Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
ms § m
£ && -J|||
PHIL COPE
PUSHBUTTON PARANOIA
With the ease of fingertip control an ex-stair-climber groks
his way up to the sixth floor of the Reitz Union, while
driving would-be passengers paranoid on his leisurely ascent

OConnell Seeks Ruling
On Revised Loyalty Oath

See Editorial Page 6
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C. OConnell Monday
asked for a speedy court ruling on the
constitutionality of a revised loyalty oath UF
and other state employes are being required to
sign if they are to continue in their jobs.
In a letter to State University Chancellor
Robert B. Mautz, OConnell asked the Board of
Regents and/or the proper State official or
agency to endorse his request for a speedy
answer on the constitutionality of the oath
form.
In 1961 the Florida Supreme Court deleted
the phrase, ... I have not and will not lend

Rathskellers Success Or Failure On Review!
ffl

JOE HILLIARD
... "a UF experiment"

my aid, support, advice, counsel, or influence to
the Communist Party... from the old Florida
loyalty oath.
The legislature soon passed a revised form
identical to the old one except for the deleted
phrase.
In a Februaiy 1969 Board of Regents meeting
the new form of the loyalty oath was prescribed
for state university employes.
Sometime after, the Board of Regents
discovered a suit pending in the Federal District
Court in Orlando challenging portions of the
revised oath.
OConnell conceded a decision was delayed
over the summer hoping for a decision which
would settle the matter.
However, ten days ago the oaths were sent to
(SEE 'COURT' PAGE 2)

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The Rathskellers first annual
evaluation comes up on Nov; 20. This is the first in a series
of three articles on the Rathskeller's problems and success
during it's first year in operation.)
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer -4
UFs Rathskeller, within two months of celebrating its
first anniversary, is beset with problems in personnel,
finances and disagreement over philosophy.
On Nov. 20, a group of 30 students, faculty, and
administrators will get together with the Rathskeller's board
of directors to evaluate the success or failure -of the
taverns first year of operation.
When the Rathskeller was in it's planning stages over two
years ago, many other schools in the state had also
expressed interest in forming the same type of on-campus
beer hall, board of directors Chairman Joe Hilliard said.
It was decided at that time the UF would go ahead with
the experiment and evaluate it after one year, making the
results available to these other schools, he said.
And as this evaluation nears, the problems faced by the
Rathskeller during the past year have come into sharper
focus as the evaluators consider the relative success of the
Rathskeller.
Has the original concept of the Rathskeller been carried

Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 29

HINGES ON REFERENDUM

Activities Fee Hike
Needed For Coliseum

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Assignments Editor
Unless the students agree to
a hike in student activities
fees, plans for the $17.5
million University Activities
Center will probably fall
through, Board of Regents
Chairman D. Burke Kibler said
Monday.
If the referendum fails, the
coliseum fails, he said.
A campus-wide referendum
on Feb. 4 will give UF
students the option of agreeing
to a $5 increase in fees to
help defray construction costs
of the center. What this means
is that more money from each
students tuition fee will be

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

The

allocated for student activities
- Le. the coliseum. The
tuition itself will not be
increased.
At a meeting Monday, two
professors from the
Department of Architecture
presented eight
recommendations to UFs
Department of Planning.
Assembled in UF President
Stephen C. OConnells board
room were key administrators,
Alachua Countys legislative
delegation, city and county
officials and interested
students.
The activities center to be
built on the land now
occupied by Flavet 111, would
include a 16,000-seat coliseum,
an 1,800-seat theater for the
performing arts, an Olympic
pool and diving facility, a
6,000-seat amphitheater and
academic and support facilities.
The center should be
designed for academic use, the
report states.
The adjacency of
jiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiii^^
AMBUSH AUBURN is
the theme for Thursdays
pep rally scheduled on
Florida Field ........ page 3
Classifieds 9
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Movies 9
Sports 11

through successfully? Has the financial situation of the
Rathskeller lived up to expectations? Is the business
organization the best possible? All these questions need to
be answered.
Finances profit and capital have been a continuous
subject of debate. The Rathskeller was literally subsidized at
birth through Student Government and the administration.
The administration, donated $25,000 from funds which
were already designated for renovation of its site, the east
wing of the okl Main Cafeteria. And SG matched the sum
with a donation of $25,000.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd estimates that
an additional $4,000 was also contributed by SG through
special funds of former President Clyde Taylor.
The Rathskeller was continually in debt last year to the
sum of about $7,500, Hilliard said.
"But almost $4,000 of this was lost in the first three
weeks of operation due to large expenses on frauleins, he
said.
A special loan of $9,500 was granted to the Rathskeller
by SG this summer. It must be repaid at the rate of $1,200
per quarter, Shepherd said. r:\.
The Rathskeller asked for an amount over $7,500 in
order to have capital for experimentation, Hilliard said. The
break-even point has been hit now, he said, with profits
' (SEE'RAT/PAGE 2)

Tuesday, October 28, 1969

circulation space- plus the
proximity of more than 2,000
tons of air conditioning allows
for the construction of such
academic space at a cost
savings of 25 per cent over
normal construction.*
(SEE 'ACTIVITIES' PAGE 2 )
Football, IFC
Tickets Are
Still On Sale
Tickets for the
Florida-Auburn clash Saturday
still exist. UF Ticket Manager
Ray Dorman said 5,000
standing room only tickets
would be available at Auburns
Cliff Hare Stadium at $3 a
head. The tickets will go on
sale at 9:30 am. Saturday.
All tickets for the
Florida-Georgia battle in
Jacksonville Nov. 8 at the
Gator Bowl are all sold out,
Dorman said Monday night. He
said UFs allotment of 6,038
student and date tickets were
gone and there would not be
any sales on the game today.
Tickets for the Lettermen
concert Friday night are selling
fast, IFC Treasurer Miles
Wilkins said Monday.
Students who want to buy
tickets should get them today
or Wednesday, he said.
Tickets are on sale at the
Reitz Union box office, the
Record Bar and Belk-Lindsay
for $5 a couple.



Page 2

2, The Florida Alligator; Tuesday, October 28,1969

Laird Announces Large Operations Reduction

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Defense
Department will close or reduce operations at
307 bases in the United States and overseas, it
was announced Monday. The economy measure
will eliminate 64,800 jobs and save $609 million
a year.
Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird said in
announcing the action that the U.S". and Puerto
Rican bases involved would be announced
Wednesday but that decisions involving overseas
installations will not be announced until
necessary consultations with host countries have
been completed.

Activities Coliseum Fate Hinges On Fee Hike

Lfbom page one^
To handle the flow of
traffic generated by the center,
a four-lane roadway connecting
Archer Road and University
Avenue should be built. And
padcing for about 2,500 cars is
essential.
The professors also
recommended that an
architectural programming team
be appointed to analyze the
academic, cultural, social

j Rat Evaluation Set |
J
from operation equalling expenses. Enough money has also
£ been taken in to repay the SG loan at the agreed-upon rate, :$
:j:j he said. S
| Shepherd said he feels the Rathskeller should not only 55
g recover its expenses, but make enough profit to make 55
*:*: changes in the building.
g It was never intended for the Rathskeller to make a55
£ profit, Hilliard said. But we do need capital to experiment
g with. g
g Im not worried about finances, he said. I knew we 55
g were going to take losses during the first year or two. I $
never expected an overnight success. £
£ The students at this university have already given too
£ much money to the Rathskeller, Shepherd said. I dont 55
£ think students should give another dime. £
g But, SG has no official voice in the Rathskeller, he said. 55
£ Its strictly an informal relationship. g

Court Ruling Sought

gJROM PAGE
UF employes, with the
mandatory clause, subject to
immediate dismissal, for not
signing the oath. A deadline
for its return was set for Nov.
15.
An ACLU-backed request
for a restraining order was
then filed in the Fifth Circuit
Court in Orlando asking that
state university employes not
have to sign the oath until a
decision on the oaths had been
issued.
In his letter to Mautz,
OConnell said he was
complying with Florida
Statutes which require that
those who refuse to sign the
oaths be fired, and those in
authority be charged with a
misdemeanor if they fail to

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida AKgator, Reitz Union Building,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The A Bigs tor is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida
32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
al advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida AHjpisr wfll not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given'AT thf AAfejtjsytg< Managerwithin <1) one day aftrv of*pJveTtirement
* appears. .The' .Farida* not be responsible 'fbr.hlblt than one.
incorrect* insertion, qf ,ajr,ajlyet!ataient scheduled to run several times.- Wotices-
far pipy given before the next insertion. /. ,',l

athletic functions that could
be included in the center. An
architectural firm should be
designated to work with this
team.
It is paramount that the
prime architect selected be of
a caliber commensurate with
the magnitude of the task. We
feel that this architect should
be of national reputation and
not necessarily selected from
the state at large.
Finally, the report urges

fire an employe who refuses to
execute the oath.
The Board of Regents
directed this move to up-date
the records of oaths in the
past eight years, ACLU
chairman Norma Muhn said
Friday.
Apparently the Board of
Regents chose the UF to do it
first, since this directive had
not been done at other state
universities at the time, Mrs.
Munn said.
OConnell, however, denied
that this was true.
I assume every other state
university is seeking to comply
with the ruling of the Board
of Regents and is obeying the
law of this state, he said. If
not, then they are violating
the law.

