Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
A& Amnia*

Vol. 62, No. 34

Education Referendum Today


Amendment
Gets Strong
Rally Support
.
See Related Story Page 3
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Support for the Higher
Education Building Amendment
was shown to be strong among
state, local and campus leaders
at the Vote for Education
Rally sponsored by UF Young
Democrats Monday on the Plaza
of the Americas. / t
Among those speaking in
' support of the amendment were
State Sen. Bob Saunders, State
Repwalph Turlington,
Gainesville City Commissioner
Neil Butler, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell and
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd.
Speaker after speaker
emphasized the wide support all
over the state for the
amendment, but they expressed
fear that voter apathy and
ignorance could defeat the
amendment.
The Higher Education
Budding Amendment, if passed
will not raise taxes, but will use
existing utilities gross tax
receipts for construction in
Florida universities, junior
colleges and vocational-technical
schools.
But many voters, uninformed,
think of the amendment as a
way to hike taxes and will vote
no.
During the rally, termed a
splendid success by Bruce
S mat hers, president of UF
(SEE 'RALLY' PAGE 3)

( l Want Peace As Much As You Do

m v £
*r ab^sr
RICHARD NIXON
... shares concern

Florida T Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

ON BUILDING AMENDMENT

YES!%^I
college population
explodes and
facilities fail

NIXON REJECTS TOTAL WITHDRAWAL

WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon Monday
night rejected demands for total, immediate U.S.
withdrawal from Vietnam and asked the great,
silent majority of Americans to support his careful
course toward a settlement of the war.
For the future of peace, he told a nationwide
broadcast audience from his White House office,
precipitate withdrawal would be a disaster of
immense magnitude.
The United States and the South Vietnamese
government, he said, had adopted a plan for the
complete withdrawal of all UJS. ground combat
forces and their replacement by South Vietnamese
forces on an orderly scheduled timetable.
Ground troops number more than 250,000 of the
total 495,200 U.S. men still in Vietnam.
The President refused to divulge his timetable,
saying he could not be frozen in a set schedule.
But he disclosed that the timetable based on

University of Florida, Gainesville

estimates last June is more optimistic now, partly
because of the lull in Communist military activity
and the progress in training South Vietnamese
forces to take over a greater share of the fighting.
Nixon warned that if Communist infiltration or
American casualties increase while the United States
is trying to scale down the fighting, it will be the
result of a conscious decision by the enemy that
will be met by strong and effective measures.
I would be untrue to my oath of office if 1
allowed the policy of this nation to be dictated by
the minority who hold that view and who attempt
to impose it on the nation by mounting
demonstrations in the street, he said.
Speaking midway between nationwide antiwar
demonstrations, the President told the nations
youth: I respect your idealism. I share your
concern for peace. I want peace as much as you
do.

See Editorial Page 6
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The future of the state
university system rests in the
hands of the voters.
Florida's voters will go to the
polls today to decide the fate of
the Higher Education Building
Amendment passage of which
is essential to meet the needs of
a burgeoning student population
in the states universities, junior
colleges and vocational schools.
The amendment would
alleviate some of the problems
caused by an exploding college
enrollment
This amendment would
reinstate the 1963 bonding
authority which was prohibited
in the 1968 revision of the
Florida Constitution.
The reviseddocument says the
state cannot issue revenue
anticipation certificates (bonds)
financed from taxes.
The amendment will renew
permission to sell bonds, to be
paid off with already existing
gross receipts from utility taxes
on electricity, gas, telephone and
telegraph service. This
permission expired at the end of
June, 1969.
Passage of this amendment
would not mean more taxes.
Although the amendment is
only a stopgap measure, most
informed educators and
lawmakers agree it has to be
passed.
The $l6O million expected
from the sale of bonds by 1975
when die authority will again
expire will be far less than half
of what is needed to meet
currently existing goals, based
on very conservative enrollment
projections.
Universities need $175
million, junior colleges $146
million, and vocational schools
$36 million. UF alone must have
SB4 million if it expects to

V y

Tuesday, November 4,1969

accomodate its growing
enrollment.
This amendment is not going
to provide all the needed money.
Other sources must be found.
However, political observers
agree that 1970's legislature is
not likely toi raise taxes or create
new ones.
Some lawmakers have
Voters will
decide
educations
future.
advocated a revised state tax
structure. Rep. Richard Tillman,
D-Cocoa Beach, said recently he
favored a state income tax/
Former Speaker of the House
Ralph Turlington, D-Gainesvifle,
has suggested a corporate
income tax as a possible
alternative.
Another possibility might be
to legalize gambling.
Educators are counting on
passage of the amendment
because it will commit the state
to starting a number of projects,
from which it will then be
unable to back out.
At UF the focus is on getting
funds to start construction on
the J. Hiffis Miller Health
Center's expansion program.
More than half the first year's
money the university system wi
get from the sale of bonds will
go to match the $19.7 million in
federal funds promised the
project.
The expansion will nearly
double, the $23 million center's
physical plant; which will then
include die state's first dental
school.
The construction date has
already been pushed back six to
eight months because the
legislature failed to appropriate
the sl3 million in state money.
If the amendment fails, in all
likelihood the federal dollars will
be lost for good, possibly
meaning the end of expanding
state and mental education.
Federal officials probably will
frown on a state unable to do
its share, sources dose to the
Board of Regents have raid.
THE GATOR SUDE was
gutted by fire late Sunday
night. Arson has not yet been
ruled out .page 5
Classifieds 9
Small Society 4
Editorials. 6
FSU News 3
Letters .7
Movies $1?
Orange and Blue 8
Sports 10



Page 2

!. Tlm Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 4,1960

OConnell Praises
Gator Nursery
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Officially open now, the Baby Gator Nursery received words of
praise Monday from UF President Stephen C. OConnell and Student
Body President Charles Shepherd during an informal gathering at the
nursery.
Its a terrific facility, OConnell said. We are grateful to the
people who have cooperated to make this nursery a reality.
The nursery is a pilot project sponsored by Student Government
arid organized by the Married Students Mayors Council. SGhas
allocated $4,000 to help fund the first six months of the operation.
United University Methodist Church at 1320 W. University Ave.
donated space for the nursery and invested about SI,OOO in
renovating the building.
Shepherd said the nursery has been in the talking stage for years.
It took someone like Jerry Yakatan to get the program going.
Yakatan, chairman of the nurserys board of directors and past
president of the mayors council on campus, for the past six months,
has been in charge of planning the facility which caters only to 3, 4
and 5-year-old children of full-time UF students.
Although there was an exchange of congratulatory words for the
success of the program, Yakatan mentioned a problem area which
could hinder the nurserys future plans.
We need more funds. After the student government grant tts'
out, we will need funding from other sources. ;
Yakatan said the organization will go to civic groups, stale abd
federal agencies and any other possible source for funds.
We would lflce to have a broad base of support from the
community to keep us in business.
As far as getting more funds from SG, Shepherd said This is not
likely. However, we would consider the need when it arises.
Married students are going to have to get behind the program and
support it, he said.
Mrs. Peg Pritchett, nursery director, said, We could come to a
screaching halt after five months of operation unless we get more
help.
However, she said the program is doing real well so far. T
We have new applications coming in every day. The children are
happy. We will soon, reach our capacity enrollment of 30 students.
The nursery is open from 7:45 ajn. to 5:15 pjn. Monday through
Friday. Tuition for each child is S3O a month. Mrs. Pritchett said
applications are still being taken. The nursery telephone number is
376-0105.

s j
[Loyalty Meeting Setj
- c

A special joint meeting of
the American Association of
University Professors
(AAUP), the American Civil
liberties Union (ACLU) and
the American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) has been set
to discuss the UF loyalty
oath as it has been altered.

