Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
-AS jAmtoim.

Vol. 62, No. 29

OATH DISPUTE CONTINUES
AAUP Asks OConnell
For Directive Delay

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The confusion and conflict
involved in a running dispute
over a UF directive ordering
university employes to sign a
state loyalty oath by Nov. 15
took some further turns
Tuesday.
A letter from UFs chapter
of American Association of
University Professors to UF
President Stephen C.
OConnell, who issued the
directive, asked the
administratibn to either rescind
the order or delay the
effective date of enforcement.
The letter apparently is a
response to a American Civil
Liberties Union-backed request
for a restraining order on the
directive due to a current
court case considering the
oaths constitutionality.
But, the letter also implied
UF is acting alone in ordering
the signing and is doing so on
a calculated attempt to
carry out a last minute
purge* of professors whose
views it finds unacceptable or
embarrassing.
In its arguments, the letter,
signed by AAUP President Ray
Fahien, said there is no
current campaign of
enforcement by FSU or by the
Board of Regents.
This was confirmed by
FSU*s director of personnel
Tuesday afternoon, according
to the campus newspaper, the
Flambeau.
Apparently FSLPs policy
requires employes to sign the
oath before their contracts are
finalized at the beginning of
each year.
The Flambeau reported

TOWERS TURNED DOWN
Hale Says 'No To 24-Hour Open House

See Editorial Page 6
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale will not
approve a policy of 24-hour
open house for Towers
dormitory.
The question came up
some time ago he said
Tuesday. I said then and 1
would still hold that Towers
should be governed by the
same hours that hold for the
other living areas. I would not
approve it.
A proposal was made last
spring by a committee of
Towers residents and
counselors tova 1 low <
around-the-clock open house in
*.£*%*V # V 9 v V

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

I
k
m I
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
...receives letter
FSUs AAUP president said
faculty had no qualms about
signing the oath.
UFs directive was
prompted, said UF presidential
aide Rae Weimer, after a check
with files revealed many
employes had signed the oath
before.
Also, Weimer said, the files
check indicated many oaths
had not been notarized, as
required by state statute.
Weimer said OConnell was
only conforming with state
laws in issuing the directive.
The AAUP letter, however,
said the revised oath is further
unconstitutional because it
violates a 1967 U.S. Supreme
Court decision saying mere
membership in the Communist
Party should not be grounds
for dismissal.
The revised oath is in
accordance with a 1961
Florida Supreme Court
decision deleting the phrase
... I have not and will not
*
lend my aid, support, advice,

that area.
The group ajrgued that
because of the physical
arrangement of die dorm, and
the age of the residents (only
students of junior standing or
above may live there), Towers
should be exempt from the
limited open house hours
imposed on all campus living
areas.
The proposal was approved
by the Division of Housing,
but denied by Hale.
Hale did approve a
recommendation that the unit
for determining open house
hours within the prescribed
limits should be the suite
rather than the floor in the
Towers, but he said the nature
of the suites as complete urnts
in themselves should not
*TvC.;-* ** *' v.- *- v; r > *f. v ? ? "

University of Florida, Gainesville

counsel, or influence to the
Communist Party... from
the old Florida requirement.
The Board of Regents at its
Feb. 3 meeting deleted the
phrase and prescribed the new
form for all state university
employes.
Employes are now subject
to dismissal if they fail to sign
the oath by Nov. 15, the
O'Connell directive deadline.
The AAUP also charged
certain departments and
colleges were issuing earlier
deadlines to insure
conformance. Fahien said
faculty members were worried
their paychecks would be
withheld.
He mentioned the College of
Law which, he charged* had
set Friday as its deadline.
However, Law Dean Frank
Maloney denied this.
He said the confusion arose
because his college was the
first to inform its employes of
the OConnell directive, and
faculty members thought the
deadline was earlier, also.

I Tickets Gone Monday 1

g In case you planned to go to the
g Georgia-Florida game and you were going to
wait for a day or so to get your tickets,
:§ forget it.
:j:j All 6,038 tickets went the first day of
£: sales, Monday.
Ray Dorman, UF ticket manager explained:
All the tickets were sold because we opened
up a lot of windows so lines would not be so
x long.
Dorman said this was to avoid the conflict
V
and confusion caused last year when few
windows were opened and some people waited
:*: for two days to get tickets.

permit Towers area to have
different rules from other
areas.
All open house regulations
except for that variation
should affect the Towers the
same as the other living areas,
he said.
Towers counselor Barbara
Lembke said Tuesday the
Towers Area Council plans to
bring up the proposal
sometime in the future, but
right now the emphasis is on
developing away to enforce
current open house regulations.
Some students, probably
most of the students in the
Towers, feel that 24-hour open
house is appropriate for the
Towers. But no one is correct
in assuming that all* students in
Towers are in favor of the

: :::;i:sl
yH|
|S|E>p&£ -'y -i?~ ffiffl|B||pffig* > :& .: ;> ... <
PHIL COPE
MONEY FOR A MUG
Gator Loan Fund is now making money from mug sales, arid
fund chairman Eddie Floyd, left, and Gator businessman Bill
Donigan are happy about it The mugs are decorated with the UF
seal and the. 1969 football schedule. They're sold for $1 at
Donigan's, 1123 W. University Ave., with all proceeds going to
the Gator Loan Fund.

plan, she said.
Towers resident assistants
contacted said they think
Towers should have constant
open house.
I think it should (have
24-hour open house) because
of the apartment set-up, R.A.
Caryn Gettler said.
In the Towers we are
different from most areas in
that we have juniors and
seniors living here and because
of the apartment set-up, R.A.
Jan Short explained in giving
her reasons for supporting
24-hour open house.
R.A. Steve Bazinski
questioned the idea that all
housing areas must have the
same regulations. He said not
all students have the same
heeds and that a possibility is
..*,** k > ' 1 **

Wednesday, October 29, 1969

One fading hope was that left-over tickets
given to Georgia would be sent to Florida.
This is a fact, said Dorman, Its part of
the contract. However, the tickets should have §
been here Sunday and here it is Tuesday and )$
no tickets. ?
Although Street and Smith's College |j
Football Yearbook lists neither Georgia nor
Florida as the home team, Georgia Athletic g
Director Joel Raves said it was customary for |
the schools to alternate the right to be home S
team. |
This year Georgia received 30,000 tickets, :$
said Raves, and, supposedly,\ext year Florida §
will receive 30,000. A

to have specific housing areas
with varying regulations, giving
the individual student the
opportunity to choose the
situation he prefers when he
applies for ho^mig.
ACCENT 70 only four
months away, may be in hot
water with only three speakers
committed page 3
Classifieds 11
Editorials 6
Entertainment 13
FSU News 2
Letters 7
Small Society 4
Sports 14
Whats Happening ... 12



. The FI orkfo All ig?tor K Wednesday

Page 2

Finances Aren t The Rathskeller sUnly rroDiem

(EDITORS NOTE: The
Rathskellers first annual
evaluation comes up on Nov.
20. This is the second in a
series of three articles on the
Rathskellers problems and
successes during its first year
in operation.)
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Although the Rathskellers
financial situation has been a
constant subject of debate
throughout its first year of
life, disagreement over
entertainment, concept and
methods of operation have by
no means taken second place.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd says
Rathskellers type *of
entertainment has not been a
success.
I dont think the students
want to go drink beer and
hear about pollution, the
Vietnam War and racism, he
said. They get enough of that
everywhere else. It should be a
place to have fun.
Entertainment of the

Veterans Day Program
Will Show Gl Support

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Writer
In accordance with a request
by Sen. Barry Goldwater for

news "Ifch**.
SMC The Student Mobilization Committee to End the
Vietnam War, voted down a resolution Monday calling for the
support of the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong.
SMC voted instead to accept a three point platform calling for
an immediate withdrawal of US troops from Vietnam, an end to
similar military involvement, and an end to all campus
complicity with the war machine.
This complicity includes ROTC, military recruiting, and
military research.
STRIKE Another march is planned today in support of the
striking workers of the Elberta Crate and Box Co.
A similar march four weeks ago brought out about 200
townspeople, students and workers. An even larger turnout is
expected today.
ABOLISH A proposal to abolish specific basic studies
requirements for junior college transfers is now before the Council
of Academic Deans.
A faculty senate proposal states transfer students with 54
quarter hours of general education courses who hold an associate
of arts degree will be deemed to have fulfilled FSU basic studies
requirements.
Under the present system, junior college transfer students often
have to take courses specified for FSU freshmen students.
Don't Miss Saturday's Game
Teddy Bear Nursery
Y/fJr All day Set 7am- 6pm $2.00
l Jjrim i Also all night Fri. (fa Sat.
2TRAINED AND EXPERIENCED BABYSITTERS
Jf Children can be left and
1 picked up anytime convenient to you.
1214 N.W. 4th Street
Ph. 376-0917 for further information
Till FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
I nitcrsity of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weeklv. and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz Union Building.
University of Florida. Gainesville. Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at tlie United States Post Office at Gainesville. Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement invoking typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the Advertising Manager within (11 one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices
'* flefohr rite next inftfrW*>*> j' J ,IT .V .

sing-along type is the best for
this type of place, he said.
Entertainment is one of the
changes Joe Hilliard, chairman
of the Rathskeller board of
directors, said he has planned.
More big-name groups will be
brought to the Rathskeller,
with a cover charge of $1.50.
With the profits from this,
bands and smaller groups can
be brought to the tavern
without a cover charge, he
said.
The concept of the
Rathskeller is another subject
of debate for the evaluators.
T o provide a place where
students, faculty and
administrators can get together
and talk was its stated purpose
at the outset.
Has the Rathskeller fulfilled
that purpose?
Shepherd says it has, but he
disagrees completely with the
entire concept.
A place for students and
faculty to get together and
talk is unrealistic, he said.
For one thing, it costs a
faculty member $25 to belong
while a student can join for

demonstration to show support
for Gls, UFs Veterans Club
will sponsor a Veterans Day
Program Nov. 11.

only $2.
Hilliard said the original
purpose hasnt been carried to
the extent it could be. The
business situation of the
Rathskeller and the precedence
of everyday problems overrode
the more general and
long-range concept, he said.
But its not lost to the
extent that it cant be
reinstated, he said. I think
we should reaffirm the purpose
of the Rathskeller at the
evaluation.
The need for a changing
philosophy by the Rathskellers
board has prompted Hilliard to
suggest that the evaluation
become an annual event.
It has also prompted him to
retire.
Hilliard said he has been
with the Rathskeller from its
beginning, partly due to a
feeling of obligation and partly
because he wanted to.
I feel my function will be
complete after this first-year
evaluation, he said. Because
Ive been with the Rathskeller
for so long I dont think I can
be objective about the changes

Jim Hollis, a former
president of the club and
chairman of the program, said
the day would not be a
pro-Vietnam demonstration,
but rather, a display of
support for Americas fighting
men.
The program is scheduled to
be presented from 1 to 2 p.m.
in the Plaza of the Americas,
but in case of rain, the
location will be changed to the
University Auditorium.
The program will open with
the UF Choir, followed by the
ROTC color guard. Bill Bosse,
president of the Veterans Club
will deliver a welcoming
address, followed by an
invocation. Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale
will then introduce the main
speaker, former Congressman
William Matthews. Then there
will be two minutes of silence
and the firing of the cannon.
This is not a pro-war
demonstration, Hollis stressed.

