attractive on its own. The colois are beet
I f blue. Sizes, 10 to 16. Modeled by Sharon.
I l< jm BHfIE
S I f9fi? h '^l^B' f'*
I I
'll tilPvv 1 '.v
I9K B B
Ik* if ' p
1 fill I
HH
Ifekb
-a I
1 ife

I
I fi \/'\J
mma# '/ /Wmyfis%Bsi v ./ > < ;.- / :/ 'y
I ~. m |ff|| ;-" || p Wsosmk
JS m mjf|§£
jf|§£ mjf|§£ P 'K§r 'si£¥''-i,
w-%.
fl
9 fl B Im!
,i| M*KB '-"'Ml.
I * |
J 9j Hra
R;, ; / 2>
jwg :: :^^;^ B& "-': Swag

FIGURE FAIR
For your lounging party in I
the dorm you can be so warm I
and cozy in our guilted robe or I
long pajama of a washable I
cotton print Trimmed in beige I
lace with matching velvet I
ribbon.., the pajama top can I
also be worn as a mini robe. I
Assorted sizes. Robe price, sl3, I
pajama, $lB. Modeled by Kathy. I
I

ra (f Wr SEARS
UU 1 Ul lllu fc>A.otfae*As

\
£
MRS. 'X-.*- vX V N


"
E
IB B xVx V v \'Vv.' "' | B -x' V' 1 - I .'''xVC "'V 1 v *~* I >,v ,", Y r,r - .
**s..,;-.:> r v* ?? T i .'- -t.f'x ' : rC^ a ,'
Vff&VV'
' -'H
|
mWMfy fi&ri K'v
Hr- t,. u

I

I
M


I

pi#
- * >,
i-5 It #
BHj|Bfe :
. -.tr <.^^j TMm.M* V
T'4'.r> r iJjg >JBg .^ynJpgM^^^^B
|iW
Kapipp^
- I 4 T'z *i. ~i r I H I I I .'!* ; ">y v /':*-^ 1
k 4 *; i-i,*", -C' -''/ f \ r 7 ' v Zi '* _- *": sj* ,S *'r <5 .'X> "', lv 1 m. { V -. k '", 1 >*' . >
% ... y^iwMl
-

yyH.y\ v *-'^


J v; ; i-
DONIGAN'S
Donigan's has dressy clothes as well as sportswear! Tanya sets an
jxotic mood in this glittering, brocade belted dressy dress. For the
nicest looks in style... look to Donigans.
* XHi...- :,*s- !;' ; : .f i;-;'
\ . .' * ' '{
f :
r : ... "X:
f<; ,-... '
'
r r - .
'
W"-\
fcX .. i I.. ' . '- ' ii <: 'i- ;.%';
& '-..., ' '
,X.
*vV ,;*
r --l
. 1; \ x. :
-" u .'* "
£. .;
Ki- 1 ;.- ... X,X X l s
' : XV '
l
fashion layout by... joyce gehrke
photography by... mathews and o'neal
V-v n'X V'^r^ v:
. .
, i-. < -L ,...' a,'-,.,. j, .. VV'Vkfs

* - 1 *-K AAA TkA Clnrlil. A >IS I
WiOiWIBWfI IwwWHw Oj lwW| I VIV r IOTK3B Allipnwi| I

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 5, 1909

Samson Still Needs Volunteers

By ANNE FREEDMAN
FMturas Editor
SAMSON UFs community
service program needs as
many volunteers as we can get,
Marsha Kaufman, chairman, said
Tuesday.
The response from the
community has been so good
there have been so many
requests for new kinds of help
that for the first time we have to
have a second recruitment in one
quarter,*' she said.
Recruitment of volunteers

Jobs In Europe Available

Job opportunities in Europe for the summer are
being made available to American students through
the American-European Student Service.
The program offers jobs to university students in
Germany, Scandinavia, England, Austria,
Switzerland, France, Italy and Spain. They consist
of forestry work, child care, farm work, hotel work,
construction work and work requiring more
specialized training.
The purpose of the program is to give the student
an opportunity to get into real living contact with
the people and customs of Europe. In return for the

UPD Holds Collection
Os Irreparable Bikes
The University Police Department has a collection of one-wheeled
bicycles, motorless motorcycles and scooters and uncollected
insurance company property in the bicycle racks by the station.
Most of these bicycles and scooters were found abandoned and
tom up on campus, Chief Audie Shuler said. We used to give them
to the Gainesville Fire Department to repair and give to needy
children if nobody claimed them, but the junk out there now is
beyond repair.
Some motorcycles and scooters are being kept at the station
because they were in an accident and the insurance claims have not
been settled.
Sometimes the insurance companies won't even come and get
their property after they have already paid the owners claim on the
scooters and cycles, Shuler said. We still have to keep them.
We are hoping that the legislature will pass a bill allowing
abandoned personal property on campus to be auctioned, he said.
The revenue would go to the University. The bill might be up in the
coming session.
Shuler suspects that some of the vehicles are stolen, but he said
there was no way of identifying them because they are not registered.
neWS
frem...jHWFSU
SLEPHIN FSU President J. Stanley Marshalls new special
assistant Stephen Slephin denied that he counselled Marshall last
spring on tactics which ultimately led to the arrest of 58 students.
Slephin also denied any recent affiliation with the reactionary
Young Americans for Freedom which he helped to found both on the
national and state level in 1960.
STRIKE Factory workers at Alberta Crate & Box Co. returned to
work today after a six-week strike for higher wages, safer working
conditions, and fringe benefits. Negotiations stretched the two cents
per hour raise offered by Alberta to 11 cents. The workers also gained
another paid holiday, and a raise in sick leave and jury duty
compensation.
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
for
Florida Playors production of
A COMPANY OF
WAYWARD SAINTS
"a farca-comody
Opons November 10
H.P. Constans Theatre, 8:00 P.M.
U. of F. Students: $.75 General Admission: $1.50
All seats are reserved. Box Office: 392-1653