Rail Shopcrafts Receive Pay Increase

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
presidential fact finding board
Monday recommended a 5 per
cent pay increase for members
MnN^osm
fir i
LIKE TRAVEL?
(MmM/ u
JOIN TH£
WFS 1 SUIT
o

I THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR k the offickl student newspaper of the
University of Florida and b published five times weekly except during lone,
July and August whed it is pubHshed semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to die Florida AKgator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesvifle, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wB not consider adjustments of payments for any
adu-rtiseawnf involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
b given to the Advertiring Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears the Florida Alligator wil not be responsible for mote than one
hniMMl ihrnnfipn Qftap.advqtpentent scheduled to run sevftai times. Notices
f. far correction must.be jiven before the next insertion. */, i B

The meeting, open to the
public, will be held
Wednesday night at 8 pjn. in
the Architecture and Fine
Arts building. Jerry
Bomstein, the lawyer -who
filed suit against the Board of
Regents protesting the
loyalty oath, will be present
to explain the oath.

of four railroad shop craft
unions and premium pay of at
least 20 cents an hour for skilled
mechanics.
caAfataiM sitr-mpMvtMiNT
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THIRD POINT DISPUTED fei
Loyalty OatKMmter Fire

By KAREN ENG
a m A
AMpnOr elHf wwwwwm
UFs much disputed loyalty oath even with
two of its four points ruled unconstitutional
remains the subject of debate as Board of Regents
members and professors continue to argue that a
third point should be deleted.
U.S. District Court Judge George Young issued a
restraining order on the oath Thursday after finding
unconstitutional the statements I am not a
member of the Communist party and I am not a
member of any organization or party which believes
in or teaches, directly or indirectly, the overthrow
of the government of the United States or of
Florida by force or violence.
The ruling came Thursday afternoon on a suit
filed by an Orange County schoolteacher, Miss
Stella Connell, who was contesting the same oath.
Young said since the two portions had been
declared unconstitutional, the UF oath should not
be administered in its present form.
But the suit filed by Orlando lawyer Jerry
Bomstein with the backing of the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU) also contested a third
portion of the oath. This is I do not believe in the
overthrow of the Government of the United States
or of the State of Florida by force or violence.
The way the statement is worded is legally
justifiable, Board of Regents member Julius F.
Parker Jr. said Monday. But I dont like that
wording, either. I would rather see it as T do not
personally advocate...
Mrs. Norma Munn, chairman of the Gainesville
chapter of the ACLU, said Monday she is happy
the restraining order was granted, and she doesnt
think employes should be threatened with dismissal
for not signing the oath.

can GET YOUR
Together
Lead your own life.
Enjoy it.
Dont let life let you down
because of a silly head headache.
ache. headache. Happiness is as far
away as an Anacin* bottle. II
Anacin is twice as strong 111 II IB* *1
in the specific re- |l| 111 II 9 £ y
liever doctors recom-
mend most as the other |l|jS I j*l 0
well known extra strength tn U\tk
tablet L. Hi
your mind, but it sure will f kki \ %
get your head together. /
qitFlr

4fcraigjl|| of the oath. Any
mSm& a personal, private matter and
said he is very
pte^3|mn j me iktraining order, but it is only a
the third point included is very
repugnant to many people,** he said. Many feel it is
The /OFT, ACLU and the American Association
of University Professors (AAUP) will have a joint
meeting Wednesday night. Bomstein will go over the
legal points concerning the oath, Zeman said, and
options for appealing the decision will be discussed.
The AFT appeals to the UF community to
continue to fight the oath, Zeman said.
Tom Biggs, UFs attorney, said Monday the
Regents have the oath under advisement,** but the
oath as it exists cant he administered. However, the
path with the second and fourth points deleted is
constitutional, he said, 'JL
State University ChpefAar Robert B. Mautz said
Monday his office is miring advice as to what
our position will be.** %
This oath affects many state employes, he said,
and we have asked Afiomey General Ear! Faixcloth
for his opinion on the oath.**
The oaths already signed by UF employes will
still be on record. But the two points which have
been declared unconstitutional will be deleted.
A decision as to what steps the Regents will take
on the loyalty oath will be made before the end of
the week, Mautz said.



SrtjilcJes
ransportation to the polls- j
ide to vote in the Higher j
referendum. The meeting j
elow:
- Armory, 1125 N.E. Bth j
Id.
3th Pharmacy, 16th Ave. at
- Winn Dixie, 3rd Ave. at j
N.W. 6th St.; United Fuels, j
y Precinct 12 Steven Foster School Gainesville Animal ]
I\ Hospital, 2838 N.W. 6th St.; Quie Shop Groceiy 4120 N.W. 6th ]
i St.
Precinct 13 School Administration Building Kennedy j
\ Apartments, 15th St. at S.E. Bth Ave.; Gainesville Drive In, j
j 2400 Hawthorne Rd.; Duval Elementary, Bth Ave. at N.W. 21st j
I St j
Precinct 16 Girl Scout Cabin l3th Pharmacy; Georgia \
\ Seagle Hall, 1002 W. University Ave., Thriftway, 620 N.W. 16th j:
I Ave. j:
Precinct 17 Gainesville High School 39th Ave. Church of j:
| Christ, 1811 N.W. 39th Ave.; Grace Presbyterian Church, 3146 -j:
N.W. 13th St.; Pine Grove Baptist Church, 4200 N.W. 39th :
| Ave.; University Baptist Church, 340 N.W. 34th St.; Westwood :
| Junior High j
j Precinct 23 PJC. Yonge School Greshams Drug, 13th St. at j:
i S.W. 16th Ave.; Idylwild Elementary, 4601 S.W. 20 Terr.; Dixie
| Minit Mart, 4205 N.W. 16 Blvd. i
$ Precinct 25 Santa Fe Junior College Genes Grocery, 224 : :
g W. Depot St.; Cottons Minit Mart, 317 S.W. 4th Ave.; U. of Fla. j:
jj| Credit Union, 1200 S.W. sth Ave. |;
Precinct 26 Westside Recreation Center Fire Station, 37th j:
g St. at W. University; Womans Club; Bevilles Nursery, 5402 N.W. ij
Bth Ave. §
Precinct 27 Recreation Center City Park, N.E. 16th Ave. at :
>: 4th St.; Pantry Pride, N.E. 10th Ave. at Main St. :
Precinct 28 Voting Machine Warehouse Lincoln High :
fe School, S. Waldo Rd. at ldth, Jacksons Minit Mart, 1023 S.E. :j
:j:i 4th Ave.; State Employment Office, 315 S.E. 2nd Ave.; Minit :
fe Mart, S.E. 4th St. at S. Waldo Rd. §
fe Precinct 29 Howard Bishop Jr. High Lutheran Church, N.E. S
fe 23rd Blvd. at 12th J
;!fe Precinct 30 Lake Forest School McGilvary Fish Camp, E. §
| University at the Lake; Church of God, 4700 S.E. Hawthorne S
| Rd.; Jiffy Food Store, 3421 S.E. Hawthorne Rd. j
fe Precinct 31 Reitz Union no transportation
§: Precinct 32 Terwilliger School Bevilles Nursery, 5402 N.W.
% Bth Ave.; St. Michaels Episcopal Church, 2180 S.W. 43rd St.; j
jijj Pine Grove Baptist Church \
Precinct 33 Metcalf School Lutheran Church, N.E. 23rd j
I Blvd. at 12th; Rawlings Elementary, N.E. 15th St. at 38th Ave. jj

Hoffman: No Mistrial

CHICAGO (UPI) Black
Panther leader Bobby Seale
appeared unshackled and
ungagged at the trial of the
Chicago Eight Monday but
refused to cease his demands
that he be allowed to act as his
own attorney.
U.S. District Court Judge
Julius J. Hoffman turned down
motions that Seale be allowed to
defend himself and that a

(W. Sun Jen 1
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w Cfocten
nniKip f| BRING
BRING COUPON
COUPON ULUKL.*
E> TUES. & WED. ONLY
>INNER 990 I
bring -COUPON

mistrial be declared because of
the shackles and gag which were
placed on Seale during the trial
last week.
Seales ailing attorney, Charles
Garry of San Francisco, sent a
letter saying he would not come
to Chicago to take part in the
trial because it had gone on too
long without him. He threatened
to file a suit charging Hoffman
with violating Seales
constitutional rights.

FOR HIGHER EDUCATION BILL |
Rally Support Strong

Young Democrats, telegrams in
support of the amendment were
read.
Included were telegrams from
Sen. Spessard Holland, Sen.

Student Senate Gets
Towers Resolution
A resolution asking the administration to permit 24-hour open
house in the Twin Towers living area will be presented to the Student
Senate tonight.
The bill, introduced by Students Rights Committee Chairman Bill
Armstrong, is expected to pass with little opposition. Armstrong's
resolution is the result of a petition his committee circulated in
Towers last week. Similar recommendations have been passed by UF
President Stephen C. O'Connells Committee on Housing, and
Interhall Council. Even if the bill passes it must be approved by Vice
President for Student Affairs Lester Hale.
The Senate is also expected to permit the release of $1,5000 for
improving Ravine Park. Plans for the park, located across from the
sewer plant between Graham Area and the Reitz Union, include
several pine-chip sidewalks and a rustic chain fence.
Secretary of Legislative Affairs, Scott Holloway will brief newly
elected senators on senate procedure.
There are still vacant senate seats from the colleges of business
administration, health related professions and physical Education and
Health, and from Murphree Area.
The senate will convene at 9 p jn. in room 349 of the Union.