"Take me home 1AI
pr a i i| Win a
Poodle
Tonight at the...
1 N.w. 10 AVE.
Yeswin a pup tonight-or one of
the bottles of Champagne we're giving
away FREE. And while youre here, enjoy
Htpc : !p^a^^
/.,>// yt /* \

that will be suggested.
Hilliard is also chairman of
Accent 7O, which comes up in
early February. The duties of
this job will start to be a real
burden after the evaluation,
Hilliard said, and will require a
lot of time and energy.
Shepherd would not say
what changes he is going to
suggest at the evaluation for
a premature disclosure could
be damaging.
I do intend, though, he
said, to make sure there is
very open and frank discussion
of all problems including

Radio WUWU Asks:
Is McCartney Alive?
Wanted: Dead or Alive. Will the real Paul McCartney
please stand up?
Radio station WUWU will attempt to answer the life or
death question of the Beatles existence through the voices
of UF students tonight. Mike James, disc jockey at the local
station, is preparing a program to present the facts and
draw out any conclusions.
James will be taking calls from UF students at the station
from 7 pan. to 10 p.m. tonight and recording their views
on McCartney. We want to hear some academic and
intelligent opinions on whether this thing is a hoax or the
truth, said James.
Students can call at 376-2688 or 376-2689 to have their
ideas recorded. These tapes will be edited and played back
during a special McCartney show on WUWU from 5-5:30
p.m. on Sunday.
The actual dues concerning McCartneys death,
including recordings played backwards, will be aired on this
special show so people can hear for themselves and
decide.
The Beatles death has been the subject of a graduate
thesis, disc jockey campaigns, thousands of newspaper
articles and an essay in this weeks Time magazine.
Recordings and album covers indicate McCartney is dead
despite his recent statement that he is alive and well.

Decal Refunds
Due Thursday
Thursday will be the last
day to receive decal refunds.
Traffic and Parking
coordinator Lee Burrows said
anyone who wants their
money back because they no
longer need the decal should
come to the University Police
station. This applies to
students and staff who have
border or commuter decals,
and only drive on campus
after traffic control hours, he
said.

personnel.
The attitude of the
Rathskeller employes toward
the student customers has to
be a little more polite, he said.
They treat the students like
criminals and there is no real
customer-proprietor
relationship.
Not only that but theyre
paranoid about minors drinking
on the premises, Shepherd
said. The Rathskeller doesnt
have to be any more careful
than any other bar in
Gainesville.

MINI-POSTER
IF eteVodE UT JUST
| ONE UTUE CANPIE.--
AIR fUufflori WOOU>
Doowt woue Wi
O O



SHEPHERD AND WEIL DISAGPFP
Accent 70 Lagging At Take-Off

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent *7O may be in
trouble it has a shortage of
student help, committee
chairmanship resignations and a
general chairman who is also
chairman of the board of
directors of the Rathskeller
with little time until now to
spend with Accent.
However, Student Body
President Charles Shepherd
disagrees with the statement
that Accent is in trouble* even
though chairman Joe Hilliard
and last year's speaker
chairman admit it is lagging
behind schedule.
Jeff Weil, Accent *69
speakers' chairman and an
advisor to this year's program,
said Friday that slowness in
signing speakers for the
program has, thus far, resulted
in a minimal lineup of three
symposium speakers for the
Feb. 14-19 program, which
may require as many as 16
speakers.
Shepherd said this is not so.
I have great respect for
Weil. His concern is genuine,
but his time table for Accent
is not the only one which can
be utilized to have an effective
program,! he said.
Chairman of the Accent
progran in 1967, Shepherd said
the executive board has to
work with schedules which can
vary the planning speed of the
program.
"These things ebb and
flow," he said.
Weil claimed that by this
time last year, Accent had all
16 speakers lined up.
"All the contracts were
signed during the "summer. By
the first of September we had
our program get up, he said.
Our brochures were sent
out to speakers*, program
publicity was complete, the
high school delegations knew
where they were going to stay.
In other words, we were ready

UF Joins Blood Drive
The UF has joined the Blood for Peace campaign, a
statewide student blood drive. The movement began at Florida
Technological Universitys Moratorium Day, Oct. 15.
The blood donations will go to military hospitals for
deployment to fighting men, but one-fourth of the blood
collected is pledged to UFs own blood bank.
Blood may be donated from Oct. 28 to Nov. 10 from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center or Alachua
General Hospital; or donors may go to the Phi Delta Theta
fraternity house Thursday, from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
t f SB -(resK wade
fTilCatuiy /
Wione Mow or Gome ji
376*1370
ZSO6NW I3HST.
C&Kjrti Kgttle

.v^.w.wAv. .'..v.w.w.y J .y.v.y. .y
[ DEPTH REPORT j

to go,
Weil said he doesn't want to
downgrade this year's program,
but theyve got three weeks
to finish their work.
Why three weeks? It's
three weeks before
Thanksgiving,' lie said, No
one works over Thanksgiving
break, and when they come
back they study for finals.
Then students go home for
Christmas, and after that, its
too late to sign most speakers
few an early Febreary date."
Hilliard said Friday the
. program has had a lot of idea
work with very little work in
the area of concrete action
yet.
However, he said, we are
now leaving the formulation of
ideas stage and moving into
program implementation."
Hilliard has been under
pressure from SG leaders to
resign from either the
Rathskeller or the Accent
chairmanship because both jobs
have full-time responsibilities.
He decided last week to
resign from his job at the
Rathskeller, but wont quit
until after the Nov. 20 SG
evaluation of the club.
He admits that his
responsibilities at the
Rathskeller have taken away
from the time he should be
spending on Accent.
Ive been a little derelict in
my duties toward Accent, he
said* There is concern about
this but Im sure it wont
effect the outcome of the
program.
Hilliard said a Thanksgiving
target date for having all
speakers lined up is still
possible to make.
Speakers Chairman Bob
Martin said the three speakers

which are supposed to speak
at the symposium are not
completely confirmed.
Stuart Udall, former US.
secretary of interior has
signed a contract; Dr. Rene
Dubois, professor at the
Rockefeller Institute for
Medical Reasearch will be
signed for certain; and John
T. Volpe, secretary of
transportation has sent us a
letter saying he will come
unless something else comes up
and he cant make it, Martin
said.
In the area of committee
chairmanships, there are two
vacancies; personnel and
technical committee chairmen
are needed. Also Honored
Guests Committee Chairman
Marc H. Click resigned last
week and has been replaced by
SG Senator Bill Harrell.
Glkk resigned because he
said he didn't have time to
spend working with Accent.
1 work at Rathskeller 22
hours a week, Im an advisor
to Shepherd, and a member of
the university student affairs
and conduct committees.
Glick said Accent has plenty
of time to get its program
ready by February.
They're a long way along.
Theyre not in hot water at
all. If they go past December
without making any progress
then they would be in
trouble.

' Col. Sanders' 1
W thicken
BRING UL
COUPON COUPON
WEDNESDAY COUPON SPECIAL
| 3 PC. CHICKEN BOX (
m MASHED POTATOES
M AND GRAVY M
% COLE SLAW AND ROLLS %
|jj 1 1' 1 Y EE*. V
BJBINC COUPON

Some people are worried.
Theyre saying that the
program is in trouble. They
have three to five speakers
definitely lined up. Theyre
not in trouble, he reiterated.
Hilliard can carry it off,
he said.
Vicki Fagan, Accent vice
chairman, said Friday the
program needs more student
help.
She said students who are
interested in helping out
should apply at the Accent
RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL
HAS THE NEW
LED ZEPPELIN II
AT DISCOUNT PRICES

r ~ STEAK* SHAKE 1
1 jes 7 Student Special 9 |
I Mr (With The Coupon)
I Regular 93< Sfoakburgor
I Lunch ton And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90 C plus tax |
1 Steak n* Shake i
I 1610 S. W. 13th St. Gainesville
Anyone can be a radical Y
but to boa well-informed
radical, come to the
Socialist Forum
and see
'Mayday 1
Story of the May-June 1968
FRENCH REVOLT
a V/2 hr film
also
A panel of five socialists and radicals
will speak on'France, May-June 1968:/
l The first stage of the French J
Socialist Revolution.' y
TODAY 8 p.m. j
McCarty Aud.
L Sponsored by SPU A |

Wednesday, Octbber 29,1969, the Florida AlHgator.

offices located on the third
floor of the Reitz Union next
to the SG offices.
Accent has been alloca Hi
$ 10,189 from SG for I.e
February program.
Along with funding, the
committee is expecting funds
from the colleges of medicine,
arts and sciences and
journalism to pay for speakers
who will represent the
academic areas of the donating
colleges, according to Martin.
4.
MOMS AHMCT a4 SCHOOt (4
jinfitii^lrfr * nm 1 .4*
euM Mt uu-iafsonauat ...'
tan May 572-M4*
jttir^y^v.svi.s
Page 3



TIM Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Ottdber 29, 1960

Page 4

Florida Blue Key
Will Drive Voters
To encourage support for the higher education bond
amendment in the Nov. 4 election, Florida Blue Key (FBK) will
provide transportation for UF and Gainesville voters.
Weve got to get as many voters out as possible, FBK
President Jack Harkness said. We need volunteers with cars to
pick voters up and drive them to the polls.
Pick-up points are being scheduled now.
The Young Democrats and Gainesville high schools are aiding
FBK transportation project.
Volunteers may call 392-1661 anytime after 1 p.m.