DUE TO COMMUNITY RESPONSE
I. 1..I 1 am r.-i Ti* ,1.?

will be at 7:30 pjm., Thursday in
McCarty Hafl.
At present more than 200
SAMSON-placed UF students
are involved in community
service in Gainesville and in
nearby towns. Miss Kaufman
said that volunteers come from
all colleges, not primarily
education.
Among the community
agencies seeking SAMSONS aid
for the first time are a detention
home Forest HiD Girls School,
the welfare department and the
Division of Family Services.

work, the student receives room and board plus a
wage. However, wages will be in scale with the
European economy, and working conditions will be
strictly controlled by the labor ministries of the
countries involved.
In many cases, the employers have requested
American students indicating a particular interest in
the program.
For further information and application forms
students may write to American-European Student
Service, Box 34733, FL 9490, Vaduz, Liechtenstein
(Europe).
\

Tutoring is the biggest need.
We can place tutors all over,
she said.
More than half of the first
crop of volunteers about 120
are involved in tutoring. Last
year almost all of the 300 active
year-long volunteers were tutors.
A. Quinn Jones Elementary
School requested 55 tutors at
the beginning of the year and
has just submitted another list to
SAMSON. Other area schools are
also asking for more volunteers,
Miss Kaufman said.
We also need help on the

TWD
MONTHS
FREE.
k ' ' >T "*
5* .. - >. / fV ' I '*

WeTI send you the $1.69 size of Playtex t
first-day tampons for only 504.
You get more than two months 9 supply free.

Theres no other tampon like
Playtex. Outside, soft and silky,
not cardboardy. Inside, so extra
absorbent, it even protects on
your first day. Thats why we
call it the first-day tampon.
In every lab test against the
old cardboardy kind, the

'Baud on the average woman's use of ten tampons per month.
I 1
| Here's 50$ for my more than two months supply of Playtex tampons. |
j Send in a plain brown wrapper, please.
J Regular Super j
I I
Name J
(please print) J
| Address I
I rit y Tin |
! MaN coupon to: International Playtex Corporation, Dept WV 3SO
Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10001. Offer expiree December
I 31, 1969. Please allow four weeks for delivery. I
.1 iipLi' I
f Playtex is the trademark of International Playtex Corp., Dover. Dal. IMS International Playtex Carp.
. ' mi ill

construction crew and adult
education is begging, she said.
The construction committee
volunteers are currently
rebuilding and repairing a center
in Daysville and will be restoring
the buildings Operation
Outreach will be housed in.
Adult education is being
offered in six areas but the
program needs volunteers to
handle more classes.
SG Sponsors
Mail Call
Student Government is
sponsoring the mailing of
Christmas greetings to U.S.
troops in Vietnam.
Vietnam Mail Call is the
code name for the program
being handled through the office
of. the Secretary of Student
Organizations. Jeff Estes is head
of the program.
Individuals interested in
supporting the mailathon can
contact Estes at the Student
Government office on the third
floor of the Reitz Union by Nov.
24.

Playtex tampon was always
more absorbent. Actually 45%
more absorbent on the average
than the leading regular
tampon because of the unique
way its made. Actually adjusts
to you. Flowers out, fluffs out,
protects every inside

I TIME I
The longest word I
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, I
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infbr- I
mation about words than in any I
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing U.S. time
zones, youli find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time yo' owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1/uO pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

inch of you.
Once you try it, we think
youll love it. That's why were
making you this special two
months free offer.
So go ahead. Use the coupon
and get more than two months
supply free.



r m hhk vJTÂ¥> ,>> 1 > *> <).,< < *,*
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

yftv.w.Y.v.w.-.-.-- v
§ FOR SALE |
Regency CB radio 12 channels
included 5 Ft. fiberglass antenna with
bumper mount. 5 mo. old. $130.00
376-9971 after 4 p.m. (A-3t-34-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and lot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. 1969 Honda 350 scrambler $575.
Very clean 4200 miles. Call Frank
373-1523. (A-2t-34-p)
1966 HONDA 65. Excellent
condition, low mileage; make offer.
Call 372-9757 after 5 p.m. (A-st-31-p)
1969 HONDA 50 Only 250 miles
Book rack and helmet included.
SIBO. Call 392-8208 after 7:30 p.m.
(A-st-34-p)
GunsGunsGuns Inventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.'
Reloading supplies. Custom,
.reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
- , -J- i
Honda 305 Dream 1965 runs good.
Must sell $275 or best offer. Call
372- (A-3t-33-p)
Stereo Components Dual Turntable
Speakers and amp new cost 375. Sell
for $275. Call Steve 376-4911.
(A-3t-33-p)
FOR SALE: Salt, S3O a cup. Where?
Biafra. Novelist Herbert Gold records
his impressions of a people half-mad
from starvation and bombings. In this
months HARPER'S MAGAZINE,
Americas First Monthly. On sale
now. (A-lt-35-p)
ITS inexpensive to clean rugs and
upholstery with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-35-lt-c)
SPORTSCAR OWNERS!! Specially
built trailer hitch for Triumph, tow
bar complete for MG or TR, also
front light protector bar for MG. Call
Harvey at 373-2713. (A-3t-35-p)
66 Honda S9O. Full bell helmet
included. $155 or best offer. Call
373- after 6:30 any nite. Ask
for George. (A-2t-35-p)
AUCTION new used antique
merchandise. Saturday, Nov. Bth
7:30 p.m. C & J Auction House
Archer, Florida. (A-3t-35-p)
f FOR RENT j
Beautiful furnished mobile home. 2
bedroom, 2 bath, study, living room,
and kitchen. Central air and heat. 68
long. Call Liz at 373-2210. (B-st-31-p)
Female wanted to sublet LaMancha
apt. either for winter qtr. only, or
for the rest of the year. (Has private
bedrooms) Call 376-6 951.
(B-2t-34-p)
NOWS.
/mm i\
/ HELD OVER \
f 2nd. WEEK! \
f q academy q l
0 AWARDS I j
1 JOSEPH eieviNe...* Ji I
1 AN AVCO EMBASSY FILM I
\ P6T6R KATHARIN6 /
\OTOOL6 HEPBURN/
\ TH UON /
\IN WINTER/
/ LAST 2" DAYS \
/NO ONE UNDO! 17\
I ADMITTED AGE \
I PR Of REQUIRED! I