FSU
NEWS
SLEPIN Steve Slepin, a
Florida assistant attorney
general for the past two years
was appointed assistant to FSUs
president J. Stanley Marshall
Monday, In appointing Slepin,
Marshall said that he will assist
him in a variety of
university-wide projects, reports,
and committees.
EDITOR Malcom Johnson,
editor of the Tallahassee
Democrat condemned Friday
night Homecoming Pow Wow
for being vulgar and in general
condemned the entire theme of
the FSU Homecoming, Peace is
Relevant.
MORATORIUM Vietnam
Moratorium Committee of FSU
sponsored a panel discussion
Monday night following
President Nixons broadcast
speech. The moratorium leaders
also discussed their plans for this
month which will include a
candle-light march on the state
capitol building.

Edward Gurney, Gov. Claude
Kirk, attorney General Earl
8 Faircloth, Florida State Senate
President John Mathews,
Speaker of the House Fred
Schultz and 10 U.S.
Congressmen.
Turtington said failure to pass

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'TIL
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LAST SHOWING TONIGHT I
UNION AUDITORIUM 7:0049:30
a program of New Experimental films I
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Tuaaday, Novembar 4,1908, Tha Florida Alligator,

the amendment would result In
a prolonged delay in getting the
buildings needed for education
beyond high school.
This will bring deprivation of
opportunity to young men and
women left with no facilities for
preparation for future life,
Turlington said.
Saunders reminded the
audience that passage of the
amendment would not raise new
taxes and would simply continue
the bonding authority granted
to the legislature in 1964 by the
voters by a 2-to-l margin.
Butler blamed the legislators
for creating the problem and the
voters for ratifying a
constitution that omitted a
provision for constructing
educational facilities.
Speakers urged students to
call their parents to ask them to
vote yes on the amendment.
.:/ ; 3? '. ,r >
Short Beer Story
The first commercial brewery
built in the United States was
erected in 1612 in New York,
report researches at Rheingold
Breweries.

Page 3



.The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 4,196&

Page 4

Man Meets Computer
The Northeast Florida Chapter of the Association for Computing
Machinery will meet in the Reitz Union Tuesday, rooms 362-363.
Two color films will be shown starting at 7:15 dealing with man
and the computer. At 7:45 Dr. George Lebo in Whats New will
discuss data handling problems in Radio Astronomy. At 8 members of
the College of Liberal Arts will discuss aspects of the Computer in the
Humanities.

MARINE MAY GET UP TO 30 YEARS
Hijacker Facing Eight Charges In Italy

ROME (UPI) An Italian
prosecutor said Monday a plane
hijacker Raffaele Minichiello
would be tried in Italy before
facing prosecution in the United
States.
Three more charges were filed
against the young American
Marine.

Klonsky Denounces
White Supremacy
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Calling the UF a brain center for imperialism, Mike Klonsky, former
national secretary of SDS, cried for a united front against white
supremacy in the world.
We should support the National Liberation Front and the
Vietnamese people, Klonsky told a group of 250 assembled in the
Plaza of the Americas Monday.
He summoned workers, students, blacks and whites to join in the
anti-war effort but denounced white supremacy in the movement.
The politicians and the millionaires are jumping on the
bandwagon since the reaction to the war began to snowball, he said.
It is the woikers who oppose the war, he said. They pay the taxes
and suffer the effects of inflation.
Klonsky accused students of pushing aside the workers.
They train you in schools to think workers are stupid slobs who
sit in front of the T.V. set, you dont know how they suffer.
The UF became engaged in white supremacy by oppressing the
very people that helped to build this university, he said.
It is the big pigs in the gray suits along with the little pigs in
the blue uniforms, that are oppressing blacks and workers.
But there is a lot of pig in us too, racism and chauvinism that we
have to get rid of, he added.
Oppression of women was also singled out for attack by Klonsky.
Men like to dominate women, he said.
Women are trained to be cute and stupid and white middle class
girls come to college to sell themselves and find a husband, Klonsky
said.
Women are paid less than men, and they are given the typing and
steno... the shit work to do he said.
Klonsky, who is on national tour, spoke for the Revolutionary
Movement 11, a faction of SDS. Referring to the split in SDS, Klonsky
said it was a good thing, and felt it got rid of the white supremacy
in the organization.
fTACOi Ga, rSp<,tiai
t RANCHO
C Mexican £ (5 Ifife X
* OLE/ g
MON. TUES.
| Tos ** 29{ |
g Frijol.s 22( i |
f Tostodos YZ
g 6t 1$
j 1624 S.W. 13th St. K/
X
A (Across from Sin City) Jo

The new charges brought to
eight the number of charges
Minichiello faces here.
If convicted on all of them he
could spend as long as 30 years
in Italian prisons before
American authorities could lay a
hand on him.
Assistant prosecutor Massimo

' v f f ( >
the small society hy Bridcmdn
Y{/'£e A
i&THe

Carli called on Minichiello at
Romes Queen of Heavens jail
tonight to inform him of the
new charges, which include
kidnaping, private violence
against the crew of the Trans
World Airlines jetliner he
hijacked and violence against a
public official.
Maximum sentences on the
eight charges add up to 31 years
and six months, but under
Italian law the most time a
person can serve in prison short
of life imprisonment is 30 years.
Minichiello, who hijacked the

WATCH I
for I
A and I
IIKA I

seminole
pictures

Bring a $1.50 sitting fee.
Dress for men is dark coat, dark tie, light shirt.
Dress for women is a dark sweater.
TUESDAY NOV. 4
8:30 l2 SENIORS
1 4 JUNIORS (D THRU D)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Kappa Delta,
ATO, Beta Theta Pi, AEPhi, SAE)
WEDNESDAY NOV. 5
8:30-11 SENIORS
12-4 JUNIORS (E THRU F)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Phi Tau, Pi
Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda
Phi, Theta Chi)
THURSDAY NOV. 6
12-4 JUNIORS (G THRU H)
4-5,6-9 GREEKS (Chi Phi, Delta
Chi, AOPi, ChiO, Sigma Nu)
FRIDAY NOV. 7
12-4 JUNIORS (I THRU L)
4-5 GREEKS-All
6-9 SENIORS

CALL 392-1687
Between Noon-sp.m.
FOR APPOINTMENT

plane in California last Friday
and forced the pilot to fly it to
Rome, faces a possible death
sentence in the United States on
a hijacking charge.
I am sure he will be tried first
in Italy, Carli said; No doubt
about it. However, that is my
personal opinion only.
Carli also said Minichiellos

FACULTY MEMBERS
JACK GORDON
BANK PRES. WASHINGTON FEDERAL
LUNCHEON WED. NOV. 5 12:30
ROOM ABCD OF JWRU CAFETERIA
WILL SPEAK ON
THE WAR

elderly father, who lives in
southern Italy, would be allowed
to see his son.
Carli charged Minichiello
Sunday with five other crimes,
including another count of
kidnaping, private violence,
bringing weapons of war into
Italy, possessing them illegally
and carrying them illegally.

MONDAY NOV. 10
12 4 JUNIORS (M THRU N)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS
(Delta Sigma Phi, DTD, Tri Delt,
Delta Gamma, Sig Ep)
TUESDAY NOV. 11
12-4 JUNIORS (O THRU P)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Delta Upsilon,
KA, DPhiE, Kappa Alpha Theta, TEP)
WEDNESDAY NOV. 12
12-4 JUNIORS (Q THRU T)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Kappa Sigma,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Mu, Phi Delta
Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi)
THURSDAY NOV. 13
12-4 JUNIORS (U THRU Z)
4 5,6 9 GREEKS (Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Kappa, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi
Kappa Phi, TKE)
'u
FRIDAY NOV. 14
12-5,6-9 SENIORS



Side Five
Invesliqation
Sill Pending
An on duty Gainesville
policeman called city firemen to
the Gator Slide Sunday night,
but the call came too late.
Sgt. R.B. Ward was patrolling
13th Ave., and noticed a small
fiie in the center of the huge
fiberglass sliding board, used as
an amusement feature for local
residents.
Ward summoned firemen.By
the time units arrived on the
scene flames had engulfed the
entire structure.
The slides owners, Edward
Simmons and Marvin Julius
estimate damage to the slide at
$53,000.
Julius recalls running off a
group of children previous to the
fire. According to Julius they
left in a hostile mood.
Gainesville Fire Chief J.
Dampier and State Fire Marshall
H. Deese spent most of the day
Monday at the slide and have
not yet ruled out arson as a
cause of the blaze.
According to Dampier, the
investigation is still underway.