Federal Service Exam
Scheduled Here Nov. 17

An on campus Federal Service Entrance
Examination (FSEE) will be conducted by the
Civil Service Commission on Nov. 17, at 1 p.m.
Students may sign up at the University
Placement Center in the Reitz Union.
Half the positions for which the Government
recruits college graduates each year are filled
through the FSEE. This includes over 200
occupations, ranging from electronic data
processing and financial analysis to personnel
management and general administration.
Beginning salary for these positions is usually
$6,176 a year, but with an outstanding scholastic
record, one may qualify for $7,639.
Opportunities for advancement are excellent with
significant pay increases.

UF Debaters
Top Rated
The junior debaters of the
Florida Debate Society hosted
the Second Annual Gator
Invitational Debate
Tournament Junior Oct. 25
and 26 and garnered top
ratings in two of the three
catagories for awards.
Over 25 junior colleges and
universities participated in the
regional tournament, including
the University of Georgia,
University of Miami, Florida
State University, Middle
Tennessee State, Wake Forest,
Emory, Carson Newman
College and Stetson College.
Finishing undefeated the
home team was the top
affirmative team through the
efforts of Paul Rosenthal and
Phil Schwarts.
Because the home team is
not eligible for awards the first
place affirmative trophy went
to the University of South
Carolina, second place to UM
and third to FSU.
Middle Tennessee State
University remained the only
undefeated negative team and
received the first place negative
team. Second went to Stetson
and third to Wake Forest.
In the four-man team
division the overall school
division the winner was UF
with a 13-1' record. The
awards in this catapory went
to University of South
Carolina, first place and UM,
second place.
Micron
A micron is a measurement
125,000th of an inch.

Do you think
a bright young engineer
should spend
his most imaginative years on
the same assignment?
Neither do we.

Thats why we have a two twoyear
year twoyear Rotation Program for
graduating engineers who
would prefer to explore several
technical areas. And thats why
many of our areas are organ organized
ized organized by functionrather than
by project.
At Hughes, you might
work on spacecraft, communi communications
cations communications satellites and/or tacti tactical
cal tactical missiles during your first
two years.
All you need is an EE, ME
or Physics degree and talent.

Some of the current openings at Hughes:

Microwave & Antenna Engineers
Electro-Optical Engineers
Microcircuit Engineers
* Space Systems Engineers
Missile Systems Engineers
Guidance & Controls Engineers
Spacecraft Design Engineers
Weapon Systems Engineers
Components & Materials Engineers
Circuit D6Sigh' Engineers:"",
Product Design Engineers

All college seniors who will complete degree
requirements within nine months are eligible, as
well as graduated, regardless of academic majors.
.The examination is a general test of verbal
abilities and quantitative reasoning requiring
about two and a half hours.
There are special cases of qualifying for
immediate selection without taking the written
test. These cases are explained in an FSEE
announcement which can be reviewed in the
Placement Office.
No written test is required for positions in
Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, the Physical
Sciences, Accounting, Auditing, Forestry or Law.
Applicants for these positions are evaluated
according to education and experience.

the small society

4 WHAT W & M e&P
A HtJMAH ITALIAN n
?ollA cY- HiM-
Star >yw#ete h ... ________________,

jk i
rnamm
If you qualify, well arrange for
you to work on several different
assignments...and you can
help pick them.

For additional information,
please contact your College
Placement Director or write:
Mr. Robert A. Martin
Head of Employment
Hughes Aerospace Divisions
11940 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Culver City, California 90230
ti.S: Citizenship is required
An equal opportunity employer ~ j

\
fiMSklMf PACHU
I) V PROTECTS YOU FROM\{ A
/ f \ ASSAULT AT HOME, CAR wM.
hi/-A OR ON THE STREET! WjM
Ul/ J l\ If the threat of attack comes, spray Safe Guard. Your as- \\\
Sm/ \\ sailant will choke and cough violently ... is temporarily
/ \ \ blinded. Keep it in your car, purse, pocket, even under your
//. .. f rHnn \ 1 pillow. Not dangerous... completely harmless after 15
fill )\ minutes. Causes no permanent damage. Order Safe Guard 1
Vor Money BackU totlay en oy Protection in the palm of your hand. S 3 PR. J
"Home Safety Systems, Inc. 96 Riverside, Jacksonville, Fla. 32202
I Please send me ... ... Safe Guard Spray Pack at $3 PP.
NAME :
l
ADDRESS J
CITY STATE

CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
November 13
Contact College Placement
Office to arrange interview
appointment.

You may select special specialized
ized specialized jobs, or broad systems systemstype
type systemstype jobs. Or you can choose
not to change assignments if
youd rather develop in-depth
skills in one area.
Either way, we think
youll like the Hughes ap approach.
proach. approach.
It means ypull become
more versatile in a shorter
time. r .. n
(And your j HUGHES j
salary will !_ J
Qhn\A/ It HUGHES AIRC HA r T COMPANY
Ol IUW 11./ AEROSPACE DIVISIONS

by Brickmqn



Gator Marching Bands Boom Biggest In Dixie

*' ||pp
TOM KENNEDY
DRUM WITH THE BIGGEST BOOM IN DIXIE
... has a diameter of 6 feet and "really" plays

By MAGGIE COE
Entertainment Writer
Spirit plus talent equals the
Gator Marching Band the
band with the "Biggest Boom
in Dixie.
**Our students are so
gua§4o that they are always
looking for ways to improve,
said Richard Bowles, director
of bands. The spirit is
According to Bowles many
students join the band to relax
from academic pressures.
Students find in the band,
said Bowles, a community of
interest and identity. The band
is in everything around
campus.
The Gator Bands main
activity is, of course, to play
at football games. During the
Fall quarter, they practice
vigorously.
Tuesdays, Bowles said,
the entire band has an indoor
practice. On Wednesdays we
practice on the field. Fridays
are our sharpening-up sessions
and then Saturday mornings,
the band has its final
run-through and we make any
last minute changes before the
game.
Half-time shows are carefully
charted out early in the week
by Bowles and his associate
director Bob Foster. On a
board, which reminds one of
war games, they plot each
movement of every member.
These stagings are given to
every one of the 200 students
to memorize, and execute.
Along with the dummy
sheets, band members are given
prepared extracts from their
repertoire. Numbers include
everything from E Pluribus
Unum and Easy to be
Hard to the Alma Mater.
In addition to new sounds,
the band is getting new
uniforms. According to Bowles,
they will have orange pants
with blue, white and orange
coat. We will have the effect
of a color change when we do
our turns, he said.
Thfery have been pWtfdsed*

for the Miami game and we
hope to have them for the
final home game, Bowles said.
Also lending color and
pageantry to the band are the
blue and orange flags that
are carried by 16 flute and
clarinet players, he said.
Everyone in the band plays
an instrument.
Out in front of the
marching band are the
Gatorettes, led by Nancy
Wolfson 3ED. We always
head our majorette corps with
a student, Bowles
said .Strutting around at the
head of both the marching
band and the majorettes is the
drum major.
The band has two drum
majors this year: Lamar Sawer,
senior major and Mike Jones,
personnel major.
While the band is out on
the field the drum major is in
charge.
The drum major, Sawyer
said, goes back to Scotland.
There he led the military band
into war, but as time
progressed he became more
decorative. However, bands
always have to have a leader.
Last year, to liven the drum
majors position, Sawer learned
the Key West Strut. It
involves leaning forward then
back in an exaggerated
position. I wanted to get
flash into it, Sawyer said.
We are trying to be a little
more athletic.
A new tradition was started
by Sawyer during the recent
Fkmda-FSU game. The drum
major from FSU lost his
plume during tlie half-time
show. Sawyer picking it up
declared if FSU won he would
give it back; otherwise he
claimed it as part of the
spoils. Os course, he kept it
and FSU and its drum major
will have to try again next
year.
Mike Jones, a freshman, was
an all-star drum-major in high
school. Art exception was

PROVIDES IDENTITY

made for Mike, Sawyer said.
Usually drum majors must
have Gator Band experience
first.
Completing the Gator
marching band is The Drum
with ; the Biggest Boom in
Dixie. The drum was
purchased in 1953 by Harold
B. Bachman, director emeritus.
It is the largest drum that
plays like a drum, Director
Bowles said. The drum is 6
feet in diameter and 22 inches
wide. The drum heads have to
be made of unborn calf hide
called *kips\
The marching band is
financed by the athletic
association. They foot the bill
of any trips the band takes
during the season.
Our major trip of the
season is usually to the Miami
game, Bowles said. However,
dong with other Gators, hes
hoping for bigger and better
things this year.

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PETE KNOCKE
HEAD GATORETTE NANCY WOLFSON
... nonchantly waits for halftime activities

. practice.makes perfect for Senior Drum Major LariitfSawyer

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Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 29,1969

Andnw^^^^MLDtLNS
."I Trained Him My self I"
i-Speaking Out

Charles M. Schulz, creator of Peanuts, once
wrote a book entitled Happiness Is A Warm
Puppy, listing some examples of happiness.
Since I have encountered quite a few plastic
people at this university, I thought I might list
some examples of phoniness. These excerpts
are from my new book, Phoniness Is Charlie
Shepherds Middle Name, to be published by
Grove Press, with an introduction by Jacqueline
Susann and her sister, Truman Capote. Here
goes:
Phoniness is a sorority girl wearing bell
bottoms to class once a week (just once) because
this way they won't think shes a bitch.
Phoniness is flashing a peace sign as a reflex
action when you meet people, trying to convince
them that you're not really straight.
Phoniness is becoming an Education major
because you don't want to take a language for
Arts and Sciences.
Phoniness is putting down fraternities, even
though you use the drug scene as a frat pin-type
gimmick for snowing chides.
Phoniness is calling yourself conservative
because the word racist doesn't sound as

Satire

The Infirmary is UFs training
ground for those ( who consider
themselves in the medical profession.
Its a nice place to visit but no place
to go when youre sick.
Put yourself in my place. You
wake up Friday morning, feeling
really bad? Its not a hang-over,
because the night before was study
time for all those Friday tests. The
most welcome sound in the students
day the incessant ringing of the
alarm clock arouses you from a most
peaceful sleep of four full hours.
You bound out of bed, and your
stomach feels as if it just settled into
the little toe of your right foot. My
god, what did I eat last night it
must have been that pizza from
Ginos and those two KA specials,
you say to yourself. You stumble
down the hall through all the garbage
of the night before and proceed to
review all that passed through your
mouth for the past two days.
Well, you say to yourself, I
guess I'd better make the scene at the
Infirmary and let them check me out
to see exactly whats happening