FORR^r"!
Turned off by dorm life? Try Georgia
Seagle Co-Op 1002 W. Uni. Ave.
Installment plan rm-meals s22o j
quarter. Some financial aid available
378-4341. (B-st-35-p)
Large corner room 4 windows 2
closets lavatory campus 2 blocks
kitchen ample parking garage
available weekly-monthly 378-4645.
(B-lt-35-p)
Sublet Jan-June 1 bdr ac carpeted
apartment 2 balconies I** blks from
campus or 1 coed roomate 373-1921
(B-3t-35-p)
I WANTED
1 or 2 female roommates for Village
Park apartment. $42.50/mo. Call
373-1962. (C-st-31-p)
LITTLE HOUSE needs male
roomate. 4 blocks down NW 16th St.
$37 mo. 1538 NW 4th Ave.
373-1013. (c-3t-34-p)
WANTED Female to live with
mature woman in exchange for room
and board. Occasional light houswork
(washing dishes), limited visitors, but
no strict hours. For remainder of
quarter. Call 372-3851 after 5:30
p.m. (C-3t-34-p)
PAPERBACKS WANTED! Clean out
your bookshelves and bring your old
paperback books to the Browsing
Library, 2nd floor, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. A section of the Browsing
Library has been prepared for
paperbacks and will be operated on
an exchange basis. (C-st-32-c)
Hip roommate wanted to share
apartment. 32.50 per month.
Immediate occupancy. See Marc at
1113 S.W. Ist ave. apt. 2 or call
372- (C-2t-35-p)
Female roommate 2 bdr apt 3 blocks
behind Norman $lO9 per qtr. Call
373- after 3 p.m. (C-st-35-p)
NEEDED: SINCERE student
activists. Discontented youth driven
by ideas, not boredom. Practical
visionaries with plans to rebuild what
they destroy. Will enough step
forward before the alienation
becomes too complete to be
productive? Prof. John W. Aldridge
analyzes the delimma and YOUR
role in it in The Country of the
Young. In this months HARPER'S
MAGAZINE. On sale now.
(C-lt-35-p)
Female roommate wanted winter and
spring terms for attractive SBS apt. 2
blocks from campus. Prefer senior or
grad students non-smokers 372-2666.
(C-st-35-p)
Need coed roommate for apartment
3 blocks from campus. Rent will be
$37.50 a month. Call 373-2766.
( C-2t-35-p)
Immediate occupancy Laonne Vie
Apt RENT & UTIL. FREE til Dec 15
if you live with us (3 jr girls) Winter
& Spring qtrs for $165 per qtr. (incl.
rent & util.) Call 373-1029 NOW.
(C-st-35-p)
I HELP WANTED J
^ l j^v.;.v.v.-.v.v.*.v.v.vX-XW>WBWyW
HELP WANTED: TTS tape punch
operator. Student wife preferred but
will consider student who can work
regular schedule at least 20 hours per
week. Experience desirable but will
consider person with good typing
(60wpm or better). Good pay.
Regular hours, no Saturday. Storter
Printing Co., 1024 S. Main St., Phone
376-2658. (E-2t-18-p)
JOB OPPORTUNITY: Mayor. Over a
dozen vacancies created this year by
voluntary drop outs. Qualifications:
thick skin, endless patience, Degree
in Confrontation. Minor in law and
order also helpful. Interested? Meet
four retiring mayors who arent. In
this month's HARP ER S
MAGAZINE, Americas First
Monthly. On sale now. (E-lt-35-p)
Girts extra income, part time, full
time, receptionists, telephone girls,
typists, etc. Late shift 3pm to 9pm.
Bonus plan set you own pay. Apply
in person 2929 NW 13 St. Suite. 3
10am to 4pm. (E-3t-l-p)
Charles Chips has 2 areas open. 21
years old with sales ability 2:30 to
6:30 p.m. Commission basis
376-6943. Mr. Welch. (E-st-32-p)

