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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
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Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Kafii
-Ass

Fo/. 62, No. 52

DELETES 2 PORTIONS

District Judge Young
Alters Loyalty Oath

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KENNETH MEGILL
... wouldn't object

UF Student-Police
Liaison Underway

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Campus PoliceStudent
Liaison Commission, established
last week by Student Body
President Charles Shepherd, is
ready to start accepting
complaints from students
concerning student-police
conflicts.
John M. Parker, commission
chairman, on Thursday said
students who have a complaint
should contact the SG
Ombudsman at 392-1650, or call
Parker at 378-1711.
Shepherd created the six-man
commission by directive after
students had asked for a system
that would promote dialogue
between the student and
policeman on campus.
Parker said he is willing to
listen to anyone.
The purpose of the
committee is to establish a
-rapport between the student body
and police. We make
THERE ARE very few
tickets remaining for the
UF-Aubum game ... 20
Small Society 6
Editorials
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Sports 20
Whats Happening 3

House Passes Lottery 77

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

ORLANDO, Fla. (UPI)
U.S. District Judge George
Young agreed Thursday to
alter portions of a loyalty
oath opposed by a group of
University of Florida
professors.
Young made the decision
during a hearing on a petition,
by University of Florida
philosophy professor Dr.
Kenneth Megill and 10 otheis
for a court order restraining
University President Stephen C.
OConnell from requiring
professors and other staff
members to sign the loyalty
oaths.
OConnell Monday asked for a

recommendations to the police
so they can better serve the
students.
Audie Shuler, Campus Police
Chief, said Thursday the
commisssion will work in
general Policy Procedure
areas.
They would be concerned
with how we can serve the
university better. They wouldnt
make recommendations on
things like traffic tickets, these
will still go to the student traffic
court.
Shuler said he hasnt met with
the committee yet to determine
what type of working
relationship his department will
have with it.
Students now complain to
The Florida Alligator, he said.
We never hear about their
complaint until we read about it
in the newspaper.
Most of our contact with the
student is when we issue him a
parking ticket, and no one likes
to have that type of relationship,
especially the student.
Shuler said his department
wants to show the student that
campus police do other things
beside give out tickets.
To do this, Shuler and the
coordinating committee have
worked out a plan which allows
committee members the
opportunity to ride around
campus in police cars observing
the petroling operation.
This gives the student a
chance to learn about the details
of police work. They should
know the hows and whys of our
job, Shuler said.

University of Florida, Gainesville

hasty court ruling on the
constitutionality of a revised
loyalty oath.
He did so in a letter to State
University Chancellor Robert B.
Mautz in which he (OConnell)
asked the Board of Regents to
endorse his request for a
speedy answer on the
constitutionality of the oath
form.
The issue began to snowball
Wednesday when the American
Association of University
Professors (AAUP) sent a letter
to OConnell asking that the
President either rescind the
order or delay the effective date
of enforcement
AAUP hinted that UF might
be acting alone in ordering the
signing and was doing so on a
calculated attempt to cany
out a last minute purge of
r professors whose views it finds
unacceptable or embarrassing.
The AAUP letter said the
loyalty oath beiug circulated was
unconstitutional because it
violates a 1967 UJS. Supreme
Court decision saying mere
membership in the Communist
Party should not be grounds for
dismissal.
The portion! which will be
deleted as ordered by Young
involve membership in the
Communist Party or
organizations advocating the
overthrow of the government.
Megill has said at the outset of
the hearing he would not object
to signing an oath that
supported the UJS. and Florida
constitutions.

'V T7. 1 -wo.
DICKENS

John Englehardt and Jan Dickens were appointed
along with Joe Hilliard to Gov. Kiiks advisory
counpil.
The three students will represent UF on the
council which is to serve as a discussion forum for
subjects relevant to Floridas campuses.
Representatives from each of the states universities
and junior colleges were named to the council by
Kirk.
Englehardt was recently appointed first student
president of the Reitz Union. As secretary of
finance under Student Body President Clyde Taylor,
he was named the Outstanding Cabinet Member,
and he was budget director during the first two
quarters of Charles Shepherds term.

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Two More Chosen
For Kirks Council

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WHICH IS WITCH?
~
Not going to be outdone by a dime store spook. Gator goblin
Marian Jo Jedrusiak, lUC, does an unusually good job of imitating
Student Government's Halloween mascot. Actually Marian was
coaxed into this witchly posture by Alligator photographer Phil Cope.

I feel that this board is a good opportunity to
open up long-needed lines of
communication between the students of state
colleges and universities and Florida's lawmakers,"
he said.
' Miss Dickens is president of Savant, women's
leadership honorary, and of Delta Delta Delta
sorority. She is also a member of Mortar Board,
another leadership society.
She said she hopes the council would discuss the
policy on demonstrations and illegal drugs.
"Maybe if the council is listened to by Gov. Kirk
and his aides, it will benefit the students," she said.
The state government needs the students' point of
view.

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Friday, October 31,1969
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ENGLEHARDT



Page 2

, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 31,1969

Resolution To Renew 24-Hour Open house right

By NEALSANDERS
Alligator Staff Writar
On the basis of overwhelming support from a
Twin Towers* petition circulated Wednesday, UF*s
Interhall Council and a towers* group plan to
introduce a resolution into the Student Senate next
week to renew that area's fight for 24 hour open
house.
Bill Armstrong, 3AS, Thursday said results of a
petition demanding unlimited open house gave near
unanimous support to earlier resolutions passed by
Interhall and die Presidents Committee on Open
Housing.
We {dan to introduce a resolution into the
Senate Tuesday night, he said. Basically stated,
the resolution will affirm the towers is unlike any

Parking Board Discusses Problems

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The Parking and
Transportation Commission met
with Vice President for Business
Affairs William Elmore
Wednesday to discuss many of
those traffic problems which still
exist.
Commission chairman Harvey
Alper said busses, previously
naked will be properly labeled
and research done on the
problem of people riding the
buses who have not paid for the
service by purchasing a decal.
The fact that people who have

'Vote For Education Bill Rally
Slated For Plaza On Monday

A Vote for Education rally
slated for noon Monday at the
Plaza of the Americas will seek
to generate support for the
Higher Education Building
Amendment which will go
before the voters Nov. 4.
The amendment would
authorize tax certificates for
construction at Floridas
universities, junior colleges and
vocational schools; it would also
permit a form of tax-backed
bond where the state borrows

OConnell Leads Speakers
For Higher Education Bill
UF President Stephen C. OConnell Monday will lead a
distinguished lineup of speakers in a rally for the NoV. 4 vote on the
higher education amendment.
The rally, sponsored by the Young Democrats and several other
campus groups, will start at noon in the plaza of the Americas and run
approximately two hours, said rally director Bruce Smathers.
Scheduled to speak in support of the higher education issue are
State Sen. Bob Saunders, Rep. Ralph Turlington, Councilman Neil
Butler, Student Body President Charles Shepherd, Student Senate
President Jack Vaughn and OConnell.
Students are urged to attend and show support for the ballot,
which goes before the voters the following day.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator wiR not be responsible for more than one >
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices A
for correction rhWWgWW tteftflrtfttnfcxt

BY INTERHALL COUNCIL, towers ukuut

INCLUDING BUS ASSESSMENT DECALS

not bought decals are using the
buses, is causing overcrowding.
This has led to complaints from
persons who have paid and
watch full buses pass them by.
When the original survey was
made, it was figured dorm
residents would walk as they
have in the past he said.
We will also be providing
additional motorcycle parking
spaces behind Hume, he said.
The system is still flexible,
Alper said. But, as soon as bus
stops are permanently
established, shelters will be
provided.
The traffic rules and

money now, paying back with
tax revenue increases created by
state growth in the future.
The rally will open with
entertainment by the UF Choir
and some members of the Gator
Band. Fifteen speakers are
scheduled including UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Santa Fe President Joseph
Fordyce, City Commissioner
Neil Butler, Ralph Turlington,
former speaker of the Florida
House of Representatives and

other dormitory on campus, and is, in fact, not a
dormitory at all.
Armstrong, Chairman of the Senate s Studen s
Rights Committee, said his eventual goal is to make
Vice President Lester Hale see towers as it is an
on-campus apartment unit.
Hale turned down Towers request last spring for
24 hour open house with the explanation that
towers was no different, from any other campus
dorm, and must abide by the same regulations.
We hope to see Hale before Tuesday,
Armstrong said. Our own proposal is for each
four-person unit to set their own open house hours,
with no_restrictions placed on the maximum number
of hours.
Joining in with Armstrong is Interhall President
Sue Johnson, who cited the all-upperclassman

present chairman of the House
appropriations committee.
State Sen. Robert Saunders,
Student Senate President Jack
Vaughn and Florida Blue Key
President Jack Harkness will also
speak. Coach Ray Graves will
appear with some of the football
players to remark on the
amendment. Also present will be
Interfratemity Council President
Steve Zack, Panhellenic Council
President Diane Baron and John
Marshall Bar Association
President Ben Patterson. The
program will last about an hour.
The rally is sponsored by the
UF Young Democrats to dispel
some of what the organizations
president Bruce Smathers calls
the apathy and ignorance
about the proposed amendment.

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regulations will also be
reprinted, hopefully in a style
which will be easier to
understand, Alper said.
The problems concerning the
Reitz Union parking lot were
also discussed.
Although students should
not have to pay for parking after
5 pjn., some of the ticket-takers
have been charging. We are
making sure this will no longer
be true, he said.
He said there have been
proposals to put meters in the
lot, but nothing is definite.
Sophomores with a 3.0
overall average who brought cars

residency requirement and self-contained living
units as reasons for exempting the Towers from
open house restrictions.
If approved Tuesday night, Miss Johnson said the
resolution would display such a show of hands
that Hale would agree, or else the vice-president
would have to show a more just cause than he has
stated to date.
We dont like to think in loco parentis is tied
up in this, she said, but we feel we can show
beyond any shadow of a doubt that towers is not
just another dorm.
We realize Hale is under pressure from all sides
on this issue. However, we want to make him see
towers request is Everyone in housing felt
this way, and now, it is up to us to make him see it
too, she said.
uiMuosm

to school because they were
unaware of the change in rules
which made it impossible for
them to buy a decal may be
allowed to register their cars, he
said.
But, even if they are allowed
to buy a decal, after this year
only juniors and seniors will be
permitted to register their cars.
Alper said no decision has
been made as to whether or not
refunds will be made to people
not using their sticker for the
whole year.
He also said unless students
have any more specific
complaints, his Commission will
submit its final report in a
couple of weeks and then
dissolve.
Any complaints which
students have could then be
addressed to Elmore.
UF Accident
Reports Rise
University police Lt. VJC.
Holliman reported a rise in
traffic accidents on the UF
campus this month.
In 1968, 28 traffic accidents
were reported on the UF campus
for the month of October but
there have been 66 in October of
this year.
However, none involved the
loss of human life.
JC Funds
Funds released to Floridas
27 junior colleges totaled $5.1
million during July, Comptroller
Fred 0. (Bud) Dickinson, Jr. has
reported.

o o
>
UF Senate
Approves
TwoPrograms
Two new degree programs
were approved Thursday by the
University Senate, who also
received a letter from UF
President Stephen OConnell
urging them to support the
Vote for Education rally
Monday.
The two new programs,
requested by the College of
Physical Education and Health,
include a Master of Arts in
Health Education, a thesis
program and a Master of Health
Education, a non-thesis program.
The proposed tenure policy
from the Academic Freedom
and Tenure committee also
passed with minor changes from
senate members.
Because of a discussion
concerning the conferring of
honorary degrees, all
non-members were asked to
leave the meeting at 5 p.m.



New Opinion Poll May Guide UF Policymaking

By Alligator Services
UF policymaking may soon be guided
by Pulse, a student opinion poll, and
this week the first Pulse concerning the
proposed University Activities Center is
being taken.
The opinion poll is being conducted
by the SG Pulse Committee headed by
Ralph Nobo and George Franks. James
L. Terhune, assistant professor in the
College of Journalism, is advising.
This weeks Pulse consists of five
questions:
Are you aware of any publicity for

Vice Chancellor Agrees
With Open Deans Council

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a series of stories
on the closed door policy of
UFs Council of Academic
Deans.)
By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
' y ; ; _', Cy'.f i j k
State University System Vice
Chancellor Phil Ashler said

Frosh Council Meets
After 5-Year Sleep

The recently resurrected
Freshman Council will convene
Monday for the first time in five
years to promote interest
among members of the class in
student activities.
Revived to fulfill Student
Body President Charles
Shepherds campaign promise to
stop wasting student talents
during the freshman year, the
group will discuss their goals and
functions.
Secretary of Interior Kevin
Davey, appointed advisor to the
group explained that they will
try to represent their peers to
the five IUC senators elected on
the spring ballot.
The Council has
representatives from all housing
areas, including off-campus, with
one councilman representing
every 100 students.

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BRING BRING
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the movement to build a coliseum for
this university?
Do you feel the UF needs a
coliseum?
Do you plan to vote in the Feb.
4th referendum?
i Are you willing to accept an
increase in tuition in order to pay for it?
(If yes) What increase in tuition
would you be willing to accept?
$5/quarter $6/quarter $7/quarter
SB/quarter $ 10/quarter
To make sure that the students
answer to the fifth question was not
influenced by the order in which the
answers were listed, the answers were

Thursday the closed doors of
UFs Council of Academic Deans
should be opened to the public.
Ashler said he considers the
deans council an official
body and should come under*
Floridas Govemment-in-the-
Sunshine law. However,
Attorney General Earl Faircloth
has given his opinion that a

The groups charter instructs
representatives to act as an
advisory body to the freshman
class; and in a service capacity
toward the betterment of the
University of Florida.
Shepherds own First Party
has a small majority over Focus
in the 35 member body. He is
expected to address the group
when it convenes at 7:30 p.m. in
room 347 of the Union. Officers
are scheduled to be elected early
in the meeting.