Plastic People

respectable.
Phoniness is forming a super-idealistic group so
that you can make it with the chicks that join
(To quote a famous 20th Century philosopher:
It is easy to talk of peace, love, and pacifism
when you have a chick hanging on your bod.)
Phoniness is wearing an armband because it's
now the in thing, not knowing what the
figures represent.
Phoniness is backing the Vietnam War while
securely attending college.
Phoniness is telling people you came to college
for knowledge, though youre just here to find a
husband, settle down, and have 2.8 kids in a
restricted suburb.
I could go on and on, but better you should
read the book. Im sorry if there's anyone I
haven't offended, because were all guilty, and
I'm just as bad as the next person. I just Wish
that we could all open our eyes and, for just a
moment, *see what fools these mortals be. But
it ? s difficult to do that. To paraphrase Donovan
Leitch, an artist who has gone commercial at the
age of 23: An ego trip is the longest trip of
all.

inside. Sure, youve heard all the
gross stories about incompetence
among the staff and that they
diagnose everything they dont
understand as mono, but you say that
nobody could be that bad.
So you throw on some clothes,
grab you bodes for your afternoon
class in which you have three tests,
and you proceed to stumble to the
Infirmary.
You arrive there at quarter to
twelve, shaking all over, fighting to
keep your stomach settled, feeling
that you are about to faint. You
approach the reception desk
Excuse me, but I need to see a
doctor, you squeeze out between
your clenched teeth.
Do you have an appointment,
the receptionist asks.
No, but I am sick and really do
need to see a doctor, you answer.
Im sorry, but you have to fill
out a card before a doctor will see
you, she says. It would have been
"a lot easier* if you had an-A
appointment, she chides.
Just what on earth am I supposed A

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
it the exorcise of reepomibility
Raul Ramirez
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor
RateL
A&t Avuom.

By David Miller-

Infirmary Doctors

to do plan when lm going to get
sick, you think as you fill out the
card. Finally the card is finished and
taken to the desk. Now may I see
the doctor, you beg. It is now
12:05 pjn.
Im sorry, she says, All the
doctors are out to lunch. Please be
seated and a nurse will be with you
shortly.
Shortly turns out to be an hour
later when a nurse appears and asks
you to follow her. Now, finally, a
doctor, you think. However she
leads you down a hall that reeks of
alcohol, the medical kind (of course),
to a little room.
Please wait here, she says. Ill
be with you in a minute.
Time is now 1:05 p.m.
At 1:45 p.m. she reappears with a
thermometer.
Here, take this and Ill be back
soon.
She does return soon (surprise,
surprise, surprise) to discover that you
dont have a temperature.
You must be OK, there is no
indication of a fever, she says.
But nurse, I feel really rotten.
Cant you do something?
OK, Ill give you some medicine
that should help some. With this
promise, she reaches ipto ; a cabinet
and secures bottles of white pills,.
green pills, and some sort

editorial
Closed House
It is too bad that when Vice President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale made his statement about open house hours for
Towers residents Tuesday it didnt come out sounding like the
Christmas Carol.
Instead, it was flat and terribly old.
I still hold that Towers should be governed by the same
hours that hold for the other living areas, he stated.
And with that, he closed the door on the proposal put forth
by the Division of Housing to allow 24-hour open house in
that area.
And we fear he closed the door on reason. One man With
one set of ideas who can singly block change.
Towers is NOT just like any other living area.
It was never meant to be just like any other liviiig area.
Its design was to create a dorm situation which could
compete with the growing number of off-campus apartment
complexes.
And so each living unit is just that... a unit by itself. It is
not a concrete block cubicle with four walls and two closets.
But with Hales immoveable stand the Towers may as well
be just like any other cracker-box dorm room.
And it must give up the idea of real apartment living. It
isnt. It can never be. Not with doors that seal by the clock.
The absence of reason behind this arbitrary stand is
over-whelming.
And if his word is to stand as law, it is frightening.
There can be no valid reason why Towers residents cannot
have guests into their apartments any time agreed upon by all
of the suite-mates.
There are no such restrictions on off-campus residents.
There could never be.
The whole thing makes even less sense since residents are
required to be upper-classmen, many of whom are legally
adults.
Hale is still apparently clinging to the unwanted concept of
in loco parentis.
And, Mr. Vice President, this is getting old too.
We went through this three years ago.
It was settled then... we thought. So did most of the
university.
But like the ghosts of Christmas past it keeps coming back
to haunt us.
Towers is but a prime example of the haunting of UF.
We commend the Division of Housing for approving the
proposed open house hours change.
We urge that they continue in their efforts.
And we urge Vice President Hale to take a second look, to
open his mind and open the Towers.

:By Royce Beauchamp

of pink liquid.
Take one green pill every three
hours with one spoon of this liquid.
Every three hours take four yellow
pills, with one white pill and two
spoons of this liquid. Drink plenty of
liquids but be sure you dont drink
too much. If you arent feeling better
in a week, come back and well check
it out.
By this time you have missed all
your tests, feel worse than ever, and
all you have to show for it is a
handftil of bottles.
So goes a typical day. at the
Infirmary.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Janie Gould Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Helen Huntley
Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices in Room 330, Reitz Union.
Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
"Opinions expressed in the Florida
Alligator arc those of.,the editors qr qf the
writer, of the article and not those of the
University of floral a.



Wednesday, October 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Two Offenses And The Whole Floor Suffers

Life
On
Campus

MR. EDITOR:
To all Florida students and student organizations, and to all
others who participated in Homecoming 69, I offer the thanks,
congratulations, and commendation of the University, and my
own, for the greatest and best Homecoming ever had on this
campus.
STEPHEN C. OCONNELL
PRESIDENT
Sign The Oath?
MR. EDITOR:
During the week of October 19, all employees of the university
were requested to re-sign an oath which is said to be required by
Florida law (section 876.05). I oppose a law which requites all
Florida employees to disclaim beliefs or opinions, whatever these
may be, because, to my mind, beliefs and opinions of any person
should not be perscribed or proscribed by the state.
That this university should cooperate with such a law, I find
reprehensive. That the employees of this university should
contribute to the efficiency of a mass re-signing of such an oath,
I find beyond belief.
A. R. TODD

Scholarship House: Best Rules

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is written in
response to the recent articles
appearing in the Alligator
concerning the FEA
Scholarship House.
Unfortunately, I could not
participate in the interviews
because I was in the hospital
at the time. If I would have
been interviewed and if the
complete statement given by
those who were interviewed
had been published, the story
would have been made much
clearer to the public.
Every organization has a set
of rules to follow, therefore a
critical article concerning
individuality in that group
could be written about any
organization.
The Scholarship House has
less restricted rules imposed on
its members than any other
organization that I can think

LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300 words in length. A writer s
name may be withheld from publication only if he shows just causa. No
letters signed with a pseudonym will be accepted for publication. The
editor reserves 'right tQ edit. all letters in the interest of space.
, .presses and telephorw numbers^ must accompany all letters.

Page 7

MR. EDITOR:
Mary Coed is a freshman
and lives in Broward Hall.
Suzie Doe is a transfer student
that lives on the same floor in
Broward. It is Friday night
and on returning from her
date, Mary decides to bring
her date up to the room. It is

of on campus. This does not
stifle individuality but gives
the members of this group
more of a chance to expand
their individuality than do the
rules of other organizations.
Nothing was said of our 24
hour open house rule.
Concerning cars, most members
of the house arent allowed to
have cars because of UF rules.
These are only a few
explanations for the many
misleading statements quoted
in the Alligator. Besides more
freedoms than the typical
student living on campus,
those accepted into this
scholarship receive the benefits
of a college education they
probably could not have
attained if it were not for the
scholarship.
Every complaint quoted
against the house was later
explained and justified in the

perfectly legal because her
floor has open house that
night until 1:30 AM.
The only thing wrong is
that Mary forgets to yell man
in the hall (a dorm
regulation); to close her door
(a dorm regulation); forgets to
put a sign on her door
(another dorm regulation); and
after being informed of her
forgetfulness deliberately
ignores it.
The next day she is turned
in for these offenses. The floor
as a whole is given a warning
that it this occurs again, the
entire floor will lose open
house for homecoming.
The following Wednesday a
similar event occurs, with
transfer Suzie Doe. Suzie
remembers to close her door
and put up a sign but her
date doesnt leave the floor
until 30 minutes after open
house. Some concerned student
turns Suzie in the following
day. And being the second
offense for this floor, open
house is taken away for the
bjg event homecoming.
There are 36 students on
this floor. Two of them have
broken open house regulations.
The other 34 have been very
careful in upholding all the
rules to the utmost. But

Fireworks In The Hall?
Act Maturely, Please!

MR. EDITOR:
I have prompted myself to
write my first Letter To The
Editor with the hope that
some people will be
embarrassed into mature
behavior.
Right now it is almost
midnight and no one on the
floor can sleep because there is
no consideration for those who
must turn in (is midnight too
early?) in time to rise for a
first period class as I must
do every day.
The last two nights we have
had fireworks displays in the
ball. A few people think it is

interview, but omitted from
the Alligator story.
Last year, an article
concerning the FEA
Scholarship House was printed
in the Alligator. It had to do
with how the house was run,
who the student officers were,
who was on the board of
directors, and what benefits
the scholarship recipients
would get. This article
appeared around the middle of
the paper. This year, a few
complaints against the house
were written into a front page
article.
If anyone should harbor
hostilities against the FEA
Scholorship House its me
because I fell off the roof of
the {dace. While in the hospital
I received invaluable help and
encouragement from the board
of directors and the men in
the house (who are supposedly
at such a state of unrest.) I
have no complaints and can
only show my gratitude by
thanking Mr. Lunsford,
president of the board, the
rest of the board, and the men
who live in Scholarship House.
i 1 T*
SNYDER, 2UC

because of two coeds, Mary
and Suzie, the whole floor has
lost open house privileges. Not
a big deal, you say. What if
you are a senior, 21 years old
and living in the dorm. You
have waited all quarter for
homecoming for your boy
friend from home to come up.
You cant wait to show him
your room. Now you cant.
Thanks to two girls.
What does all this mean? It
means dont turn anyone in
for violating open house. But
my gosh, Interhall will jump
down your throat. But then
why doesnt Interhall realize
what its rules are doing. First
of all, because two girls were
honest enough to turn in
violators, 34 girls are suffering.
Besides that, the two big
mouths have lost many
friendships on the floor.
A&oki
omjl
"DtMeAAtr
There is no hope
for the complacent man

terribly clever to shoot off
fireworks on the carpeting and
in the trash chutes, which has
caused damage for which we
will be assessed. In addition,
we've had at least three trash
chute fires which smoke up
the building and cost the floor
$25 a fire for damage to the
sprinkler system.
Our bathroom resembles an
outhouse because there are
people who clog up the sinks
and urinals with trash, litter
the floor, and throw whole
rolls of toilet paper in the
toilets.
The other week I was
mmmsm Cw m&wwMwlm