r Mwhb value mu mm
'Twmfalin-BECKUM OPTICIANS

Wednesday, November 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I HELP WANTED j
LISTENERS WANTED will pay 2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and normal hearing.
Please call Mary. University
Extension 392-2046 between 8 and
5. (E-10t-35-p)
Men interested in sales for better
than average commissions. Full
training, no experience necessary. No
door to door, or travel. Apply in
person 2929 NW 13th St. Will not
interfere with school. Between 10 am
& 3 p.m. (E-3t-l-p)
I AUTOS I
s 0 iiwiip
VW 1966 new tires, radio, low
mileage, dark green owned by
female student. $925. Call 372-5796.
(G-st-34-p)
67 Cougar, light blue, automatic
transmission, power brakes, power
steering, air cond., call 376-0329.
(G-st-34-p)
Must sell yellow 1966 Mustang 289
four barrel with heavy duty clutch
and suspension. Asking $1250. Call
Ed at 373-1473 anytime after five.
(G-st-32-p)
65 MGB. Own a real sportscar. Very
well cared sos. Mechanically perfect.
Radio, heater, new top, tonneau,
boot, lucas light, etc. Call Harvey at
373-2713 or come by La Bonne Vie
no. 339. (G-Bt-35-p)
1969 Karmann-Ghia, 3 months old.
Excellent Condition, Call 392-1479
or 372-0947. See at 4015 NW 9th
Ct., S2OOO. (G-st-35-p)
1965 Chevy Impala automatic, radio,
heater, vinyl top. Must sell honest!
$650? ph. 372-1792. (G-4t-32-p)
I PERSONAL I
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
Is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be In
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-34-st-p)
Adorable, loveable kitten needs
home. Male, half-Siamese, playful.
Free delivery plus 1 can cat food.
Litter trained. Call after 6.
(J-2t-34-p)
Desire information concerning
existance, location of communal
living groups, how to join, or form,
etc. Call 392-7825. (J-3t-27-p)
DO YOU KNOW HOW SPECIAL.
YOU ARE? Theres no one like you
under the sun, or under the moon or
any of the planets. But each of these
helped to shape your
INDIVIDUALITY and
PERSONALITY. Now, 4 complete
personal HOROSCOPE for only
$3.50. Send personal data to
COMPUTERCAST, Box 56, Norman,
Oklahoma, 73069. (J-2t-35-p)
Miss Kathy Van Order: O. K. You
win. Thin will be in but only Nov.
28. (P.M.) B. (J-lt-35-p)
ANNOUNCEMENT: The 1969
Chutzpah Cup goes to ... Ted
Sorensen! (1) For writing himself
into the Kennedy legend on behalf of
his N.Y. Senate campaign. (2) For
ghosting, then criticizing EMK*
Chappaquiddlck speech. David
Hatberstam elucidates at presentation
ceremonies .... .in this months
HARPERS MAGAZINE, Americas
First Monthly. On Sale Now.
(J-lt-35-p)
PERSONAL: You are cordially
invited to celebrate 40th Anniversary
of Great Cash. But economist J.K.
Galbraith forsees no party ... only
disturbing similarities in todays
market that invite unhappy returns
of the day. R.S.V.P. this month*
HARPERS MAGAZINE, Americas
First Monthly. On Sale now.
(J-lt-35-p)
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,
BERKELEY CAMPUS: unique
lecture notes. Hundreds of courses,
taken directly in class by
professionals, from world-famous
teachers. sl-$4. Send for free
catalog. FYBATE LECTURE
NOTES, Dept. 6, 2440 Bancroft
Way, "Berkeley, Calif. 94704.
(J-lt-35-p)

Page 11

| LOST A FOUND I
Lost 8 month old female Irish Setter
Monday in SW section. Please call
378-6480. (L-3t-33-p)
FOUND: .... eight years later, your
child hood" idol. Pop-rock critics
view Elvis in Vegas and ring up loads
of lemons. In this month*
HARPERS MAGAZINE, America*
First Monthly. On sale now.
(L-lt-35-p)
LOST: 55 American paratroopers.
CIRCUMSTANCES: Each one traded
for 12T& NVA*. PLACE: Hamburger
Hill, now abandoned. Surviving
buddies seek explanation of Gallant
victory" in their Letters From
Hamburger Hill ... in this month*
HARPERS MAGAZINE, America*
First Monthly. On sale now.
(L-lt-35-p)
| SERVICES 1
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight Instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing In
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
Student Discount has free delivery
and 10 to 40% discount on all soap
rasors, blades, cigarettes, deodorant,
hair products, kleenex, etc. Call
373-2757 between 1 and 5
(M-st-32-p)

jf CENTER 1
CHARLTON HESTON JESSICA WALTER
# "NUMBER ONE" \
t CENTER 2 |
I "CAN HERIONYMUS MERKIN EVER I
\ FORGET MERCY HUMPPE AND FIND j
\ TRUE HAPPINESS? §
FLORIDA J
OIRL^ p^
< Wmk
v'
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti _99e
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
GAINESVILLE MALL ;j§
SHOPPING CENTER If

| SERVICES Jj[
PROFESSIONAL. TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists who
can typa your manuscripts
professionally and In good form. We
also have a XEROX machine. Call
Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160.
(M-7t-25-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station. 2,78-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
Coe-eds Eliminate facial hair for ever
Edmond Dwyer Electrologist (over
20 yrs. experience) 372-8039 By
Appointment Only. (M-ts-33-p)
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS. 1126V*
N.W. Bth Street, 376-8506.
(M-st-31-p)
Joy's Paint & Body Shop. 2017 N.E.
§7th Ave. Gainesville, Fla. Student
pecial Any car or color $49.95.
Come see us. You will find us a
"Joy to do business with.
(M-st-34-p)
| fi?Hsm|
I l,awootaiv I
The Total Female Animat! |
liLipr |||



I m BLmLAa AIILmAm ** - -- C 4AM
if I flB VAJvvCHI

Page 12

Buy Your 1970
'
-.v .v. v:v. fr: K iumHHIH
i j : B _nni
- 5 -.
I \mwim& UfT OC : *;;
%
/; B tBBWBB B
Katie has ordered her Seminole
You too can order one from any
. - y v-- 4..
member of aes
; V*
At these three convenient locations:
Little Hall
Research Library
Service booth across from
the Hub
|[
~ The sisters and pledges of ae* will take your order
at any time between 9 AM and 4 PM weekdays
' <£ j
through November 21.
.^j. . --. a-.., ..^yx.-.v ;- ,lfa. -*,- :--*-- **->-' :<- ;^: 'v- '^r^-r^viftr^rly ; ;-; -- ; --t-jS- ; -*-** T. W



The
Florida
Alligator

Heart
C w'V'V ,, '' v? w \ K i'' /n''
| -
' 9 VB
CHARLTON HESTON IS "THE BIG CAT"
... in the story of an aging football player
f Number One