All Saints Day Mass
A folk mass will be celebrated by the Rev. Michael Gannon starting
at midnight tonight at the Catholic Student Center.
The mass will be for All Saints Day. Everyone is welcome to come
and join in the singing and pray for the Gators, Gannon said.

s

similar executive council would
not be required by law to be
open.
Ashler joins Chancellor
Robert Mautz in his opinion that
council should conduct open
meetings. Mautz formed the
deans council in 1963 when he
was vice president for academic
affairs here.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has yet to express his
opinion on the matter.
Presidential Assistant Rae
Weimer said OConnell has not
had time to prepare a statement
concerning the Council of
Academic Deans.
The deans council is
composed of the deans of UFs
colleges, the vice president afnd
assistant dean of academic
affairs, the registrar and the
library director. The council
votes on and presents unofficial
policy recommendations to the
University Senate and the
administration.

randomized.
Nobo said the committee made sure
the questions were worded in away so
that they are not pushing anything.
The poll will survey a totally
random sample of 315 students. Every
fifth name on the registrars printout of
enrolled students will be chosen.
The margin of error will be less than
six per cent, Nobo said. Because of the
brevity of this poll, tabulation will be
done by hand.
For this poll the students will be
telephoned. Later polls probably will be
lengthier. Students will then be
interviewed personally.

WHAT'S HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
UP EM THE SKY, IS IT A BIRD, A PLANE ... NO, THE GREAT
PUMPKIN HAS ARRIVED!!!: Ah, in most humble hommage the
Reitz Union is providing lots of goodies to celebrate Halloween. Cider,
doughnuts and caramel apples can all be purchased on the Union
Colonnade. Pumpkin pie is also available for just 10 cents in the
cafeteria, v
GAMES PEOPLE PLAY: The UF Chess Club meets tonight in
room 118 of the Union at 7.
ALPHABET ATTRACTION: The Lettermen, performing for Fall
Frolics, will have two shows in our beautiful, spacious,
comfortable ... gym. Oh, well, at least its a building. Curtain time
(thats a joke in itself) is at 7:30 and 10.
COME, LET US GATHER TOGETHER: At the Catholic Student
Center, on Sunday night at 8, for discussion sponsored by the married
couples committee.
OUT, OUT: The SMC has planned a general meeting for Sunday
night at 8 in rooms 361-363 of the Union. A film will be shown and
discussion about the March and Strike will occur.
IN THE BEGINNING: Genesis 1 will be presented by the
University Film Series on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday night at 7
and 9:30 in the Union Auditorium. The two hour program is by
independent young film makers and has won awards for experimental
films.

ART SUPPLIES
Oils, Water Colors, Palettes
Easy Park Right in Front
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engineers always have been.
See your Placement Director soon to arrange a
Q&A session with the Ebasco representative on
the above date. If this is not convenient, write to
College Relations Coordinator, Department 122,
Ebasco Services Incorporated, Two Rector
Street, New York, New York 10006. An Equal
Opportunity Employer.
EBASCO

Friday, October 31,1968, The Florida AlNootor,

Pulse will be conducted once a month
and each poll will focus on a different
topic. Nobo suggested the Hub,
Rathskeller and other UF facilities and
services as possible future poll topics.
Each quarter a new printout from the
registrar will be used. This will assure
randomization and accuracy of the poll:
Nobo and Franks said the effects of
Pulse had a tremendous possibility.
The poll will replace the
time-consuming question and answer
periods held in dorms.
Pulse will indicate areas where there
is a strong demand, Nobo said, and it
will get things done sooner.

RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL
HAS THE NEW
LED ZEPPEUN II
AT DISCOUNT PRICES

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator,' Friday, October 31,1969

Ticket Scalping
Could Result
In Expulsion

Newest UF Group
An Anti-Organization
The newest group on campus is an anti-organization organization.
Aquarius, composed of about 36 UF students, has no
organizational structure.
Its based on spontaneity thats why were not Chartered, says
Larry Woldenberg, organizer and leader of the society.
Woldenberg, a graduate student in Latin American history, says
Aquarius members have no great desire to be recognized by the school
in order not to lose this spontaneity.
Aquarius is non-sectarian and apolitical, according to Woldenberg.
While other organizations are trying to induce political change, we
dont think people are ready for it yet.
If you change the nature of the society, political change will come
of itself, he explains.
Aquarians believe that a logical way to begin changing society is to
change yourself. They advocate applying the basic creeds of love,
peace and non-violence to life.
We are trying to find an answer in this holocaust of egoism we
live in today, says Woldenberg. We are searching as a group.
He got the idea for the society while attending the Woodstock
Aquarian Music Festival last August in New York.
For three days, 400,000 people lived side by side. There were no
policemen there and there was no violence, no thefts or property
damage.
At the same time, they were cooperating with one another. It was
raining, and they were all helping each other to build fires or sharing
food, Woldenberg recalls.
Aquarius, he claims, is striving to achieve a similarly harmonious
communal situation on a more enduring basis.
The groups meetings are characterized by informality. I sort
of conduct them at the moment, says Woldenberg.
In them, we deal with the concept of Aquarius.
Recruiting** is done by word of mouth. Members ask their friends
to attend sessions.
Although Aquarius has no political or organizational features, it
does have some goals in mind.
We want to stimulate a cultural environment, says Woldenberg.
We'd like to bring quality films to students.
His group is planning to sponsor art movies of the type the
now-deceased State Theatre used to show.
He thinks films shown at the Reitz Union don't fulfill this cultural
function often enough. Once in a while theyll have a good show, but
they're inconsistent.
Although not yet sure of how the movie project will be handled,
Woldenberg believes Aquarius will probably get a sponsorship to
show them (the films) on campus.
Photography I
Bill R. Horne I
Green Studio) I
Miss Betsee Smith
THINKING OF CHRISTMAS? YOU SHOULD BE. I
And what would make a better present than a beautiful 1
color or blade & white portrait. And for students only, f
from now til December Ist you can get one Bxlo color
portrait for only $29.95 ... a gift that he or she will I
cherish forever. I
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By RALPH BETANCOURT
Alligator Writer
You might be in for expulsion or suspension
from the University or any lesser penalty for
selling your student ticket to some enthusiastic
Gator fan.
With prices of student tickets for the
FloridaGeorgia game reaching the $lO mark,
officials of the Committee on Student Conduct
and the Honor Court are searching the books for
the legality of such ticket sales.
Two possibilities for violation, both very
nebulous, appear in the University Regulations
on Student Conduct. The first is under Section
D.3.C., which determines the following
violations: forgery, alteration, or misuse of

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;ij Members of Aquarius, a newly formed campus-community >
organization, will be visiting houses not to trick or treat but >
ij to give candy away. :
: This is to symbolize that in the act of giving, one receives. >
: We should cooperate in working out a solution to our common :
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Woldenberg said that anyone who would like to go with the >:
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Friday, October 31.1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octorber 31, 1968

Black Coeds Seize
Vassar Building

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y.
(UPI) Vassar College officials
said Thursday they would not
give in to the demands of 50
black coeds who took over a
section of the schools
administration building.
We will make no concessions
under duress, a spokesman for
President Alan Simpson told the
girls at the exclusive school.
The Negro coeds immediately
responded that the
administrations statement was
not adequate and vowed to
remain barricaded in Simpsons
office.
The students qdietly took
over the central section of
Vassars main building before
dawn. The occupied area is the
campus main administration
Center. Classrooms to either side
of the area and dormitory
facilities above it in the same
building were not involved.
Service at the main dining hall
nearby was shut off by the
takeover.
The girls took over the
college's main switchboard and
were answering all incoming
calls.
Its quiet here, were just
waiting for the administration to
answer us, the girl on the
telephone said. Some classes
are being held, I guess.
She said a number of white
students were standing outside
the seized building, indicating
Old Architecture
The oldest governors mansion
flying the U. S. flag is the
residence of Puerto Ricos
governor in San Juan, says the
National Geographic.

ALBERT SPECIAL
from Phillips 66
Jumbo Size Coca Cola
- at your participating m jk 1 m Wffthk (til 11/
fillips dealer,
~ wl
support for the takeover.
We have shut down Vassar,
said a spokesman for the group.
She said that nearly all of the 59
Negro coeds at Vassar were
taking part in the
demonstration. Vassar has a
total enrollment of about 1,600.

BLACK LEADER BOUND. GAGGED

Panther Trial Wild Melee

CHICAGO (UPI) Black
Panther leader Bobby Seale,
although bound and gagged
when he was carried into the
courtroom, still managed to get
into a wild, shouting scuffle with
U.S. marshals at the trial of the
Chicago Eight Thursday.
His chair was knocked over
into the press section and he
yelled that the marshals had
kicked him in the groin.
Chief defense attorney
William Kunstler stormed,
When are we going to stop this
medieval torture? This is a
disgrace to the law. I am
ashamed to be an American
lawyer.
To which U.S. District Judge
Julius J. Hoffman shot back,
You should be ashamed for the
way youve conducted
yourself.
It was the second day that the
trial of eight men accused of
conspiring to incite riots during
the Democratic National
Convention had turned into a
yelling and shoving match

m M *, 2 A V --1 =- . |, |- it Mum-* BLffllP
Ihe small society

SSkSw--' j NefVe* A LITTL6-
Svnd-caM >-* ii^

t
'I am ashamed
to be an
American
lawyer.
William
Kunstler
featuring Seale, the marshals,
and Hoffman
The Judge Wednesday ordered
the national chairman of the
Black Panther party gagged and
shackled to a chair when Seale
refused to stop his strident
demands to act as his own
attorney and cross-examine
witnesses.
Thursday,Seale was carried into

the courtroom strapped to a
wooden chair and with a heavily
reinforced gag over his mouth.
While defense attorney
Leonard Weinglass was
cross-examining a witness, Seale
managed to scribble a barely
legible note on legal foolscap. It
was handed to Weinglass, who
told Hoffman Seale said the
metal buckles on the straps were
hurting his wrists.
While the marshals worked
with Seales straps, his left arm
came loose and his gag dropped
off. There was an immediate
struggle, Seales chair toppled
over, and he began yelling that
he had been struck.
Defendant Jerry Rubin tried
to intervene and was
straight-armed away.
As Kunstler spoke of medieval
torture, chief prosecutor
Thomas Foran jumped up and
said, Yes, and it was all
arranged by Mr. Kunstler.
Kunstler said, We are going
to ask for an investigation of
this.

by PfycKmqn

Fish & Chicks
1515 SW 13TH ST



AMI.RK 'A'S Ql 'FAT FOR A ( 'I\SSI .FAS DRAFF fir A fgF jj

House Passes Lottery Plan
But Senate Undecided...

WASHINGTON (UPI) The House approved and
sent to the Senate Thursday a bill to give President
Nixon his draft lottery plan, but the Senate said it
would not consider the measure this year.
Informed of Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfields decision against taking up the lottery
now, Nixon urged him to reconsider.
Clearly, this is not a matter which should be
casually dismissed or made a political football,
Nixon said.
At the heart of the controversy was a desire on
the part of many liberals in Congress to undertake a
broad overhaul of the Selective Service this year.
The President wants his lottery implemented now
with further reform next year after a study
commission makes its recommendations.
Pointing to further reforms which might be

Kennedy: Eliminate Unfairness
Mansfield: Not This Year

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.,
said Thursday that youths rich
enough to hire a lawyer were
buying their way out of war
through legal loopholes in the
nations draft system.
Kennedy differed with
Selective Service Director Lewis
B. Hershey before a Senate
subcommittee while on the
other side of the Capitol, the
House geared for a vote on
President Nixons draft lottery
legislation. There was a growing
prospect that congressional
action may be put off until next
year.
Kennedy called for draft
reform of the most sweeping
kind. But the 76-year-old
Hershey, who is being replaced
as draft chief, told the senator
that reformers might wind up
with a procedure ... that you
get no men.
Hershey said most senators
and House members have never
been on a draft board and
declared: Ive never been
convinced that there is some
authority m Washington that can
tell die people in Maryland, for
example, how to run their
business better.
Kennedy urged Nixon to
eliminate the procedural
unfairnesses,, which permit those
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young men who have the
inclination and the money to
hire lawyers to beat ihe system,
while those without legal
representation are, generally,
routinely inducted.
He said 32 per cent of U.S.
combat fatalities in Vietnam are
draftees. If some men with the
education and money are
avoiding the draft, while others
cannot, then it can fairly be said
that they are buying their way
out of war.
He termed the draft system a
collection of patchwork rules
and regulations full of
loopholes.
But Hershey said despite its
flaws, the Selective Service
System works. He denied that
antiwar protesters had been
drafted as punishment and said
he disagreed with Kennedys
contention that youths
appealing their draft
classification should be

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made is no excuse to make no reforms at all, the
President said at the end of the day that saw the
draft issue bouncing back and forth between the
House, the Senate and the White House.
The House overwhelmingly approved the lottery
plan, 382-13, after beating back efforts to open the
lottery bill up to all sorts of further Selective
Service changes.
Mansfield announced his decision against taking
up the bill on the Senate floor and in the face of a
threat by the President to implement a modified
random selection plan by executive order by the
end of the year if Congress did not act.
Under the Presidents lottery proposal passed by
the House, 19-year-olds would make up the draft
pool and those to be inducted would be selected at
random by a computer.

represented by a lawyer.
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield said Thursday
President Nixons draft reform
proposals will not be considered
by the Senate during the
remainder of this year.
Even as the House prepared to
vote on a bill to permit creation
of a lottery system for drafting
men for military service,
Mansfield signalled that there
would be no Senate action until
after Congress reconvenes in
January.
Sen. Robert P. Griffin,
R-Mich., asserted that the
Democrats must bear the
responsibility for holding up
draft reform legislation. But Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.,
said Nixon could institute most
of his draft reform proposals by
executive order without action
by Congress.