Squeeze Up On The Bus
So All Os Us Can Ride
MR. EDITOR:
Fer crissake woman, MOVE BACK!!** Often has this plea
echoed in the minds of the poor people crushed in the front of
the bus. Occasionally it echoes in the air too, but nobody hears.
I know it's groovy to talk to your friend who's sitting in the
middle of the bus, and it's easier to get out if you stand by the
door, but those folks in front have to get to class. I'm not saying
it's all your fault girls, just about three-quarters of it. Everybody
squeeze up so we can all ride. Remember, next time it could be
you left standing at the curb. It ( t <
m**, v JOHN SP4WAY, 4EG

It hasnt affected Mary and
Suzie in the least. Why should
Mary ami Suzie be disliked?
The fact that they did
something wrong didn't hurt
the floor. It was the big
mouths that turned them in
that caused all the trouble.
If the floors stick together,
and no one turns in any
violators then the floor has
little chance of losing open
house and getting in trouble.
Do we have a better
solution? Well, yes. Instead of
the minority ruling the
obeying majority, the
individual causing the offense
should be the one that has to
suffer. Punishment should be
for Suzie and Mary and not
for 34 innocent girls.
We, in Broward, appeal to
Inteihall for a clarification of
these regulations. These
regulations concern our fathers,
boy friends, and other boys.
Some of us like open house
and think it is a privilege to
be treasured.
SINCERELY,
JOYCE MILLER
BROWARD-RAWUNGS SEN.
DAWN SOWARDS
BROWARD FLOOR ADVISOR
DOTTTE SASKO
BROWARD FLOOR ADVISOR

surprised to see one of my
neighbors urinating over, the
rail near our outside stairway.
He came dose to sniping down
some passerby. Tonight he did
the same thing to the freight
elevator while on a firecracker
bombing raid to the ground
floor.
Are these actions
representative of college men?
These people are acting as
children would over the
exdtement of living away from
parental authority or any
authority, for that matter.
1 can understand that
hell-raising is typical of college
life, but the outright vandalism
I have seen is not in that
spirit it is malicious
behaviour. It's for certain that
I don't want to pay to repair
the vandalism of irresponsible
people.
Now I understand why there
are so few juniors or
fraternity-affiliated sophomores
in the residence halls these
people prefer life in an
apartment or fraternity house
to the ruckus in the
dormitories.
I shall be very glad when 1
am able to live off-campus.
DAVID GLANTZ, lUC
GRAHAM AREA



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 29,1969

Page 8

TREAT

FIGURE FAIR
Entertaining ... then you'll
want our glamourous culotte
of 100% acetate in brilliant
shades of a purple print. The
outfit features long -sleeves
with a three-button cuff, wide
turned-back collar, and a satin
sash belt. Sizes 10, 12, 14;
price about $20.00. Modeled
by Kathy.
STAG AND DRAG
The perfect dress for its
style and simplicity. The outfit
is sleeveless with little gold
buttons that run down to the
low-belted waist over the
pleated swing skirt. Featured
in precious pink, Stag and
Drag creates the right dress for
you. Modeled by Linda.

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SILVERMAN'S
Look as romantic as you'll
feel at the Lettermen
Concert . wear something
deliciously sentimental from
Denise. The dress is beige
crepe and complimented by a
many colored, gold-braided,
close-fitting bolero. Modeled
by Ingrid.
DONIGAN'S
Make your best moves in
this brown, black, and beige
checkerboard jumper by Craig
Craiely. Donigan's wants to
help you make your fashion
moves. Modeled by Tanya.



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Charm of California presents
a camel-colored coat in cotton
suede, and trimmed with
fabulous fake fur. The coat
has side pockets and a tie belt.
A great way to maintain your
fashion cool, and snugglely
warm at the same time.
Modeled by Lynn.
SEARS
/ Sharon is all set for the
coming of cool November
nights in this plaid acrylic
poncho and polyester textured
bells. A great plus feature is
that poncho and slack are
both machine washable.
Available in sizes 8-18. Misses
sportswear... Sears.
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Wadnaaday, Octafear 29, 1969, Ttw Florida Alligator,

P^ : '. 1 ~W§:" A v 'ft V '^ :
I
MAAS BROTHERS
For your bewitching hour,
Leslie Junior gives you the
long, seductive look of black
wool jersey. To be worn at
informal parties instead of a
jumpsuit or slacks. A fashion
first from Maas Brothers,
modeled by Marlene.
ET' \v. _. *;
y '*s*> -. : ':':4' v
TV/V/i p
wiu
For the Cuddled look
fake fur makes the scene at
Twig. This year the fur comes
in many styles and colors.
Boots and shoe boots will
complete your outfit. Modeled
by Cindi.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October '2b; 1369
J * Vi *4 V * * A

greek schedule
I Nov. 3 Nov. 4 Nov. 5 Nov. 6 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 N0v.12 Nov. 13
AEn KA 4>KT X* A24> AT K 2 n*
ATP ATQ IIKA AX ATA KA AXA 2K
axq Ben nra* Aon aaa a*e *m zta
IA An AE* nA* XQ Ar KAO A8 CP
*22 2AE ex 2N 2*E TE* *FA TKE
2X
call for appointment times 392-1681
between 12 noon & 5 pm. all photos will be taken in your
time block, have everyone on time, bring $1.50 sitting fee.
dress for men dark coat dark tie light shirt
dress for women dark sweater
juniors
nov. 3-14
sign-up sheets in room 337 of
the Union
this is the only time photos will
be taken
bring $1.50 sitting fee
dress men-dark coat-dark tie-light shirt
dress women-dark sweater
I .t- ** I .T > u . . .6- . ~ r*
1 4t 44 4 % h *'** /y> M m* I ***.
I T T.-.*'-



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Y Foi SALE \
1969 HONDA SUPERHAWK
305 cc. Oil changed every 500 mi.,
new' rear tire, heavy chain, 2
helmets, luggage rack. Appearance,
mechanically perfect. Must sell.
S6OO. Call Jon, evenings, 372-7575.
(A-lt-30-p)
.2 Drawer full suspension files, full
depth, your choice of colors.
Elsewhere $49.50, NOW ONLY
$39.95 at JR Office furniture Co.,
620% S. Main St., Call 376-1146.
(A-24-10t-c)
SPECIAL Study desk (36 M x24').
Perfect for apartment or trailer living.
Paint them any color, they look
sharp. New costs $35.00 or more.
NOW While They Last $14.95. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620% S. Main
St.. Call 376-1146. (A-24-10t-C)
67 Ducati 250 scrambler and helmet.
Must sell. Scrambler and road
sprocket. $275 or best offer. Call
378-7726 1224 SW Ist Ave.
(A-st-25-p)
LOT NEAR UNIVERSITY across
from golf course $4,500 write R.T.
POOLER I, Box 1027 Apopka
Florida 32703. For Sale. Brand new 54 volume set
of Great Books and Syntopieon.
S3OO or best offer. Call 378-3923.
(A-st-30-p)
BLUE Lustre not only rids carpets
of soil but leaves pile soft and
lofty. Rent electric Sliampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-30-c)
The Great Pumpkin is alive and
well and soon arrives In Gatorland!
Celebrate, not as a witch, but as a
Halloween Beauty. Take advantage
of Transworld's fabulous hair sale
this week only. Stretch Wigs, sale
priced SB.BO. Human Hair Wiglets
only $2.80. Human Hair Falls, reg
$37, only $14.80. Many
others... All on first come basis.
Trans-World Hairgoods, Corner
University & 13th St. Sale ends
Saturday, Nov. Ist. (A-3t-30-c)
Unclaimed freight. Discounts to 70%
on Sewing Machines, Stereos, Color
TV's car & home tape players, diving
gear and furniture plus many other
items. All '69 Models. May be seen at
1228 N.E. sth Ave. Phone 378-4186
hours Mon Thru. Thur. 9-6 Fri. & Sat
9 to 7. (A-13t-20-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Mlcanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Doberman Pups 1 male 1 female six
mo. old, ears trimmed champion
sired show quality priced to sell. Call
372-2225 or 376-7828. (A-st-27-p)
YAMAHA -80 cc. Two years old but
runs like new. Babied for 4,000
miles. With two helmets. S2OO. Call
Maury 373-2254. (A-3t-28-p)
-
For Sale Flamenco Guitar from
Spain. Call 376-3166. S6O.
(A-st-29-p)
1958 Classic Speedster
convertible, rebuilt must
.sell need money. Call 378-6988
after 3 p.m. S9OO or best offer I
(A-st-29-p)
Mobile Home, 1965 New Moon, 12'
x 60 3 bdrms, cent air cond, washer,
lots of storage, close to campus. Will
discuss price, 376-0921. (A-4t-27-p)
1968 Javelin SST. Excellent
condition, low mileage, radio, heater,
white sidewalls. $2150. Call
392-2704 days or 378-4338 nights.
(A r 3t-28-p)
|
Penthouse apartment beautifully
furnished, 2 Ig brms, 2 bath, living
room, sitting room, ww carpet,
central air, heat. Private patio on roof
deck. $250 mo. See this luxurious
penthouse at Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111. Grad
students preferred. (B-6t-27-c)
Large 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen, living
room, completely furnished ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 272-7111
prefer 2 students. (B-6t-27-c)
Must sublease one bedroom apt. four
blocks grad lib AC pool S9O mo. Call
378-5715 to see. (B-st-27-p)
UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
802 W. University
Adjacent King's Food Host
2 BLOCKS FROM HUB
X-TR A quick watch repair
Diamond Setting
Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophys plaques
"BECK" BECHTOLP 373-1025^