By GLENN FEW
Alligator Reviewer
With thuds, bands, and an
occasional very tasteful groan,
Number One, now playing at
Center I Theatre, tells the story
of an aging superstar
quarterback.
His inner voice, with
enthusiastic support from the oT
rheumatiz, tells him to hang it
up. Therein lies the conflict.
Charlton Heston plays Catlan,
and does a good job, a real good
job. He lurches, glares, and flares
his nostrils at every opportunity.
He is generally convincing as a
middle-aged man with the
emotional maturity of a choleric
child.
Number One is a
chronological mishmash. Catlan
has been with the New Orleans
Saints for over fifteen years.
This means, since the Saints
werent formed until 1967, that
the movie is set in the
mid-1980s.
Great but Catlan drives a
shiny new 69 model car. Also,
because scenes from actual
games are used, such names as
Leroy Kelly, Les Shy, and
Monty Stickles are heard over
the P.A. system. This may be a

wmmm
GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
-Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
guns and ammo. Bring this
ad and your student I.D.
card
offerexpires NOV. 8
1969
Harry Beckwith Gun Dealer
Micanopy / Fia. Ph 466-3340


Lmm IJL BJ 1 lil&li.I8 H i
mmm i' IT. jHjJ If Wt
- w& sap.-. j wm ..- mm. :|gfis wm&r jmbee Hr- v am*Br -* RBl£ '
* M M *****6 *< ** > **** > ***** l l l *** l *H*iiittiiiii^ii^

trivial consideration however.
The movie supposedly
transcends time and place to
become more than the tale of
Ron Catlan, or even of just any
ordinary pro quarterback.
Life for Catlan is full of
problems and his home situation
doesn't help any.
Catlans wife has her own
sexual hang-ups. Portrayed by
Jessica Walter, she is
unresponding until her husband
accosts her in the office of her
dress shop.
Not finding the mindless
adulation he needs at home,
The Cat finds an outside love
interest. He meets a
naughty-nice tennis player, who
assures him, 1 think you do
what you do better than anyone
else in the world. Catlan carries
on from there.
After he makes it with her in
a scene as irrelevant and
contrived as such scenes usually
are, he is not so sure. End of
story, more or less.
There are some good football
shots in this one, somewhat
complicated by the true-to-life
overacting of Coach Tom Fears
and the New Orleans Saints. Too
bad theres a plot to go along
with it.

JUST INFORMAL
Church Isnt Underground

By TERRY WAGNER
Alligator Correspondent
The Underground Church is
not from the underground the
name leads you to expect.
It is part of Campus Advance,
a religious organization that
developed out of the Fourteenth
Street Church of Christ two
years ago.
The Underground Church
was the thems of Wednesday
afternoons Dialogue with a
Theologue program, sponsored
by Reitz Union.
Chuck Lucas, director of
Campus Advance, admitted the
title Underground is
obviously to attract attention.
It does the trick.
Approximately 30 people, not
all students, showed up at
Lounge 122 of the Union to
hear Lucas speak about The
Church.
The number one problem on
this campus is loneliness, said
Lucas, who graduated from
Harding College in Searcy,
Arkansas. He earned his MA at
the University of Mississippi at
Jackson.
Lucas and his assistant, Miss
Martha Bell, also a member of
the Church of Christ, give 13
Soul Talks at dormitories,
sororities and fraternity houses
and private homes each week.
These are not services, but

3&attjSfeeUerl
Tonight try our J|
Candlelight 1
Italian Dinner I
I Buffet I
I All the breed and spaghetti you can fl
I eat served with a delicious tossed salad §
SUS I
I Beverage and dessert separate
I at a la Carte prices H
I After dinner, the Rat features
I (ireek Night 1

Wednesday, November 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

dialogues, discussions, and this
kind of thing, explained Lucas.
Campus Advance is concerned
with helping students find the
real spiritual values in life, said
Lucas. The main thing that
turns kids off is that they can't
buy the bit that religion is
. something you do on Sunday.
The actual services of the
Church are unstructured, and
informal. Members of the
congregation are free to come
any way they want.
There are the hip as well as

Want your money to AAA,
be worth something? Wv
Just 20 minutes away North on 441
Lower prices Trained technicians
Personal service eFriendly atmosphere
JIM DOUGLAS CHEVROLET
Santa Fa Boulevard High Springs, Florida
_ Call 454-1488 Toll Froo
Restaurant
ASK ANY OLD TIMER ABOUT US
AND OUR FAMOUS
LONDON BROIL STEAK
CHOmO SALAD HUNCH HUB ROUS A BUTTER
$ 1.15
AND THE BEST SOUR M TOWN
BLACK ANGUS STEAK
AN The Trimmings $ 1.45
BREAKFAST SOLVED ALL DAY
WE believe WERE THE BEST RESTAURANT IN TOWNT
AaH/UJA OKH WOM 6:30 AM TIL 300 AM
' 1225 W UNIV. AVE 372-6666

TEDREMLEY
Entertainment Editor

the well-off in the
congregation. Its beautiful
such a divergence and unity at
one time, explained Lucas.
Lucas explained that you
cant define or label die Church
because its too varied.
Groups trying to be the
Church are loyal to Christ
instead of the institution. It's an
effort to be the Church, an
effort to redefine what the
Church is. When Christianity
became institutionalized it lost
its power and beauty.

Page 13



The Florida Alligator

NO RULING TO PROHIBIT
Athletes Absent From Protests

: By RIP GRAY
Alligator Correspondent
If there has been a
conspicuous absence of athletes
at student protests, such as the
Vietnam Moratorium on Oct.
IS, the athletic department has
no policy concerning
participation in such protests.
Our boys are just like any
other students, said Don
Brown, assistant football coach.
Im sure they would participate
in what they feel are worthwhile
causes, and even some that
arent.
The athletes themselves have
varied reasons for their lack of
participation. Some feel they
have an image to uphold, some
dont agree with the protesting,
but most say they just dont
have the time.
Andy Owens, Gator
basketball player, said, With
trips every weekend, you miss
Friday classes and Monday
classes, and you just cant afford
to miss any more to go out and
protest.
COMEBACK
MR. EDITOR:
To paraphrase a popular
saying from a quaint
Wisconsin town, THE
GREATNESS OF THE
GATORS IS NOT THAT
THEY NEVER FALL BUT
THAT THEY ALWAYS RISE
AGAIN AFTER THEY
FALL ... THE GATORS
WILL BE BACK. ...
M:A., 3JM