CUTBACK TO AFFECT 307 MILITARY BASES

Jerry W. Friedheim, a Pentagon spokesman,
said the cutback was part of Lairds $3 billion
economy program announced Aug. 21. He said
the personnel reductions announced Monday did
not add to the 220,000-man reduction in
military strength and the 68,000-man cut in
civilian employment already scheduled by the
Defense Department to be achieved by July 1.
The 64,800 jobs to be eliminated at the 307
bases will be divided between 37.800 military
personnel and 27,000 civilian employees, the
Pentagon said.

that liaison be established and
maintained between the design
architect, the university
community and the
community at large to
assure proper consideration of
their respective needs.
The report was submitted
by Harry C. Merritt, architect
and associate professor in the
Department of Architecture,
and John M. Mcae, instructor
in the Department of
Architecture.
The first concern is coming
up with the $17:5 million
needed to make the activities
center a reality. Fred Cantrell,
UF vice president for
development, said its unlikely
the legislature would
appropriate any funds from its
general revenue next year for
the center.

I World Campus Afloat
is a college that does more
than broaden horizons.
It sails to them and beyond.
Again in 1970, the World Campus Afloat
program of Chapman College and Associated
Colleges and Universities will take qualified
students, faculty and staff into the world
laboratory.
Chapman College now is accepting final 11 JmSl^
applications for the next three'"consecutive 91
semesters: Spring 1970, Fall 1970 and |f|fl X
Spring 1971. Preliminary applications also
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Fall semesters depart New York for ports M
in Western Europe and the Mediterranean,
Africa and South America, ending in
Los Angeles. Spring semesters circle the
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India and South Africa to New York. Art student Leana Leach of Long Beach
For a catalog and other information f etches ruins of once-buried city during
complete and mail the coupon below. World Campus Afloat visit t 0 Pompeii.
SAFETY INFORMATION: The s.s. Ryndam l 1 I
registered in The Netherlands meets 1/
International Safety Standards for new ships 1
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0581 WORLD CAMPUS AFLOAT
. Chapman College, Orange, Calif. 92666 :
I Please send your catalog and any other materia,, need to have i
I SCHOOL INFORMATION
HOME INFORMATION I
Miss
2 Mrs. 2
Last Name First fnrn^r
i RimToTScHooi L *"
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I CRy State ~2jp Area Code l I
Campus Phone f ] Un anf^^7~^ t shou,d be sent to campus home l
V, n, Im Intareslad In Fall Spring 19 \
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Senate Republican leader Hugh Scott said
President Nixon will cut one million men from
the nations armed services before 1972.
He also predicted in a broadcast interview
Sunday that Nixon would bring back about
300,000 of our troops in Vietnam over a period,
but he did not say how long a period he had in
mind.
Scott said he favored the closing of
unnecessary bases, including a few in Spain and
Morocco, although he said he would be flatly
against reducing our commitments to West Berlin.

And OConnell said the UF
couldnt possibly ask the
Legislature for $17.5 million,
when the university needs S6O
million in academic facilities.
We need the S6O million in
academic facilities, but we also
need the activities center, he
said. Its not a question of
either or, because we need
both.
The group looked to the
campus referendum as a first
step in obtaining funds for the
center. Other sources of funds
would be city, county, state
and private sources.
But if we dont get
support from the students, we
cant expect to ask it from
others, OConnell said.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said the
referendum should be
favorably received by the

students, if it is presented
fairly.
Its a gamble, but I think
the students will come through
for us in February, he said.
MiM-rosm
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THE ONLY PLACE
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CRUDE
0



V
Bailey Under Attack |
For All-Area Sticker

A special investigator has
been named by the traffic
court to lode into allegations
against Jimmey Bailey with
respect to his possession of an
all-area parking sticker.
Chief Justice Bob Wattles
has appointed one of the
courts six associate justices,
James Lorman, to investigate
student right-wing leader Bailey
for using what is suspected to
be an illegal parking sticker.
Baileys yellow Falcon was
sporting the coveted purple
pass for several weeks earlier
in the quarter. An Alligator
investigation discovered that
Traffic Coordinator Lee
Burrows has no record of
issuing Bailey the permit. But
Bailey still claimed that he had
gotten it the same as
anybody else, from Burrows.
If he stole the permit, it is
an Honor Court offense,
Wattles explained, and if he
altered one it is a case of false
registration, and thats a traffic

Venture:
Purify water
with the fiber
that made
men whistle.
Nylon. Reverse osmosis.
A fiber that started making girls' legs more beauti beautiful
ful beautiful some 30 years ago.
And a process that's been around a lot longer.
But when Du Pont scientists and engineers look
at them in a new way, they combine into an idea that
can change the world.
Reverse osmosis is a purification process that
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est cheapest way to desalinate water.
Du Ponts innovation? Hollow, semipermeable ny nylon
lon nylon fibers much finer than human hair. Symmetrical,
with an outer diameter of .002 inch and a wall thick thickness
ness thickness of .0005 inch, with an accuracy of manufacture
maintained at close to 100%. Twenty-five to 30 million
of them encased in a precisely engineered unit 14
inches in diameter by 7 feet long.
The result: a semipermeable surface area of about
85,000 square feetthe size of a 2-acre lotand up
to 10,000 gallons of desalted water per day.
So far "Permasep permeators have been used
experimentally to purify brackish and polluted water,,
and in various industrial separations. But the po potential
tential potential to desalt seawater, too, is there.
So Du Pont scientists and engineers are even now
working toward improved fibers, units and plant
designs that should make It possible to get fresh
water from salt at a price that any town or nation
can afford.
Innovationapplying the known to discover the
unknown, inventing new materials and putting them
to work, using research and engineering to create
the ideas and products of the futurethis is the
venture Du Pont people are now engaged in.
For a variety of career opportunities, and a chance
to advance through many fields, talk to your Du Pont
Recruiter. Or send us the coupon.
i
| Du Pont Company, Room 7890, Wilmington, DE 19898
J Please send me the booklets checked below.
Chemical Engineers at Du Pont -
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court offense. We will decide
from the evidence Lorman
gathers whether we want to
bring him to court.
Refrigerators
Available
Students living in dorms will
soon be able to rent
refrigerators by applying for
them at the Jennings Hall area
desk, Secretary of Student
Services Howard Lubel said
Monday.
The Alligator reported
Friday that students wanting
to rent the refrigerators should
apply at the offices of student
Services and Consumer Affairs,
but Lubel clarified that they
should apply at Jennings Hall
at the end of this quarter and
the beginning of next quarter.
Jennings residents will get
first priority for the 200
refrigerators, which will cost
about $7 a quarter.

SPIRIT BILL ON AGENDA

The emotion-charged card
section debate will be renewed
by the Student Senate tonight,
probably bringing its demise
for the rest of the season.
Secretary of Athletics Lee
Greene will brief the newly
elected group on the
circumstances surrounding the
controversy.
To replace the card section,
Senator George Seide
(First-AS) will introduce a bill
proposing a spirit section of
1,300 seats. The new section
will be manned with student
volunteers who will remain
with the section for the whole
season. The seats will be
located near the 50-yd. line at
the bottom of the east stands.
Also on the agenda is the
election of new senate officers.
Incumbent President Jack
Vaughn is expected to be
unopposed in his bid for
re-election. Both parties plan
to elect new floor leaders and

4HKNHMRKKKBMtmKm .wiSafc
SSMKSS&Hoyiiyii-.-'U'v.-'.. '* : .V-:?*. *£: -. ',.
USHEBb^-:-..:>V., £*.: N

Card Debate Renewed

party officials in caucus before
the meeting.
The .meeting is due to start

Auburn Pep Rally
Planned For Thursday

Plans to Ambush. Auburn
will be laid at a colossal pep
rally, featuring the band and
cheerleaders, on Florida Field
Thursday at 5 pm as Gator
fans urge the team to GET
7.
Part of the plan is to flood
the team with telegrams before
the game. Organizations in on
the plot can send a night
letter of 100 words to Ray
Graves, Governors House,

IGATORS WILL BEAT AUBURH

* Tbttday, October 28,i860, TW Florida ARigrtor, I

immediately after the First
Party caucus at 9 p.m. in
room 349 of the Union.

Montgomery, Alabama..
A further portion of the
conspiracy for the ambush
requires an Ambush Auburn'*
bumper sticker. Stickers will
be available at the Student
Activities Center Wednesday
afternoon and will be used as
official identification of Gator
ambushers.
The Fightin Gators leave
the airport at 8 pm Friday
and arrive in Montgomery at
10 pm

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 28,1989

College Bills
Introduced
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Two bills were introduced in
the Senate Monday to give tax
breaks on college education.
One would exempt fellowships
and scholarships from income
tax and the other would allow
a tax credit up to $325 on
the first $1,500 of tuition,
fees, books and supplies.

They Help Children Adjust

By MARY McBRIDE
Alligator Coriapondent
Talk as much as you can. Dont expect any responses. Work
individually.
With these instructions UF students each chose an
underprivileged child and began the motor coordination games.
Little brown-eyed girls with ribbons in their hair listened and
some began to play. Three-year-old boys squirmed and grinned as
ioys were brought out.
This is a typical scene each week at the Hillel foundation and
the Catholic Student Center where UF students have volunteered
their time and talents to aid the culturally deprived.
About 30 children, ages 3 and 4, and bussed from one area of
the city to the school each Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Gator-tutors can spend as much time as they want on the
program which runs from 9 to 11 a.m.
Along with nine regular staffers, UF students are helping the
children learn reading, mathematics and language skills they would
not ordinarily be exposed to.
We introduce the same kind of things the middle-class mother
does at home, said Mrs. Emile Jester, director. The goal of the
program is to make the adjustment to school easier, she said.
A
That's the only
' reward tutors
Photo by Tom
W Kennedy.