Wednesday, October 29.1969, The Florida Alligator,
11

i
Three Bedroom House Furnished
Central Heat 2 Blocks From Mali
slls Per Month 495-2124
p.m. (B-st-25-p)
TRAILER LOT for rent. $35/month.
Close to campus. Available November
1. 3585 S.W. 20th Avenue after 5:00
p.m. (B-3t-28-p)
WANTED ROOMATE MALE APT
60 LANDMARK alrcond. ww
carpet pool must sublet. Call
STEVE 373-2207 after 5 pm.
(B-4t-30-p)
'SpMMMQgfI i: iiKawwu
I. WANTED 1
> see b
Female roommate. House, AC close
to campus 1246 S.W. 13 St.
376-0578. (C-4t-30-p)
Wanted: Girl to work as model so.
a student publication. Must long
hair, good looking, nice shape. Call
Jim at 372-9719 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-3t-nc-29)
WANTED: Two Auburn tickets.
Will pay $20.00. Call 376-8958
after 5 P.M. (C-2t-29-p)
Wanted: Married couples to
participate in a group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives This Is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment' experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-10t-9-c)
Male roommate wanted 1 br. apt. ac.
Fully carpeted, new pool. Univ.
Gardens S7O/mo. Call 378-3884.
(C-4t-27-p)
Male Roommate needed for Jan.
Prefer thru summer quarter. All
conveniences including pool. Call
376-6361. DEBI is cute 502.
(C-3t-28-p)
2 passengers for flight to Flushing,
New York City during Thanksgiving
vacation. Round-trip fare S9O.
Contact Doug at 372-9447 after 6.
(C-st-28-p)
Attention Typlstsl The Student
Activities Desk, J. Wayne Reitz
Union, is compiling a list of typists
for the convenience of UofF
students. If you are skilled In typing
term papers, theses, or dissertations
and wish your name to be placed on
this list, please call Mrs. ONeill at
392-1674 between 8:00 a.m. and
noon. Financial arrangements will be
the sole responsibility of the typist
and client. (C-st-28-c)
a d'flu b inriwl
j HELP WANTED |
WANTED Sorority girl to be
campus representative for Pappagallo
shoes. Write Pappagallo, 3958 St.
Johns Ave. Jacksonville, Florida,
32205 or call Jacksonville 384-2388.
(E-st-27-p)
DAYBARTENDER @
RATHSKELLER. Hours 11:30 a.m.
7:30 p.m. Mon. Frl. $1.50/hr.
Apply Rathskeller Office between
1:00 p.m. & 5:00 p.m. (E-3t-28-pJ
Male attendant for week end work
hours extremely flexible $20.00 per
week end. Steve Hal pert 378-3397.
(E-2t-30-p)
Co-ed for babysitting Mon-Thur.
would llve-ln, room & board plus
s2o % per week. Call 378-4150 after
5:00. Ask for Doreen. "(E-3t-30-p)
AUTOS
*: %*
% V
SCWMCwmswapava.w-aiw-w.*.*.
MUST SELL
VOLKSWAGEN. AIR
CONDITIONED, radio, good tires.
$550. Call 373-2646 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-25-p)
Oldsmobile *63 good condition
power steering power brakes radio
heater jet-a-way transmission 8 cyl
engine. Firm $650. Call 373-1451.
(G-st-25-p)
VW 1966 new tires, radio, low
mileage owned by female student.
$925. Call 372-5796. (G-2t-27-p)
Impala, 1966. 4 door sedan. AC,
radio, heater, power steering. $1350.
Call 372-6821 after 5:30. (G-st-28-p)
I Mr. Rags
lISTYLE & BARBER SHOP I
1; Haircuts from $2.00 UP.
We Specialize in Long hair.
Appointments Available.
II Four Barbers to serve you.
] 1128 W.U*V.,AV 372-3678 I

Porsche -64 SC Air cond.
AM/FM Radio & Tape White w/
Blue Interior Completely
Re-cond. Engine 52700 Call
372-6846 to see. fG-st-29-p)
For Sale 1967 VW Fastback,
L excellent condition, good tires, new
sticker, radio, $1075.
378-4532. (G-st-29-p)
67 Cougar, XR7, 390, 4 barrel, 4
speed, posi-tractlon, front disc,
wood panel dash, leather bucket
seats, Just Inspected. 372-5698.
(G-st-29-p)
1966 Anglia English Ford. Deluxe
model. Radio, heater, excellent
condition. SBOO. 392-7951.
(G-st-29-p)
BEAUTIFUL! 61 TR3 Complete
with radio, heater & wire wheels
a classicl $650.00 Phone 378-4186
before six. (G-4t-39-p)
Oldsmobile 63 dynamic 88
excellent condition beautifully
clean new tires automatic trans
power steering & brake electric
windows & seats air cond. two
speakers $690, 376-2377.
(G-st-30-p)
1960 Falcon 4dr, auto trans,
heater. Reliable $l5O. 378-2063
after six. (G-3t-30-p)
68 Triumph TR2SO Must sell
asking 2,350 8000 miles. Call
372-1694. (G-st-30-p)
End walking. Perfect college
transportation. 1961 Oldsmobile
FBS. Less than 60,000 ml. on 63
motor. Air, radio, heat. $lB9. Chip
Clarke c/o House. (G-st-29-p)
| PERSONAL |
1963 CESSNA 150 mkll mkV dual
omni 150 hours on major S3IOO, or
will form club with six members
Phillips Flying Service 495-2124 after
6 p.m. (J-st-25-p)
Immokalee want to fly home?
Leave 31 Oct. return 2 Nov. S2O
round trip. Bo Kagan, Box 428
Health Center, or 378-4859 by
Thursday. (J-3t-29-p)

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Page 11

I PERSONAL I
BgMwwwwweww:.wowiiioiiii Y
Kosher pizza party at HHIel, 16
NW 18 St, on Saturday, Nov. 1, 8
PM ? 50c members, 75c
non-members. All welcome: food
and dancing. (J-2t-30-p)
Jewish coed with kitchen needed.
Grad student tired of hamburgers.
Need dinner 4-5 times per week.
Call 378-0529 10:30-11:30 Jack.
(J-2t-30-p)
HALLOWEEN PARTY prizes for
costumes favors for all Oct. 30
10:00 PM to 2:00 AM at the
CHATTERBOX 4551 NW 6 St.
(J-2t-30-p)
Need your term paper typed? Will
type anything. $.50 a page.
Broward Hall. Call 392-9760.
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING, 16
NW 7th Ave. (J-st-28-p)
COED: -Private room with private
entrance and meals in exchange for
cooking. Close to campus. Call
378-3742. (J-3t-28-p)
SERVICES |
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
FLORIDA J
STATE THEATERS
** CENTER I *\
£ "LAST SUMMER" \
* CENTER 2
"THE LEARNING TREE
\ FLORIDA £
* "FUNNYGIRL" >
V AT 2S 8 JT

u i u t awwa
I SERVICES I
PROFESSIONAL TVPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
who cart type your manuscripts
professionally and in good form.
We also have a XEROX machine.
Call Carol Lyons today for an
appointment 376-7160.
(M-7t-25-p)
FLYING HAWKS CLUB private
pilot flight instruction commercial
flight instruction Instrument flight
instruction. Aircraft rentals, sales,
service. Aerial advertising banner
towing you cant beat the deal at
the nicest little airport in the area,
Stengel Airfield Archer Ftoad at
34th St. 376-0011. (M-20t-30-p)
Repeat Special your portable
typewrite! cleaned, adjusted,
lubrcated A new ribbon Installed
(SAVE $10.00). Now $12.50.
Standard typewriters $19.50. All
work guaranteed. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620% S. Main St., Call
376-1146. (M-10t-24<)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Alternators-Generators-Starters
-Electrical Systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 3 78-7 330.( M-ts-2-c)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For Information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
CO-HIT
BAREFOOT IN THE PARK H



Page 12

, Th* FJorida Alligator. Wednesday, October 29,

Sophomore
Arrested
After Chase

YES, LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS...

There IS An A&S Council

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Arts and Sciences
Student Council is a
little-known but potentially
powerful organization.
An all-student group, the
council is composed of one
representative from each major
in Arts and Sciences, plus all
the Student Senate
representatives from Arts and
Sciences.
The council meets once a
week to discuss ideas for
improving the College of Arts
and Sciences by letting the
administration know what the
students think, said chairman
Tom Blackmon.
Arts and Sciences Dean
Harry Sisler instituted the
council as one of his first
official acts.
I consider the council to
be one of the very effective
ways to bring the insight of
students to bear on the
problems of the college.
The members of the
council have been the source
of a number of new and
productive ideas concerning the
way the progress and processes
of the college can be
improved, Sisler said.
The problem is that few
Demos Urge
Axe On IIS
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Democratic reformers urged
Americans Tuesday to contact
their congressmen in support
of a move to amend the
Selective Service Act to
eliminate most student
deferments IIS and make other
major changes in the draft.
The aim of the 16
Democrats is to overturn
planned parliamentary ground
rules that prohibit a House
vote Wednesday on anything
but President Nixons proposal
for a draft by lottery.
They told a news conference
that Wednesday may be the
last chance the House will
have to revise the draft law
before its routine renewal in
1971.
SLSunshinb
y Bar-B-Q
Take out Mrviea
ASSORTED
BOX LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
BY THE POUND
CM alMt ll b
watting for you.
1202 NE Bth AVE.
(NEXT TO TRIANGLE
PACKAGE STORE)
378-3206

students are aware of the
existence of the council, so
there is no feedback from
them.
If the students have
complaints, we want, them to
come to us and talk,
Blackmon said.
If students would just
know who we are, we could
help them.
Presently the council
members are for the most part
appointed. Blackmon says he
would like to see
representatives elected so they
can better represent student
viewpoints.
The council, which was
organized last January, wants