Is Paul
McCartney
Coming to
Accent 7Q?

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Would You Believe Whats
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.
At the United Church of Gainesville
Sex is our topic
Special service and seminar on
the sexual revolution
1402 W. Univ. Ave. Ken Stokes, Pastor
9:45 AM Sunday 378-3500
Joseph Raieff
of the Juillatd School of Mo#kf ~
presents a lecture-recital on
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the Modem Contemporary Music.
Nov. 2 at 3PM in the
Union Auditorium 50{
66 zaiiiiffq tA Sponsored by JWRU
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Friday. October 31,1969, The Florida Atligolor,

ANTIQUE, DECOUPAGE I
All Needs Old Masters fines f
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc. I
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431 I
I
# £

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 3V1969

Page 8

Guess Well Have To Do It Ourselves

i /' V*
The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercia of responsibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor
'RdsL
All Auwm

Onlooker To A Minareted World

There was a large, lizard-like gila
monster with a tough grey skin and
huge, round eyes which orbited in their
sockets.
I called him Kemal, meaning
perfection.
His eyes seemed to rotate
independently of each other, taking in
the view on both sides at the same time.
He lived in the ruins of a broken-down
flour mill which stood on the hill
overlooking the village.
Kemal never smiled and he never left
the mill. In fact, he hardly ever moved.
Occasionally his long, red tongue would
dart out after a spider or a fly, but it
would re-enter the small mouth as fast
as it had exited. His skin matched the
color of the crumbling stone and, if he
wanted, he could make himself invisible
(or so it seemed).
Kemal seemed to like his self-imposed
exile. He played amid the rocks and
took in the sights and sounds of the
village life below. The first time I
climbed the hill, I found Kemal. And
every time since then, he was always
there.
Kemal and I fast became friends.
Together we observed the human
movement below us, although we
seldom discussed what we saw. If there
was anyone talking, it was on my part.
Kemal, for the most part, was quiet, and
his face never betrayed what was going
on within his small, pointed head.
1 liked Kemal. I liked Kemal almost
as much as I liked sitting on top of the
old mill, my feet dangling over the sides,
and watching the view below. For
hours, we would sit in silence.
There was a huge, green valley,
surrounded by snow-capped mountains.
Somewhere in the middle there was a
road winding its way toward Aydun and
eventually Izmir. The small towns could
be seen from the mill, and there was a
river making its snake-like way
somewhere between the road and the
village below.
In the vifisge thqre, r a
minarets jetting upward like missiles

If you want anything done... do it yourself.
And thats how it stands.
Apparently, if we ever want an activities center on this
campus we can only do it ourselves.
This is not right.
This is not the way it should be.
We did not come here with the intention of building this
university brick by brick... we came here for an education,
perhaps foolishly expecting the states largest and best
university to have the necessary facilities.
But the way it stands now, if we want the education we
deserve and expect we must also bear the burden of of
physical construction.
Either that or see this school topple from the ranks of
great universities and abdicate its station as the states
number one institution.
We dont want to see this. We dont think any student
here does. And we deplore the fact that the legislature of
this state, sitting on its pocketbook, has brought the choice
to us as the only alternative.
Our choice is clear.
Vote on Feb. 4 to pay a little extra in student activities
fees and have these monies put toward the construction of
an activities complex, or vote to erase this university from
the roster of the great and the modern.
The activities complex would house a 16,000-seat
coliseum, an 1,800-seat theater for the performing arts, an
Olympic pool and diving facility, a 6,000-seat ampitheater,
and academic and support facilities.
These are all things this university is in dire need
0f... and fast.
With a student body growing at the rate of 1,000
additional students enrolled each academic year, we cannot
afford to wait much longer before tackling the problem.
At the present time we have one gym mostly
condemned as a fire hazard by the State Fire Marshall; one
auditorium for university-wide use University
Auditorium, constructed around the turn of the century
and accommodating less than one-twentieth of the student
body; and the Reitz Union Ballroom fit for meetings,

about to be launched.
Five times a day a voice would come
from each of the minarets and call the
Moslems to prayer. In the late afternoon
stillness, the chant would suddenly rise
from the minaret in the main square of
town. No sooner was it begun than
another voice would sound out from
another minaret. Then a third. Then a
fourth and suddenly they were all
chanting at once. The chants somehow
sounded clearer in the breeze-swept
mountainside sunshine.
There they go, I told Kemal one
afternoon in late fall. Ozcan is closing
his shop and Erol will soon join him.
And, sure enough, the two moustached
forms soon met on one the miniature
streets below.
I was talking to Kemal in English. I
wasn't sure if he really understood, but
it didn't really matter.
Look at them head toward the
mosque youd think theyd get tired
of doing it so often. I was talking the
other day with Ali whats-his-name (Ill
never learn to pronounce these Turkish
names) and he wants me to become a
Moslem. Just because I said
Bismiilahirramanirrahim when I sat
down, he thinks Im converting. I told
him my mother would be quite upset if
I changed religions and he said it didnt
matter because theres only one God
and as long as we believe in Him and love
; Him and afe of Him it doesnt
really matter. I agreed him, J(

The Adventures Os
Joe Torchia
Peace Corps
Volunteer

EDITORIAL

MB pip In

Kemal didnt move. His left eye made
half an orbit in response.
Except I said we shouldnt be afraid
of God and he asked me if I was afraid
of God and I said no. Then he
congratulated me but he said he was
afraid of God and he probably always
would be.
Ali was a good man. He drank a little
and laughed a lot and played tavla well.
I liked him.
Then I saw the Doktor Bey going on
sick call.
The Doktor Bey wants to go to
America, I told Kemal. I teach him
English at night and he teaches me
Turkish but Im a poor student. He
studies all the time. Hes my best
student; sometimes I wish the kids in
school were like him. Maybe someday
he will go to America. I hope so. He
likes the village but his mind is big and
he wants to get out.
Below, a large camel with a huge bell
on its back tolled its way up the
cobblestone street. A group of
pre-school children followed it with
sticks in their hands, laughing and
shouting. A rooster crowed. Two dogs
began barking at each other.
Turgut Bey invited me to his house
for dinner tonight. Well probably drink
raki. I dont know if I can take it. We
played poker last night and I lost I
think he felt sorry for me. Everyone
lauded when I lost and said it takes a
ruWfeijfe Play poker. They said theyd
'* M> S'-

banquets and fashion shows, but not much else.
With these facilities to our dubious credit we have but a
skeleton of what is basic to our academic excellence.
But try to tell this to a legislature busy looking greedily
at the vast quantities of votes floating around the
well-populated Dade and Duval Counties.
With the two new state universities being planned for
those areas, Gainesville and the UF can kiss the
much-needed funds for an activities complex good-bye.
But if we choose to sit around and bemoan our fate well
be sitting on the grass because thats the only place where
we can all fit en masse -for a long, long time.
An activities center is something we need... and if we
have any initiative at all, it can be something we will get.
Even if we do have to go out and vote to do it ourselves.
We urge the students of this university, who can now
claim to be enrolled at the best equiped and most complete
school in this state, to allow future students the same proud
boast.
We can only do it ourselves.
Vi 1 \
i! 1 & \ $ r&i |
1 \ v J
- credit OLD MOLE/LNS

teach me ... but I think I enjoy losing
more.
The days were getting shorter then. I
had been in the town two months, and I
was beginning to fed a part of it. I had
some work to do and I wanted to go to
the hamam (bathhouse) so I excused
myself.
See you next week,
Kemal... maybe, I said. He didnt
answer. He didnt even move his eye. I
wonder if you ever watch me walking
along those streets? I asked him. Still
no answer. Somehow, I still cant even
imagine myself walking down
there ~ it seems
so ... we 11... 50...
1 couldnt finish.
I made my way down the twisting
steps of the old mill, two at a time. As I
started down the path I looked back but
couldnt see Kemal. I knew he was
watching, though. I could feel the two
huge eyes taking all of me in at the same
time. Or maybe it was just my
imagination.
As I neared the village I pretended I
was Kemal. I pretended I was still on
the mill watching a miniature me below.
I tried to see myself in context of this
minareted world.
But it was hard.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Janie Gould Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices in Room 330, Reitz Union.
, Ph one 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed ill the Florida
Alligator are those of the editors or of the
writer of theTaHicfcPaitd nbt those of the
Universityiiaf SfioridlQti A



#** *r k *£&%* t &
\ 'W y L 1 I\/V|i " ,;|?\ >%-sl|fc% f if-^U
*- 1 fspP '%'* '" W^%w£Q's& v 1 111 1
v v \k' y
*&, 5 fc &| x :ffr' w : H v i - ~
kfi i p(W imV 1
1 w >' : %
\ /"\ t y** 1 **' I
*5 \ % .-y> v w^ * 'fffc' x '" ~&' > v ,y£ : M
Awarded for: simplifying beyond rationality,
demanding something be done but not saying what nor
how, having a larger oral than cranial cavity; being
faster than a speeding typewriter carriage, more
powerful than reason or lo&ic, able to leap vast
problems with a single generation Look, up in the sky,
it's a bird (one could have written the winning article,)
it's a plane, no, its a screaming law student, flaming
out in the Alligator.
The student wins a free all expense paid trip to
Viet-Nam, where the army will utilize him as a
flame-thrower!!!
SGS REVENGE -*
The sign above was found hanging on the wall of the Cabinet room
in the SG office. It refen to a Speaking Out column, "SG On The
Spot/' which appeared in the October 27 Alligator.

Lake Alices Alligators
No Longer Will Threaten

MR. EDITOR:
It is with a great sigh of relief
(ahhhhhhh) that we hear of the
plans for a new super highway
which is to run through Lake
Alice.
Unfortunately, many
malignorant students are
opposed to this project, which
will benefit the students
themselves, as well as the county
and indeed the entire state.
Most people are unaware of
the reasons that this project is
being carried out.
First, the economic benefits
should be obvious. For example,
the orange growers from
Orlando need better connections
to Tallahassee and other
important cities. They are not
adequately served by existing
roads such as 441 which is over
congested due to local traffic,
stoplights, and lade of planning.
According to figures
published by the State Family
Travel Commission, over
800,000 manhours are wasted
per day by people traveling
through Gainesburgs traffic. It
has been estimated that 800,000
manhours would build eight
filling stations, sixteen Arbys,
and five Greyhound bus
terminals (including snack bars).
Other SFTC estimates
indicate that over 2,000,000
gallons of fuel per day are
wasted idling under Gainesburg
stop lights. This much gasoline
would run an electric generator
producing enough electricity to
light 30,000 100-watt bulbs for
97 years. This gasoline would
cost $660,000, enough money
to convert salt water into fresh
water for irrigation of 40,000
acres of the Gobi Desert. It is
therefore obvious that this
project is an economic necessity.
But what about the students:
how will it benefit them?
Everyone is aware of the
viciousness of the alligator; he
will stop at nothing. Few people
are aware, however, of the threat
posed by
inhabit Lake Alkamjlhrtt,f
pryoenrr n tn n r nn

in the area. Man and dog are
subject to constant terror while
walking near their feeding
grounds. This threat is obvious.
However, people are misled to
think that this is the only threat.
We, ourselves, were unaware of
the principle threat on campus
until last month at the Union,
when we observed (whose
identity cannot be revealed)
being attacked by a mob of
frenzied ducks. We immediately
called the campus police, who
told us, We dont know where
they come from we think its
from off campus, so we dont
have no jurisdiction .
In order to find their modus
operatii, we followed them west
to where we saw them filing into
Lake Alice. Lake Alice, then, is
the nocturnal haven for these
ruthless feathered tribes. After
learning of their plans, we
informed the administration.
It is to their credit that thev

rFluted Columns ;
In The Name Os World Domination...
> By John Parker

We in the Fluted Columns
office are in favor of the
state-required loyalty oath for
university teachers.
The reasoning is quite simple.
Everyone is well aware that the
commies are everywhere. I have
heard no good arguments to the
contrary lately and some
personal investigation has
revealed this startling
information.
What I had taken to be a tree
outside my door is, in fact, a
communist agent in disguise. Oh,
its an excellent ruse, I admit,
(that damned bark is awfully
convincing) but there is no
getting around that pink tinge to
the leaves. When I think of the
things I have said about that tree
that may be ( vital to our
fciolihtrps defense, well it make*
mid itiink; knost

By Walt Morgan

SG Working For You

Once more a prophet of doom
has spoken out against Student
Government. In regard to Mr.
Schillingers letter of October
27, I feel it is time for some
facts about to be made known
to someone such as he, who has
obviously not looked for them.
First, if the author had ever
been to the offices of SG, he
could have seen just how many
hours the members of the
Cabinet and the Executive spend
on projects benefiting students.
Under this administration,
examples of these projects are:
the academic reform that has
been sponsored by SG, the
development of Convenience
Counters, refrigerator leasing for
students in the dorms, handball
courts, Teacher Evaluation, free
team rosters for the football
games, Babysitting Referral
Service, Christmas employment,
P.E. resolution I could go on.
Second, he singles out
budgetary problems and football
tickets fpr specific criticisms.
These were programs adopted by
the Senate. They may not please

took immediate action and
ordered Lake Alice destroyed.
But according to the precepts of
Dr. T. J. (Bud) Zuckerkandl, the
administration is not merely
destroying; they are building
also. To take the place of Lake
Alice is a new super highway
with all its economic benefits.
Springing up around the
highway will be hamburger
stands, parking lots, churches,
paper mills, bus terminals, filling
stations and shopping centers.
Petes Hamburgers, Inc. has
already bid for two acres of now
submerged Lake Alice property.
The universitys greatness is
determined by how the needs of
the students are met. In our
minds, student needs are being
met. After all, what other
university can boast of a
cloverleaf expressway in the
middle of it.
VICTOR RAMEY
PAUL RICE