Gators Drop In Polls
The Gators after dropping a 3812 decision to Auburn Saturday
fell from seventh to 13th in the AP College Football Poll and was
unlisted in the DPI poll.
In the UPI poll:
The Buckeyes, defending national champions, maintained their no.
1 ranking after a weekend in which two previously unbeaten teams
Louisiana State and Florida were stunned by losses.
Ohio State received 31 lint place votes and four second place
nominations for 346 points from the 35-member United Press
International Ratings Board, easily outdistancing second place Texas
(307). Tennessee was third, with Penn State moving up to fourth and
Southern California jumping into fifth place.
Arkansas slipped to sixth, followed by UCLA, Missouri, Purdue and
Notre Dame.
Louisiana State fell to 11th after its upset loss and Stanford took
12th. Michigan was 13th, followed by Houston, Georgia and
Mississippi and Wyoming, tied for 16th. Auburn and Utah finished
deadlocked for 18th.
THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
*ry';;r
NW 14th ST ft UNIV. AVE.
f '

Wm
m£%i
I
w -j 'lwsEf Wa&wM
CARLOS ALVAREZ
... says wont protest
Mike Dunn, varsity baseball
player would have gone to
listen, but Im not an active
protestor. But I just dont have
time between practice and
classes.
Although the coaches have
made no policy regarding
athletic participation, some of
the athletes fear repercussions.
If any of the coaches saw a
picture of an athlete at a protest,
theyd get pretty mad, said
Greg HSley, a tennis player.
Somebody might hand you a
beer can and snap a picture, and
there youd be. We have to
protect the athletes image.
Andy North, UF golfer, said,
All the coaching staff have
rules they want the team to
follow, and I think they would
really frown on protesting.
Many other athletes felt a
responsibility to the school and
team.
Athletes are a certain type of

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Page 14

person, which doesnt go along
with protest, said Tom KenneD,
Gator football player. Maybe
hes just afraid of public
opinion.
Carlos Alvarez, the Gators
starting flanker, said, I agree
with what they are saying, but I
owe it to the Athletic
department to stay out of it. I
cant do anything of that sort.
We arent going to protest
the way things are run, cause I
really dont think we could do
better ourselves, said David
Peek, an offensive tackle.
Every week we confront a new
problem on the field and We
have learned to handle life the
same way. We think the problem
through, rather than
demonstrate.
Bill Strate, UF swimmer,
thought, Athletes usually have
the attitude Dont bug me, I
have my own troubles. We

ELROD'S -ST
i (\O/ Discount
\J/o To Students
All Makes And Models Corvair Specialist
Get a Fair Shake See ELROD
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 SO. MAIN 376-7771

. _
smml/
TM.
'': -'' "' 7 : ' . " '-;. -y

Bring a $1.50 sitting fee.
Dress for men is dark coat, dark tie, light shirt
Dress for women is a dark sweater.
O
WEDNESDAY NOV. 5
8:30-11 SENIORS
12 4 JUNIORS (E THRU F)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Phi Tau, Pi
Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda
Phi, Theta Chi)
THURSDAY NOV. 6
12 4 JUNIORS (G THRU H)
4 -5,6 -9 GREEKS (Chi Phi, Delta
Chi, AOPi, ChiO, Sigma Nu)
FRIDAY NOV. 7
12-4 JUNIORS (I THRU L)
4-5 GREEKS -All
6-9 SENIORS

CALL 392-1687
Between Noon-sp.m.
FOR APPOINTMENT

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 5,1969

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

could care less about those
hoopies out there. Protestings
fine, but not unless you have a
solution. This system is working,
it may have troubles, but its
better than no system at all.
Paul Maliska, Gator split-end
said, Florida athletes are
conservative, we get more
satisfaction out of achieving
what we have to do rather than
protesting. I feel a
responsibility to give this
University the kind of image
that I think it ought to have. My
stand will live with me longer,
and I dont think I will have any
guilt feelings about it later in
!ife. ;

NOW
MAKES
POSTERS
YOUR PHOTO
BLOWN UP TO
HUGE
POSTER
FOR
$4.50
1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657

MONDAY NOV. 10
12 4 JUNIORS (M THRU N)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS
(Delta Sigma Phi, DTD, Tri Delt,
Delta Gamma, Sig Ep)
TUESDAY NOV. 11
12-4 JUNIORS (O THRU P)
4-5,6-9 GREEKS (Delta Upsilon,
KA, DPhiE, Kappa Alpha Theta, TEP)
WEDNESDAY NOV. 12
12-4 JUNIORS (Q THRU T)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Kappa Siffna,
Lambda Chi Alpha, iPhi Mu, Phi Delta
Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi)
THURSDAY NOV. 13
12- 4 JUNIORS (U THRU Z)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Kappa, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi
Kappa Phi, TKE)
FRIDAY NOV. 14
12-5,6-9 SENIORS



\ *s(fe
iai '. -£^^^^^j*lggV?yaS&R^Lr>v>~^. y* :
iiw^^WMMjgWMSiitei6asaS?^ ?g;.i^aa^^^^^M^#^.
. A f,:,.4 M?vVrLy> /Vr- - I fyffiffa4w*v'A A t w >'
SS UIH
A
FOR BOWL GAME TILTS
Under-Table Deals Begin