WHAT'S HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
TEA TIME (BUT WHICH TEA?): The Pharmacy Dames are
inviting all student wives to their fall welcoming tea to be held
tonight at 8 in room p-111 at the Health Center.
THIS IS THE DAWNING: The Aquarius Club meets tonight at
the Episcopal Sunshine School, 107 NW 15 Terrace. The meeting
is scheduled for 9:30.
FRIENDS, FRIENDS, FRIENDS: Who else but the Befrienders
meet tonight for a bring-your-own-dinner meeting. Pleasant aroma
comes not from the Union cafeteria, but rather from room 123,
where they will meet starting at 6:30.
MINDS IN MEETING: MENSA gets together at 8 tonight in
room 356 of the Union.
THE GREAT PUMPKIN TAKES FLIGHT: Angel Flight and the
Arnold Air Society will conduct a food drive Thursday, Oct. 30.
Members will collect non-perishable items in Gainesville
neighborhoods from 7:30-9:30 pjn. All food collected will be
donated to the Neighborhood Service System.
PHYSICAL FINESSE: Alpha Epsilon Delta, the premedical
honorary, is holding its annual premed orientation meeting tonight
at 7:30 in the Union Auditorium. All AED members are asked to
come at 7. Speakers from the J. Hillis Miller center will talk and
refreshments will be served.
SUBTERRANEAN RELIGION: Chuck Lucas, director of
Campus Advance will speak on the Underground Church in 122
and 123 of the Union. The program is scheduled for 4 this
afternoon.
FROM AUTUMN TO MAY: The Student Peace Union is
sponsoring the film Mayday Story of the May-June, 1968,
French Worker-Student Revolt. A socialist forum will follow the
movie, all starting at 8 tonight in McCarty Auditorium.
THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'TIL
ALIBI w
Jp- Lounge -4T
NW3*thSTVWV.AVE: ~,
, IV. *: */.*> V f-.'.V.
* \ 0

"X high speed Chase ended early Saturday
morning with three major automobile accidents
and the arrest of a UF sophomore.
William Hugh McCall, 2UC, was observed by
University Police officer Earl Crews traveling
westbound on Radio Road at over 60 mph.
Crews gave chase to McCalls vehicle which
entered a side road. He lafcr reported that
McCall turned off his lights to elude the officer.
The chase continued on Fraternity Row where
McCall was finally stopped' after he collided with
three parked vehicles.
The student was immediately placed under

to serve two purposes,
Blackmon said.
It should act as a
spokesman of students in Arts
and Sciences to promote
change in the college and also
as a spokesman of Arts and
Sciences to the rest of the UF.
Last year the council
worked mainly on organizing a
Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory
grading system in Arts and
Sciences.
This year the council has
started working on a grade
appeals board for Arts and
Sciences, a course and teacher
evaluation and a report on
improving the foreign language
department, Blackmon said.

arrest and charged with reckless driving, high
speed chase, and causing a, major automobile
accident^
Damage to the parked vehicles according to
police was over SI,OOO.
Police said McCall was slightly injured in the
mishap and a passenger in the car, Alan Murphy,
escaped bodily harm.
McCall, son of Ocala physician Dr. W.C.
McCall, former member of the Florida Board of
Regents is free on bond and due to appear in
municipal court on Nov. 18.

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George Corl Phil Tarver
QO Sk>P Lujack Mel Ward
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The
Florida
Alligator

'Learning Tree Staaev

By GLENN FEW
Alligator Reviewer
Ive been blind for thirty
years, Newt, and I dont think
of people as black or white
any more. There are just
people.
So says the black but
unbeaten uncle of young
Newton, the teenager
protagonist of The Learning
Tree. In this story of racial
prejudice in a small Kansas
town in the 20s, we once
again have the Degenerate
Whites pitted against the Noble
Blacks, in a sort of upbeat
Hurry Sundown.
All the steroetypes creak
and jerk through their
well-worn paces once more,
forcing an unholy semblance
of life into a production that
might have been timely ten
years ago.
Our little morality play
begins with Newt tripping
blithely along in Gods own
hayfields, sublimely innocent
in body and spirit. A tornado
whips up while he is studying
an anthill, and he ends up in
an abandoned bam with Big
Mabel, a local prostitute.
Comes the passing of the
storm, and Newt is minus part
of his innocence.
The other part is ground
away throughout the movie,
by the inevitable paunchy,
red-faced sheriff, by a bigoted
teacher, and by the judges
degenerate son, who despoils
Newts sweetheart.
He does not give way to
blind hatred, however; unlike
the rebellious and murderous
Marcus (a boy of his own age
who is sent away for assaulting
a white man), Newton tries to
cope with his situation as
peacefully as possible.
It seems to be the case that
if Negroes are not to be

Underground Church Anyone?
The Underground Church is the theme of this afternoons
Dialogue with a Theologue.
Chuck Lucas, director of Campus Advance, a religious
organization, will speak at 4 pjm. in lounges 122 and 123 in the
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Admission to Dialogue is free and refreshments are provided.
The series is sponsored by the Union and the University
Religious Association. Its purpose is to bring the religious leaders
of the area in contact with students in a panel type atmosphere.
Sponsors of the series hope to run it throughout the entire
year.
PIALO6UE WITH A
THEOLO6UE
'The Underground
Church
speaker
CHUCK LUCAS
Wednesday, Oct. 29, 4:00 P.M.
Lounges 122 and 123, J.Wayne Reitz Union
FREE ADMISSION t REFRESHMENTS
Sponsored by J Wiwnejteitz^UnionandJtejigiou^Assn^^^^^^^^

ENTERTAINMENT

U/ -dnfc.

portrayed as moronic Stepin
Fetchits, they must inevitably
be near-gods. Sarah, Newtons
mother, is a figure of such
imposing dignity and
understanding that she
becomes unreal and distant.
Newtons uncle, brother, and
father are a stark contrast to
the guilt-ridden bigoted, and
ignorant white population of
Cherokee Flats. Unfortunately,
such characterizations stand
with all the warmth and
spontaneity of a hero
silhouetted against the sunset.
Stagy is the word for the
movie; a subversion of reality
in a sterile, artificial attempt
to put across a message.
Indulging in reverse racism,
The Learning Tree idealizes
Negroes to such an extent that
it makes false the words of
Newts blind uncle. Even a
blind man could distinguish
black from white in Cherokee
Flats.
Os course, there is more to
The Learning Tree than a
simple condemnation of racial
predjudice. As a complication
supposedly intended to support
and add depth to the main
theme, we have the search for
identity by Newton and
Marcus.
Marcus finds his identity in
hatred, Newton in an attempt
at understanding. There is a
message in this also, but it is
one not even so well
developed as the other.
As a synthesis, the movie
fails. The net effect is that
produced by a television
entertainer who tells jokes

because he cant sing very
well, and sings because he isnt
very funny.
It may be that someday this
country will have grown up
enough so that the raw
emotional impact of prejudice
will no longer be sufficient to
sustain the essential mediocrity
of films such as this, that feed
upon it and use it.
It may also be that there
now is necessity for unreal
evelation of the Negro image,
as a counterattack againsWthe
prevailing picture of a ck
man as an ignorant lout whose
vocabulary is limited to
Yassuh, Boss. However, the
fact remains that it is
distortion.
Stripped of this distortion
The Learning Tree would
be, if not the most potent
social comment that has hit
the screen, at least passably
good entertainment of the
Walt Disney school.
GATOR
GOLF
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2-12 P.M. DAILY
9 AM 12 AM SAT.
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Saturday November 1,1969 Y
8-? PM
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The Lettermen.
Friday night.
u An Evening In
Concert."
It could be the
best show of the
year.
Why wait until
Monday
to find out it was?
" c..
/ a .;. _' > -t;* t .- . ;
Fall Frolics 1969 THE LETTERMEN
A* Evening In Concert
Friday, October 31 Florida Qym
File dollars per couple
Clickets sold at
J.W.R.U. Box Office
Record !Bar
!Belk -J2indsey
an I.F.C. Production
'il ihlill It lii i ; l .mi'.i.i. i if mm i > Vi r i' i : i .1 Hi in

Wedneeday

Page 13



Student Buries Gator Victims

By SAM PEPPER
v Alligator Sports Editor
What ever happens to the teams that lose to the Gators? They
go to heaven, of course.
If you dont believe it just ask UF student Lamar Pearson Jr.
hell tell you.
Since the beginning of football season he has been staging
mode funerals, complete with ceremony, flowers, crosses and
tombstones, in memory of Gator foes.
Burial grounds are located at his grandfathers service station,
Tubby Ebers Pure Oil on the comer of SW 13th St. and SW
16th Ave.
Lamar starts getting everything ready when the game starts, in
anticipation of the victory, Erber said. So far he hasnt missed
yet.
Each grave is a small mound of dirt, marked by either a cross
or a tombstone. On each marking are the initials R.I.P. and the
name of the losing team.
1 start the funeral immediately after each game, Lamar says.
Since we dont have much room by the cemetary I have to step
out in the street and dodge traffic to deliver the ceremony.
Sometimes people passing by take part in the service.
Any student who wants to come by and pick some flowers to
put on the graves can do so anytime. Pearaon said.
Qn (Hie of the windows .at the station is a sign informing
everyone that This is Gator Country. Next to it is a painting of
an alligator in an old World War 1 plane shooting down Gator
victims in similar aircraft;
Right now the burial grounds are a little cramped for space.
But Eber says there is still room for four more graves and
maybe even five if we go to a bowl game.

TO FLORIDA GATORS:
YOU'RE BRINGING UP A GREAT TEAM. WE'RE
RINGING OUT OUR GREAT SUPPORT. BY
LAND OR BY AIR THE GATORS ARE BEYOND
COMPARE. GO BEAUTIFUL GATORS DEAL
MISERY TO AUBURN. ELEVEN MISPLACED
GATORS ATTENDING AUBURN VETERINARY
MEDICINE SCHOOL: STAN JACKSON '62, EVAN
FEIST '67, ROY KFAULKNER '67, SAM YOUNG
'67, BILL DELAPORTE '67, LARRY SHAFFER
'67, LES SCHWARTZ '67, JOHN CAUSEY '67,
RICHARD WYNN '67, DICK BROWN '67,
ALBERTO (GO CARLOS) ME I LAN '6B, STAN
JACKUON '62.
1969
FLORIDA-GEORGIA
BARBEQUE
Saturday, Nov. 8
Jacksonville Coliseum (next to Gator Bowl)
Delicious Barbeque
Served from 11:00-1:30pm
$225 p., d c.
$ 2J)O Por Person at the door
Order your tickets today send
money to- Fla.-Ga. Barbeque
P.O. Box 21
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
GIGANTIC PEP RALLY Entertainment "The Ray
Graves Decade" Films of the best plays during the
*, "Graves 'sEte" at Florida will be shown on large
screen. 11 _|

HOLDS SERVICE AFTER GAMES

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Page 14

:
PHIL COPE
MAY ALL OF THE GATOR VICTIMS REST IN PEACE
... football cemetery still has room for four or five plots

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Looking for the hidden Rat Pumpkin?
Heres another clue!
From this hydrant water flows 1
When they put on the hose I
See our other ad today for more clues J
mftrnniiii nunfhim>< i i il

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 29,1969

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

ROBBIES
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'
'
.