Panty Raid-
New Style
A Flavet area housewife
phoned police and reported
that over 30 pairs of panties
have been stolen from her
clothesline in the last few
months. Police have promised
a thorough investigation.
A housing maintenance man
called police early Wednesday
and reported a double seated
couch stolen from the lobby
of the girls Tower dorm. The
couch was valued at SIOO.
c.
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Some of the volunteers give the children pre-school tests that
point out problem areas. The questions may contain words
familiar to middle-class children, but completely foreign to the
deprived tots. One such term was ferris wheel. ?
Some dont have any idea what youre talking about. It s
frustrating, said Marta Padrone, chairman of the students
participating. She got all enthused about the program through
the Catholic student council.
Since the children speak in a distinct dialect, most time is
spent on familiarizing them with the language. The phrase talk
big is a signal to the children to speak proper English in class.
About 50 students, undergraduates and graduates, married and
single, have volunteered for the program, now in its fourth week.
Some attend every session. This is important since attachments
form between the child and his individual teacher. Those who
cannot attend will sew or knit things for the youngsters. The men
volunteers will build shelves and a sandbox.
I love those kids, said Sharon Broucek, a sophomore who
will enter secondary education.
Thirty kids, two hours together and none of them fight, she
said, amazed.
Once students took the children to a public library to acquaint
them with books. Miss Broucek tried to show one little girl the
art of opening and reading a storybook. But when I tried to get
her interested, she laughed, all she did was play with the
library card.
Gail Sasnett, a graduate in personnel services, is using the
program as a project for her psychology class. She was assigned to
develop a relationship with a child.
They have a whole different subculture, commented Pat
Staggs, graduate student in special education.
She observed the group of three-year-olds as they played.
Their only emotion is aggression. They dont know how to show
affection, she said.
The only return students get for their services is what the
children themselves can give, several of the participants said. This
may be a grin when a child learns to play a game or sing a song.
Or a child who would rather behave than have to leave the room.
Or black children playing with white children oblivious of skin
difference.
Help is still being accepted. The more people you have, the
more you can do, said Miss Padrone. We could help more
children, or even plan an outing.

te v TO
Bs^
i,.. .?,* PM OCT. 27 &28 Monday & Tuesday

Wwtm
KRTHLEEII PECK t
MSiasisss y
dUUHi AM SIUF-IMPMVIMIIIT
tall Today 5724940
AVE. Suita 2
Q&emU
Gmw a
jEil
With a John Roberts
class ring from
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida
-- - - ~



Here's what your first year
or two at IBM could be like.

Soon after his intensive training
course, IBM marketing representative
Preston Love, B.S. '66, started helping
key lowa commissioners solve
problems. Like how to introduce
school kids to computers, without
installing one. His answer: share one
in Chicago by phone cable.

ON CAMPUS
NOV. 18,19

You'll become involved fast.
Youll find we delegate responsi responsibilityto
bilityto responsibilityto the limit of your ability.
At IBM, you'll work individual individually
ly individually or on a small team. And be en encouraged
couraged encouraged to contribute your own
ideas. You'll advance just as fast
and far as your talents can take you.
Here's what three recent grad graduates
uates graduates are doing.
jm MBmI- f usJL. jmm
II ~JI |
9 1i H p* Wii> *^^l
si t
Hi
i|H| iP;
WHK m m m
Bk V f-m
89p% :s;i
v.j v.j
v.j mb ||llt
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM

Tuesday, October 28,1968, The Floride Alligator,

Doug Taylor, B.S. Electronics
Engineering '67, is already a senior
associate engineer working in large largescale
scale largescale circuit technology. Aided by
computer design, Doug is one of a five fiveman
man fiveman team designing integrated
circuits that will go into IBM
computers in the 1970'5.

Soon after his IBM programmer
training, John Klayman, B.S. Math '6B,
began writing programs used by a
computer system to schedule every
event in the Apollo tracking stations.
And when the finished programs were
turned over to NASA Goddard Space
Elight Center, he was responsible for
making them work.
; V 4
Visit your placement office
and sign up for
an interview with IBM.

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 28, 1969

Page 6

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
/jkjis the exercise of responsibility
Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
yi nn Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
J\ 111 Executive Editor News Editor
JK Mlim
gSSSWeflections JXSftSattWSXW:WSSSS*
.*! v.'
v v
v V
v.
v
Iv X
1 End Os Camelot I
$ £
3 $
I |
By BrUCe Greer
And so at the traumatic end of Camelot Arthur and Guenivere
retreated to the hills to dispair or to hope that someday love
would be given its chance.
The queen, with sleek hair and sparkling eyes had seemed to
lose the most; not in riches so much as in expectations. For she
knew that when the world is shattered it is the idealists that fall
the furthest.
So she retreated in mind and soul but not in body. She was
still to be seen at the new court parties on Saturday nights. She
did it for the game of it, or so she said.
While the King stayed home she did make all the merriment
with loud of voice if not true joy of spirit. And she still
remained the favorite of the round table knights. Never did they
stop vying for her affections and never again would she give in.
For now she was disillusioned and alone in the crowd.
Arthur, understanding, as he always was, remained silent.
Sometime, he reasoned, she would grow tired of these frivolties
and discover the truth which he held so sacred. How difficult
could it be for her to accept people for what they were?
But, alas, expectations for the most part usually exceed results.
So Arthur lives in New-Camelot alone, but satisfied. Satisfied in
the knowledge that he showed her the lighted path. The lighted
path that Queen Quenivere could never choose. For image was her
goal, and everyone knows that image is really only imagination in
the mirror.
And though you may think she is a winner for defeating him,
there are only losers in this game. For the game must go on and
when it does there are no real winners, only players.
Arthur is a player no more, if truly he ever were one. The
King sits in his study and reads poetry, listens to the lute, and
reflects upon all the beautiful colors which he placed around her
head.
But the world for a moment has dissapointed him. So there he
sits alone in his chamber, waiting. And it is there that we must
leave him, because it is there that he is waiting for the world
to change its color.
* k'
VdCkl I a
What Worries Me, Senator, Is That Theyre
' Getting Into Step.
. : , < *i? i *
- credit Space City News/LNS

EDITORIAL
Shades Os McCarthy

Once again this university is over a
political barrel.
And once again we can thank the
legislature of this state for our
uncomfortable position.
This time it is the loyalty oath
prescribed by state statute.
Apparently ever-dauntless in their
pursuit of Communists lurking behind the
ivory towers of this institution, and in any
state agency, the legislature seconded
by Attorney General Earl Faircloth is
attempting to ferret out these evil beings
through an oath.
. . that I am not a member of the
Communist Party; that I do not believe in
the overthrow of the Government of the
United States or of the state of Florida
by force or violence; that I am not a
member ,of any organization or party
which believes in or teaches, directly or
indirectly, the overthrow of the
Government of the United States or of
Florida by force or violence.
It reads like something out of the
McCarthy era. And it has no place in the
supposedly-p regressive government and
educational institutions of this state.
We do not stand alone in these beliefs.

Is Reagan Being Hoaxed?

Frank Mankiewicz Mankiewicz_
_ Mankiewicz_ Tom Braden
LOS ANGELES What may have been
conceived as the most elaborate political put-on
since Hearst invented the Spanish-American War
is unfolding here as a major test of.Gov. Ronald
Reagans theory that constant and violent
confrontation with students is the best policy.
At issue is the status of Angela Davis, an
attractive, 25-year-old, black Ph.D. who was
appointed earlier this year as an assistant
professor of philosophy at UCLA and who has
been fired by the Board of Regents, at the
insistence of the governor, because it appears she
is a member of all things the Communist
Party.
Miss Davis membership in the party was
leaked this spring in a letter to the college
newspaper by an alleged FBI informant. She
readily admitted membership in something called
the Che-Lumumba Chapter of the Communist
Party, and her firing came soon after. The issue
has mobilized opinion among the faculty,
administration and student body throughout the
statewide campus of the University of Calfornia,
almost all of it against the governor. But it has
also mobilized most of the nonstudent,
nonacademic public opinion in the state, mostly
on Reagans side.
What is curious in the whole episode,
according to some faculty members who know
Miss Davis and more important know
something about the American Radical
movement, is why no effort has been made to
discover if Miss Davis is telling the truth when
she says she is a Communist.
These people are saying, in effect, that the
regents, the university and, above "all,Gov. Reagan
are quite likely being victimized by a giant
perhaps even lighthearted hoax, promoted by
the New Left, designed to provoke just the
confrontation which both Reagan and the
militants want.
If there is one thing young radicals in our
society today share, whether they are nonviolent,
biracial pacifists or violent Maoist separatist
militants, it is contempt for the Communist
Party. The party itself is bourgeois, bureaucratic,

The state of California has declared
such oaths unconstitutional.
The courts of this state currently face
the same decision... the same opportunity
for enlightenment.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell
asked Monday for a speedy answer on
the constitutionality of the oath form. v
The urgency of this request, on which
hinges the income and employment of
countless persons, cannot be
overemphasized.
In the meantime he has no choice but
to fire any university employe who
refuses to sign the oath by Nov. 15.
It is sad the minds of our legislators
are so narrow that even the smallest idea
which does not conform to theirs must be
stiffled and smothered by a loyalty oath.
And it is sick that in this university,
whose purpose is to open and expand
minds, we must be protected from anyone
who may challenge the diet of apple pie
and motherhood we have been weaned on
since birth.
The loyalty oath is both sad and sick.
We join with President OConnell in
asking for immediate court action on the
questionable constitutionality of this
remnant of Americas Dark Ages.