So what is to be done about
this menace? (I would chop the
tree down, but it does give
lovely shade in the summer.)
Obviously a loyalty oath is one
good way to ferret out these
insurgents. God knows Arts and
Sciences is loaded with them.
The real problem is that the
loyalty oath is not effective
enough. Those dirty pinko
bastards have been known to
actually LIE. about their loyalty
before, and there seems to be an
indication that they will try to
sneak by again. (What some
people will do in the name of
world domination...)
Oh, well. The answer is here.
Hiram Sigafoos, a well known
inventor and a FINE
AMERICAN, has put together a
device which he calls a
iP*t*k>meteriJ rmoob u m
* Wfe tt&led bn Hiram at his !!rd

everybody, but both bills were
adopted by the Senate after
considerable debate in which no
selfisii partisanship was
displayed. By the way, Mr.
Schillinger, exactly what do all
21,000 students want done
about tickets and budgets?
Thirds the thrust of the
argument seems to be aimed at
the card section whose members
have been painted as some sort
of martyrs. The gentlemans
argument is spurious and
partisan, however, because he
calls legislation, which is
designed to represent ALL
students as being
unrepresentative of a small
segment of students; thus it is
wrong. No SG has a
responsibility of providing
special priveleges to any
minority groups.
If you, Mr. Schillinger, had
taken time to look into any
facts, you would have found
that this SG has far from
completely turned against
these groups. You may discover
that all married students were
given the chance to purchase a

jtS^k'uiT^,
aivMW ' l Li r/ISJ
- credit Oliie Harrington/Daily World /LNS
... >4wcf Did You Voluntarily Accept A Free, Hot
Meal From Known Black Panthers At Nine A.M.,
September Nine, Nineteen Hun \ert An Sixty-nine?

shop behind the Let Freedom
Ring office on the right side of
Gainesville to find out the
details on this new device aimed
at stopping the comr unist rot
of this countrys moral fabric.
Hiraip, how does the
Patriometer work?
Its really very simple. A
shaft is sunk into the suspect's
chest on the, uh, left side where
it enters into the vena cava, or
something like that. Anyway a
pressure gage is onto
the outer end of the tube and it
measures the amount of pressure
the heart is exerting in pumping
blood.
Then it is just a matter of
observation. You watch the
commie creep at football games,
parades and so on, and see how
much pressure his heart is
exerting when they play the
Wtional Anthem or a flag goes
1 /.Mm 9<

Friday, October 31,1968, The Florida Alligator,

Speaking Out

OPEN FORUM:^^
Aim ul Vm£^)
hope for ihe compl*£!Sl2^'
season date for their wives. It is
SG who arranges for the spouse
II). cards, and it is SG who just
gave $4,000 to the Day Care
Center so that it could open and
operate.
SG is also the one who gave
$4,000 for bus services for
school children, and it is SG who
is putting in hours working with
the Infirmary trying to obtain
Infirmary priveleges for student
wives.
Finally, those in the Cabinet,
myself included, have spent
repeated evenings in the dorms
trying to find out exactly what
is troubling the students. Very
few students have specific
complaints related to SG. While
this may not show a complete
representative government, it is
one which is proving successful
for most of the student body.

Very interesting. Has it
worked well so far?
Not exactly. No one has
survived the original operation
yet, but we figure that is a sure
sign that they were infiltrators
anyway.
How is the operation
performed?
Oh, we just drive the tube in
with a ball peen hammer.
Doesnt that hurt?
Not if youre careful not to
hit your thumb.
I mean the suspect.
Hey, what are you? Some
kind of pinko creep, too?
Martha! Bring me the hammer!
Wait a minute. Havent you
got some other ways of checking
for communist tendencies?
Yeah. We make em walk
across a bed of hot coals. If it
bums their fleet, theyre enemy
4phtiii jjmlfrj. ;-l3!

Page 9



Page 10

[.mTOaaflmptar.Fniniv; otmnw lii.ism

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION will be given
Saturday, Nov. 1 at 9:45 a.m. at
207 Leigh Hall, in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
VISTA applications are
available at the International
Center, south of Walker Hall.
FULBRIGHT PROGRAM
Adviser at the International
Center has received the final list
of participating countries in the
one year program for American
seniors or graduate students
wishing to compete for the
overseas study/research grants in
1970-71.
MIDTERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses
listed below are expected to
take the test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
CEH 131 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 210, 203,
205 or 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111,, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110, or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditprium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f TT"
~ w n' \ fh#
_ Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... JL-* 7^
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, aa
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your ~C- fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole £ £ /
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories!

CEH 132 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
(M-Z) to Peabody 101, 102,
112, or 114.
CPS 121 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday,
November 6, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wendesday,
November 5, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Walker Auditorium; (M-Z) to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125.

BLUE BULLETIN

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career
Planning Center, Room G-22
Reitz Union, two weeks in
advance. Companies will be
recruiting for December, March
and June grads unless indicated
otherwise.
NOV. 5 & 6: UNION CAMP
CORP.
NOV. 5, 6 & 7: UNION
CARBIDE CORP. NUCLEAR
DIVISION.
NOV. 6: NAVAL SHIP
RESEARCH & DEVELOP DEVELOPMENT
MENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER; B.F.
GOODRICH CO.; EASTMAN
KODAK CO.; LIBERTY
MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.;
BETHLEHEM STEEL CORP.
NOV. 6 & 7: FORD MOTOR
CO.; TENNESSEE EASTMAN
CO.; HASKINS & SELLS; U.S.
STEEL CORP.
NOV. 7: DANIEL
CONSTRUCTION CO.;
HYSTRON FIBERS; DOW
BADISCHE CO.; TOUCHE
ROSS & CO.; PRATT &
WHITNEY AIRCRAFT; CITY
OF LOS ANGELES.
GENERAL NOTICES
VOTER EDUCATION
RALLY will be held November
3 at noon in the Plaza of the
Americas. Speakers will be
President Stephen C.
O'Connell, the Honorable
Ralph Turlington and Senator
Bob Saunders. Come and
support it's your education.
Sponsored by the UF Young
Democrats.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus
Calendar

Friday
October 31
Journalism Day, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Inside Daisy
Clover", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, 118 Union, Please
bring sets, 7:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Services, 16
N.W. 18th Street, 7:30 p.m.
Halloween Party for Children of
Married Students, Union
Terrace, 8:00 p.m.
IFC: 'THE LETTERMEN",
Florida Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Mensa Prospective Member
Mixer, Unitarian Church,
8:30 p.m.
Saturday
November 1
Hillel Foundation Services, Hillel
Foundation 16 N.W. 18th
Street, 10:00 a.m.
Football, Univ. of Fla. vs.
Auburn, Auburn
Union Movie, 'The Double
Man", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Hillel Foundation Kosher Pizza
Party, Hillel Foundation,
8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "Frosted Glass",
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
November 2
Hillel Foundation Bagel and Lox
Brunch, Hillel Foundation,
11:00 a.m.
Catholic Student Center Social
Committee Meeting, Student
Center Lounge, 12:00 noon
Reitz Union Lecture: "Josef
Reieff", Union Aud., 3:00
p.m.
University Symphony Orchestra,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "Genesis I",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Catholic Married Couple
Committee Discussion Group,
Catholic Student Lounge
8:00 p.m.

Monday
November 3
Young Democrats Rally, Pres.
Stephen O'Connell, Ralph
Turlington, Bob Saunders,
Plaza of the Amer. 11:00
a.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Humanities Film, "A
Taste of Honey", Union
Ballroom, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Genesis I",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:39
p.m.
Beta Alpha Psi & Alpha Kappa
Psi Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday
November 4
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 8t 4:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Genesis I",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
s p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Veterans Club
Meeting, Rathskeller, 7:00
p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Tupperware
Party, Air Force ROTC
Library, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept: Florida Baroque
Ensemble, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00. "Genesis I" tickets, SIOO
for students and $1.50 for
General Public. \



> *'**
*m>*
or drink it straight
l^piH
::^>^^^ji^:jig : i^^: : : : : : : : ::|^^^j^i|^^^ : : : : Dear Schlitz'Malt Liquor, *^Q/
I am anxiously awaiting
Sctilitr Mall Liquor PeriLO FolderdL^
- ___.lL: :| ;

Friday. October 31.1968. Tha Ftorida AWaaloc.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE §
i K
1966 HONDA 65. Excellent
condition, low mileage, make offer.
Call 372-9757 after 5 p.m. (A-st-31-p)
Wedding dress size under
nylon lace, floor length, A-line shirt,
short sleeves, scoop neck with veil and
train. $35. 376-4143 after 5.
' (A-3t-31-p)
Unclaimed freight. Discounts to 70%
on Sewing Machines, Stereos, Color
TVs car & home tape players, diving
gear and furniture plus many other
items. All 69 Models. May be seen at
1228 N.E. sth Ave. Phone 378-4186
hours Mon Thru. Thur. 9-6 Fri. & Sat
9 to 7. (A-l 3t-20-p)
~ ~ : -
The Great Pumpkin is alive and
well and soon arrives in Gatorland!
Celebrate, not as a witch, but as a
Halloween Beauty. Take advantage
of Transworlds fabulous hair sale
this week only. Stretch Wigs, sale
priced SB.BO. Human Hair Wiglets
only $2.80. Human Hair Falls, reg
$37, only $14.80. Many
others... All on first come basis.
Trans-World Hairgoods, Corner
University & 13th St. Sale ends
Saturday, Nov. Ist. (A-3t-30-c)

m mm 4 COLOR HORROR
DRACULA schoc ers
HAS RISEN
%£//// >7]!^ mmt starts sun.
1A WOMAN
carmen baby
I You just cant keep a good man down

TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoeoniosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoeoniosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoeoniosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing U.S. time
zones, youli find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time yoi owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1700 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

Cx-x-x-x-x-x.x.wx-:*x*x-x-:-:-y.*.*x ; ;
FOR SALE
yK*xx*x.xxyxv
Nikkorex camera body with 180 mm
F 35 lens. SSO. Fits Nikon lenses
peacock manual, hi fi turntable, Shure
arm, S2O. G. Winius, Ext 392-0271.
(A-4t-31-p)
2 Drawer full suspension files, full
depth, your choice of colors.
Elsewhere $49.50, NOW ONLY
$39.95 at JR Office Furniture Co.,
620VZ S. Main St., Call 376-1146.
(A-24-1 Ot-c)
For Sale. Brand new 54 volume set
of Great Books and Syntopieon.
S3OO or best offer. Call 378-3923.
(A-st-30-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySell TradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
SPECIAL Study desk (36x24).
Perfect for apartment or trailer living.
Paint them any color, they look
sharp. New costs $35.00 or more.
NOW While They Last $14.95. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620V2 S. Main
St., Call 376-1146. (A-24-10t-C)

H Dont
pbe a
fink.
Come
see
my
movie!
-Daisy
Clover
(you-,
Jievv
teA D£R\J
%
CHRiSfeOPHer
Plummer
ensioe Daisy GLover
1 'ISHIM) Hllltww ~ ... H
TECHNICOLOR PANAVISION FROMWARNER BROS.

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 31,1969

Page 12

:^rtp*x<*x^xc*x-x.:.w.Nyw*:*x*x*xw*wtf.
I FOR SALE
?to^vx*xyxyxx*x*x-x-x*x-x-x*y.y-y.'
1958 Classic Porsche Speedster
convertible, rebuilt engine, must
sell need money. Call 378-6988
after 3 p.m. S9OO or best offer!
(A-st-29-p)
PILE is soft and lofty ... colors
retain their brilliance in carpets
cleaned with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowery
Furniture Co. (A-lt-32-c)
FOR RENT |
&x<*xy:xrxxx*x*xtfvxswssxi*i
1 BR efficiency. New, clean, quiet, can
move right in. Must sublease. SBS per
month. Call late any night. 376-6854.
(B-3t-31-p)
Beautiful furnished mobile home. 2
bedroom, 2 bath, study, living room,
and kitchen. Central air and heat. 68
long. Call Liz at 373-2210. (B-st-31-p)
Penthouse apartment beautifully
furnished, 2 Ig brms, 2 bath, living
room, sitting room, ww carpet,
central air, heat. Private patio on roof
deck. $250 mo. See this luxurious
penthouse at Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111. Grad
students preferred. (B-6t-2 7-c)

SIOOO $1,500 Per Quarter
FACTS
International SMC organization has openings in Gainesville
for several high calibre men who need money to continue
college
REQUIREMENTS
18-28 years old with car, neat and personable.
BENEFITS
Part-time work with flexible hours, group insurance and
paid vacations.
You are invited to attend a group interview at:
HOLIDAY INN on 13th street
TUESDAY NOV. 4th 7:00 P.M.
MORRISON S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
ROAST TOM TURKEY
Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
Choice of Potato
79c
GAINESVILLE MALL

REITZ UNION THEATRE
Admission 50<
|HP9||||||| The screens most
ill fantastic creation!
flft The free worlds most
incredible challenge!
BOQ MYMNER
DIFFRiNG LISTERS NOLAN
HAL E. CHE SI Efi Dneded b, FRANKLIN j SCHAFFNER Story by FRANK FARLOFF W
TECHNICOLOR- FROM WARNER BROS. SEVEN ARTS
SATURDAY NOV. 1 Si3Q, 800, UH3Q P.M.