Rowdy Students Bomb
Gainesville Firemen
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville fire units responding to a trash chute fire Sunday night
in Simpson Hall, were met with water balloons, ice, fireworks and
bottles.
University police reported that students were hanging out of
windows throwing cherry bombs and water balloons at the firemen as
they arrived to extinguish the small fire.
Theyre crazy as hell, they really showed themselves, said
Gainesville Battalion Chief J.R. Hardee.
Hardee said about ten students were throwing debris and hollering
at firemen from the windows.
University Police Officer JH. Lassiter reported that students also
hit police patrol cars with water balloons.
It could have turned into a very bad situation, Lassiter said.
When men are performing under emergency conditions, the least
distraction can become dangerous.
Lassiter said the small fire was located in a stuffed trash chute
between the second and third floors.
When I arrived before firemen and went into the building,
everything was quiet. When I left file dorm, though, it was quite
* different, he said.
Simpson area counselor Ron Cookston arrived shortly after the
firemen.
The firemen and police handled the situation with great reserve,
they acted very quickly in the situation, Cookston said.
Cookston, who believes the fire was deliberately set, said smoke
damage to the carpet on the fourth floor was extensive.
Police made no arrests.
There were so many people around it was hard to single out those
who were involved, Lassiter said.
Cookston said a number of students were apprehended but declined
to give the exact number or details.
The students will be taken before conduct boards, he said,
Were still investigating the incident because we believe more persons
were involved.
W.C. FIELDS
REIGNS Supreme
tonight
9 PM ON
AT
r -V y .
633 NW 13th ST.
REMEMBER THIRSTY TIME 4:30 700

r HSHnH
- V-.4 'Mm i
dp i \ < i| Jk. x
y.J 1 "| .... r % v
u- a / r ; tu X
ill a If' !)
I 1 if. if' "£* H I ''* x
Hiyj I
11
ax
-
I
\ v \
'&: \ ; V \ \ jjj- TB
PHIL COPE
HOT SEAT?
... what the Gator Slide looks like now

WIG 1
I
i 4|
J curly or semi-smooth I
1 iiliri o *io 80 fl
\ n ll I # NEVER NEEDS 1
-y VVIUU Ikg setting U
PERFECT FOR CLASS OR PATES 8..
MT*- ~ s long luxurious $ 80 mm
W y 11 ;"L --M
f FALLS 9 ;J|
I loox TanKED I HUMAN HAIR 4 3B
CASCADES 16 'MI
I TRANS-WORLD IMPORTERS S /
I CORNER 13 ST+UNIVERSITY IM
(across from FLAGLER INN)
sj
| GAINESVILLE /JSMj
B OTHER SHOWROOMS IN ORLANDO,
COCOA BEACH, JACKSONVILLE & k &Jm WJ jfl WM

AN EXCi,MS(VE SERVICE ,~V-,
FOR STUDENTS!
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ...
LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT. ROBBERY.
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
LOSS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING. \ Mfi
ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE.
REGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY RlNcl\
HATCHER'S JEWELERS
2 EAST UNIV. AVE 3755892
An Evening at

The Center of Man
.
Diddier Graeffe: "The Way I See Her"
Guitar Poetry People with people
Thursday Evening November 6 8:00
Presbyterian Student Center (Temporary
Location ) $1.50 per person
$.75 students
The Center of Man is also forming weekly
Encounter Groups. If you are interested
Call C. W. Duncan 372-2119 evenings and
weekends. |>

Tmtoy. Nowmbw 4,1X8, Ts FtorMi AWpfr, I

Page 5



i. Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuwtoy, Novmbf 4,1908

Page 6

- -I. *l .. :. - - --.
TFh.
"p 1 Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette /SjStiSSkjb.
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor /aaaiSciX^jiA
Alligator (fSJfeg?)
Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel Wy
th* price of freedom Executive Editor News Editor NgjK
is th. xtrciM of responsibility
&rifl -Tml A
n '**^
|r SjjHlS ISplIil|§8 |3|gJ|i|Elp IlSiSii? I^Bp% eipsiw 1%
THE OU) BREED

Unlike at most campuses across the nation, the
older breed of buildings are not disappearing from
UF. They linger on, like Peebody Hall, above, built
in 1912 and renovated only once or twice.
Grandfathers of this generation of college students
attended classes in that building, suffering from the
same inadequacies students today experience: Poor
ventilation, cramped space, poor heating and no air
conditioning with which to shut off outride
distraction. But, Peabody is not alone. Flint,
Newell, Anderson. Floyd and Walker Halls still
stand with more than 40 yean of service. Twelve

H £* w
. < .. rffltt - iiinMMaMiiiii II mi in tfit 1 W l||§§j|p.
B B
What Theyre Saying |
The student population in education has more than $:
;: doubled in the last ten years &us the space facilities £:
/lave not developed at the same time. We have had to g
go to selective admissions, keeping out some qualified sj:
BUHB people because we have no room to put students or g
fVVfIHBHr enough space for teachers to teach. Dr. Emmett $
Williams, Assistant Dean of Education
WILUAMS |
We are very short of library space. The new 1
ilj P research library finished two years ago was not built of |
sufficient size at that time, and it is full now. Most of f JB
i j the branch libraries are full. We badly need
construction byway of an addition to the research |I||BBBPS
library and we need to carry out the proposal to |fal W* |
establish a major central science library. Dr. B
Gustave Harrer, Director of Libraries
HARRER

buildings on the main campus were constructed
before 1928, and that's not including the old men's
dorms, among this campus' first structures in 1905.
Below, right and left, are examples of the general
state of disrepair which afflicts these old buildingi.
Left, corroded pipes decorate a 1930 vintage
chemistry lab, while right, a broken window
overgrown with vines is part of the facade of
another building. Such is life on fob campus, and
only a yes" vote today on the Higher Education
Building Amendment can help change it

editorial
'IF
The year was 1905. And Gainesville was a tiny farmland
crossroads town, complete with muddy, rutted streets and
On the edge of town in the midst of a pinewood forest
workmen bustled about starting construction on Buckman
and Thomas Halls, the first buildings of the new University
f had been established under the Buckman
Act the year before, and the entire institution was predicted
to cost no more than $1 million. Buckman and Thomas, at
first serving as classroom, administration and dormitory
buildings, were built for about $75,000. Induded in the
plans were a science building, a teachers college, a chapel
and an agriculture building.
Those were grand expectations for 1905. They were
developed to accommodate Floridas growing need for
educating its youth. But, somewhere along the way, such
events that cannot be predicted took place. World War I
came, and the Florida land boom exploded and then
quicldy subsided. Depression and another World War came,
and tourists rediscovered the state, and some stayed
permanently. The states population almost doubled from
1950 to 1960. And it is exploding still.
And during those 55 years the first to be
junked. Education was hard put to keep up with a demand
for quantity along with quality.
But, this desire for greatness, this design for quality, has
not always been without opposition.
From the first there were rumors the new University of
Florida would cost more than $1.5 million, just for
Buckman and Thomas. The Florida Times-Unkm couldnt
see it. The paper-voiced its complaints and suggested
repealing the Buckman Act. Education just wasnt worth
spending that much money on,espedally when citrus
production and agriculture needed support more.
Sixty-four years later the resistance has not been
subdued. Education was to have a long heritage as the
stepchild of Florida politics, always the first to have its
budget cut during legislative appropriation sessions.
Unfunded, unsupported and demeaned, educators faced
the opposition, winning a few battles, but always losing the
war.
Sixty-four years after the University of Florida came to
Gainesville, education still finds itself on the losing side,
except for a few ifs.
Only a sparse few daring legislators and editorial writers
come to its aid.
And that is why the Higher Education Building
Amendment is on the ballot today ready for ypur vote
yes.
That yes vote is just one if.
Today, eight other institutions, plus 28 junior colleges
and 35 designated vocational-technical centers stand with
the University of Florida as shields against ignorance and
apathy, but they do so while struggling for existence.
Theres a thin thread separating that existence from the
full life of distinction. Its a thread composed of some more
ifs.
IF the legislature last spring had appropriated adequate
funds for capital improvements, no amendment would be
on todays ballot. If* the people of Florida, including its
citizen-businessmen, had been willing to create a personal or
corporate income tax, the state would not have to resort to
bonding to gain capital outlay money.
When voters go to the polls today, they should remember
that no new taxes are in order just because they vote y es *
The bonds will be paid off with taxes on gross utility
receipts.
But, voters should remember, too, that still another if
is involved when they enter the polling booth. IF you
vote no, new taxes could be forthcoming.
Education can not stand still. Enrollment is doubling.
Despite violent opposition, new taxes will likely have to
be created or existing ones might be raised, if the
amendment does not pass.
In view of those alternatives, we urge you to vote yes
for the amendment today.
Then there might not be so many ifs.
. V
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
OpiaioM expressed la the Florida ARigator are-thoae of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not thoeeofthe University of Florida.