in the view of youth timid and in view of
intellectuals turgid and irrelevant. The New Left
ridicules the Old Left.
No longer, as through much of the Thirties
and Forties, is Communist Party membership in
any way heroic or even chic in left and
intellectual circles. Indeed, it is regularly derided
as irrelevant to the struggle. If it were not for
the enrolled members of the FBI and subscribers
to Communist publications among public and
private institutions, it could hardly survive.
Consequently, it is highly unlikely that Miss
Davis, admittedly an activist, admittedly a
militant radical, a student of Herbert Marcuse
and of considerable intellectual attainment, would
join the party. Some movement with a date in
name, perhaps SDS or one of its splinters,
perhaps but the Communist Party? David
Eisenhower is as likely a member.
But these intellectual musings are surely not
for Ronald Reagan. Elected as a foe of The
University, he has fulfilled his campaign
promises and thrived, though the student body at
UCLA, when polled this week, favored by more
than 80% the proposition that Reagan had
lowered the quality of the states education.
Reagans most likely foe, former Assembly
Speaker Jesse Unruh, has been hammering on the
issue, mostly without visible success. Unruh is
telling whoever cares to listen that it is the
governor, not the students, who has provoked
the confrontations as with the Peoples Park in
Berkeley which have led to violence and a
paralysis of education.
Thus, the case of Miss Davis looks more and
more like a radical-left fraud. After all, she is
almost the only accused Communist in recent
memory who has broken the story first and then
not denied it. The suspicion is strong that, by
providing a real live Communist on the faculty,
Reagan could be provoked into another
confrontation which might accomplish the goals
of both the governor and the New Left. So far,
its worked.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Janie Gould Helen Huntley
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Anne Freedman
Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer pf the article and not
those of the University of Florida."'



Vietnam 1 Worth Destruction?

MR. EDITOR:
Re Speaking Out of
October 22nd by Jim Hollis:
I am gratified to see that
Jim would like to discuss
goals, for so would I.
However, before I get to
anything really substantive I
would like to bring to your
attention certain half-truths,
non-facts, etc. that typify a
particular mode of thought
concerning the war. To wit:
I quote Jim as saying: It
would require months to pull
all the troops from Vietnam.
A recent article in the St. Pete
Times quoted a Pentagon
spokesman as saying that
contingency plans have been
drawn up to provide for
withdrawal in three weeks with
the aid of planes borrowed
from the airlines. The plan
also takes into account the
possibility that U.S. troops
might have to fight their way
to departure points through
resistance provided by their
erstwhile allies.
It is interesting to note
that since the country was
divided into North and
South-Vietnam, over a million
people have fled south... I
am surprised that Jim didn't
hand us the old cliche about
voting with their feet etc. In
truth, 860,000 people did
leave the North for the South,
but Jim neglected to include
that 600,000 of these were
Catholics who constituted 65%
of the Catholic population in
North Vietnam. More than
99.5% of the non-Catholic
population stayed put. The
Catholics left because of a
long experience of persecution
at the hands of non-Catholics.
In addition, many had
collaborated with the imperial
French against the Viet Minh.
Furthermore, it is well to
remember that Ngo Dinh Diem
was in power in the South at
this time, ps closest associates
(mainly his family) were

Hold Those Women Back

MR. EDITOR:
I just finished reading
Working Women Face
Prejudice, Un-equal Pay, and
was somewhat disturbed about
the sheer nerve of Mrs. Wells
at writing such an article.
It seems to me, that
womans equality is something
irrelevant to the technological
age in which we live. The
place of women should be in
the foundation for building
family life.
Men should suppress all
attempts made by females to
exchange places in everyday
life. Not until women began to
put down mops and brooms,
quit washing clothes and
diapers, did the family
institution begin to crumble.
Not until women wanted to
make the marriage game a

MR. EDITOR:
On Oct. 10, two SMC
members were arrested by the
UF police. The facts of the
case are:
David and Judy Rossi were
walking through the Graduate
Library parking lot. They were
handing out anti-war leaflets

themselves Catholics from
North and Central Vietnam.
All this comes from Bernard
Falls book, The Two
Viet-Nams.
That nut in Washington
who suggested that Americans
fire only in self-defense just
happened to be Defense
Secretary Melvin Laird. The
recent drop in U.S. casualties
is in large part a result of the
implementation of this policy.
Jims charming little analogy
(i.e., Vietnam is more serious
than a football game etc.)
reminded me of a similar usage
that my R.O.T.C. (mandatory)
was fond of. However, judging
from the fact that classes were
suspended for Homecoming,
but not the Moratorium, plus
UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIH
Jim Hollis attempts to
link the Moratorium and
its supporters with the
future deaths of American
soldiers. They are
offering considerable moral
support to the enemy, he
says.
IIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIiIIIIIIII
the blithe expressions on so
many faces that Saturday,
there would appear to be at
least one university president
and 60,000+ fans who might
take exception to Jims
declaration that Vietnam is
more serious than a football
game.
In the next paragraph, Jim
attempts to link the
Moratorium and its supporters
with the future deaths of
American soldiers. They are
offering considerable moral
support to the enemy, he
says. Witness the following
quote from William J.
Lederers book, Our Own
Worst Enemy. Lederer quotes
North Vietnams Premier Pham
Van Dong as saying, Our
enemy pretends that we seek
victory through United States
peace* movements. But we
know that we must count

little more interesting by
trying to imitate her male
counterpart did the business of
building childrens reform
- schools expand.
There is no great need for
most women in America to
work. Females should be given
priority only when the survival
of the famiy is at stake. For
example, the situation in
which black and lower class
families can hardly provide for
themselves.
By mere laws of nature,
man was bequested the role of
providing economically and
politically. Men didnt hang
their heads in shame because
of the jobs they had to
perform in order to perpetuate
some form of society.
American women, on the
other hand showed disrespect
for themselves by trying to

A Case For The SMC

and, when passing two UF
policemen, handed a leaflet to
an Officer Gladin. Gladin
dropped the leaflet and, as the
Rossis were walking away, the
officer called out, Hey, boy!
and ordered David to pick up
the leaflet. Judy, at this time
did pick up the paper.
Gladin and another officer,

mainly upon ourselves and no
one else.

Jim closes with a stinging
castigation of radicals (By
the way, I am not a radical,
not yet.) who profess concern
for the men in Vietnam, but
are really not willing to
accept the responsibility of
serving their country, to accept
their duty as free men.
Army Pfc. Chris Yapp, a
civil affairs team member in a
Montagnard villiage, doesnt
seem to see it that way, Jim.
Life magazine quotes Chris:
Outside our families, I think
the protesters are the only
ones 'who give a damn about
whats happening. Pvt. Jim
Beck came to Vietnam as a
volunteer to avenge his
brothers death. I came partly
for revenge, says Beck, but
now I have lost all faith. The
demonstrators are right to
speak up because this war is
wrong and must be stopped.
Some paragraphs earlier I
expressed a desire to dis'cuss
goals, as did Jim. However,
where Jim discussed the goals
of the Moratorium, I would
like to discuss the goals of the
U.S. in Vietnam. Pfc. Sam
Benson would also like to
know why his government has
seen fit to. send himself and
others like him to Vietnam. I
dont even know what Im

fighting for. Im just out in
the bushes getting shot at,
says Benson. Yes Jim, Pfc.
Benson would like to know
just why he is risking his life
in Vietnam, and so would I.
Suppose you tell us Jim,
precisely what it is in Vietnam
that is worth all that has been
destroyed by the war. Ill be
looking for your answer in the
pages of the Alligator, Jim, and
if its really good, Ill send a
copy to Pfc. Benson, just so
hell know too. After all, he is
fighting the war. Dont you
think he should be told why?
- RUSSELL TAYLOR, 3AS

invade the male realm of
responsibility and leaving
behind the chores on which
society thrives and depends.
Until women are biologically
capable of all that a man is,
they should be held in check.
If and when they are
biologically capable wifl they
be given the right to wear
overalls, dig. ditches, become
longshoremen, cause traffic
jams (legally), and go to
foreign lands to fight the
nations battles.
Women of America
remember, when you develop a
mechanical woman to take
your place then the men of
this nation will be willing to
give you all you ask without
prejudice and with an open
heart.
EARL J. WILCOX

Overstreet, ran up to David
and told him he was under
arrest (no specified charge).
The Rossis continued into
Anderson Hall where, in a
deans office, they were told
they were under arrest for
resisting arrest, the first time
a charge was mentioned.
At this point, Gladin and
Overstreet knocked the Rossis*
books from their hands, threw
David against the wall,
searched the Rossis (for
machine guns?), handcuffed
their hands behind their backs
and carted them down to the
Gainesville Police Station.
It took the intrepid officers
two and one half hours to
figure out a charge. It couldnt
be littering since the Rossis
had picked up the paper. And
you cant put someone under
arrest for resisting arrest unless
you have something valid to
arrest him for to begin with.
So, our officers decided to
charge the Rossis with
disorderly conduct by words
in that after being thrown
around David called Gladin a
bastard.
Die American Civil Liberties
Union (ACLU) took this case
and after an investigation
conduded:
Given the weakness of the
charge, there is no escaping
the strong possibility that it
was the nature of the paper
NOT the nature of their acts
or work, that prompted the
arrest.
SMC voted on Oct. 14 to
endorse the Rossis and demand
a dismissal of their charges.
This was announced at our
Moratorium.