gator classifieds

WANTED ROOMATE MALE APT
6 0 LANDMARK aircond. ww
carpet pool must sublet. Call
STEVE 373-2207 after 5 pm.
(B-4t-30-p)
Large 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen, living
room, completely furnished ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 272-7111
prefer 2 students. (B-6t-27-c)
"wanted |
DRIVING TO NEW YORK in new VW
bus. Need one or two people to share
driving and expenses. Leaving date
negotiable. 376-9845. (C-2t-31-c)
All who missed Uelsmann, repeat on
Nov. 6, 7:30. 50 free tickets at Union
Box Office you must have a ticket to
get in. (C-2t-31-c)
1 or 2 female roommates for Village
Park apartment. $42.50/mo. Call
373-1962. (C-st-31-c)
Female roommate. House, AC close
to campus 1246 S.W. 13 St.
376-0578. (C-4t-30-p)
2 passengers for flight to Flushing,
New York City during Thanksgiving
vacation. Round-trip fare S9O.
Contact Doug at 372-9447 after 6.
(C-st-28-p)
Wanted: Married couples to
participate in a group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment" experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-10t-9-c)
PAPERBACKS WANTED! Clean out
your bookshelves and bring your old
paperback books to the Browsing
Livrary, 2nd floor, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. A section of the Browsing
Library has been prepared for
paperbacks and will be operated on
an exchange basis. (C-st-32-c)
I HELP WANTED J
Co-ed for babysitting Mon-Thur.
would live-in, room & board plus
S2O per week. Call 378-4150 after
5:00. Ask for Doreen. (E-3t-30-p)
Charles Chips has 2 areas open. 21
years old with sales ability 2:30 to
6:30 p.m. Commission basis
376-6943. Mr. Welch. (E-st-32-p)
Cashier co-ed wanted part-full time
to work for that unsoggy fried
chicken place. Call Bill Macomber
378-0536 for interview. Wishbone
Chicken (E-3t-32-p)
Part time work study time available.
Earning based on initiative. Phone
Mon-Fri, 9-5. 376-3315. (E-3t-31-p)
Impala, 1966. 4 door sedan. AC,
radio, heater, power steering. $1350.
Call 372-6821 after 5:30. (G-st-28-p)
1966 Anglia English Ford. Deluxe
model. Radio, heater, excellent
condition. SBOO. 392-7951.
(G-st-29-p)

mi
y/^VOW AT ... 2:04 4:31 7:00 9:29
/winner! 3 ACADEMY AWARDS\
/ NO ONE UNDER 17
/ ADMITTED .;.. PROOF OF
/ AGE REQUIRED TO SEE
VIXENhW
M I I Mll^jl mim 1lrr 1..111111 1 I.

Friday, October 31,1969, The Florida'Alligator,

:jx.:.>xxrxrwx*x-x*>x*!^x*:*x.%M.xs?;->;*
AUTOS |
. 5I
JvX*X*X # X*X*X # X # X*X # X # X*XX*X!S*i*X*XX*X^
BEAUTIFUL! 61 TR3 Complete
with radio, heater & wire wheels
a classic! $650.00 Phone 378-4186
before six. (G-4t-39-p)
OI d smobile 63 dynamic 88
excellent condition beautifully
dean new tires automatic trans
power steering & brake electric
windows & seats air cond. two
speakers $690, 376-2377.
(G-st-30-p)
1960 Falcon 4dr, auto trans,
heater. Reliable $l5O. 378-2063
after six. (G-3t-30-p)
68 Triumph TR2SO Must sell
asking 2,350 8000 miles. Call
372-1694. (G-st-30-p)
End walking. Perfect college
transportation. 1961 Oldsmobile
FBS. Less than 60,000 ml. on 63
motor. Air, radio, heat. $lB9. Chip
Clarke c/o House. (G-st-29-p)
67 Cougar, XR7, 390, 4 barrel, 4
speed, posi-traction, front disc,
wood panel dash, leather bucket
seats, just inspected. 372-5698.
(G-st-29-p)
Porsche *64 SC Air cond.
AM/FM Radio & Tape White w/
Blue Interior Completely
Re-cond. Engine 52700 Call
372-6846 to see. (G-st-29-p)
For Sale 1967 VW Fastback,
excellent condition, good tires, new
safety sticker, radio, $1075.
378-4532. (G-st-29-p)
VW 1966 New tires, radio, low
mileage owned by female student.
$925. Call 372-5796. (G-tt-32-p)
Must sell yellow 1966 Mustang 289
four barrel with heavy duty clutch
and suspension. Asking $1250. Call
Ed at 373-1473 anytime after five.
(G-st-32-p)
1969 Chevy Impala automatic, radio,
heater, vinyl top. Must sell honest!
$650? Ph. 372-1792. (G-4t-32-p)
:--x-wx-:-%w.v.-.-.vx-;-xcx-x*wvsvx<:-
| PERSONAL |
if youre not yet a MENSA you may
never find yourself unless you come to
our Halloween mixer. If you suspect
youre in the top 2% of IQ now is your
chance to meet similar people in a
provocative, interesting and
intoxicating atmosphere. Unitarian
Church Fri. at 8:30 p.m. V* mile north
of 16 Blvd. on 43st. For info call
378-8697 or 372-1409. (J-2t-31-p)
EGR-180 student needs help in
CY-204. Hrs. and terms to be arrngd.
Call collect 496-3017 after 6:00 p.m.
Ask for Larry. (J-3t-31-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING, 16
NW 7th Ave. (J-st-28-p)
Jewish coed with kitchen needed.
Grad student tired of hamburgers.
Need dinner 4-5 times per week.
Call 378-0529 10:30-11:30 Jack.
(J-2t-30-p)
Kosher pizza party at Hillel, 16
NW 18 St, on Saturday, Nov. 1, 8
PM ? 50c members, 75c
non-members. All welcome: food
and dancing. (J-2t-30-p)

Page 13

j PERSONAL I
: fewwwwwfrxxww.vw iwhi coaoeo ?
HONEYBEE QUEEN Flrday night
was the greatest ever am looking
forward to finding little purple things
in Jax Cancer. (J-2t-32-p)
Flying to Auburn Oct. 31 Share
Expenses 1969 Piper Cherokee.
Phone 372-1717 or 376-2139.
(J-lt-32-p)
I NEED YOUR LOVE for my two
baby tigger-cats. They will give love
in return for good homes 4 mo.
female 2 mo. male 372-4509.
(J-lt-32-p)
Happy one week Anniversary, C.D.
Love, L. J. (J-lt-32-p)
"Fightn Gators We're no. 1"
Bumper Stickers in Orange and Blue.
$1.25 each or 10 for SIO.OO. Send
check or money order to: Bumper
Stickers. PO Box 99, Perrine, Florida
33157. (J-3t-27-p)
GREEKS remember this week-end
and impress her with a PARTY
PICTURE by Stan. Stan (the Picture
Man) stops at most houses every big
week-end! (J-4t-22-p)
Pumpkin, Today Is our day. Dont
worry, the Great White Pumpkin
protects us all. tooup Love Richard.
(J-lt-32-p)
x-x-x-x*x-v..svxvx, w <*x*xx*x-v.v;, i k
I LOST & FOUND |
,|;>X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X.XX-X-V-SS'X-:-:-X-X-X->S
LOST: DIXIE HOLLINGS CLASS
RING. If found, please call 392-9039.
REWARD. (L-2t-31-p)
Lost thru 10-23 on way to Peabody
or Towers & dorms, goldplate pin,
showing 2 intertwined rings
(memory) reward if returned, please
call 378-5504. (L-3t-32-p)
SERVICES |
I i-x-:.:.:.ss i ;*: xs'*xx>i-:*x-v;YW-xx-Xs*-x.vi-J 5
Repeat Special your portable
typewriter cleaned, adjusted,
lubrcated & new ribbon installed
(SAVE $10.00). Now $12.50.
Standard typewriters $19.50. All
work guaranteed. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620V* S. Main St., Call
376-1146. (M-10t-24<)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
servicC Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Road at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)

-
;= ' -
.-; .. Sms- £>; /; i__ .~ > J \ t jr )C'l% C,' ;-
: : ..

SERVICES |
&SKW l 4a Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c>
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 1126V*
N.W. Bth Street, 376-8506.
(M-51-31-P)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
- 1

JT CENTER 1
CHARLTON HESTON JESSICA WALTER
/ "NUMBER ONE
CENTER 2 |
I "CAN HERIONYMUSMERKIN EVER |
i FORGET MERCY HUMPPE AND FIND j
\ TRUE HAPPINESS?" /
FLORIDA
"FUNNY GIRL S
I[3 HORROK *U M COLOR
|m| MIME Hftt STRIPPED I
| s I

rSNSSW^XW-^K-XW.Vi^Wr-XW-X*^:
SERVICES
Student Discount has free detelvery
and 10 to 40% discount on all soap
rasors, blades, cigarettes, deodorant,
hair products, kleenex, etc. Call
373-2757 between 1 and 5
(M-st-32-p)
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
4% £ Per game
3 games SI.OO
Sat. 9 am 6 pm
Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Octdfiar 3f, 1969

kopechne:
Court Grants Closed-Door Inquest
At Kennedy's Request For Secrecy

BOSTON (UPI) The Massachusetts Supreme
Court Thursday granted Sen. Edward M. Kennedys
request for a closed-door inquest into the death of
Mary Jo Kopechne.
In its 17-page decision, the full bench of the high
court ruled that not only the Kopechne inquest but
all future inquests in Massachusetts should be closed
to the public and news media.
The court in effect overruled Edgartown District
Court Judge James A. Boyle who had ruled that
newsmen would be allowed at the inquest into the
death of the 28-year-old secretary killed in mid-July
when a car driven by Kennedy hurtled off a bridge
on Chappaquiddick Island into a tidal pond.
The court, in addition to ordering a closed door
inquest, laid down these ground rules for inquest
proceedings:
Witnesses may be accompanied and advised by
counsel while in attendance or testifying.
Following the inquest, all documents pertaining
to it shall be impounded.
Access to the documents shall be afforded only

Arabs Fight To Rachaya

By United Press International
Arab guerrillas Thursday fought their way into the Lebanese
fortress town of Rachaya but were driven out while a Lebanese
delegation in Cairo sought to keep peace discussions from collapse.
Arab guerrilla leaders have refused to go to Cairo to talk with the
Lebanese delegation, led by Maj. Gen. Emile Bustani, and sources
close to the discussions said prospects for an early solution were dim.
Bustani scheduled a nighttime meeting with Egyptian President
Gamal Abdel Nasser. But the Lebanese commander-in-chief planned
to return to Beirut Friday unless progress was made toward settling
the Conflict.
UPI correspondent Ray Wilkinson reported from Rachaya that the
guerrillas twice Thursday poured out of the hills to attack the fortress
town in south Lebanon with rockets, mortars and machineguns. The
first assault was repulsed by Lebanese army defenders after an
houis-long battle. The second which began around dusk was still
raging, Wilkinson said.
At one point, Wilkinson reported, a band of rebels fought their way
inside the town, but were eventually driven out.
The army rushed reinforcements to the besieged town of 6,000.
The Rachaya attacks coincided with guerrilla action against the
Al-Koleiat air base and new clashes in the northern city of Tripoli.
Spokesmen said guerrillas firing rockets and 120-millimeter artillery
damaged the runway and an airport building at Al-Koleiat, two miles
south of the Syrian border and 65 miles north of Beirut.
Two minor bombs exploded in Beirut Thursday and Arab guerrillas
armed with machineguns led a funeral procession through the city for
a Palestinian youth killed in earlier fighting.
The latest attack on Rachaya, a junction town about 40 miles
southeast of Beirut, was the fourth in three days and the heaviest so
far.
GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
-Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
guns and ammo. Bring this
ad and your student I.D.
offerexpires NOV. 8
1969
Harry Beckwith Gun Dealer
Micanopy, Fla. Ph 466-3340
i ad in i/U (pM*
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d.

to the attorney general, appropriate district
attorneys and counsel for the persons involved in
the case.
The high court rejected the motion by lawyers
for Kennedy and other potential inquest witnesses
that Judge Boyle be disqualified from presiding at
the inquest.
The lawyers had asked he be disqualified on
grounds his presence could lead to bias and
prejudice in the case.
Although the court did not set a date for the
Kopechne inquest, the court said its rulings should
not hinder or delay the pending inquest.
In setting down the ground rules, the court said,
we shall not make any special rules for a particular
case.
However, the court said the Kopechne inquest
presents unusual problems.
It has aroused great public interest, which in
turn has stimulated great efforts by the press, radio,
television and other media to provide news
coverage.

Is Paul
McCartney
Coming to
Accent 70?