ATLANTA (UPI) Few are
naive enough to believe that the
bowl people are going to wait
until that Nov. 17 deadline
before selecting the contestants
for this years post-season games.
The under-the-table deals are
under way right now and,
although theyll profess
innocence to the whole affair,
there are some teams here in the
South which have already
received firm offers.
Theres nothing that frightens
the bowl promoters more titan
the thought that they might be a
day late in picking off one of the
choice candidates. So the
unofficial negotiations start a
little bit earlier each year.
One veteran coach, who asked
that he not be identified, said
that while usually nothing is
signed prior to whatever date the
NCAA insists upon, some of
the obviously better teams have
gentlemans agreements by
midseason.
There is one big hitch this
year. Second-ranked Texas and
sixth-ranked Arkansas dont get
around to settling the Southwest
Conference championship until
their nationally televised finale
on Dec. 6.
But, that shouldnt stall the
bowl scouts too much. While the
winner of that game figures to
host the Cotton Bowl, an earlier
understanding will be reached
for the loser to [day in another
major post-season game.
The bowl-conscious Deep
South figures to have a
bigger-than-ever hand in this
years lineup.
The Southeastern Conference,

* RANCHO | w, W Mexican £ FIESTA PLATE K
$ foods 5 V
jUssJ! 7O < I
Our delightful Mexican dinner includes NOW b%
* Taco Filled with beef, cheese, lettuce JA
* Tamale Garnished with our Jose' Chili hy
v Frijoles-Whipped Mexican beans & Cheese I,
jjG Mexican Salad Our own special thing jo
A Ranchitos Broken com Tortillas K>

which placed six of its 10
members into bowls a year ago,
has seven candidates this time
around and independent Florida
State is a good bet to join them.
With top-ranked Ohio State
out of the picture, under the Big
Ten rule which prohibits
back-to-back Rose Bowl
;<*x*x-:ow.x*v.vx%%v.svxsv;vft
Picks I
: Rose UCLA vs. Purdue :
Orange Tennessee vs. ft
Penn State jjj
jij Cotton Texas vs. LSU |
ij Sugar Auburn vs. S
jij Arkansas
jij Gator Florida vs. §
jj: Missouri
Liberty Mississippi vs. §
jij West Virginia >
ij: Bluebonnet Alabama vs. |
| Wyoming |
ij Peach Houston vs. £
ij Georgia ij
Sun Florida State vs. §
ij Utah :j
S^x c-x/x*x*xwx*x*xx*x-x*x*x*x*x-: 1

Rugby Team Faces Georgia
Friday On The ROTC Field
The UF Rugby team opens its season Friday as they take on
Georgia at 3:30 p.m. on the ROTC field, located across from the
stadium.
The team is still looking for prospects to play in the match Friday.
What we need is* the type of fellow who has played American
footballteam captain Tony Barker said.
Rugby was organized last year at the UF under the sanction of the
intramural department.
The team practices at Fleming Field every Tuesday at 5 p.m. and
on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. Interested players should contact Tony
Barker or Phil Whyatt.

appearances, and Texas first
allegiance to the Cotton Bowl,
third-ranked Tennessee is
presently the hottest bowl
prospect in the land.
Some of the Vols have already
indicated theyd like to spend
New Years night cavorting on
prime-time television in the
Orange Bowl.
Once-beaten Louisiana State
appears a shoo-in for a major
bid, likely as the other team in
the Cotton Bowl. And the team
that survives the
Auburn-Florida-Georgia
round-robin probably will meet
the Texas-Arkansas loser in the
Sugar Bowl.
Weve only got 12 more days
to wait before many of the
jig-saw pieces fall into place
although some of the teams will
get win-or-forget-it offers and
thats when the squeeze really
begins.

Wednesday, November 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Scribe Picks Gators
In Gator Bowl Clash

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPtW
Nashville Banner Sports Director
Fred Russell says he believes
that seven Southeastern
Conference teams will play in
bowl games this year.
*'l may turn out to be 90 per
cent wrong, he said, But this
is the way things may shape up:

se MALONES ,or
* A '# .. .v 't V :?*>* -v
Art Supplies
9 Desk Lamps
9 Slide Rules
9 Architectural Supplies
9 Course Outlines
1712 west university avenue
r Climb aboard
The S.S. Winnjammer /{
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to n
L Midnight wj
J Bernie Sher //
t at the Organ on Thursday> Friday & Saturday II
] Oysters & clams on the half shell pi
Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
i Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager 1/
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. rl
Closed Sundays A)'
He buys it...
she loves it
' -
/p:%' r ;*
t ~ . :
m K / H| 1
for a little money. Cute,
easy to drive and park. 96 HP overhead cam
engine unique in class-delivers up to 25 miles
per gallon. Safety front disc brakes. 4-speed
stick or optional automatic.
DATSUN
Drive a Patsun...then decide at:
GODDING & CLARK
2nd Ava. A 2nd St.(SE) 378-2311
OPEN TILL 8 PM
NO PROFESSIONAL SALESMEN. YOU TALK. WE LISTEN."

Orange Bowl
Tennessee-Arkansas Sugar Bowl
- Aubum-Penn State Cotton
Bowl LSU-Texas Gator Bowl
- Florida-Kansas State
Bluebonnet. Bowl
Georgia-Nebraska Peach Bowl
- Mississippi-Oklahoma Sun
Bowl Alabama-West Virginia.

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 5,1969

Page 16

LOPSIDED SCORES PREDICTED
Gators Underdogs Again

NEW YORK (UPO The
oddsmakers, anticipating
another weekend of lopsided
college football scores, included
only three teams from the top
ten in the betting line Tuesday.
The Georgia Bulldogs were
chosen as 6% points favorites
over the Florida Gators, when
the two teams meet in the Gator
Bowl on Saturday.
Third-ranked Tennessee was
picked by 21 points over South
Carolina and ninth-ranked
Purdue was given an 11-point
margin over Michigan State.
However, no. 8 Missouri was
expected to have trouble with
Oklahoma and was only a
one-point favorite.
The rest of the games
involving the top ten seemed so
one-sided on paper that the
oddsmakers declined to touch
them. Ohio State, ranked first, is
expected to ruin Wisconsin.
Ohio Stated first six opponents
this season have a grand total of
only eight victories against 33
losses and a tie, and Wisconsin,
with a 2-5 record, doesnt
promise to be much of a test
either.
Other eames not included in