There is no hope
for the complacent man

Out
| $
1 Infirmary Aid 1
V. >'
:$ $
: fi $
I |
Kim Whyte

I am writing this on behalf of
the UF Infirmary. It seems to
need it after all of the bad
publicity it has received.
Put yourself in my place.
says Royce Bcaucamp in her
article Infirmary Doctors. So I
did, only the circumstances were
a little different.
It was Friday night, the first
weekend after classes had begun,
about 11:30, and I was having a
jolly time with some friends. 1
was on the second floor of the
building where we were, when
we decided to leave. Three steps,
six steps, nine steps, CRASH. I
hit the ground at a jaw
breaking speed. Mv friends
surrounded me immediately
asking the usual question. Are
you hurt?
Unfortunately, I was hurt. My
chin was split open and bleeding
fairly bad. Off we went to get it
stiched up. Our first stop was
S hands Teaching Hospital
Emergency Ward. Are you a
student? Yes. Sorry, you
have to go to the Infirmary.
Sir off we went, once again,
arrived at the Infirmary, I
tilled out the information card
and went into a little room with
a nurse. She had just enough
time to clean my wound before
the doctor came in and sewed it
up. He wasnt only intelligent,
accurate, and gentle, but
entertaining as well. He gave me
a shot to prevent an infection
a; td let me leave, without
charging me anything.
The next morning my jaw was
exceedingly sore and l could
only open it wide enough to fit
m y thumb in After tolerating
this tor most of the day. 1 went
haek to the Infirmary to have it.
Waved.
I entered, filled out another
ulr d and sat down to wait, since
there were at least ten other

In Loco Parentis--Alive And Well

MR. EDITOR:
The old newspaper clippings
tell us that, a few years back, In
Loco Parentis had a ceremonial
death on the UF campus. But it
seems as if the magic moment
has not quite arrived. We are all
aware of the myth.
Out of the perpetual cloud
cover in Tigert Hall the great
foggy shape of the old monkey
demon continues to be seen. In
Loco Parentis alive and well.
The administration which has,
shall we say, not been exactly
united in support for liberal
causes has decided that
cohabitation by males and coeds
in dorm rooms is basically not
desireable and has never found
reason to revise that opinion.
Not satisified to concern
themselves with the practicalities
of acedemic life, the powers that
be arc convinced that only they
can lead these kids today, and
America, on the road to right
thinking and clean living. They
have expanded their area of
* interest to include the guarding
of campus morals.
Why is it necessary to have
the existing highly restrictive
dorm regulations, particularly in
the Towers Area? Not many
answers there. What is the need

I
.- < m Bpa
UF INFIRMARY
.. prompt, competent service
peuple already there. I only had
to wait about two minutes
before the nurse called my
name. Again she took me into a
little room and again the doctor
was there almost immediately.
I explained what had
happened and then he sent me
upstairs for x-rays. They took
six x-rays and only charged me
< ten dollars! My jaw was broken,
so the doctor referred me
directly to the Medical Hospital
and called a campus patrol to
take me over to the hospital.
. The.service d received at the
l n fir ni sMy was prompt,
incx pe n sive, and quite
competent. For those who have
the little aches and pains, I
suggest an Alka-Seltzer instead
of bothering the doctors and
then complaining about their
irrational decisions.

for, and justification of
collective punishment, sign-in
lists for guests and a host of
other individual dorm
regulations which are
bothersome, ineffective, and in
many instances unenforceable?
The issue here is not of
symbolic importance, but rather
a substantive issue concerning

iiiiiiiHHHiiHiHMiwMmMwmiiimHmmimromiwii^MiMmwwwwiHtimiiiimmHiiiHiiimHiwiHHiHitiHi
... what precisely is the objection to a24 hour
open house policy? This objection should be made
public. I assume the administration is concerned that
something adverse will happen. Handholding? Kissing?
Something more critical?

Slavery Still Exists!

MR. EDITOR:
Right under my nose, by
some process of mental deletion,
I had failed to notice a very
obvious fact. Slavery still Exists!
While walking over this massive
campus, noticing at intervals the
grass and all the other niceties
which must have required hours
of back-breaking work, I noticed
a crew of workers shoveling dirt.
Somehow the crew was all black.
There underneath the
coolness of a nearby shady tree
stood a white man watching the
black men work. I watched for a
length of time. At 10:00 AM he
shouted with a deep southern
accent, Break. The men rested
for fifteen minutes and then
they were back at it again.
Somehow there was
something else very typical
about this crew, not only were
the manual workers all black but
the watcher was white.
Up to now this fact had
remained hidden from me. It
goes bade a long way. When
people are so accustomed to
seeing things one way, somehow
they accept this way as normal,
or shall I say, the accepted way.
As a southerner might say, the
way it used to be, and the way it
should be.
After walking a little further I
noticed two blacks down in a
hole digging sweat dripping.
There underneath the coolness
of still another tree stood
pother white watcher.
Since I was very perturbed, I
walked up to the watcher and
asked, very politely, what was
his specific job. I wasnt able to
understand anything but his
name when he answered me.
(Even a second grade diploma
would not convince me of his
graduation because he could not
even communicate in English.! I

'Valid Oath Wasnt Signed

MR- EDITOR:
In Fridays Alligator, you erroneously reported
(in a UPI story) that I was a plaintiff in the loyalty
oath case heard in Orlando. Several members of the
faculty and staff were plaintiffs, but I was not
among them. Like many other members of the
faculty, I was willing to join the plaintiffs if that
would have been necessary.
I did testify at the hearing that I had never signed
the loyalty oath in the form requested by the
university and that I had been employed by the
university for more. than three years. I further
testified that President OConnell stated in March
(during the Slade affair) that he knew that I had not
signed the oath and that he knew that other
* i -* *t \ **'** V' *+ 4

basic rights. Plainly, what
precisely is the objection to a 24
hour open house policy? This
objection should be made
public. I assume the
administration is concerned that
something adverse will happen.
Handholding? Kissing?
Something more critical? If in
fact the purpose of the present

asked a blade worker was this
moron his boss, and he replied
yes.
I further inquired what the
white watchers duty was. The
black man thought for a
moment and then replied that he
did not rightly know but all he
did was stand up and watch
them do all the work.
I really thought America had
progressed far ahead these days,
but right there under our very
noses slavery still exists the
white master watching blade
men work.
Im sure that the work could
have been performed with equal
effidency without the white
watcher.
But no, white America you
must continue to make people
feel inferior. A crew just would
not look typical without a
lily-white watcher.
To you so-called white

BLACK WORKERS
... rite way it should be?

Tuesday, November 4,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

employees of the university had not signed the oath.
He asked me to revise the oath as 1 saw fit and in
March, 1969, I did sign an oath which contains
those parts of the oath left after Fridays ruling in
Federal Court.
There are at least two interesting questions which
remain to be answered. Why did President
OConnell attempt to require everyone to sign a new
oath at this time? Why did President OConnell
decide to enforce the law in October, 1969, even
though he had known for at least six prior
to that time that members of the university faculty
and staff had never signed a valid form of the
loyalty oath.
KENNETH A. MEGILL
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
} > > > j -,/ . 4'i t \ > * j .wV * * f

policy is based on the possiblity
of limiting sexual activity, the
policy seems doomed in its more
complex aspects.
The administration refuses to
accept the idea that the
responsibility for certain highly
significant and personal affairs
should be in the hands of the
students themselves. However,
students have the power to
obtain basic rights if they can
agree on a particular course of
action, and follow the dictates
of their position. In lieu of such
resolute activity, nothing can be
won except what the
administration sees fit to grant.
RICHARD McCULLOCH, 4AS

liberals, these are the things we
as blacks have to walk around
this campus and face everyday.
You always over us. Not because
you are more quaftfied but
because you are white.
1 sincerely believe that if
mentality tests were given to the
crew I approached, the blacks
would have outscored the white
radst watcher in eveiy category.
To the Physical Plant
Department: its time you did
away with such white radst
practices. You are furthering an
institution that this place of
higher learning should be the
first to help destroy.
We blades are tired of your
institutionalized racist tactics
and tired of being watched like
we were sub-humans destined to
the hard back-breaking chores of
life. You can do better.
ERNEST K. JOHNSON, 111, 3AS

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 4.1909

Page 8

Orange d

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

VISTA applications are
available at the International
Center, south of Walker Hall.
FULBRIGHT PROGRAM
Adviser at the International
Center has received the final list
of participating countries in the
one year program for American
seniors or graduate students
wishing to compete for the
overseas study/research grants in
1970-71.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
Dec. 6. The last day for receipt
by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, NJ., 08540,
is Nov. 12 for application and
$lO fee for reading knowledge
examinations in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
Registration fees increase $3 after
Nov. 12 and up to the closing
date of Nov. 19.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 6, at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 235 Tigert Hall.
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses
listed below are expected to
take the test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
CEH 131 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 210, 203,
205 or 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matheriy 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 1
*. %#OUl* e T \ /
Why miss Out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From \ /Hy IF
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... TjSR/ /7
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, *^7
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole t j/

104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110, or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CEH 132 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
(M-Z) to Peabody 101, 102,
112, or 114.
CPS 121 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday,
November 6, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11. 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matheriy 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wendesday,
November 5, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Walker Auditorium; (M-Z) to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.