INTRIGUING... SEE THE WORKS OF THE
NEW HITCHCOCKS. GODARDS AND FELLINIS!
THE BOSTON GLOBE
MISSIS l
A FRESH COLLECTION OF CINEMATIC STYLES
BY A NEW GENERATION OF YOUNG FILM MAKERS
EXCELLENT
ASSOFIMENT WHICH WE t REPRESENTING EVERY
STRONGLY RECOMMEND J§§P TYPE OF FILM SHORT
SSfflF
ERA IN FILMTUKING m^io
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nnn*nnn**n*n**n*B**n**i
Its a Halloween Happening
at the Union
On i the B Colonnade In the Cafeteria
Cider 1(K Pumpkin Pie
ra rK/ 20< IOC Slice
0 7 all day specials
Hot Doughnuts ... today
[""""""Come together"'"*
to the sounds of
CHUCK CONLON
and the
TONIGHT
9 PM TIL
1 N. W. 10th AVE,
MOMnennMnnnnmnnnnnnnnnnMMnwMMWMMMMnnM
/JjN BEAT THE 'AWAY GAME'
DOLDRUMS I
K HMj color TV's catch the
IWIIIVJn best games & shows PLUS
a fabulous lineup of
P food and beer
home of
1621 SW 13th ...
BALLANTINE BEER SCHLITZ DARK AND
AND ALE HALF DARK-HALF LIGHT
*** (available in schooners)



l : V .' - | - \
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I RACY... I
I BUT WELL MANNERED |
§> Individual and exciting authentic Tartan plaids. Comfortable fit in a trim.
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Friday, October 31,1968, The FlorW* Alligrtor,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 31,1969 : %

greek schedule
Nov. 3 Nov. 4 Nov. 5 Nov. 6 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 N0v.12 Nov. 13
AEn KA *KT X* AX* AT K 2 HB*
AFP ATQ IIKA AX ATA KA AXA 2K
axq Ben nK* Aon aaa a*e *m zta
AAn AE* nA* XQ Ar KA6 *A6 *22 2AE eX 2N 2*E TE* *FA TKE
2X
call for appointment times 392-1687
between 12 noon & 5 pm. all photos will be taken in your
time block, have everyone on time, bring $1.50 sitting fee.
dress for men dark coat dark tie light shirt
dress for women dark sweater
juniors
nov. 3i4
sign-up sheets in room 337 of
the Union
this is the only time photos will
be taken
bring $1.50 sitting fee
dress men-dark coat-dark tie-light shirt
dress women-dark sweater
t ft V ' 1 a m m . i
~ *' --jnr"-T-i-rinKmMiriiiii n _i.i_u.ij
| n ||w
j i ., .. ,~ l m**** ... / "**:
" " I INI I I lll.l -I ,|| I, _



The
Florida
Alligator

t i ~ /z'&yMMM&wiMMim Lj ...
FALL FROLICS '69 TONIGHT
The Lettermen will perform for capacity audiences tonight in
Florida Gym at 7:30 and 10. Interfratemity Council is hosting this
group on its 20th national tour. The Lettermen's current hit, "Hurt
So Bad," is well on its way to selling a million copies.
Piano Concert Sunday

Concert pianist Josef Raiell
will perform in the Reitz Union
Auditorium, Sunday at 3 p.m.
Raieff, Russian-born
American concert pianist, is a
professor of piano on the
faculties of the Xuilliaid School
and the Mannes College of Music
in New York.
A graduate of Juilliard
Graduate School and the
American Conservatory in
Chicago, he studied under the
famous Alezander Sitoti (teacher
of Rachmaninoff and pupil of
Liszt) and under Josef
Lhevenne, the great Russian
pianist.
Disney Twin
HELSINKI The Finnish
public has been invited to
compete in a contest in which a
first prize of 18,000 Finnmark
($4,290) will be awarded for the
best design submitted for a
Disneyland-like park to be
known as Santa Claps Land.
The park will be built on a
5,975 square yard site near
Rovaniemi in Finnish Lapland.
The plan must ,include small
workshops, hotel, sauna,
restaurant and amusement
facilities. Winners will be
announced in November.

"LISTENING PARTY
Hear the
GATORS BEAT AUBURN
BEER sl/PITCHER
During the game
FREE-SNACKS-FREE
633 NW 13th STREET
. ......

v Wl IK Mm 111 filla fM Ha sm wmm mmm ;$m Wmm
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More recently he has
specialized in lecture recitals,
master classes and piano
workshops in universities and
colleges all over America.
His lecture-recital is entitled
Decline and Fall of the Tonal
System.
Admission to this Union
sponsored concert is 50 cents.
PAINT All types & Uses
Color Guild Quality
See the New Deep Tones!
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431
BAR-B-Q
Ribs fChicken
Pork Beef
SAUCES:
mild 1
mild 2
medium
medium hot
hot
red hot
double red hot
super duper
super saber-jet
(1 unknown sauce)
PARKERS BAR-B-Q
1214 N. W. sth Avenue
Ph. 378-3673
We take pride in having the right
sauce to suit your particular taste.

New Movie Is 'Cuckoo\

Based on John Nichols first
novel, The Sterile Cuckoo, is a
new movie from Paramount
Pictures soon to be released.
Jerry Payne and Pookie
Adams are two college students
from adjacent schools in up-state
New York. They become
involved in a romance that is as
unpredictable as it is irresistable.
Director Alan J. Pakula has
Love With the Proper
Stranger, Inside Daisy
Clover, Up the Down
Staircase and The Stalking
Moon on his list of production
credits along with his partner,.
Robert Mulligan.
Turning down a bid to star in
the Broadway musical
Promises, Promises, and
cancelling a projected personal
appearance tour, Liza Minnelli
(daughter of Judy Garland)
accepted the part of Pookie.
Wendell Burton makes his
film debut in The Sterile
Cuckoo as Jerry Payne, coming
to motion pictures from the title

RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL
PRESENT
LETTERMEN WEEK
OCTOBER 31 THROUGH NOV. 7,1969
$ 2.69
KESHI $4.98 VALUE I IWlIi IBHMai = I
HurtSoad
The Best of b|H{ffiSH^HHsi
The Lettermen V llUffijjHMn
AVAILABLE

a 8 Track & Cassette
Igf $6.98 VALUE-NOW-
Capitol
$ 4.49
' - /.£ ' ' s}! V' j; I §* *1? *
RECORDSVILLE
I GAINESVILLE MALL
378-8686 OPEN TILL 900
. v .i* 'V M / CT r 4 .v, yjtrr ? *. '* AiSHfPsp.
.. '-.i0:.:. .i * .* ........... 4

Friday. October 31,1969, The Florida Alligator,

role in the San Francisco stage
companys veision of Youre A
Good Man, Charlie Brown.
John Nichols, the author, is a
graduate of historic Hamilton
College not far from the city of

.
Restaurant
ASK ANY OLD TIMER ABOUT US
AND OUR FAMOUS
LONDON BROIL STEAK
CHOPPED SALAD HtBICH HUB SOUS A SUTTOt
S 1.15
AND THE BEST SELUER VI TOWN
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BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY
WE BELIEVE WFRE THE BEST RESTAURANT IN TOWNf
AaTiAUA onH raoM fe3 AM m 3:00 AM

TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor

Rome, New York. He wrote his
first novel with this locale in
mind.
The Sterile Cuckoo was
shot on Hamilton Colleges 815
acres.

Page 17



Page 18

!, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, 0ct0ber.31,1969

> l ''7'f!\'
iltninm ,~J
WAEujAKxfc :
*M jgajpi HHe,. M|i
THE RESTLESS YOUNGSTERS OF "LAST SUMMER"
... in a very rare moment of togetherness
f Last SummerWow!

By RICK WHITWORTH
Alligator Reviewer
Remember when you were
just beginning to be turned on to
the opposite sex and booze. If
youve forgotten, Last
Summer will bring it back to
you.
The story for you might have
been different, but the feelings
are the same. We all know in real
life the actors on the screen.
It is the story of a girl and
two boys who spend their last
summer as kids together on the
beaches of an island resort
their last summer as kids because
what they learn about life makes
them grow up.
The kids portrayed are typical
middle class American teenagers.
They are products of an affluent
society which offers all the
comforts a person could want
but cannot give what is needed,
namely attention, concern and
plain old-fashioned love. As a
result it is not hard for any of us
to identify because we are of the
same generation.
Sandy, played by Barbara
Hershey, is a cute chick who
knows how to have fun. But she
can really be a bitch when she
doesnt get her way.
You have to like her though
because she is such a beautiful
portrait of someone you know.
Although she delights in
controlling her two boyfriends
and is a tease from the top down
- you dont mind; She is just a
kid, with a grown-up body that
is out of sight.
Some may hate her, but many
have to empathize with her
because she is just as normal as
any of this love-craving, affluent,
automized society.
Her two boyfriends, Peter and
Don, are just average guys. You

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can see them anywhere; be it
Lauderdale Beach, a fraternity
social or even a not-so-very-hip
pot party.
All three possess several ideals
blameless youth that are
carefree, happy and gay. They
become real people (something
more than a sunny surface)
when the fourth playmate enters
the scene.
Their relationship is
drastically changed, when they
meet Rhonda. She is a plain,
unattractive chick the
alter-ego of Sandy. Rhonda
represents all that is square, to
the other three, and they detest
her at first, but take her finally,
as a friend.
It soon becomes obvious that
this is only a surface acceptance
and she becomes the object of
jealousy and hate. That hate
finds expression in an actual
assault on Rhonda (which,
incidentally is almost too real).
It is fitting that rites of
passage are performed on such a
violent note. It signifies at a
grass-roots level, the violence
and hatred in our world.

FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. . Gainesville. Florida

Moore Gives Blacks View
. **'

Chuck Moore, star of WNEWs
show Right On in New York
City, spoke to UF students last
week on black militancy.
Entitling his talk White
Mans Indifference Breeds Black
Mans Violence, Moore gave the
black mans view of. todays
society.
Moore said the black man
would be violent until he gained,
equality and respect. Speaking
specifically of the black soldiers
returning from Vietnam, he said,
You think youve seen
violence. You aint seen nothing
yet.
Concerning the numerous
racial riots Moore posed *a
question to the white students in
the audience, asking, If
American life is so good, why
must it be dealt out with a
bayonet?
Moore repeatedly stressed the
point that the black man wants
nothing more from life than the
white man. Both have the same
needs, but the blacks have only
limited access to the means of
fulfilling those needs.
Moore said that there is now a
black separation movement
suing the United States for
possession of five Southern
states. He pointed out that
Mexico sued the United States
last year and won.
The President changed the
course of a river to give them
their land, he said. This shows
that if youre right you can
collect. We are due reparation
for being held in slavery so
long.
Naming his son as one of the
organizers of the Black Panther
Party movement in New York,
Moore said that until he finds
something better, he cant
condemn their actions.

ON MILITANCY

Moore accused the press of
calling attention to violence
from the black man and
minimizing his achievements. He
pointed out that the
announcement of Dr. Whartons
appointment to the presidency
of Michigan State University was
buried in the back pages of a
The Rathskeller
Pumpkin Has
Been Found!
Patronize us
anyway.

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Concluding his talk, Moore
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'Genesis Infers
New Mystery Tour

Genesis I, a two hour
collection of student and
independently made films, offers
to take you on a magical
mystery tour of new film
techniques.
The films explore such wildly
experimental techniques as color
separation, solarization, negative
and positive stoibe, and rapid
fire cutting.
A soup to nuts arrangement
for film faneieis, Genesis I,
presents a good cross-section of
what is currently being done
with film. Its mood ranges from
the shockingly powerful in
the film Numbers, in which a
Caesarian birth is photographed
and undercut with footage of
steers being slaughtered, to the
nostalgic, in a film poem of the
destruction of the American
Indian culture, Now That the
Buffalos Gone, to the
hilariously incongrous ritual,
Breakfast Dance, about the
agonies of getting up in the
morning.
Perhaps Patrick ONeill's
award-winning *7362 best
exemplifies the entire film. A
nine minute study in kinetic
abstraction similar to Kubrick's
2001, it has the complex
intensity of a work of visual
music. It is a reminder to us that
good film requites as much

PLAYERS PORTRAY WAYWARD SAINTS
George Herman's rollicking farce-comedy, "A rehearsal are (left to right): Sam Zimmerman,
Company of Wayward Saints/' has been chosen by Melissa Shepherd, Bob Nader, Tom Nash and Gene
Florida Mayers for their Fall produ ction. The play Touchet
opens Nov. 10 in Constans Jtieatre. Players in

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B INCREDIBLE NEW
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painstaking study as any highly
developed art form.
Along with the rest of the
films, 7362 illustrates that
experimental film-making is at
least one area of artistic
endeavor in which students are
capable of outshining their
professional counterparts.
Genesis I is a part r ** the
University Film Series. i.Jcets
for the showings cost Si for
students and $1.50 for the
general public and are available
in the Reitz Union Box Office.
The film will be running Sunday
through Tuesday with shows at
7 and 9:30 p.m.
Concert Series
Sets Deadline
Tuesday is the last day for
subscribing to Student
Government Productions
69-7O Concert Series.
The program consists of eight
events.
Subscribers reserve the seating
area of their choice for the
eintrie season and receive a 20
per cent discount over general
admission prices.
Subscription tickets may be
purchased at the Public
Functions Office on the first
floor of the Union.

I UNION DANCE x-%^^l
I "Th e Frosted 1 I
I Glass A J\ I
ISaturdayi J\ I
I Nov. 1 &l6rVrYwuy II
1 9 tH 1 I
I Reitz raf) I
| Union Y2T I
| Ballroom I f .. I
r U. of F. /
I
I admission I |Ds must bo J
I 25<

TROUPIN CONDUCTS

Symphony To Perform

BY MAGGIE COE
Entertainment Writer
Tschaikowskys Symphony
no. 5 will be featured in
Sundays concert by the
University Symphony Orchestra.
It begins at 4 p.m. in
University Auditorium.
Admission is free.
Almost the same concert will
be played for all the sixth
graders in Alachua county, said
conductor Edward Troupin.
Every Fall we give two
concerts. One was given on the
29th and the other is next
Tuesday. The kids are bused in
to the Auditorium, he said.
Troupin explained that these
concerts have been going on for
many years. Ive been here for
ten years, he said, and I
continued the program that had
already been started. They
predate the cultural programs.
The 72-member orchestra led
by Conductor Edward Troupin
will also play Mozart's Overture
to the Clemency of Titus,
Samuel Barbers First Essay
For Orchestra, and Faures
Elegy For Cello and
Orchestra. The cello solo will

be played by Marie Henderson.
The Symphonys next
appearance will be the Choral
Union in the annual presentation
of Handels Messiah under the
direction of Dr. Elwood Keister.

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Is Paul
McCartney
Coming to
Accent 70?

Page 19



-.-.-A-,...