* 0
j
,i,- .. .;* credit Panlante/LNS

Tuesday, October 28,1960, The Florida Alligator,

jAfaiiti
omL
There is no hope
for the complacent man

ON TUESDAY, OCT. 27,
THE UNIVERSITY DROPPED
THE CHARGES AGAINST
THE ROSSIS.
But SMC did not limit its
demand to dropping charges.
We also called for the
University Police Department
to issue a public apology to
the Student Body for this
humiliating act they
perpetrated on the Rossis. We
again make this demand.
This is, of course, not the
first occasion where local
police have attempted political
repression. Hie cases are
numerous and well known over
the last several years.
What is significant is that
three times in the last two
months, cases against political
activists have had to be
dropped by police because of
the widespread public
opposition to this form of
political repression. We are
speaking of the cases against
Charles Fulwood, Ed Freeman
and, now, the Rossis.
TTiere was a rally scheduled
today at the city court. We
are still having a rally but the
site has been changed to the
Plaza at 4 pjn. There is
another case SMC is supporting
and that is the case of Jim
Fine who faces four years in
prison solely for his anti-war
activism. We call on all
students to come to the Plaza
and show their support for
political prisoners.
FIGHT POLITICAL
REPRESSION!
STUDENT MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 28, 1969

Page 8

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION will be given
Saturday, Nov. 1 at 9:45 a.m. at
207 Leigh Hall, in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATION
TION ADMINISTRATION STUDENTS: The Beta
Gamma Sigma S2OO scholarship
Is available for students of the
College of Bus. Adm.
Scholarship, accomplishment
and need are the basis of
selection. Application forms
may be obtained from Mrs.
Young in the Dean's Office,
Room 214 Matherly Hall and
must be returned by Oct. 31.
THE UNIVERSITY
SENATE will meet Thursday,
October 30, at 3:30 p.m. in
McCarty Auditorium. The
following items are on the
agenda:
Action Items
1. Recommended allocation
of book, periodical and
binding funds for the 1969-70
fiscal year.
2. Proposed masters degrees
in the College of Physical
Education and Health: Master
of Arts in Health Education
(thesis program) and Master of
Arts in Health Education
(non-thesis pro program).
gram). program).
3. Proposed masters
degree in Health Related
Professions: Masters of
Occupational Therapy.
4. Report on tenure policy
from the Academic Freedom
and tenure, constitution, and
professional relations and
standards committee.
5. Proposed amendments to
the University of Florida
constitution regarding the
reorgani za iton of the
University Senate.
Information Items
1. Annual Reports for the
following: Parking and
Transportation Committee;
Admissions Committee, and
Committee on Student
Conduct.
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses
listed below are expected to
take the test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
CBS 263 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, October
28, at 7:00 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with (A) report
to Floyd 104 or 106; (B) to
Little 101 or 109; (C) to Leigh
207; (D-E) to Little 113,121, or
125; (F) to Little 201, 203, 205,
207; (G) to Little 213,215, 217,
or 219; (H) to Little 221, 223,
225, 227, 233, 235, or 239;
(l-L) to Matherly 2,3,4, 5,6, 7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16,

I drive like a king #
\ Add to the trade-in value and at the
Hh / rjr P\ 'l' \\ same time enjoy ar conditioned com-
WM yj '(yy-v \\ fort...arrive refreshed and wrinkle free!
J \rfc\ \\ We'll make all of the arrangements!
& L V \\ That's what YOUR CAMPUS CREDIT
jk/) \\ UNION is for!
s/> V v \\
rV FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
r f -T l -
"' ''' f .**> ->\ 'V.' '. ... ..*> ;.* :* .', > I

Administrative Notices

(M) to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111,113,115,116,118, or 119,
(N-O) to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; (P-Q) to Floyd 108 or 109,
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday,
October 29, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with (A-M) report to Walker
Auditorium; (N-Z) to Peabody
1,2, 4, 7,10, or 11.
(R) to Flint 101, 102, 110, or
112; (S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5, 7,18,
or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday,
October 29, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with (A-F) report to Matherly 2,
Jl, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10.11,12, 13,
14, or 16; (G-L) to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118, or 119; (M-R) to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125, (S-Z) to Little 201, 203,
205, 207, 213, 215, 219, 221,
223, 225, 227, 233, 235, or 239.
MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, October
30, at 7:00 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
MS 301 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, October
30, at 7:00 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with (A-F)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,
7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14, or 16;
(G-L) to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118, or 119; (M-R) to Little
101, 109, 113, 121, or 125;
(S-Z) to Little 201, 203, 205,
207, 213, 215, 219, 221, 223,
225, 227, 233, 235, or 239.
CEH 131 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 210, 203,
205 or 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110, or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
CEH 132 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday,
November 4, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to

BLUE BULLETIN

Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
(M-Z) to Peabody 101, 102,
112, or 114.
CY 201 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wendesday,
November 5, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A-L) report to
Walker Auditorium; (M-Z) to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125.
,CPS 121 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday,
November 6, at 7:00 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with (A) report to Floyd
104 or 106; (B) to Little 101
or 109; (C) to Leigh 207;
(D-E) to Little 113, 121, or
125; (F) to Little 201, 203,
205, 207; (G) to Little 213,
215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; (P-Q) to
Floyd 108 or 109; (R) to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
(S) to Walker Auditorium
(T-V) to Anderson 2,4, 5,7,
18, or 20; (W-Z) to Walker
Auditorium.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career
Planning Center, Room G-22
Reitz Union, two weeks in
advance. Companies will be
recruiting for December, March
and June grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 29 & 30: GENERAL
ELECTRIC CO.
OCT. 29, 30 & 31: THE
BELL SYSTEM.
OCT. 30: U.S. ARMY
MATERIAL COMMAND; NEW
YORK STATE DEPT. OF
TRANSPORTATION.
OCT. 30 & 31: AMERICAN
CYANAMID CO.
OCT. 31: U.S. ARMY
ENGINEER TOPOG R APHIC
LABORATORIES; STATE
HIGHWAY DEPT. OF
GEORGIA; TORNWALL,
LAND AND LEE;
HONEYWELL, INC.;
STONEROCK, HOLLINGS HOLLINGSWORTH
WORTH HOLLINGSWORTH & SIMONET; FIRST
UNION NATIONAL BANK
North Carolina.
CANCELLATIONS:
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
for Oct. 31.
Nov. 3: LYBRAND, ROSS
& MONTGOMERY;
VETERANS ADMINISTRA
TION; FACTORY MUTUAL
ENGINEERING CORP.: BOY

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

SCOUTS OF AMERICA;
DAVCO MANUFACTURING
CO.: ATLANTIC RICHFIELD
CO.: STANDARD OIL CO.
LOUISVILLE KENTUCKY.
NOV. 3 & 4 :
WESTINGHOUSE
ELECTRICAL CORP.; ERNST
AND ERNST.
NOV. 4: NORTHROP
CORP.; THE PROCTER &
GAMBLE CO.: CITIZENS
AND SOUTHERN NATIONAL
BANK; TEXACO, INC.;
SOUTHWIRE CO.; BROWN
ENGINEERING CO.; DUKE
POWER CO.
NOV. 5: SCHLUMBERGER
WELL SERVICE;
ROBERTSON, MAY, ZIMA &
CO.; THE CHARMIN PAPER
PRODUCTS CO.: PAN
AMERICAN PETROLEUM
CORP.; GENERAL FOODS
CORP.: REPUBLIC STEEL
CORP.; THOMAS J. LIPTON,

Campus Calendar

T uesday, October 28
Informal Modeling, Vogue
Shop, Arredondo Room,
12:00 noon
Ballet Lessons for Children,
C-4 Union, 3:00 & 4:00
p.m.
Union Humanities Film,
"Gospel According to St.
Matthew", Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, &
D Union, 7:00 p.m
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 7:30
p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Florida String Quartet,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, October 29
Union Religious Discussion,
"Dialogue with a
Theologue", Chuck Lucas,
"The Underground Church",
122 Union, 4:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Chinese Language Society
Film, China Today",
Room 403 College Library,
7:00 p.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies Colloquium,
Speaker: Prof. Peter
Fraenkel, College Library,
8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.

INC.; ORLANDO UTILITIES
COMMISSION; SOUTHERN
SERVICES, INC.
NOV. 5 & 6: UNION CAMP
CORP.
NOV. 5,6, & 7: UNION
CARBIDE CORP.
NUCELAR DIV.
CANCELLATIONS: NOV. 3
- AMERICAN OIL CO.; NOV.
5 NAVAL ORDNANCE
STATION, HUNT-WESSON
FOODS, INC.
GENERAL NOTICES
VOTER EDUCATION
RALLY will be held November
3 at noon in the Plaza of the
Americas. Speakers will be
President Stephen C.
O'Connell, the Honorable
Ralph Turlington and Senator
Bob Saunders. Come and
support it's your education.
Sponsored by the UF Young
Democrats.