BLUB BULLETIN

NOV. 10: UNION CARBIDE
Linde Div. ChE, ME, EE,
MetE, Engr. Sd. *; GENERAL
MILLS, INC. Business, Mktg.;
RAYMOND INTER INTERNATIONAL,
NATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL, INC. CE, BCN;
J.B. IVEY & CO. Any majors;
MAAS BROTHERS; FLORIDA
JUNIOR COLLEGE AT
JACKSONVILLE;
ALEXANDER GRANT & CO.;
FLORIDA STATE ROAD
DEPT.; PRENTICE-HALL,
INC.; RIEGEL TEXTILE
CORP.; ALABAMA POWER
CO.; FLORIDA AGRICUL AGRICULTURAL
TURAL AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
SERVICES; DEPT. OF
HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT; GT & E
DATA SERVICES.
NOV. 10 & 11: GENERAL
ELECTRIC COMPANY PHD
DIV.
NOV. 11: GRAND UNION
CO.; DEPT OF THE NAVY
CIVILIAN PERSONNEL DIV.;
NORTH AME RICAN
ROCKWELL; STATE FIRE
INSURANCE COS.;
WASHINGTON NATIONAL
INSURANCE CO. Lib. Arts,
Bus. Ad. *; WESTERN UNION
TELEGRAPH CO. ME, IE,
EE, Math, CS, Acct., Mgmt.,
Eco., Sta., Law *.
NOV. 11 & 12: ST. REGIS
PAPER CO.
NOV. 11, 12 & 13:
PROCTER & GAMBLE CO.;
THE BELL SYSTEM.
NOV. 12: AL JOHNSON
CONSTRUCTION CO.; TRW
SYSTEMS; SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE CO. OF
CANADA; INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE;
KIMBERLY-CLARK CORP.;
AIR PROVING GROUND
CENTER ELGIN AFB; J.C.
PENNY CO.; THE RUST
ENGINEERING CO.
NOV. 12 & 13:
DEPARTMENT OF THE
ARMY.
CANCELLATIONS: NOV. 12
- U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH
SERVICE; PENNSYLVANIA
DEPT, of HIGHWAYS
* U. S. Citizenship Requried.
GENERAL NOTICES
VOTER EDUCATION
RALLY will be held November
3 at noon in the Plaza of the
Americas. Speakers will be
President Stephen C.
O'Connell, the Honorable
Ralph Turlington and Senator
Bob Saunders. Come and
support it's your education.
Sponsored by the UF Young
Democrats.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus
Tuesday
November 4
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 8t 4:00 p.m.
Union Movie "Genesis I", Union
Aud., 7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Veterans Club
Meeting, Rathskeller, 7:00
p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Air Force Dames Tupperware
Party, Air Force ROTC
Library, 7:30 p.m.
Jujitsu Club Meeting, South
end of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Latin American Club Meeting,
355 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Baroque Ensemble,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday
November 5
V. i
Reitz Union Indian Dinner, 150
C & D Union, 4:00 p.m.
Befrienders Dinner Meeting,
1804 N.W. 39th Avenue,
6:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Scoiety
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
*

Calendar
Thursday
November 6
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Association for Childhood
Education Meeting, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Union Speaker: Jerry Uelsmann,
122 Union, 7:30 pm
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Student Contractors and
Builders Association Meeting,
349 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Fridav
November 7
Union Movie, "Odd Couple",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.. Please Bring Sets.
UNION BOX OFFICE
"LA TR AVI ATA", $3.00,
$2.00 and $1.50. Florida
Players, "A COMPANY OF
WAYWARD SAINTS", $1.50,
Faculty, Staff 8i General Public;
SI.OO High School Students;
$.75 Univ. of Fla. Students.
Rathskeller Membership, $2.00.



*GAT O R CLASSIFIEDS

'#* %V V>vv*>
| FOR SALE
Regency CB radio 12 channels
included 5 Ft. fiberglass antenna with
bumper mount. 5 mo. old. $130,00
376-9971 after 4 p.m. (A-3t-34-p)
Why pay rent? Build salable equity in
a Scam Mobile Home and iot
financing available on both home and
lot to qualified buyers. Contact our
retail sales lot 3506 N. Main St. Ph.
376-5207. (A-14t-34-p)
1969 Honda 350 scrambler $575.
Very clean 4200 miles. Call Frank
373-1523. (A-2t-34-p)
THE proven carpet cleaner Blue
Lustre is easy on the budget.
Restores forgotten colors. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowery
Furniture Co. (A-lt-34-p)
Nikkorex camera body with 180 mm
F 35 lens. SSO. Fits Nikon lenses
peacock manual, hi fi turntable, Shure
arm, S2O. G. Winius, Ext 392-0271.
(A-4t-31-p)
1966 HONDA 65. Excellent
condition, low mileage, make offer.
Call 372-9757 after 5 p.m. (A-st-31-p)
1969 HONDA 50 Only 250 miles
Book rack and helmet included.
SIBO. Call 392-8208 after 7:30 p.m.
(A-st-34-p)
For Sale. Brand new 54 volume set
of Great Books and Syntopieon.
S3OO or best offer. Call 378-3923.
(A-st-30-p)
GunsGunsGunsInventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
( A-ts-6-p)
Honda 305 Dream 1965 runs good.
Must sell $275 or best offer. Call
372- (A-3t-33-p>)
Stereo Components Dual Turntable
Speakers and amp new cost 375. Sell
for $275. Call Steve 376-4911.
(A-3t-33-p)
:.\Xv:-:-x.Nx.:&*J9?;YXWW*x-x*x*x-X4ft
FOR RENT I
Beautiful furnished mobile home. 2
bedroom, 2 bath, study, living room,
and kitchen. Central air and heat. 68"
long. Call Liz at 373-2210. (B-st-31-p)
Female wanted to sublet LaMancha
apt. either for winter qtr. only, or
for the rest of the year. (Has private
bedrooms) Call 376-6 951.
(B-2t-34-p)
tt/g^OCCCC'X-X-NNXX-X-X-X-X-V-V-SV'SWOOeCA
I WANTED I
1 or 2 female roommates for Village
Park apartment. $42.50/mo. Call
3 73-1962. (C-st-31-p)
LITTLE HOUSE needs male
roomate. 4 blocks down NW 16th St.
$3 7 mo. 1538 NW 4th Ave.
373- (c-3t-34-p)
WANTED Female to live with
mature woman In exchange for room
and board. Occasional light houswork
(washing dishes), limited visitors, but
no strict hours. For remainder of
quarter. Call 372-3851 after 5:30
p.m. (C-3t-34-p)
PAPERBACKS WANTED! Clean out
your bookshelves and bring your old
paperback books to the Browsing
Library, 2nd floor, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. A section of the Browsing
Library has been prepared for
paperbacks and will be operated on
an exchange basis. (C-st-32-c)
| HELP WANTED j
HELP WANTED: TTS tape punch
operator. Student wife preferred but
will consider student who can work
regular schedule at least 20 hours per
week. Experience desirable but will
consider person with good typing
(60wpm or better). Good pay.
Regular hours, no Saturday. Storter
Printing Co., 1024 S. Main St., Phone
376-2658. (E-2t-18-p)
Girls extra income, part time, full
time, receptionists, telephone girls,
typists, etc. Late shift 3pm to 9pm.
Bonus plan set you own pay. Apply
in person 2929 NW 13 St. Suite. 3
10am to 4pm. (E-3t-l-p)
REDPM oX I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
_ GAMES AREA

| HELP WANTED |
Charles Chips has 2 areas open. 21
years old with sales ability 2:30 to
6:30 p.m. Commission basis
376-6943. Mr. Welch. (E-st-32-p)
Cashier co-ed wanted part-full time
to work for that unsoggy fried
chicken place. Call Bill Macomber
378-0536 for interview. Wishbone
Chicken (E-3t-32-p)
Men interested in sales for better
than average commissions. Full
training, no experience necessary. No
door to door, or travel. Apply in
person 2929 NW 13th St. Will not
interfere with school. Between 10 am
& 3 p.m. (E-3t-l-p)
n nin;rnil^rQl n yiQQflyflTQf
AUTOS
C'U...-.-.,. 1 n r o c QiQiQiqF
VW 1966 new tires, radio, low
mileage, dark green owned by
female student. $925. Call 372-5796.
(G-st-34-p)
67 Cougar, light blue, automatic
transmission, power brakes, power
steering, air cond., call 376-0329.
(G-st-34-p)
6 8 Triumph TR2SO Must sell
asking 2,350 8000 miles. Call
372-1694. (G-st-30-p)
Must sell yellow 1966 Mustang 289
four barrel with heavy duty clutch
and suspension. Asking $1250. Call
Ed at 373-1473 anytime after five.
(G-st-32-p)
1969 Chevy Impala automatic, radio,
heater, vinyl top. Must sell honest!
$650? Ph. 372-1792. (G-4t-32-p)
I PERSONAL
SINGLE WOMEN! Computer Dating
is fun. No fee charge. Free
processing. All your dates will be in
Gainesville. For free compatibility
questionnaire write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-34-st-p)