Goblin Gators

By Alligator Services
i -A FL
On the eve of Halloween
Florida head football coach Ray
Graves is approaching the
Auburn game Saturday with
some confusion about the
possible outcome.
Fisrt of all, Graves believes
Auburn is easily the best
football team his Gators have
seen in 1969.
They have by far the best
defensive team weve faced,**
says Graves. They have the
most explosive offense we*ve
seen since Houston, and they
have a strong kicking game.**
By the same token, Graves
thinks he has never taken a
Florida team to Cliff Hare
Stadium with a better chance to
win. The Gators have never won
at Cliff Hare Stadium, and this is
where the superstition of
Halloween and Floridas
sophomores takes a part, for the
Gators* advantage Graves is
hoping.
This is a team which could
care less about whether the game
is at Cliff Hare Stadium or not,
he says. This team has proven
to me it wont be shaken or
dispirited and will stand in there
physically. And its a team with
the ability to score quickly and
often.
All of which makes it difficult

The unbeatable combination F I
for TGIF pleasure 1
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SUPERSTITIOUS GAME

Tuesdays ABjgator said there
would be 5,000 standing room
only tickets for sale Saturday at
9:30 a.m.
This was correct Tuesday, but
Thursday the Alligator learned
that the 5,000 tickets were put
on sale Wednesday and
consequently there are very few
remaining for those Gators
thinking of making the trip.
for Graves and his staff to
evaluate in terms of what it will
take for one side or the other to
win.
4 T think it will take a super
effort on our part to beat
Auburn, not because the game is
there but because they have an
& f - [\ V 9 M
v -vst & \ P P---|gs&
--|gs& P---|gs& g| 4
EXTRA EFFORT
... needed against Tigers

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Page 20

Battle Auburn

outstanding football team,
Graves says. I think we have a
chance to win because this is a
Florida team capable of making
a super effort.
Graves has been pleased with
Gator practices this week and

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TEAM EFFORT
... could mean difference

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802 W. University
Adjacent King's Food Host
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB I
X-TRA quick watch repair
Diamond Setting I
0 Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophys plaques
BECK BECHTOLP 373-10251

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 31,1969

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

with off-the-field devotion to
duty in terms of watching films
and thinking about Auburn.
Our squad is getting ready to
play as hard as they can play,
Graves says. WeH be ready for
a great effort, as will Auburn.

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eLower prices Trained techniaans
ePersonal service eFriendly atmosphere
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I PORTRAIT OF CHERI MAYHEwI
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I Be sure to ask about our {
I casual outdoor portraits in
I beautiful, natural color. I
I There is no finer Christmas f
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I portrait by 1
111 JOHNSTON I
ul photographyl
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Directly across from f
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|



Stock Eliminators
Run At Dragwav

The Souths finest Stock
Eliminator warriors will battle
this Sunday afternoon at the
Gainesville Dragway for more
than $ 1,000 in cash prizes.
Virtually every car
manufacturer will be represented
with a large field of Chevrolets
heading the car entry list. Chevy
Shaker hopefuls include the
Revenuer 111 from Montgomery,
Ala., Charlie Casons Bounty
Hunter, Steve Sowells 57, Bill
Hooks, Phenix City, Ala., and
Guy Stenzel, record holder from
Columbus, Ga.
Jim Waibel will head the
Oldsmobile ranks with the
Smothers Brothers Olds while
Robbie Hastings and W. B.
Cowart will drive Fords.
George Oglesbee of
' Jacksonville will team his
Pontiac with Bill Banshees GTO
from Miami and Jimmy Barrs
The Judge*, of St.

t v - : v.... . .- -f., .... s
Coed Golf Success

The Intramural Departments
first Co-Recreational golf
tournament proved to be a big
success. Boyd *Welsch and
Merilee Mangels won the raw
score division of the tourney
firing a 40 for nine holes of play.
Boyds father, Walter Welsch,
playing with Essie Bartlett
finished second in the raw
division with a 43.
The men and the women
alternated teeing off every hole
and alternated shots on each
hole. Only one ball is played for
each hole.
Along with the raw score
method of scoring, the Calloway
method of automatic
handicapping was also used to
give less proficient performers an
opportunity to more readily
compete.
The Calloway system allows a
player to deduct his worst holes
from his score depending on
LBJ Is Lifer
Former President Lyndon B.
Johnson holds life membership
in the Maryland Jockey Club,
which operates Pimlico Race
Course, site of the Preakness
Stakes, second jewel of racings
Triple Crown.
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...aome Just for the fun
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customers.
TRY A LESSON
lust $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
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CASSELS IN THE AIR
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INTRAMURALS

* BY STEVE ROHAN

how bad his total score was.
Dr. CJ. Holyoak and Miss
Graham were only able to card a
45 raw score but won on the
Calloway method with a 37.
Dean C.A. Boyd and Alice
Michaels also shot a 45 raw but
their worst hole was only a five
and they finished second on the
Calloway with a 39.
Mike Jacob and Pat Fuller
finished third in the raw scoring
witli a 43 and Coach Tim Scott
and Celia Regimbal finished
* third in the Calloway with a 39.
* *
In Law League football
action, the end of a long and
tedious schedule is in sight and it
appears the Ball Busters will be
facing an opportunity to revenge
an earlier loss to Browns
Bandits.
Browns Bandits won the first
encounter and is expected to
win the next. The Bandits
feature circus-catcher Mike
Rollyson, former Gator
basketball star.

Petersburg. Paul Palmer, Ft.
Lauderdale, and James Hill,
Ocala, lead the Dodge material
entrants.
Three full rounds will be held,
with the losers of each round
returning for another chance at
the large cash purse.
A special attraction has been
added to Sundays gigantic
racing program. UF student Tim
Chitwood, son of the famous
Jde Chitwood, will attempt to
drive a 1969 Camaro down the
entire dragstrip on two wheels.
Event Director Terry
Earwook has accepted a ride in
the Camaro and will accompany
Chitwood as he attempts to
balance the car on its left side
without turning over.
The Chitwood and Eaiwood
team will perform this
spectacular driving stunt three
times throughout the afternoon.
A full racing program is also

GRAND OPENING
j, 1 it -v;,. 5- '
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'l Corf Driving Range
U iiu7 Club House
\L|mj Refreshments /^i
Wl \ Electric Carts
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f, fond % 3/ 2 MILES WEST OF 175 ON ROAD 26 (NEWBERRY ROAD)
PHONE 373-2721 I


K
CARS & TROPHIES H
... stocks run Sunday for cash prizes

scheduled with two rounds of
Super and Street Eliminators
vieing for cash prizes.
- Time trials begin at 11 a.m.
with Chitwood's Camaro starting
the radng action at 2:30.
General admission is only
$2.50 for this special show.
CUSTOM FRAMING
PICTURES, DIPLOMAS, etc.
Easy Park Right in Front
THE BRUSH & BUCKET, Inc.
112 SW 34th St., 376-2431
TAME
THOSE
TIGERS!
A A
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1232 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-7657
PHOTO NEEDS

students with ID. $ 1.50.
Gainesville Dragway,
sanctioned and insured by the
Naitonal Hot Rod Association is
located three and one-half miles
north of the Gainesville
Municipal Airport on State Road
225.
. ; T r f- ri. /
Why Do
You Read
So Slowly
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple technique
of rapid reading which should
enable you to increase your
reading speed and yet retain much
more. Most people do not realize
hew much they could increase
their pleasure, success Mid income
by reading faster and more
accurately.
According to this publisher,
many people, regardless of their
present reading skill, can use this
simple technique to improve their
reading ability to a remarkable
degree. Whether reading stories,
books, technical matter, it
becomes possible to read
sentences at a glance and entire
pages in seconds with this
method.
To acquaint die readers of this
newspaper with the easy-to-follow
rules for developing rapid reading
skill, the company has printed full
details of its interesting
self-training method in a new
booklet, "How to Read Faster
and Retain More," mailed free.
No obligation. Send your name,
address, and zip coda to: Reading,
835 Diversey, Dept. 164-010,
Chicago, 60614. A postcard will
do.

Friday, October 31,1969, The Ftorkla Alligator, I

Attention
born leaders:
If you
were the
first one
togrow
abeaid,
andthe
first one
to shave
itoff
Federated
Department
Stores
would
like
to meet
you.
Write
Federated Department Stores, Inc.,
Director of
Executive Resources
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202.
Yon could
start a trend.
Again.
l

Page 21



Page 22

Alligator, Frty{>ctobr 31, t 989

'He. re Come The Gators

By BILL RANSOM
Alligator Correspondent
I just say. he re
come the Gators, and 60,000
people go crazy, said the voice.
The voice is that of Jim
Finch.
He is the announcer that
booms over the public address at
all UF home football games at
Florida Field.
Little man, big voice, he
described himself jokingly.
Neither Castro nor the Pope
has such power, quipped Finch
about his ability to stir so many
people instantly.
Post-thirty, slight of weight,
brown-haired, and a wearer of
glasses, Finch is normally soft
spoken.
He said he considers his job an
honor.
Commenting on his ironic
obscurity, Finch said its the
voice thats important and not
the name.
Very few people know I do
it, he added.
Finch said certain Gator

ABA Far Ahead Os AFL

*. LOS ANGELES (UPI) Jack
Dolph, new commissioner of the
American Basketball
Association, drew a parallel
Thursday between the ABA and
the American Football League in
its comparable stage of growth.
Dolph, 41, made a flying visit

Hart Autocross Sunday
The Hart Rallye Team is sponsoring an Autocross this Sunday and
trophies will be awarded in six classes of sedan and production type
cars plus a special modified beach buggy class.
The autocross, Which is a speed race through marked off rubber'
pilings, is open to the public. There is a $3 entry fee per car.
Registration is at 10 a.m. at the Gainesville Mall (U.S. 441 and
S-232A) and will be followed by a practice session. The race should
start after a short drivers meeting at 12:30.
For more information call 372-2225.
j \ j*i Ik!' tS'l
SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 2 nd
SENSATIONAL
SOUTHERN STOCK CARS
Round robin style
OVER 30 RECORD HOLDERS ENTERED
PLUS!
UF STUDENT TIM CHITWOOD
will attempt to run the entire
% mile on his left two wheels
Can he do it without turning over?
Time trials 11-2 Races: 2:30 Students with ID $1.50
Located 3% Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225

SAYS P.A. JIM FINCH

Jfl I j JM,
frjwa
JIM FINCH
... Gator P.A. voice
players have commented in news
stories recently about the added
satisfaction they get when he
says touchdown Florida.
However he said his job was
strictly to give names and
statistics.
He stressed he cant show
favoritism because hes just there
to inform.

IN COMPARISON

to Los Angeles less than 24
hours after his appointment was
announced in New York.
We think there is an obvious
parallel in the AFL and National
Football League and the two
basketball leagues although we
are not implying there will be

Norm Carlson, UF sports
publicity director, said Finch
does a great job, and added
Coach Graves doesnt want a
cheering squad over the P.A.
Finch said he doesnt give the
audience a play-by-play because
it would insult their
intelligence, since theyre there
watching the game.
Finch mentioned no
particular hazards to his job, but
joked, in case of a riot hold on
to the mike with your life.
Finchs job during the week is
as news director of WRUF-radih^
He is WRUFs high school
sports director, and broadcasts
Gainesville Highs football and
basketball games.
During football season this
often takes him out of town the
day before a Gator game at
Florida Field.
Finch said, It gets a little
hairy at times, out of town until
four in the morning.
Hired by the athletic
department in 1963, Finch
became the Voice of Florida

the same outcome, Dolph told
a press conference.
I think the ABA is far ahead
of the AFL league in its first two
years. Five of our teams will
finish this season in the black or
close to it. We dont need a
television contract to survive but
it would help, he said.

Students who were
unable to have their
l
senior pictures
taken Tuesday can
' ' > -j !' i V i
get them today
from B*3o to 11*.00 a.m.

Room 337
. V>*. y.. *n l .i-*-. ,* jPI sp.,-
I- '
J. Wayne Reitz Union
I **** ' iii, .i Him mi ~ ,, L

Field in 1965
He changed from announcing
over the pressboxs inside P.A.,
repeating official NCAA game
statistics for sports writers, to
become the outside voice.
Rathskeller
Pumpkin
Has Been
Found!