Thursday, October 30
Univ. of Fla. Fencing Club
Meeting, All Fencers
Welcome, Florida Gym,
6:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting* 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Football Film: Union Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Alpha Zeta Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Dames
Association Bridge, 150 C
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Friday, October 31
Journalism Day, Union, 9:00
a.m.
Union Movie, "Inside Daisy
Clover", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Chess Club
Meeting, Please Bring Sets,
118 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Halloween Party for Children
of Married Students, Union
Terrace, 8:00 p.m.
IFC: "THE LETTERMEN",
Florida Gym, 8:00 p.m.
MENSA, Prospective Member
Mixer, Unitarian Church,
8:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: IFC:
"The Lettermeri," $5.00 per
co u pie. Rathskeller
Membership, $2.00.
"Genesis I" tickets:
Students, $1.00; General
Admission, $1.50.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

} FOR SALE 1
67 Ducati 250 scrambler and helmet.
Must sell. Scrambler and road
sprocket. $275 or best offer. Call
3 78-7 726 1224 SW Ist Ave.
( A-st-25-p)
lot NEAR UNIVERSITY across
from golf course *4,500 write R.T.
POOLER I, Box 1027 Apopka
Florida 32703. 2 Drawer full suspension files, full
depth, your choice of colors.
Elsewhere $49.50, NOW ONLY
$39.95 at JR Office Furniture Co.,
620V2 S. Main St., Call 376-1146.
(A-24-10t-c)
SPECIAL Study desk (36x24).
Perfect for apartment or trailer living.
Paint them any color, they look
sharp. New costs $35.00 or more.
NOW While They Last $14.95. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620t0 S. Main
St., Call 376-1146. (A-24-10t-c)
Unclaimed freight. Discounts to 70%
on Sewing Machines, Stereos, Color
TVs car & home tape players, diving
gear and furniture plus many other
items. All '69 Models. May be seen at
1228 N.E. sth Ave. Phone 378-4186
hours Mon Thru. Thur. 9-6 Fri. & Sat
9 to 7. (A-13t-20-p)
G u nsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
1969 120 tr Kawaski motor cycle
Great condition only 700 miles. Must
sell. Price $350 contact Lee
Stevenson. Phone 392-8372 after
8:00. (A-st-25-p)
Doberman Pups 1 male 1 female six
mo. old, ears trimmed champion
sired show quality priced to sell. Call
372-2225 or 376-7828. (A-st-27-p)
Honda CLI6O Scrambler 1967 excell,
cond. $425; 6 string Gibson, orig.
$175 only SIOO like new; Lear Jet st.
tape deck 8 trk SSO. Call 378-5996.
(A-3t-27-p)
Mobile Home, 1965 New Moon, 12
x 60 3 bdrms, cent air cond, washer,
lots of storage, close to campus. Will
discuss price, 376-0921. (A-4t-27-p)
'6B Triumph Bonneville 650 cc New
paint job with matching helmets
excellent condition, best offer. Call
Lindy at 376-0908. (A-3t-27-p)
Kittys are in and we have em
avoid the rush call 376-7502 after
spm. FREE. (A-3t-27-p)
XLCH Harley-Davidson 900 cc. Come
see it in front of Jennings. Then call
392-9520 and make offer. Got a
cycle? Lets trade. (A-2t-28-p)
YAMAHA -80 cc. Two years old but
runs like new. Babied for 4,000
miles. With two helmets. S2OO. Call
Maury 373-2254. (A-3t-28-p)
/
Golf clubs. Complete set. Includes
bag and cart, $75. Call 372-1776
(A-2t-28-p)
Wedding Ring Set. 14K white gold,
marquise-cut center stone 3O
pts-/baguettes. Total weightso pts.
New, never worn. $250. Call Jim,
378-7315. (A-2t-28-p)
1968 Javelin SST. Excellent
condition, low mileage, radio, heater,
white sidewalls. $2150. Call
392-2704 days or 378-4338 nights.
(A-3t-28-p)
For Sale Flamenco Guitar from
Spain. Call 376-3166. S6O.
(A-st-29-p)
1958 Classic Porsche Speedster
convertible, rebuilt engine, must
sell need money. Call 378-6988
after 3 p.m. S9OO or best offer!
(A-st-29-p)
FOR RENT
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
| 1 a j
| plus WAYNE CAMPBELL ;
I CO-HIT I
i BAREFOOT IN THE PARK \

| FOR RENT **"]j
Upper Division and Graduate
Students; quite well managed
trailer space available 7 ml. no. of
city on 441. Call Mrs. Tanner,
Tra ct 462-1660.
(B-Bt-l-p)
Penthouse apartment beautifully
furnished, 2 Ig brms, 2 bath, living
room, sitting room, wyv carpet,
central air, heat. Private patio on roof
deck. $250 mo. See this luxurious
penthouse at Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111. Grad
students preferred. (B-6t-27-c)
Large 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen, living
room, completely furnished ww
carpet, a/c $l2O mo. ColoniaFManor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 272-7111
prefer 2 students. (B-6t-27-c}
Must sublease one bedroom apt. four
blocks grad lib AC pool S9O mo. Call
378-5715 to see. (B-st-27-p)
TRAILER LOT for rent. $35/month.
Close to campus. Available November
1. 3585 S.W. 20th Avenue after 5:00
p.m. (B-3t-28-p)
Three Bedroom House i Furnished
Central Heat 2 Blocks From Mall
slls Per Month 495-2124 after 6
p.m. (B-st-25-p)
-;-;n-nOOOOOCjI
1 WANTED I
Wanted: Girl to work as model for
a student publication. Must long
hair, good looking, nice shape. Call
Jim at 372-9719 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-3t-nc-29) <
WANTED: Two Auburn tickets.
Will pay $20.00. Call 376-8958
after 5 P.M. (C-2t-29-p)
Male roommate wanted 1 br. apt. ac.
Fully carpeted, new pool. Univ.
Gardens S7O/mo. Call 378-3884.
(C-4t-27-p)
Wanted: Married couples to
participate in a group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-10t-9-c)
Male Roommate needed for Jan.
FYefer thru summer quarter. All
conveniences including pool. Call
376-6361. DEBI is cute 502.
(C-3t-28-p)
2 passengers for flight to Flushing,
New York City during Thanksgiving
vacation. Round-trip fare S9O.
Contact Doug et 372-9447 after 6.
(C-st-28-p)
Attention Typists! The Student
Activities Desk, J. Wayne Reitz
Union, is compiling a list of typists
for the convenience of UofF
students. If you are skilled in typing
term papers, theses, or dissertations
and wish your name to be placed on
this list, please call Mrs. ONeill at
392-1674 between 8:00 a.m. and
noon. Financial arrangements will be
the sole responsibility of the typist
and client. (C-st-28-c)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
V 2 BROILED CHICIKEN
Y.llow SI,Q 9
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauca and Spaghetti

Tuesday, October 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

j HELP WANTED 1
WANTED Sorority girl to be
campus representative for Pappagallo
shoes. Write Pappagallo, 3958 St.
Johns Ave. Jacksonville, Florida,
32205 or call Jacksonville 384-2388.
(E-st-27-p)
DAYBARTENDER @
RATHSKELLER. Hours 11:30 a.m.
7:30 p.m. Mon. Frl. $1.50/hr.
Apply Rathskeller Office between
1:00 p.m. & 5:00 p.m. (E-3t-28-p)
FEMALE Waitress Full and part
time noon hours. Good hourly wage.
Must be neat. Apply Kings Food
Host 1430 SW 13th St. PM only.
(E-ts-27-c)
MALE Full and part time
openings. Good hourly wage. Apply
Kings Food Host. 1430 SW 13th St.
PM only. (E-ts-27-c)
ftx-x-xis?XYX-x*x*x-XM-x-x-x-x*x-x.xw*>;:
1 AUTOS t
{ j;
;*x-x-X*x-x-x-x-x*x-x-x-x-x-x-rxrx-x-x-x*v
Oldsmobile '63 good condition
power steering power brakes radio
heater jet-a-way transmission 8 cyl
engine. Firm $650. Call 373-1451.
(G-st-25-p)
New 1970 Dodge Charger 500 all
power air, autotrans, vinyl top, radio,
never driven 318ci list $4,691.00
must sell for $3,700. 372-4847.
(G-4t-25-p)
MUST SELL l9 63
VOLKSWAGEN. AIR
CONDITIONED, radio, good tires.
$550. Call 373-2646 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-25-p)
For sale 1963 Triumph Spitfire. Shell
station N.W. 13 St. 16th Ave. Must
Sell. (G-st-25-p)
End walking. Perfect college
transportation. 1961 Oldsmobile
FBS. Less than 60,000 mi. on 63
motor. Air, radio, heat. $lB9. Chip
Clarke c/o House. (G-st-29-p)
Porsche 64 SC Air cond.
AM/FM Radio & Tape White w/
Blue Interior Completely
Re-cond. Engine 52700 Call
372- to see. (G-st-29-p)
For Sale 1967 VW Fastback,
excellent condition, good tires, new
safety sticker, radio, $1075.
378-4532. (G-st-29-p)
67 Cougar, XR7, 390, 4 barrel, 4
speed, posi-traction, front disc,
wood panel dash, leather bucket
seats, just inspected. 372-5698.
(G-st-29-p)
1966 Anglia English Ford. Deluxe
model. Radio, heater, excellent
condition. SBOO. 392-7951.
(G-st-29-p)
68 AMX-silver gray, 390v8, power
disc brakes, power steering,
automatic trans, bucket seats, stereo
tape, orig warranty, 16,000 mi.,
$2600 373-1379. (G-3t-27-p)
67 Dodge wagon, ps, pb, air, roof
rack. Delux ipt, new: bat, shocks, hd
brakes polyglas wide ovals, yellow,
black Power tailgate, $2350
373- (G-3t-27-p)