Gator Quarterbacks Shine
Steve Spurrier

REDWOOD CITY (UPI)
It will be Steve Spurrier at the
controls again when the San
Francisco Forty Niners try to
double their luck against
Detroit Sunday at Kezar
Stadium.
Coach Dick Nolan made the
announcement Monday and
said he was pleased and even a
little surprised by Spurriers
performance (18 for 30 for
205 yards, one touchdown and
no interceptions) in the 24-21
upset at Baltimore last Sunday.
I wasnt surprised by his
poise, said Nolan, But I was
worried because he was seeing
everything for the first
time... its seeing everything
coming at you at full speed,
and I didnt know whether he
would be able to recognize
defenses. But he did an
excellent job.

By United Press International
UF home football tickets
will go up from $6 to $7 a
seat next year. To watch
missileman John Reaves at
work, thats a bargain.
The sophomore quarterback
of Florida unbeaten,
ninth-ranked kiddie korps
tossed five touchdown passes
against Vanderbilt Saturday to
run his total to 20 in six
games.
For his efforts in the 41-20
Florida victory, the 6-2,
204-pounder from Tampa was
named today Southeastern
Offensive Player of the Week
for the second time this year
by United Press International.
Reaves, who looks a lot like
Pat Boone, also won that
honor earlier after throwing
five scores in Floridas opening
59-34 shocker over Houston.
Hes simply fantastic,
beams Florida coach Ray
Graves. He just stands in the
pocket forever while people
claw to get at him. And he
doesnt throw until hes sure
of where the ball is going.
Its not me, says the
19-year-old Reaves, who is
setting former Heisman Trophy
winner Steve Spurriers passing
records on fire, that
(blocking) line lets me have all
day to lode around and throw.
And I have a lot more
good receivers than Steve did
when he was here. Carlos
Alvarez is simply the best. I
mean the best.
Reaves and flanker Alvarez,
THE SWINGS
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All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Juet for the fun
of It, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying tripe to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
USt $5 Thats all it coats for our Bpocial
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem tow wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR

jHf iHH
WW > I M
£ mm
STEVE SttJRRIER
... gunning for Detroit
Nolan added that John
Brodies arm is not well. I
dont know when hell be able
to throw again. Thats up to
the doctor.
Has Spurrier moved out
John Reaves
~. . mk
iWf
JOHN REAVES
... player of the week
a sophomore Cuban refugee
from Miami who has caught
10 scoring passes to already
equal a Southeastern
Conference season record, are
the spark in the Gator offense.
But halfback Tommy Durrance
(74 points) and fullback Mike
Rich, also sophomores, help
make thepassing game click
with their running, says
Reaves.
In Reaves first six varsity
games, the former high school
All-America player has
completed 118 passes in 203
attempts for 1,746 yards. But
hes no runner, having lost 18
yards in the few times that
defensive linemen have gotten
to him.
I have trouble on a
quarterback sneak, laughs
Reaves. I like to drop straight
back and get in that pocket.
With the protection I get

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Brodie? Nolan was asked what
would f happen if Brodie
suddenly recovered.
Well, thats a situation, Ill
face when I come to it,
Nolan replied.
Assistant coach Paul Wiggin
pointed out Spurrier made the
first down on 10 third down
situations out of 17.
Kermit Alexander will stay
on the sidelines for another
two weeks because of his
shoulder injury which means
mighty mite Johnny Woitt will
take his place again. Baltimore
threw at Woitt constantly last
Sunday and while plenty were
completed his way, he
returned an interception 60
yards for a touchdown and he
and Alvin Randolph combined
to knockdown a Johnny Unitas
pass in the end zone on the
final play to preserve the win.

there, thats the way I better
do it.
In 1966, when Spurrier won
the Heisman Trophy at
Florida, Super Steve threw
only 16 touchdown passes.
Reaves has already broken a
raft of single-game SEC passing
records and is zeroing in on
the 23 scoring tosses in a
season by Kentuckys Babe
Parilli in 11 games in 1950.
Everybody but Graves, the
athletic director-coach who
helped make the decision to
raise the ticket price because
the schools overall athletic
program lost money in 1968,
is comparing Reaves with
Spurrier.
I just dont like to
compare them, says Graves.
Lets just say I was darned
unhappy to see np. 11 go.
And Im a 'darned sight
relieved to see no. 7 come
along, he adds.
Bookies Like
Auburn By 7
NEW YORK (UPI) The
oddsmakers gave up trying to
devise point spreads that no. 1
Ohio State cant beat and took
the Buckeyes game against
Northwestern on Saturday off
the betting board.
However, three teams in the
top 10 are picked to lose.
Third-ranked Tennessee is a
one-point underdog against
Georgia, rated 11th;
ninth-ranked Florida is a
seven-point underdog to
Auburn.

| INTRAMURAL* -II
Sigma Chi Wins |
Sigma Chi, behind the strong spiking arm of Frank Saier, won
the Orange League volleyball championship in fine style walloping
Phi Kappa Tau in two straight games, 15-6, 15-6.
The Phi Taus showed little of the form that made them a
volleyball power several years ago. Sigma Chi, however, avenged
last years failufe to win volleyball by showing a balanced attack
which included the spiking of Mike Hartman, and Harry Winkler,
and the setting up of Denny Comfort.
It was the failure of the Sigma Chi setup men to properly feed
this same crew of spikers last year that led to their downfall.
The championship placed the Sigs in second place in the
Orange league behind Beta Theta Pi, who for the second year in a
row, finished third in volleyball after winning swimming.
The Sigs and the Betas will both send strong teams into
football, the next sport, where the big question is whether TEP
with a new quarterback can win football for the fifth consecutive
year.
Word around the league is that SAE, Pi Lam, and Pi Kappa
Alpha will all be fielding contending teams.
Chi Phi is making a regular habit of obliterating the rest of the
fraternities in the Blue League. The Chis made mincemeat of the
Pi Kappa Phis in the volleyball finals to capture its second
consecutive championship this year.
John Whitlow, Bob Wattles and Steve Kaufman made short
work of the Pi Kaps as the Chi Phis won, 15-1, 15-3.
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Wednesday, October 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,
.* t a %% t 4 . .

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 29. .1869.

Page 16

Reaves: Polite-Not Sickeningly Sweet

- (EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last part of a two part
series on Gator QB John
Reaves by Sports Writer Jeff
Klinkenberg.)
By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
The reporters, as always,
weie crowded around John
Reaves locker after the UFs
victory over North Carolina
two weeks ago.
Reaves, the quarterback, had
had a rather fine afternoon,
throwing for five touchdowns
and 295 yards. But a reporter
whom Reaves didnt know
tried needling him.
John, he said, that
7bayard touchdown pass you
threw to Alvarez was thrown a
little short, wasnt it?
Reaves, normally a little
sleepy-eyed (remember how
Ricky Nelson used to sing?)
turned and started at the
reporter. We scored, didnt
we? he snapped.
Later, Reaves said, I felt
like telling that guy to go to
hell.
John Reaves isnt the
traditional yes sir, no sir, type
of sophomore. He is polite,
yes, but not sickeningly sweet.
Distant might be the
appropriate word. It is a
post-game habit of his to lay
the accolades on the offensive
line and his pass receivers
he does know whose bread to
butter but he can also be
quite direct.
After the Gators game
Saturday, a reporter asked
him, John, what were you
thinking about when it was a
second and 29 situation at
..

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prk:
TOM KENNEDY
GATOR QUARTERBACK JOHN REAVES TELLS IT LIKE IT IS
... his confidence interpreted as egotism, conceit and cockiness

your own 10? Reaves,
possibly a little amazed,
answered, 1 was thinking wed
better move the ball.
Reaves hadnt meant to
embarrass the writer but he
had. Honesty can be a
disadvantage, John had learned,
and because of it, some people
label him egotistical, conceited,
cocky, etc.
I dont think Im
egocentric, Reaves was saying
the other day. Im confident,
yes. But there are certain
things I can do and certain
things I cannot do. I mean,
Im not the type to sit around
and blush.
If I have something to say,
I say it. As far as some people
thinking Im egocentric, I guess

NOT A YES SIR. NO SIR MAN

I can see it their way.
Tampa Robinson High
School won 25 games, lost
seven and tied two while John
Reaves played quarterback.
Reaves had problems there,
too; people thought that he
was a little too sure of
himself.
I wasnt a celebrity in high
school, John said. A lot of
kids didnt like me. Some
people seemed to be
anti-Reaves. Id get letters
saying you dont deserve the
publicity and other stuff. Os
course, those letters werent
signed.
At Florida hes been getting
letters, too but theyve been
of a different sort
complimentary. He received

one, for example, from a
soldier stationed on a ship
outside of Vietnam. I keep
all of them in a box, Reaves
laughed. And I look at them
once in a while. Theyre good
for the old ego.
Reaves usually appears
rather serious but he does have
his fun. Three weeks ago, he
and flanker Carlos Alvarez
were being interviewed by a
television station. The question
asked both players was: To
what do the Gators owe their
success?
While on camera, both
players gave the expected
answers. Reaves said they
owed it to the line and
receivers and coaching. Alvarez
said that is was excellent

passmg, coaching ana clocking.
When the camera stopped
clicking, however, they had
different versions. 1 should
get all the credit, grinned
Reaves. My passes have been
right on the money.
Os course, said Alvarez,
youd be nothing if I
couldnt get open.
Reaves is in an enviable, yet
unenviable position. He has the
admiration of football furs aid
campus coeds but the hate of
opposing defensive linemen.
Coach Ray Graves promised
a steak dinner to the Florida
player who could keep
Vanderbilts 6-6 defensive end
Pat Toomay off of Reaves*
back on Saturday.
The week before, North
Carolinas 6-4 Judge Mattocks
was a concern. Before the
Gators played Florida State,
Seminole defensive tackle
Frank Vohun said how he was
going to take care of Reaves.
John now has a price on his
head. He knows how Joe
Namath (I think hes got
about the best style of anyone
alive, Reaves said. But 1
cant copy him. When I do, I
get messed up.) must feel. I
know people are trying to take
pot shots at me, he said.
But it is the best way to
defeat another team: get their
quarterback. But 1 dont worry
about it. If I did, I couldnt
complete a pass.
1 really think, and it
sounds funny, but college
football is harder hitting than
the pros. I couldnt see playing
13 or 15 years of college
football. It would be too
rough, just impossible.