1 '1 -
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
V 2 BROILED CHICKEN
Yellow Rico <£] Q
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti
yy(
ir S GAINESVILLE MALL
yiVyip* mm m
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
for
Florida Players production of
A COMPANY OF
WAYWARD SAINTS
"a farce-comedy*
Opens November 10
H.P. Constans Theatre, 8:00 PM. v
u. of F. Students: $.75 General Admission: sl-50
All seats are reserved. Box Office: 392-1653

Tuesday, November 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL |
> s
^vo.r.s--:-x^x-x.x.:xxw>x*x-x-xw x > xs&
The Gainesville Coin Club meets at
Bpm on Tuesday, Nov. 4, in the
Guaranty Federal Building, 220 N.
Main. Visitors are welcome.
(J-2t-33-p)
Adorable, loveable kitten needs
home. Male, half-Siamese, playful.
Free delivery plus 1 can cat food.
Litter trained. Call 378-4554 after 6.
(J-2t-34-p)
Free puppies, 2 month old mixed
Beagle (mostly mixed) 376-5511.
(J-lt-34-p)
Desire information concerning
existance, location of communal
living groups, how to join, or form,
etc. Call 392-7825. (J-3t-27-p)
i LOST & FOUND i
< S Sxx-xxxxcc*xxx*x.x*nssx>x*>xx*x*B
xx-xxxxcc*xxx*x.x*nssx>x*>xx*x*B Sxx-xxxxcc*xxx*x.x*nssx>x*>xx*x*B
Lost female Terrier 8 mos. old tan.
Has flea collar with tags. Call
376-9996 after 5:00. (L-2t-33-p)
Lost 8 month old female Irish Setter
Monday in SW section. Please call
378-6480. (L-3t-33-p)
Lost thru 10-23 on way to Peabody
or Towers & dorms, goldplate pin,
showing 2 intertwined rings
(memory) reward if returned, please
call 378-5504. (L-3t-32-p)
,*.v;x:x*x<*x*r*:x SERVICES |
Joy's Paint & Body Shop. 2017 N.E.
27th Ave. Gainesville, Fla. Student
Special Any car or color $49.95.
Come see us. You will find us a
"Joy to do business with."
(M-st-34-p)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)

Page 9

I SERVICES I
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carme!
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you can't beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Student Discount has free delivery
and 10 to 40% discount on all soap
rasors, blades, cigarettes, deodorant,
hair products, kieenex, etc. Call
373-2757 between 1 and 5
(M-st-32-p)
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS. L126V4
N.W. Bth Street, 376-8506.
(M-st-31-p)
Repeat Special your portable
typewriter cleaned, adjusted,
lubrcated & new ribbon installed
(SAVE $10.00). Now $12.50.
Standard typewriters $19.50. AH
work guaranteed. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620Vz S. Main St., Call
376-1146. (M-10t-24<)

f CENTER 1
/CHARLTON HESTON JESSICA WALTER
* "NUMBER ONE V
I "CAN HERIONYMUS MERKIN EVER I
\ FORGET MERCY HUMPPE AND FIND j
Y true HAPPINESS?" /
FLORIDA J
FUNNY GIRL S
I one I
I hip magazine I
I that hasnt I
I sold out. I

. "M'*\ H
I We'd like to, of course. probably waiting to be 1
I restocked (if he isn't, tell 1
I But when you only come him to get on it). I
I out once a quarter, you 1
J have to print enough to Oh, we II sell out eventually. 1
I last a quarter. 1
I But not until you get yours. I
I And there are still enough /Y
I Quarterlies for you and flOrilltt
I your friends. /\ r | / I
I So if your neighborhood (fUUTICTIff I
I bookseller doesn't have w k I
I them in the racks, he's You ve got it coming. |

/!Pffl2v
/ W \
/ KATHERINE HEPBURN \
I TH6 LION IN WINT6R J
J \
/ Ifflwy \
M | r rr> *>* w an* ! %
/ LAST 3 DAYS \
/ VIXEH \
iWilll UNDER 17 ]
If ADMITTED . .I
\M AGE PROOF /
REQUIRED /



The
Florida i
Alligator |

Gators Fortunate To Play Georgia

Br
m m
s N aSb I ?,'.. I
HHHHhL
AUBURN'S LARRY WILLINGHAM INTERCEPTS
... hauls in first of three against Gators

Maliska Okay, But Out For Season

By CHUCK PARTUSCH 1
Assistant Sports Editor

Gator split end Paul Maliska,
who was in critical condition
Saturday and Sunday after i
incurring a severe brain i
concussion during the
Florida-Auburn game, will <
return home to Winter Park
today to recuperate, Coach Ray i
Graves said. i
Maliska, Graves said, is not
expected to play again this year.
Coach Graves said that the
6-foot-l, 183-pound Maliska is
now doing fine and i
neurosurgeons at the Columbus
Medical Center told him they do
not expect any further
complications.
Maliska's injury occurired
during the third quarter when he
cracked-back to throw a block
for Tommy Durrance, who was
running a sweep.
When Maliska made contact
his helmet was pushed up in
such away that his neck and the

GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
-Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
guns and ammo. Bring this
ad and your student I.D.
card j.
offerexpires NOV. 8
1969
Harry Beckwith Gun Dealer
Micanopy, Fla. Ph 466-3340

GATOR

back of his head were exposed.
As Durrance was tackled an
unidentifiable players knee
struck Maliska in the pile-up.
Although stunned after the
play, Maliska, who had received
one pass good for 40 yards,
made his way back to the
sidelines where he made motions
of trying to clear his head.
He appeared all right
momentarily, but then without
further warning he collapsed to
the turf.
After a quick look by Gator
trainer Brady Greathouse at
Maliska, an ambulance was
called to rush the two-year
letterman to Columbus, some 40
miles away.
Maliska was taken to the
Columbus Medical Center
because it was the nearest
hospital with a neurosurgeon,
team officials said.
Maliska, after preliminary
observation, was placed in the
hospitals intensive care unit
where he remained unconscious
for 20 hours, a hospital

SAYS GATOR COACH RAY GRAVES

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
In away, were fortunate in playing Georgia, Ray Graves said.
If we were playing the Citadel or Richmond Id worry about the
team bouncing back.
But Graves, the UF football coach, isnt fearing a letdown this week
as the Gators prepare for their game with Georgia Saturday afternoon
in Jacksonville.
The UF lost its chance for an unbeaten season Saturday in its 38-12
loss to Auburn but Graves indicated that neither he or the team will
dwell on the fact.
All were talking and thinking about is Georgia, he said. And
when we play Georgia theres incentive.
The Bulldogs defeated UF last fall 51-0. Incentive, yes.
Were crippled and bruised, Graves said. Our physical condition
is causing us some concern. Raul Maliska suffered a head injury in
Saturday's game and may be out for the season. Defensive tackle
Robbie Rebols knee was injured but he may be ready for the Miami
game, Graves said.
Os the Auburn game, Graves said, They played zone defense
better than any team in the nation. But we beat ourselves. I told the
team that we couldnt afford to make mistakes.
He added that the Gators cant make mistakes against Georgia,
either. They play control football and dont make many mistakes.
In other developments, linebacker Eric Taggart, who broke his nose
in the Auburn game was okayed for Saturday and defensive tackle
Danny Williams, who suffered a sprained ankle, will play against
Georgia.
Graves said that offensive captain-tackle Mac Steen played his best
game of his career and also cited tackles Jack Youngblood, Bob
Coleman and Rebol as having outstanding games on defense.

spokesman said.
His condition was listed by
the hospital as critical to fair
until he regained consciousness
Sunday morning.
Maliska's older brother, Chris,
who had been flown in by dose
friends during the early morning,
was one of the first to speak to
him.
Chris said after talking to his
brother for a few minutes and
finding out he was all right,
someone mentioned that he
probably wouldnt be able to
play any more this year. Paul

* V
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the- longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You won't
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor
mation about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing US. time
zones, youll fi. d 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones' life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isn't
it time owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

SAM PEPPER CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

Page 10

reportedly responded by saying
bull, that he was fine and
wanted to do what he could to
make the Gators 9-1 or maybe
10-1 for the year.
Graves said the doctors
recommend he be kept out for
the rest of the year, but added
they would conduct more tests
and later it would be determined
whether or not it would be safe
for Paul to come back.
Were not counting on
haying him back for the season,
Graves said. His loss, he said, will
certainly make things thinner at
the receiving positions.