Page 9

i autos §
Impala, 1966. 4 door sedan. AC,
radio, heater, power steering. $1350.
Call 372-6821 after 5:30. (G-st-28-p)
*VW 1966 new tires, radio, low
mileage owned by female Student.
$925. Cali 372-5796. (G-2t-27-p)
[wwwMwwwwww oooeewwwwccy
PERSONAL |
wO*x*&:xx-:-x-xc-x-x-x--vavvvwc#
SMC Publicity Committee meeting
Sunday 314 NW 14 St. 2 p.m. Call
378-9219. (J-2t-25-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message ANY TIME DAY OR
NIGHT. LET FREEDOM RING, 16
NW 7th Ave. COED: Private room with private
entrance and meats in exchange for
cooking. Close to campus. Call
378-3742. (J-3t-28-p)
Immokalee want to fly home?
Leave 31 Oct. return 2 Nov. S2O
round trip. Bo Kagan, Box 428
Health Center, or 378-4859 by
Thursday. (J-3t-29-p)
Fightin Gators Were No. 1"
Bumper Stickers in orange and
blue. $1.25 each or 10 for SIO.OO.
Send check or money order to:
Bumper Stickers, PO Box 99,
Perrine, Florida 33157. (J-3t-27-p)
1963 CESSNA 150 mkll mkV dual
omni 150 hours on major S3IOO, or
will form club with six members
Phillips Flying Service 495-2124 after
6 p.m. (J-st-25-p)
>:-x-x-x-x-x-w..srX*;v;*x-x-:*x-x-x-x-x.vw:-.
I LOST & FOUND I
X v
i'XC-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-W.SSVX-X-X-X-X-I-K
Lost in the vicinity of Norman
Field: One AOPi pin. If found,
please call 372-9710. REWARD.
(L-lt-29-p)
FLORIDA
STATE THEATERS[
** CENTER I *%
f "LAST SUMMER" \
* CENTER 2
"THE LEARNING TREE"
FLORIDA £
* "FUNNY GIRL"
V AT 2& 8 m*
*********

I IQSSjH I |UjM
EnSEmlmSMl pv
WINNER! 3 ACADEMY \
INCLUDING HEPBURN
P6T6R OTOOLG KATHARIN6 H6PBURNI
LION IN WINTER a* aw., embassy * I
1 II J-A.VAYI.SH STARTS TOMORROW J
, |
ADMITTED... \

rrs?>ys>>Vyj}CAS# BeOOMMMQ|
SERVICES I
twcw i w Repeat Special your portable
typewriter cleaned, adjusted,
lubrcated & new ribbon installed
(SAVE $10.00). Now $12.50.
Standard typewriters $19.50. All
work guaranteed. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620te S. Main St., Call
376-1146. (M-10t-24-c)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
XEROX COPIES: Specializing in
thesis and dissertation copies and
collating. Call for prices. Gainesville
Printing Co. 372-4313. (M-ts-27-p)
Alternat ors-Generators-Starters
-Electrical Systems tested and repairs
- Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7 330.(M-tf-2-c)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-lOt-17-p)
Gators
will
beat
Auburn
RED PM o X
NIGHT jV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



/-*, v r k
The
Florida
Alligator ;

HIGHEST RANKING OF THE YEAR
Gators Move To Ninth In UPI Poll

NEW YORK (UPI) Kansas
State, which guaranteed its first
.500 season in 15 years by
upsetting Oklahoma Saturday,
made a spectacular entrance
into the elite of college
football Monday.
The Wildcats, now 5-1,
walloped Oklahoma 59-21, the
first time they have beaten the
Sooners in 35 years. The
Victory, which gave Kansas
State undisputed possession of
first place in the Big Eight,
brought the Wildcats 33 points
from the 35-member United
Press International Board of
Coaches, good for the no. 10
ranking in the Nation.
Ohio State, rolling
relentlessly toward a second
consecutive national title,
maintained its top ranking,
receiving 34 first place votes
and one second place ballot
for 349 points.

TEAM STRIKES GQLD
Gator Ray Sold On Sophs

ATLANTA (UPI) Dont
waste time trying to sell
Floridas Ray Graves that old
bromide that college football
teams cant win with
sophomores.
Graves, under heavy alumni
fire after last years Gators
failed to live up to
expectations, turned to his
sophomores this year and
struck gold.
Led by three super sophs
quarterback John Reaves,
receiver Carlos Alvarez and
running back Tommy
Durrance, Graves Gators have
won six straight and are
currently no. 9 nationally and
climbing.
Those three were up to
their usual tricks Saturday
when they led Florida to a
41-20 romp past Vanderbilt.
Reaves threw five touchdown
passes, hitting on 21 of 31
passes for 295 yards. Alvarez
caught three of those
touchdown passes. And
Durrance scored two TDs.
Reaves now has completed
THE SWINGS
TO WIMGS
All ovr America people are taking to the
ky...young and old...tome just for the fun
of H. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
illSt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
ntroductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
I mmm Waldo Road

y. SB o .* *- i|Bb

.al m- %
TOM KENNEDY
STEVE TANNEN ELUDES TACKLER ON RUNBACK
... Gator victory gives UF number nine ranking

Texas, which received the
other first place vote, remained

' 'M&Ml'' UMI
% J&M VMH:

RAY GRAVES
... wins with sophomores
118 of 203 passes for 1,746
yards and 20 (thats right, 20)
touchdowns is six games. Hes
fast closing in on all of the
Southeastern Conference
passing records, most of which
are held by ex-Gator Steve
Spurrier.
Reaves has already bettered
Spurriers best single season for

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM 'Til
ALIBI
Lounge -4T
i* A fr# ff .* 4 ' >,£,4 4. 4
f y> NW 34th ST 8. UNI V. AVE.

second with 306 poiflts while
Tennessee and Arkansas

touchdown passes. Super
Steve only had 16 of those
the year (1966) he won the
Heisman Trophy. And Reaves
is only three shy of the SEC
mark Babe Parilli set in 11
games with Kentucky bade in
1951.
Alvarez also is closing in on
the SEC standards. He has
already tied the record for
touchdown passes caught (10),
also set in 11 games in 1951
and, with 876 yards on 51
receptions, is only 238 yards
and 28 catches behind the
records set by Bob Goodridge
of Vanderbilt in 1967.
And that brings us to
Durrance, who just happens to
be the current SEC rushing
and scoring leader. Durrance,
who has gained 420 yards on
the ground, isnt threatening
any rushing marks. But, with a
dozen touchdowns and a
two-point play, hes already
scored more points (74) than
any SEC player since 1965
and one more touchdown will
push that back to 1962.

SAM PEPPER CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

Page 10

retained their no. 3 and no. 4
rankings.
Penn State moved into fifth
place, followed by Louisiana
State, Southern California,
UCLA, Florida and Kansas
State.
Georgia moved up to the
no. 11 ranking, followed by
Notre Dame, Wyoming,
Missouri, Purdue, Stanford and
Colorado and Oklahoma, tied
for 17th and last.
Ohio State posted its fifth
consecutive easy victory by
smashing Illinois 41-0. The

NEW YORK (UPI) The
United Press International
top-ranked major college
football teams with
won-loss-tied records and first
place votes in parentheses.
(Sixth Week).
TEAM POINTS
1. Ohio State (34) (5-0) 349
2. Texas (1) (5-0) 306
3. Tennessee (5-0) 252
4. Arkansas (5-0) 201
5. Penn State (6-0) 181

AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS!
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED |Cf7' fU*
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ...
* LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT, ROBBERY,
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
* LOSS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING. V xlPfsf
* ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE. \ TOj|ij
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I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 28,1969

Buckeyes lowest margin of
victory thus far this season has
been 27 points in a 41-14
triumph over Washington and a
34-7 win over Minnesota.
Louisiana State edged
Auburn, ranked 18 th last
week, 21-20 for its sixth
victory without a defeat while
Southern California beat
Georgia Tech 29-18 and
previously unbeaten UCLA was
tied by Stanford 20-20.
Florida boosted its record to
6-0 by beating Vanderbilt
41-20.

6. Louisiana State (6-0) 161
7. Southern Cal (5-0-1) 145
8. UCLA (6-0-1) 101
9. Florida (6-0) 94
10. Kansas State (5-1) 33
11. Georgia (5-1) 28
12. Notre Dame (4-1-1) 25
13. Wyoming (6-0) 16
14. Missouri (5-1) 11
15. Purdue (5-1) 10
16. Stanford (3-2-1) 8
17. (Tie) Colorado (4-2) 1
(Tie) Oklahoma (3-2) 1



Cool Eyes-A Sexy Smile
Thats Gator John Reaves

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first in a series
of articles by Sports Writer Jeff Klinkenberg on
super-soph John Reaves.)
By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
UF women on John Reaves:
Hes so beauoootiful, said Theresa Adjan, a
junior. Just gorgeous. Hes the most beautiful
thing.
Mary Lou Thompson, sophomore: Hes
gorgeous. Hes cool.
Suzie Chance, sophomore: Hes cute but he
does look like a gentleman.
Oh gosh, hes sooo cool, Janet Boyle, a
senior said. Hes got real cool eyes and the
sexiest smile.
Its sort of silly, said John Reaves, who, if
he got any cooler might come down with
pneumonia, I mean, they dont even know me.
In just six weeks, John Reaves, a mere
sophomore, seems to have this whole campus
right in his hands. At the UF, you dont
necessarily have to be a football hero to win
yourself a beautiful girl, but it helps.
Reaves is a hero. The leading offensive player
in the country John has produced 1,746 yards
- has led the Gators to a 6-0 record.
And 90 per cent of the coeds here at least
those prone to a bit of hero worshipping know
it. John knows they know it. Its kind of
embarrassing, he said, this attention. But its
neat, too. If you didnt have it, youd miss it.
Its a great thing.
Reaves and teammates Steve Tannen, David
Ghesquiere, Robert Harrell, Mike Rich and
Tommy Durrance took part in a fashion show
one night a few weeks ago at the Reitz Union.
The players escorted the ladies, who were doing
the modeling, around the stage. When Reaves was