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Announcing
Straight from
N.yr York
Kosher
/A
'
Hillel ...
is proud to announce
that
this Saturday night...
November 1,1969
will be dedicated
to the consumption of
Kosher PIZZA!
504 members
754 non-members



What Oddsmakers Say On Games

NE W YORK (UPI)
November is the month of
upsets in college football and
who needs it?
The last Saturday of October
was rough enough. Nine of 27

Albert the Alligator
Albert the Alligator will undergo a slight change in format this
week. Since the best I could do was to tie Dave Hunter of the
Gainesville Sun, I have been informed that this week will have no
nonsense, politico jokes or drinks.
Sporting an overall average now of .892, Albert tackles the toughies
this week, with among other things, the Southeastern Conference title
at stake.
Houston over Miami by 11 Charlie Tates Hurricanes, fresh from
their second victory of the season last week, will try to tame the
Cougars this weekend, but a bout in the Astrodome will be too much
for the visitors, and this Gator sees Houston by 11.
Notre Dame over Navy by 17 This may not be the year of the
fighting Irish, but it is even less the year of the Navy bucs. Coach
Whatshisnames crew from South Bend ought to be able to trim the
feared aerosol attack from the Navy quarterback.
Penn State over Boston College by 28 The hapless bippies from
Boston scheduled the wrong team this year, as the mighty Pennsters
(Nifty Lions?) punch out yard after yard against the hapless Terriers
(Boston Terriers get it?)
Florida State over South Carolina by 16 Bill Peterson and his
bunches of Wild Indians will really show up the poor hicks from South
Carolina, and theres gonna be blood all over the field. The old
Seminoles are really going to wipe the field with the rednecks cause its
Homecoming?
Southern Cal over California by 9 01* OJ. Simpsons really gonna
crack heads in the Rose Bowl cause hes my hero. Tons of horsemeat
from whats gonna be left of the California team. What fun.
Arkansas over Texas A&M by 21 Arkansas will win the game
with their special elephant play, where a herd of wild African beats
go ... no, they use the play where the ... anyway, theyll win. You
ever seen the cheerleaders from Arkansas? Wow.
Texas over SMU by 27 Honest Sam, Im trying.
Purdue over Illinois by 8 lllinois is going to threaten Purdue with
dropping an H-bomb on Lafayette unless they lose, but Purdue is
going to get Chicago first, and no one will ever know how the game
came out.
UCLA over Washington by 12 I give up. I tried. A well-known
politico was standing over by my cage yesterday, when a student
walked up to him, and said, Nice day. Thank you, replied the
politico, and walked away.
Georgia over Tennessee by 3 Chop up fresh pineapple into one
inch chunks, add vanilla ice milk, one can fruit punch concentrate,
sugar, fee and rum. Blend, holding back some pineapple. When all
lumps are out, put in the rest of the pineapple, blend for a few
seconds, serve. Great for coo. autumn evenings.
Thats about it, except to say the Gators will make it 7o this
weekend by trouncing Auburn by 14.
GO GATORS!
V Climb aboard f
TThe S.S. Winnjammer* t*
/ Mwh unwd from 11:00 AM to tA
U Midnight jl
/ Bernie Sher ((
f at the Organ on Thursday; Friday & Saturday \\
) Oysters & clams on the half shell Lr
Michelob on draft S
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty J
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton. Manager 1/
520 S.W. 2nO Ave. 4 fl
Reservations Accepted l\\
j
THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
'AT
. in i- 1 " 11 111

favorites listed by professional
oddsmakers last week were
beaten or tied. Five more won
squeakers by margins
considerably less Ilian the points
listed.

Gators Underdogs

Injuries and morale influence
November football. Injuries you
measure, morale you cant. But
one way or another, hoes the
first week of November, running
from die top of the current UPI
national rankings:
Ohio State 42, Northwestern
14 Buckeyes wont detour this
one.
Texas 28, Southern Methodist
14 SMU defense cant hold
Steers.
Tennessee 17, Georgia 14
Georgia favored on home field
but rested Vols have a good
shot.
Arkansas 27, Texas A&M 7-
Razorbacks are solid.
Penn State 45, Boston College
14 Eagles lack defense to hold
this class.
Louisiana State 21, Mississippi
17 LSU bruised by Auburn
but still alive.
Southern California 29,
California 20 Could be worse.
UCLA 27, Washington 10
Huskies still winless.
Auburn 24, Florida 21
Edging Floridas ace soph passer.
GATOR
GOLF
Miniature Golf
Maximum Fun
242 S S.W. 13tll St.
2-12 P.M. DAILY
9 AM 12 AM SAT.

DATSUN
IS NO. 1 IN
SALES IN GAINESVILLE
.
AHEAD OF ALL OTHER SMALL CARS.
THIS MEANS DATSUN IS NOW
SELLING MORE CARS THAN:
OPR
THE NEW LEADER
DATSUN
GODDING & CLARK
115 SE 2nd ST.
1 v ~ NO SAUESMFN. YOU TALK, WE LISTEN
AHMIIIMUIir K-m ULW'iPaWV- mn

Missouri 17, Kansas State 14
- Tigers hope to catch K. State
in a letdown.
Notre Dame 35* Navy 10
Irish too big, too fast, too
versatile.
Wyoming 16, Arizona State
14 Cowboys still playing
short-handed.
Purdue 35, Illinois 14 Illini
are 0-6 and struggling.
Stanford 21, Oregon State 10
- Caution advised; might be
closer.
Colorado 17, Nebraska 14
Andersons switch to tailback
has em in high gear.
Oklahoma 24, lowa State 21
- Oddsmen make it a big score.

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'Tit
4 ALIBI
Lounge
Mr** ST ft UNI V. AVI.

Friday. October 31.1969. Tha Florida AJJigrtor*

... * B
lir ....
\-V\./ jp
4 BLOOD HORROR SHOCKERS
SHOWING TONIGHT AT THE
SUBURBIA DRIVE IN THEATRE
KIDS OF THE VAMPIRE VAMPIREDRACULA
DRACULA VAMPIREDRACULA HAS RISEN FROM
THE GRAVE CURSE OF THE
WEREWOLF AND
FRANKENSTEIN CONQUERS
THE WORLD. WARNING THESE
ARE NOT FOR THE SQUEAMISH
- STARTING SUNDAY 2
HIGHLY CONTROVERSIAL
FILMS X RATED I A WOMAN
AND CARMEN BABY.
advtTTsoment

Page 23



Page 24

* The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 31,1969

Gator-Auburn Starting Player Lineups

UF PINS HOPES
ON DEFENSE??
I Mt ?
Uv ijW
PHIL BANNISTER

JARMAN'S HANDSOME^^^
Buckle Strap
THE NEWEST LOOK IN SHOES
. -* ..' ' - ,jk
Buckle down, style leader, buckle down! Jarmans
new buckle-strap blucher is winning all the style
honors this season. A gregarious type, it gets along
handsomely with either "forward fashion suits or
your more traditional clothes. See us soon for a
pair. (You get to enjoy Jarmans famous "wear "weartested
tested "weartested comfort, too!)
NOW AVAILABLE IN ALL
THESE COLORS:
1. LUNAR GOLD
2. WHITE
3. BLACK
THr.THitcheH*
1127 WEST UNIV.AVE
JflHtUtiVs Shoes
INTHiMAM: J
. -

GATORS TIGERS
OFFENSE

Andy Cheney 183 So SE
Wayne Griffith 217 Sr LT
Donnie Williams 209 Jr LG
Kim Helton 213 Sr C
Skip Amelung 233 Sr RG
Mac Steen 223 Sr rt
Bill Dowdy 200 So te
John Reaves 204 So QB
Carlos Alvarez 181 So F
Tommy Durr an ce 200 So JB
Mike Rich 204 So FB

Bob Coleman 203 Jr LE
Robbie Rebol 209 Sr LT
Danny Williams 219 So RT
Jack Youngblood 234 Jr RE
David Ghesquiere 197 Sr LLB
TomAbdelnour 194 Sr MLB
Mike Kelley 212 Jr RLB
Harvin Clark 189 So LCB
Jack Bums 179 Jr LS
Steve Tannen 194 Sr RS
Mark Ely 179 Sr RCB

DEFENSE

The Harmon Football Forecast
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 949 Right, 313 Wrong, 31 Ties 752)
1 Ohio State 6Southern Cal 11Kansas State 16Michigan
2 Texas 7Notre Dame 12U.C.LA 17Purdue
3 Tennessee 9Auburn IJStanford 18Wyoming
4 L.S.U. 9Georgia 14Missouri 19Air Force
5 Arkansas 10Penn State 15Florida 29Colorado

Saturday, Nov. 1 Major Colleges

Air Force 31
Alabama 26
Arizona 23
Arkansas 28
Arlington 24
Auburn 30
Bowling Green 31
Buffalo 20
Citadel 21
Clemson 17
Colgate 24
Colorado 21
Colorado State 24
Cornell 31
Dartmouth 27
Davidson 26
Dayton 17
Delaware 22
East Carolina 31
Florida State 17
Georgia Tech 28
Harvard 24
Houston 22
lowa 21
Kansas State 25
Kent State 15
L.S.U. 27
Louisiana Tech 27
Memphis State 37
Michigan 38
Michigan State 31
North Carolina 21
North Texas 32
Notre Dame 45
Ohio State 45
Ohio U 27
Oklahoma 28
Oklahoma State 23
Oregon 21
Pacific | 28
Penn State < 40
Princeton 25
Purdue 32
San Jose State 21
Southern California 26
Stanford 31
Syracuse 27
Tennessee 27
Texas 38
T. 23
Texas Tech 24
Toledo 17
U. 38
Utah 17
Vanderbilt 21
VP.I. 21
West Virginia 24
Wvoming 26

Other Games South and Southwest

Abilene Christian 34
Alcorn A & M 37
Arkansas State 30
Arkansas Tech 14
Austin Peay 33
Bluefield 16
Catawba 28
Chattanooga 27
Delta Stata 24
East Texas 27
Eastern Kentucky 25
Elizabeth City 35
Florence 30
Gle.iville 17
Guilford 20
Hampden-Sydney 20
Henderson 28
Lenoir-Rhyne 27
Martin 22
Ouachita 14
St Josephs 14
Salem 38
Sam Houston 27
SW Louisiana 26
SW Texas 25
Southwestern, Tenn. 18
Texas A & I 34
Trinity 20
Troy State 33
Washington & Lee 20
Western Carolina 30
Western Kentucky 24
Wofford 28

Terry Beasley 188 So
Greg Robert 228 Sr
Jimmy Speigner 221 Jr
Tom Banks 235 Sr
Johnny McDonald 230 Jr
Richard Cheek 239 Sr
Ronnie Ross 204 Jr
Pat Sullivan 193 So
Connie Frederick 195 Sr
Mickey Zofko 187 Jr
Wallace Clark 195 Jr

Durward Sauls 193 Jr
Don Bristow 230 Jr
Vince Bowlin 270 Sr
Bill James 222 Sr
Bobby Strickland 198 Jr
Bobby Woodruff 207 Jr
Mike Kolen 210 Sr
Don Webb 184 Sr
Sonny Ferguson 197 Sr
Buddy McClinton 190 Sr
Larry Willingham 180 Jr

Army 10
Mississippi State 14
Brigham Young 21
Texas A & M 9
West Texas 23
Florida 22
Marshall 0
Temple 8
Richmond 17
Maryland 14
Lehigh 20
Nebraska 20
El Paso 13
Columbia 13
Yale 16
V.M.I. 7
Xavier 6
Rutgers 17
Furman 6
South Carolina 16
Duke 14
Pennsylvania 6
Miami, Fla. 21
Minnesota 14
Missouri 21
Louisville 14
Mississippi 10
Southn Mississippi 7
Tulsa 7
Wisconsin 14
Indiana 22
Virginia 15
Cincinnati 7
Navy 7
Northwestern 7
Western Michigan 23
lowa State 20
Kansas 17
Idaho 6
Washington State 12
Boston College 0
Brown 6
Illinois 14
New Mexico 19
California 10
Oregon State 17
Pittsburgh 7
Georgia 21
S.M.U. 13
Baylor 6
Rice 17
Miami (Ohio) 8
Washington 7
Utah State 0
Tulane 20
William & Mary 7
Kentucky 10
Arizona State 21

Easfn New Mexico 14
Arkansas AM & N 7
Lamar Tech 14
Southern State 13
Arkansas A & M 7
West Va. (Wesleyan 14
Presbyterian 14
Tennessee Tech 26
Livingston 20
Howard Payne 15
Murray 22
Fayetteville 6
Samford 13
West Va. State 13
Newberry 14
Emory & Henry 17
SE Oklahoma 12
Carson-Newman 14
Pensacola Navy 21
Austin
Georgetown 13
Concord 0
S F Austin 20
NE Louisiana 19
McMurry 20
Principia 7
Sul Ross 0
Texas Lutheran 15
McNeese 16
Sewanee 10
Elon 12
More head 10
Appalachian 21

Li- r sn&
a T/Nn n^i^iTr
C3ATOK r UINIS
wF*Jk if m
WiatiW
PHIU COPE

How about those loud rumblings in the Big
Eight. The race for the championship cleared up
or muddled up quite suprisingly last Saturday.
When the smoke left the area, 11th-ranked Kansas
State sits atop the heap. However, the chips will
really be down this week as the K-Staters meed the
de-throned, 14-th-rated Missouri in Columbia.
Until we read the final score, well pick Kansas
State by four points.
Third-ranked Tennessee returns to football
warfare after vacationing Saturday ... and they'd
better return strong. Waiting in the wings is
once-beated, 9th-rated Georgia. We're giving the
Volunteers a 6-point edge, but Bulldog power can
be upsetting!
Another headliner in the Southeastern
Conference pits Florida, no 15, against Auburn,
still rated Bth after losing to L.S.U. by the
expected margin. Along with Stanford, Auburn is
probably the finest two-time loser in the nation.
So, well go with Auburn to beat the Gators by 8
points, but it won't be an upset if it goes the other
way.
A third biggie in the Southeast heats up that old
rivalry between L.S.U. and Mississippi. The
unbeaten Tigers are ranked 4th, but ratings are
supposed to go out the window in this annual
confrontation. However, well hang onto
ours... L.S.U. to win by 17 points.
The only undefeated major independent is
10th-ranked F*enn State. They're a shoo-in to win
their seventh of the season, this one by 40 points
over Boston College.
Southwest Conference action just has to center
around the two undefeated powers, Texas and
Arkansas. The Longhorns, still ranked a very dose
second to Ohio State in our Top 20, will pin
another conference loss on Southern
Methodist... the point spread is 25. The
Razor backs, no. 5, should have little trouble
beating Texas A & M by 19 points.
And It looks like another ho-hum hall game for
King-of-the-Pack, Ohio State. Northwestern is the
opposition, and the Bucks are winners again, this
one by 38 points. FHirdue, no. 17, and Michigan,
no. 16, are still very much in the Big Ten title and
R ?* e race Th Boilermakers will whip
Illinois by 18 ... Michigan will top Wisconsin by
24.
It's still Southern Cal and U.C.L.A. in the
Pacific Coast Conference, and the hair is getting
shorter and shorter. The 6lh-ranked Trojans are
favored over California by 16, while the Udans
will strongly nudge Washington by 31 points.