I v^*^TE I
I FRESH SEA SQUAB OR GROUPER I
Including AL >- YOU CAN EATI JK I
French Fries ADULTS 31
I iTriTn W "' StoW CHILDRE N *lls I
I PIRATE S COVE LOBSTER HOUSE I
I "SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA*-* I
I oca ERV,NG DA,LY FROM I
HWY. OWEN SUNDAY 12-9
% Mi* South I 3500 S. W. 13th ST.
of HoMoy Inn I ON MV AN ARM LAKE
1 PHONE622-6SS6 | RHONE 375-1931 |

i. The Florida AlUgrtor, Tuesday, November 4, 1960

1 Pep Rally |
k §
$: A pep rally for the,Georgia £
I game has been slated for the §
halftime break of the Baby |
. Gators game Friday at §
jij' Florida Field. 8
$ The Gators take on the |
>: Bulldogs at the Gator Bowl in 8
% Jacksonville next Saturday at 8
&;2pjn. |
Qmz&u
a
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

>% p 4 >



TUEMENT PACES VICTORY
Gator Skiers Win Tourney

UFs Gator ski team remains
undefeated after an impressive
victory in Saturdays
intercollegiate tournament at
Lake Wauburg.
The Gators won first place in
every event in both mens and
womens divisions as well as all
three overall team titles.
Florida won the team overall
with 650 points. Tampa
University was second with 350
and the University of South
Florida third with 234. Rollins
and St. Petersburg Junior
Colleges also participated but
did not field complete teams.
Tampa University, led by
scholarship skier Alan Kempton,
won four event second places

p NATION-SEC 1
Players Os Week
BY UPI ~

Manning
Archie Manning of Mississippi,
who poked holes in the nations
fourth stingiest defense, has
been named in the United Press
International Backfield of the
Week for the second time this
year.
Until Louisiana State tangled
with Manning, the Tigers had
yielded only 7 3 points per game
but Archie scored 20 and
accounted for 26 in an upset
that earned him a berth in the
weekly big four along with Jon
Staggers of Missouri, Jim Carter
of Minnesota and Steve Owens
of Oklahoma.
Owens, with 248 yards and
four touchdowns in 53 carries
against lowa State, was picked
for the third time this season.
Watson
Tennessee fullback Curt
Watson, who ran 197 yards in
the rain against Georgia
Saturday afternoon for a school
record, today was named
Southeastern Offensive Player of
the Week by United Press
International.
The Cumberland Mountain
sophomore from Crossville, led a
tough Vol ground attack to a
17-3 win over the Bulldogs at
Athens, Ga., edging quarterback
Archie Manning of Mississippi
for the offensive honors.
Manning turned in another
great performance against LSU.
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
A over America people are taking to the
ky...young and old...some Just for the fun
" other* because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying tripe to out-of-town
customers.
try a lesson
USt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
lntroductory Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
lying ease. Come visit us todaiy.
1378-26*61
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
jgU Waldo Road
*7 iHi'.j.'-m?

and two overall second places.
John Bedmgfield led the
Gators to the victory with 140
points. He did not win a first in
any event but placed second in
slalom and jumping and third in
tricks.
Jacques liHement supplied the
Gator men with first place
finishes in both slalom and
tricks. He set a new
intercollegiate record in tricks
with a one-run total of 2383.5
points.
Pat Boutchyard also recorded
a double Gator victory with
firsts in slalom and jumping. She
ran 32 buoys in slalom which is
one short of the intercollegiate
record she set last spring.
Womens tricks were won by

HOWS
THIS
FORA
CHALLENGE?

Rust is an engineering-construction firm thats
9,000 people strong and 12,000 contracts old.
We are committed to an unusually high growth
rate during the next five years. We need young
and eager architects, civil, mechanical and elec electrical
trical electrical engineers to step in and help achieve or
surpass that growth.
With Rust, your professional development
comes fast. And you have the opportunity to ex expand
pand expand your interest in the newer disciplines that

Our representative willJte on campus
November 12, 1969 D1 IQTITI
THE RUST ENGINEERING CO.
DIVISION OF LITTON INDUSTRIES
i
i ii
9 If*
I m
m
1
I V
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another determined Gator, Kim
Anton. Bill Cox won the mens
jumping for the Gators with a
leap of 91 feet.
Another chapter was written
in the Tillement/Kempton duel
in trick skiing when Kempton
fell on his run and received 1660
(good enough for second place)
and Tillement followed him with
the record breaking run.
Bedingfield, tournament
chairman,* said, The
tournament lived up to my
expectations and everyone said
it was the best intercollegiate
they had ever been to.

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_ t _

Page 11



!,Th# Florida AMgator, TuMdiy, November 4, 1960
- . j. m m . . j . 1 u W * .W. 9 iL

Page 12

Vols Too Much For Bulldog Defense

ATLANTA (UPI) Georgias
Vince Dooley had been warning
folks all season that the
Bulldogs defensive unit was too
light to stand up to powerhouse
teams like Tennessee.
Saturday, much to his sorrow,,
he was proven right.
We have our trouble and
now everyone knows what they
are, Dooley said after the
third-ranked Vols beat the
Uth-nnked Bulldogs 17-3.
Were awfully small on
defense and it caught up with
%
US.
Tennessee, whose interior
offensive line had a 30 pound
per man weight advantage over
Georgias defensive front five,
ripped off 386 yards rushing
mostly on power bursts by
] jWfIWCWWWKWWV--NVAV.'.v.j
| SPORTS
![, BRIEFS |
Goff Tourney
The UF Faculty Golf Club is
sponsoring a scotch-foursome
tournament Saturday, Nov. 16
at the University Golf Club.
The tourney is open to all
faculty and their wives
(husbands), with the event
designed for both the novice and
par golfer.
The entry fee for non-faculty
chib members is $1 plus green
fees. Just greens fees are
required of club members.
Reservations can be made up
until Nov. 15 at the Golf Club.
Miami Floridians
MIAMI (UPI) Miami
Floridians coach Jim Pollard met
with rookie Larry Cannon
Monday and had a favorable
discussion of a blowup that saw
the $250,000 bonus player stalk
off the court Sunday night
during a game against New York.
Pollard said after the one-hour
closed door meeting that he and
Cannon straightened out our
attitudes toward each other and
the team.
Pollard said he had ireduced
the $250 fine he slapped on
Cannon after the blowup, but
wouldnt say how much die fine
was reduced.
I think well have a fine ball
player that will do his best from
here on in, Pollard said.
Larry is a good competitor
and the limited time I played
him last night got to him and he
just blew up, the coach added.
Cannon was sent into the
game for 90 seconds during the
second period and promptly
removed after the Nets scored
eight quick pants.
Words were exchanged,
Cannon kicked a folding chair,
went to the showers, dressed and
left the game with his wife at the
half.
The Floridians won the game
103-98 its first win after five
straight losses.
After, he stormed into the
showers, Cannon charged, Im
being treated like a bum. Once
up the court, once down it and
Fm back on the bench. Im so
confused I dont know whats
. ; **
Happening.
Pollard and Floridians
officials denied rumors that
Cannon had asked to be released
from his four-year contract or
wanted to be traded.

VINCE DOOLEY WARNED FANS

210-pound sophomore fullback
Curt Watson who gained a
school record 197 and tailback
Don McLeary who gained an
even 100.
Theres no doubt about it,
they beat us pretty good,
Dooley said. The difference
was the great play of the
Tennessee offensive line. When
youve got big guys like that up
front, phis those backs, its going
to tell especially on a team as
light as ours.
Actually, the Vols margin
should have been bigger than it
was but a steady rain that helped
cause a lot of fumbles helped
Georgia keep Tennessee at bay.

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We don't change our car outside
each year to make it look different.
But we constantly change it inside
to make it run better. And last longer.
This year, were introducing the
biggest change of all: A system to
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your car's life even longer.
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The Vols were trailing 3-0
with less than five minutes to go
in the first half before erupting

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for two touchdowns in less than
two minutes.
Georgia Tech appeared in
danger of suffering its fifth
straight loss Saturday before
rallying in thp final period to
beat Duke" 20-7. The Yellow
Jackets were behind 7-3 with
less than 14 minutes to play and
would have been in a lot worse
shape than that except for three
stellar goal line stands in the first
half.
But quarterback Jack
Williams, back off the injury list,
led Tech to 17 points in the
closing minutes.
Sophomore Brent
Cunningham didnt score for

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Tech Saturday, but he gained a
record 190 yards rushing. That
was 22 more than the old mark
that Bobby North set against
Auburn in 1949 the year
before Cunningham was bom.
This coming weekend,
Georgia, now 5*2, goes to
Jacksonville, Fla., to meet the
Florida Gators and Tech, 3-4,
travels to New Orleans to play
Tulane.
Florida, unbeaten and no. 9
nationally beforehand, took a
38-12 beating at the hand of
Auburn which intercepted nine
of sophomore quaterback John
Reaves passes. Tulane was edged
by Vanderbilt 26-23.