Meef/ngs, Coeds Action

Independent and fraternity
football is about to begin and
the Intramural Department has
scheduled a meeting of all
managers and captains of
independent and fraternity
teams as well as all officials in
football.
The meeting has been
planned to clarify any
questions on rules and their
application. All managers,
captains, and officials are
urged to attend.
The meeting will be held
Friday at 4 p.m. in room 224
of Florida Gym.
* *
Most athletic fields after 4
p.m. are covered with the
fierce fighting males of the
species competing in vicious
intramural sports.
Generally unnoticed because

W.C. FIELDS
REIGNS Supreme
tonight
9 PM ON
AT
THIRSTY
. 633 NW 13th ST.
REMEMBER THIRSTY TIME 4:30 -7.00
-N V"* --# * ' '

INTRAMURALS

of lack of publicity, the
Florida coeds nevertheless take
their turn showing their
athletic prowess. The girls who
win, cheer and add a feather
to their caps while the girls
who lose rationalize by being
glad they are not jocks.
The Tri Delts, D Phi Es
and AOPis would like to argue
that point as they are involved
in the sorority softball
championship. Tri Delt is
slated to play the winner of
the DPhiE AOPi game.
In the Independent circuit,
Yulee I and Rawlings II will
be squaring for the
Independent volleyball
c hampionship.
* *
Chi Phi and Pi Kappa Phi
moved into the finals of the

introduced, the audience reacted, you might say.
Less than 10 men were in attendance; the rest
were women.
At first he was shy and he kept his eyes
down, said Miss Adjan, who hopes to. teach
school one day and has a steady boy friend. I
wanted to run up on stage and say its okay,
Johnny. Everything will be all right. He was the
most beautiful thing that ever walked on stage.
It was the best fifty cents I ever spent.
I got a kick out of it. Reaves said later.
Many of the women, in general, were
impressed with the football players. I didnt
expect them to be so good looking, Miss
Thompson said. I expected them to look like
Johnny Unitas. You know, crewcuts.
They didnt have football walks, Miss Boyle
said. They walked like real normal guys.
Reaves full name is Thomas Johnson Reaves.
Students hear the name called in the classroom
and many fail to associate the name with the
football player. But its different when John
walks around on campus.
Nearly 45 minutes before Gator Growl began
last week, Reaves was walking down a ramp
leading from his Yon Hall dorm. He had to walk
through the multitudes of people who were
attempting to enter the stadium. People, needless
to say, recognized him.
He was this far from me, this far, said one
coed, moving her fingers about an inch apart. I
could have reached over and touched him.
The attention hasnt changed me, Reaves
will say. At least I dont think so. People are
friendly towards me, of course. But I havent
changed. I still do the same old things, you
know.
If I had a few bad games? People would
forget all about the good ones.
Die-hard football fans, possibly. Campus .coeds,
un-likely.

Blue League volleyball
tournament on the strength of
victories over Delta Sigma Phi
and Phi Kappa Psi respectively.

I &atf)2ifeeUer
Here are some more clues for the
Rats Pumpkin Hunt
At a fence you proceed
But the horses do not feed
The road many travel
Though it is covered with gravel
Up a hill you must climb
To make this clue rhyme
Os yellow think twice
Go East is my advice
Additional duos can bo obtained at the Rat
Halloween Special Horror Movies
Friday Night "Son of Kong"
9*o til 2:OOAM
< Time Machine
Dance this Saturday Nite at the Rat
Come do your thing!!
....... l ....... . < *.*' V ****.. t ......

TOM KENNEDY
JOHN REAVES GATOR'S MR. COOL
.. .a real hero to UF women
| mu MM IB HIB Bin HUM I
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I 22 Wit Unhwcalty Am, Glrwslll, Fla. Phona 376-3516 I
I I STARK?. 1 FLORIDA I
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
|gAINESVILLEPHONE37Z£IO^NYTIMEBYAPPOINTMEnJ

Tuesday, October 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 28,1969

STOPS COLTS 24-21

Spurrier Shines In Victory

BALTIMORE (UPI) How
sweet it was!
That was the general
reaction among the San
Francisco Forty Niners Sunday
when they broke an 11-game
winless streak behind
quarterback Steve Spurrier by
downing the Baltimore Colts
24-21 for the first time since
1962.
But how sour it could have
been. The Colts spumed a
possible game-tymg field goal
with two seconds remaining to
try for the winning
touchdown. But John Unitas
fired an incomplete pass into
the end zone as the gun
sounded to disappoint 60,238
fens.
With San Francisco ahead
24-14, Tom Johnson was
called for interferring with a
Colt pass catcher in the end
zone on a very questionable
call with 11:45 remaining.
That gave Baltimore the ball
on the one and Tom Matte
plunged over to bring the
Colts to within three points of
the Forty Niners.
But then the breaks, which
seemed to elude the Forty
Niners all season, began to fall
their way.
Johnson intercepted a Unitas
pass in the end zone with
3:18 left to thwart a scoring
bid. Matte then fumbled away
the ball on the Forty Niner
eight with two minutes left
after punter Tommy Davis was
tackled by the Colts on fourth
down.
San Francisco was forced to
punt again and the Colts
marched from the Forty Niner
40 to 10 with two seconds
left. Rather than go for the
tie, Colt Coach Don Shula
decided only a win would help
Tennis Tryout
All men interested in trying
out for the tennis team are
asked to report to the varsity
courts (old Newberry Road) at
4 p.m. on Tuesday and
Wednesday.
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsiUcovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsiUcovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsiUcovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time yoi owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

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II
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dm m JSIPIllte
' m-
STEVE SPURRIER
... no interceptions
Baltimore in the Coastal
Division race with the
unbeaten Los Angeles Rams.
Unitas threw to Jimmy Orr
in the end zone but two Forty
Niners knocked the ball down
to leave Baltimore at 3-3.

What keeps dynamic young
engineers like Jim Bregi and Jeff Quick
at Ford Motor Company?
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"They tell us to do it...not how to do it!
-4U ....
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The real world is out here, says
Jeffrey Quick, Product Design
Engineer in our High Perform Performance
ance Performance Engine Department. These
arent academic problems ... not
when youve got someone waiting
for a solution!
My job is to make Jeffs de designs
signs designs work, says Jim Bregi,
Manufacturing Engineer at the
Dearborn Specialty Foundry.
Between us, we have a lot of
responsibility, but thats what
makes this job so challenging.
After only three years with Ford
Motor Company, Jim is Super Supervisor
visor Supervisor of Foundry Facilities with a
section of eight people working
for him ... including three gradu graduate

Ford Interviewer Will Be On Campus NOVEMBER 6 & 7, 1969

Spurrier, making his first
start of the year in place of
sore-elbowed John Brodie,
hurled a 17-yard td pass to
Dick Witcher. Spurrier hit on
his first five passes and
finished with a very
respectable 18 of 30 for 205
yards without an interception.
The former Heisman Trophy
Winner from UF also set up a
five-yard TD run by Ken
Willard in the second period
with clutch third down
passing. Spurrier brought the
forty Niners out of the hole
with a long third-down run on
a busted pass play in the first
half before being tackled and
fumbling away the ball.
But it was an interception
runback by linebacker John
Woitt, filling in for the injured
Kermit Alexander, which
provided the winning margin.

ate graduate engineers. His day might in include
clude include anything from solving a
problem in thermo-dynamics to
helping hire a new engineer. I
dont kpow of another job that
would have allowed me to move
ahead as fast as this one.
Theyre completely flexible,
says Jeff. Whether it comes to
trying something new or chang changing
ing changing job assignments. You get to
play a part in your own destiny. I
see people getting ahead fast...
I wouldnt be here unless I were
sure I could, too.
There are opportunities to
move ahead in every field of
engineering at Ford Motor Com Company.
pany. Company. If you want to put your en-

i i
SEC STANDINGS I
£ I
| SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE S
S Conference All S
S WL T PF PA WLT PF PA &
g Florida 200 88 55 60 0 238 114 I
£: LSU 2 0 0 58 30 6 0 0 218 44
SS Tennessee 2 0 0 86 33 5 0 0 198 57 '&
| Georgia 2 10 87 33 5 1 0 193 49 fe
| Alabama 1 2 0 57 87 4 2 0 175 127 §
| Auburn 1 2 0100 83 42 0 208 83 §
£ Mississippi 1 2 0 66 60 3 3 0 174 95
g Vanderbilt 1 20 42 91 1 5 0 84 187
g Kentucky 1 3 0 23 120 2 4 0 60 184
g Miss. St. 0 1 0 35 47 3 3 0 133 201
L__^^
Gators Seventh In AP
Led by Super Sophs John Reaves, Carlos Alvarez and Tommy
Durrance plus the defensive tactics of Super Steve Tannen the
Gators of Florida moved from 10th to seventh in Associated Press
weekly football rating after their hard-earned 41-20 victory over
Vanderbilt.
In the United Press International weekly rating the Gators
advanced a spot from their previous no. 10 position last week.

gineering degree to good use, see
our recruiter when he visits your
campus. Or contact Mr. Richard
Rosensteel, College Recruiting
Department, Ford Motor Com Company,
pany, Company, American Road, Dearborn,
Michigan 48121. An equal oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity employer.
... has a better idea
\
'