v Jv
I Jennings 111 Victors |
& w $
STEVE ROHAN

DORM FOOTBALL
Jennings 111 captured the
dormitory all-campus football
championship last Thursday
defeating Bristol section of
Hume Hall 20-0.
Bristol was a spirited group
but the rah rahs weren't enough
to thwart the Jennings offense
led by Bill Callaway, Tom
Berrigan and BJ. Robinson.
Jennings held Bristol to two first
downs while recording three of
its own.
CO-REC BOWLING The
brilliant success of the Co-Rec
golf tournament has spurred
intramural officials to present a
co-rec bowling tournament on
Nov. 19.
A great deal of interest has
already been shown in this event
and the last day for signup will
be Nov. 13. All interested
students are urged to stop by the
intramural department, room
229 Florida Gym or call
392-0581.
One boy and one girl compose
each team.
FRATERNITY FOOTBALL
SAE enjoyed watching Blue
League football favorite Pi

The T.G. Continuing Education Service
Presents
Champagne Night
CHAMPAGNE
55
THE GLASS
TON/TE
mm
SAT GATORS ON COLOR T.V. SAT
(l / * < > f* # *'*'**. * V * '*'-** 4
& fc&fcY*,,*. A A A A-L . >- AAt * -K - - - - -- -- < ---

VlS^%p
m,
w*
the betting line are
second-ranked Texas against
Baylor, fifth-ranked Southern
California against Washington
State, sixth-ranked Arkansas
against Rice and no. 10 Notre
Dame against Pittsburgh. Penn
State (no. 4) and UCLA (no 7)
are idle.
Most of the nation's other
rated teams also figure as
off-the-board choices. Among
the games not included in the
line are no. 12 Stanford against
Washington; no. 14 Houston
against T Mississippi, tied
for 16th, against Chattanooga;
Wyoming, also 16th, against
Utah, which is tied for 18th.
Louisiana State (no. 11) is 11
points over Alabama, Michigan
(no. 13J is 21 over Illinois, and

Kappa rhi roll over another
opponent in practice because the
opposing team was defending
Orange League champion TEP.
The TEPs have been beaten
by Pi Lam also this year. The
SAEs are in the TEP bracket and
are looking toward their first
victory over the purple men in
five years.
Pi Lam and Beta Theta Pi,
both in the same bracket,
continued to look strong in
practice. Both are counting on
. strong defenses. Other strong
teams in the league are Pikes and
Delta Tau Delta.
ORANGE STANDINGS
BTP 230 DTD 152
SX 190 PKA 140
ATO 178 TEP 140
AEP 176 SPE 130
PKT 170 PDT 129
SAE 160 PLP 113
PGD 158 LXA 110
SN 156 DX 90
BLUE STANDINGS
XP 270 KS 144
TX 214 PKPSi 132
PKP 170 TKE 115
DU 164 AGR 112
KA 157 DSP 103

Auburn, tied for 18th, is 20 ove r
Mississippi State.
In other games the line has
Indiana 7 1/2 over lowa,
Syracuse 16 over Arizona,
Florida State 3 over Virginia
Tech, Princeton 1 over Harvard,
Virginia even with Wake Forest,
Cornell 14 over Brown, Clemson
5 over Duke, Minnesota 8 over
Northwestern, Colorado 4 over
Kansas, Nebraska 13 over lowa
State, Kansas State 12 over
Oklahoma State, Vanderbilt
even with Kentucky, Texas
A&M even with Southern
Methodist, Georgia Tech 7 1/2
over Tulane, Texas Christian 6
over Texas Tech, Oregon 4 1/2
over Army and California 7 1/2
over Oregon State.
3sJSuNBHINE
"Taka out sarvtoa**
ASSORTED
BOX LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
BY THE POUND
Call ahead it'll b*
waiting for you.
1202 NE th AVE.
(NEXT TO TRIANGLE
PACKAGE STORE)
378-3206

SALE FORMEN I
On Fine Traditional Shirts
All merchandise is from our reguiar
stock and represents the superb quality and value on which
w 6 have built our reputation.
Long Sleeve Dress Shirts
Button-down collars
by Sero of New Haven & Eagle Shirtmakers
Solid colors of white, blue, yellow, rum
andmfait. Also multi-color stripes
Reg. 7.0 0-14.50 NOW 5.50 EACH
3 FOR 15.00
(X) mark on chart below indicates sizes available on Sale
14% 15 15% 16 16% 17
32 X X X X
33 X X X X X
34 X X X X X X
35 X X X X X
36 X
Number 6 Main Street South
THE HOME OF HICKEYFREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES
.......
!"

j=AUTO RACING i
Column Begins
lnhn Siebenihaler J
This column is designed to keep the student competitor or
spectator informed about whats happening in the world of
automotive sport, locally and nationally. :
By. now, a vocal minority of student nave visited and/or
participated at our own Gainesville Dragway. These who havent have
probably noticed an increase in funny looking cars on trailers.
Locally, Gainesvillej Dragway will inaugurate their grudge race
activities tonight. Admission is $ 1 to run or watch, and the women get
in for 50 cents. On Sind for practice and tuning runs will be Bill
Tanner and his SS/B Dctflge Dart.
Tanner, a runner-up in the WCS points meet in Sept., recently
returned from the NHRA World Series, where he lost out to Sox
Martin in their Hemi-Cuda.
Sundays action at the strip will feature Super Stocks direct from
the World Series held in Dallas, last week. Bill Grumpy Jenkins will
be here with his nine second Camaro, along with Sox and Martin,
Tanner, the Platt racing team, and many others. Grumps Camaro
features an aluminum 427 with carbs of his own design and
manufacture, and is the top Chevy in the country.
I savei
I 1 STARKe! 1 FLORIDA
I "SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORtTE DEALER
I HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
|GAINESVLLEPHONE3722I^^NYTIMEBYAPPCNTMEWT